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Just wanted to say that this is beyond impressive!

 

 

Thank you very much. I just want to share, though, that every scout can earn these awards. A scout who participates in a year round program from age 10 or 11, attends summer camp and plans his merit badges should be able to complete most of the requirements for 3 of the NOA segments - camping, hiking and aquatics. Riding is actually easier for some boys than Aquatics. The most difficult, and most expensive segment, is Adventure.

 

Now the NOA Medal, that one is impressive. Much more work and pre-planning is needed. The trick is getting the info about the awards to the boys. There is so much focus on Eagle that many of the other awards are dismissed or overlooked.

 

I wish more units, districts and councils would discuss these awards, either through unit presentations, Merit badge university classes, or what have you.

 

Light bulb moment - I am beginning Wood Badge next year and I think I will ask if I can do this for one of my tickets. DS is the first in our district to attempt the NOA (and the Hornaday) and we are educating people as we go along. I think doing presentations at all three levels (unit, district and council) woudl be an awesome ticket. Now I must be patient and wait until the next wood badge class begins.

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Middle son passed his Eagle Board of Review tonight!!!!!!!!!   I now have TWO Eagle Scouts!

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Thank you very much. I just want to share, though, that every scout can earn these awards. A scout who participates in a year round program from age 10 or 11, attends summer camp and plans his merit badges should be able to complete most of the requirements for 3 of the NOA segments - camping, hiking and aquatics. Riding is actually easier for some boys than Aquatics. The most difficult, and most expensive segment, is Adventure.

 

Now the NOA Medal, that one is impressive. Much more work and pre-planning is needed. The trick is getting the info about the awards to the boys. There is so much focus on Eagle that many of the other awards are dismissed or overlooked.

 

I wish more units, districts and councils would discuss these awards, either through unit presentations, Merit badge university classes, or what have you.

 

Light bulb moment - I am beginning Wood Badge next year and I think I will ask if I can do this for one of my tickets. DS is the first in our district to attempt the NOA (and the Hornaday) and we are educating people as we go along. I think doing presentations at all three levels (unit, district and council) woudl be an awesome ticket. Now I must be patient and wait until the next wood badge class begins.

 

I am also considering Woodbadge next year (depends on how my job/work schedule shakes out) and will tuck away this idea. [ETA fwiw, my application would be different, in that I primarily work with AHG girls, whose highly motivated members need more of a tracking system than their handbooks can provide.]

 

For you moms of newer scouts, just wanted to share a mb resource I don't think has been mentioned here. If your son likes mb worksheets, you might want to take a look at this site for merit badge "passports."

 

http://members.relia.net/thedane/passports.html

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I am also considering Woodbadge next year (depends on how my job/work schedule shakes out) and will tuck away this idea. [ETA fwiw, my application would be different, in that I primarily work with AHG girls, whose highly motivated members need more of a tracking system than their handbooks can provide.]

 

For you moms of newer scouts, just wanted to share a mb resource I don't think has been mentioned here. If your son likes mb worksheets, you might want to take a look at this site for merit badge "passports."

 

http://members.relia.net/thedane/passports.html

 

What a great resource. Thank you! I'm printing the Aviation one today. That is going to be my sons first MB. One of our leaders is a pilot for Alaska and every other year they do an Aviation day at Alaska Air. The get behind the scenes tours and all kinds of cool hands on stuff. I'm so excited for him.

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Is there a reason to sew on the badges manually versus with a machine? It's so much easier with a machine.

 

The scout can sew it on anyway he wants.

 

One of the older boys showed my son to use a staple to affix it in place, then needle/thread.

 

Remember, he's not just learning how to sew a badge on, he's learning that he's competent. He'll use this skill later to maybe fix a rip in something or make his own piece of equipment.

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I don't have a Boy Scout, but for my Girl Scout's badges, we use invisible thread. The color doesn't matter, then.

 

Where do you find this? Is there a particular type / brand that works best? GS mama here, and the idea of matching thread to every single patch is daunting - they are so many colors!

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Where do you find this? Is there a particular type / brand that works best? GS mama here, and the idea of matching thread to every single patch is daunting - they are so many colors!

 

I just looked at the Joann Fabric website and they carry it. http://www.joann.com/search/_invisible%20thread/

 

I am so glad she posted about this. I am going to pick some up today. DS and I will be working on his uniforms for Jambo this afternoon. We were going to use Badge Magic but I think invisible thread is the better choice.

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The scout can sew it on anyway he wants.

 

One of the older boys showed my son to use a staple to affix it in place, then needle/thread.

 

Remember, he's not just learning how to sew a badge on, he's learning that he's competent. He'll use this skill later to maybe fix a rip in something or make his own piece of equipment.

 

 

Good point...about the learning he's competent. I think I'll teach him how to do both ways so he can do both. Hand-stitching is useful, though I find sewing badges really hard on the fingers because of the thickness.

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Mine is Metrosene and I got it at a quilt store. However, you should be able to get it at any fabric store. Any brand should work. I don't put it in the bobbin, but I know other people do.

 

 

 

Where do you find this? Is there a particular type / brand that works best? GS mama here, and the idea of matching thread to every single patch is daunting - they are so many colors!

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DS had Jambo shakedown this weekend. DS was elected as Patrol Leader for Jambo!!! He had the interim position but was officially voted in today by the members of his patrol. This is a great big step for him and proof that he is maturing and growing with his new home troop.

 

I am so happy for him.

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DS had Jambo shakedown this weekend. DS was elected as Patrol Leader for Jambo!!! He had the interim position but was officially voted in today by the members of his patrol. This is a great big step for him and proof that he is maturing and growing with his new home troop.

 

I am so happy for him.

 

:hurray:

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I have no idea what a Jambo shakedown is but it sounds exciting.

 

DS went to his first boy scout campout this weekend. He loved it. Saturday night, they did a handful of scenarios complete with fake blood and an amputee playing the victim of an accidental amputation. DS got picked to teach his patrol CPR. DH said one of the adults told him he was impressed with how well DS conducted the class. He earned his first aid merit badge while there and wants to do the campout again next year. Oh, and he is apparently now the patrol's medic; is that something just his troop does; I can't find mention of it as an actual position. They stayed up until midnight both nights so he was a bit tired.

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Ds13completed the swim requirements for Second Class last week after taking swimming lessons for seven weeks to strengthen his swimming skills. He's pretty happy. Now he'll start working towards the 100 yd. swim for First Class.

 

DS17 just finished his Eagle service project this past weekend overseeing 20 volunteers for over eight hours. Today, he has a final at the community college. Poor guy!

 

The Eagle project is such an amazing achievement in project management, isn't it?

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I have no idea what a Jambo shakedown is but it sounds exciting.

 

DS went to his first boy scout campout this weekend. He loved it. Saturday night, they did a handful of scenarios complete with fake blood and an amputee playing the victim of an accidental amputation. DS got picked to teach his patrol CPR. DH said one of the adults told him he was impressed with how well DS conducted the class. He earned his first aid merit badge while there and wants to do the campout again next year. Oh, and he is apparently now the patrol's medic; is that something just his troop does; I can't find mention of it as an actual position. They stayed up until midnight both nights so he was a bit tired.

 

 

Give your self three more years and Jambo will be on your radar. National Jamboree occurs every four years and is an opportunity for scouts all over the nation to get together and do scouting activities. This year is a Jambo year; the next Jambo will be in 2017. Jambo had been held at Fort AP Hill for years. This year Jambo has been moved to a permanent home, the Summit, in West Virginia. The Summit joins Sea Base, Northern Tier and Philmont as permanent high adventure camps for boy scouts.

 

Going to Jambo is a fairly big deal. Scouts have to apply through their troop and Council about 18 months in advance. Typically 30,000 scouts attend Jambo. Almost every merit badge is offered as well as many other activities, including extreme rock climbing and whitewater rafting. This year Train and Carly Rae Jepsen are performing.

 

If you think your son will be interested in attending Jambo 2017, begin saving now. The price tag is around $2000.

 

The Jambo shakedown is a meeting held to build troop and patrol solidarity and to make sure all of the boys have the required gear, can pack it into two bags (a duffle and a day pack) and have the proper training. It was a 10 hour day.

 

Regarding Patrol Medic: that must be a troop thing. There is no Medic position. It's a good one and I hope you son has fun.

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The Eagle project is such an amazing achievement in project management, isn't it?

 

 

yes, great capstone!! My son finished his project this month also. It really was good prep for his college major decision and good reflection on what he wants to do with himself.

 

I am continually amazed at how something that looked so big and difficult becomes so small after it's conquered. Troop CoH soon, I'm looking forward to sampling ds's cooking! He's loving that dutch oven.

 

Dh would like to recruit (for employment) a young lady from ds's project team...her dad has taught her many useful skills and it was obvious. I don't think she wants to work indoors but if she changes her mind, she's got a career job in four years when she grads college.

 

 

Joanneqn: there is no official medic position, but every activity has a designated-in-advance first aid person that will have a bigger kit than the personal kit.. There is no official cook position either...these are roles that may be needed in having a successful safe outing. Part of second class will be making a personal first aid kit.

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Going to Jambo is a fairly big deal. Scouts have to apply through their troop and Council about 18 months in advance. Typically 30,000 scouts attend Jambo. Almost every merit badge is offered as well as many other activities, including extreme rock climbing and whitewater rafting. This year Train and Carly Rae Jepsen are performing.

 

My older son is going to Jambo for the first time this year, but as a parent, I still feel very clueless about it all. I don't feel there is very good information available about what actually goes on, and how the scouts should schedule their day. His troop has shared very little information about it -- there was talk about a parent's meeting, but as of yet, there is not one scheduled. I have spent a lot of time researching via google, but I still haven't found a lot of info. The official Jamboree website is not very informative, in my humble opinion. So what's a parent to do? I'm wondering if there are any resources or websites you know of. I would like to help my son plan a bit in advance -- I worry about him being overwhelmed on site and just coasting around, wasting the Jamboree opportunity.

 

Oh, and didn't Train and Carly Rae Jepsen step down? Have they changed their minds?

 

 

The Jambo shakedown is a meeting held to build troop and patrol solidarity and to make sure all of the boys have the required gear, can pack it into two bags (a duffle and a day pack) and have the proper training. It was a 10 hour day.
My son did attend the Shakedown, but I don't think he learned a whole lot. He can be a bit air-heady at times, so he probably missed something, but I also don't think there is a whole lotta careful prep with his Troop. He belongs to a large troop, and his regular troop makes up his entire Jambo troop -- 36 guys are going from his Troop alone, and that doesn't even include some of the scouts who are going with a Venture crew instead. I think because there are a lot of very experienced people in our Troop, they forget that there are some kids and parents who are still clueless, and sometimes it's intimidating to ask a whole lot of questions. My husband is the main adult involved in our family (he attends most meetings), but he doesn't know much about what's going on, either.
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Heigh Ho,

 

Yes, the service project just seems so big in the beginning. Now that it's done, it's almost anti-climatic! What I have really liked is that it showed him in such a tangible way, that it's one thing to have a goal, but it's quite another to make it happen and to see it through to completion. It's a lesson in perseverance and self-motivation through difficulty. Not to mention getting out of one's comfort zone.

 

As homeschooling parents, we are thrilled with what this has taught him, and the character traits it has strengthened in him. I know that there are schools that require a senior capstone project, which I would imagine serves a similar purpose.

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My older son is going to Jambo for the first time this year, but as a parent, I still feel very clueless about it all.

 

 

I am mostly clueless too. I found this link: https://summit.scouting.org/en/Jamboree2013/Documents/JamboreeCouncilGuide.pdf

 

Go to the very last page (p. 45)

 

This is the first general schedule I have seen.

 

Hope that helps.

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If you think your son will be interested in attending Jambo 2017, begin saving now. The price tag is around $2000.

 

Regarding Patrol Medic: that must be a troop thing. There is no Medic position. It's a good one and I hope you son has fun.

 

 

Thanks. I'll keep that in mind. I'm guessing the $2000 doesn't include airfare.

 

I just asked him about Patrol Medic. He's responsible for his patrol's first aid kit. In fact, he brought it home from his campout. It is his responsibility to bring it on outings, making sure it stays stocked (doesn't have to pay for items just letting the leaders know when items are used), and ensuring it gets passed to another patrol member to carry on outings he's not attending.

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My older ds and dh did their OA brotherhood while little guy did his ordeal. Little guy then left a pen in his pocket and put it in the wash, so I've been busy picking off all of their patches (yes, it got on brother's too) ... another ASM's mom likes to sew and will put them back on the new shirts. Little guy needs to meet with two of his counselors to get Camping and Cit. in the World signed off, then when his shirt is ready, he can do his Star conference and board. Older brother has done nothing -- no looking into Eagle projects, no progress on any of the 3 badges he has left. Almost-15 year old boys are so frustrating. He didn't get his paperwork in on time for NYLT, so that doesn't look like it's happening. He could work the last part of the summer at summer camp (after the Philmont trip -- he'll turn 15 on his trek), but he hasn't done the emails, etc. needed to make that happen.

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Ds bridged over last month!

 

 

We're trying to get my younger son crossed over early -- he is really just finishing up his first year of Webelos, but he has most of the Arrow of Light requirements, and if he finishes that, he can cross at 10 1/2, which he will be on May 27. He is the oldest guy in his patrol, and I don't want to delay his entry to boy scouts because he will be "kicked out" in November of his senior year when he turns 18. If we kept him in Webelos another year, he'd basically be short-changed out of a year of boy scouts.

 

Oh, my husband is so looking forward to him crossing and having both boys in scouts, rather than one in cubs and one in scouts -- too many logistics to deal with! It will be nice to have them in the same program again. So we need to go ahead and finish up those Readyman requirements.

 

Just wondering, how did your pack (anyone) handle the mouth-to-mouth and CPR instructions for Webelos? Our book said to not practice Heimlich on a real person, and I'm assuming they don't have to do "real" mouth to mouth, either. Or not? What does it mean to show you know how to treat such things?

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We're trying to get my younger son crossed over early -- he is really just finishing up his first year of Webelos, but he has most of the Arrow of Light requirements, and if he finishes that, he can cross at 10 1/2, which he will be on May 27. He is the oldest guy in his patrol, and I don't want to delay his entry to boy scouts because he will be "kicked out" in November of his senior year when he turns 18. If we kept him in Webelos another year, he'd basically be short-changed out of a year of boy scouts.

 

Oh, my husband is so looking forward to him crossing and having both boys in scouts, rather than one in cubs and one in scouts -- too many logistics to deal with! It will be nice to have them in the same program again. So we need to go ahead and finish up those Readyman requirements.

 

Just wondering, how did your pack (anyone) handle the mouth-to-mouth and CPR instructions for Webelos? Our book said to not practice Heimlich on a real person, and I'm assuming they don't have to do "real" mouth to mouth, either. Or not? What does it mean to show you know how to treat such things?

 

We had a relative of one of the boys in the den volunteer to give a Red Cross course that fulfilled the Readyman Req'ts. They used a CPR manikin. For Heimleich they viewed a video, then practiced what they could live. Another possibility is asking your Boy Scout Troop's First Aid Counselor where you could borrow training equipment from..probably your local fire dept or ambulance company.

 

Our troop doesn't 'kick out' seniors or college students when they turn 18. They turn in to Ass't Scoutmasters and do what they have the time and inclination for. Our pack has crossed 'old for grade' boys after a year in Webelos, as it was clearly in their best interest. Most of them knew boys in the troop anyway from their baseball teams so had a good receiving friendship base.

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We had a relative of one of the boys in the den volunteer to give a Red Cross course that fulfilled the Readyman Req'ts. They used a CPR manikin. For Heimleich they viewed a video, then practiced what they could live. Another possibility is asking your Boy Scout Troop's First Aid Counselor where you could borrow training equipment from..probably your local fire dept or ambulance company.

 

Thanks for your input here. I don't think our older son had an experience anything like that in Webelos, and indeed, not in boy scouts, either. Not even when he earned the First Aid merit badge, I don't think. I need to ask him. He earned it at camp, and our experience is that they are a little lax at camp. Seems like First Aid is pretty important and corners shouldn't be cut.

 

Our troop doesn't 'kick out' graduating seniors or college students. They turn in to Ass't Scoutmasters and do what they have the time and inclination for. Our pack has crossed 'old for grade' boys after a year in Webelos, as it was clearly in their best interest. Most of them knew boys in the troop anyway from their baseball teams so had a good receiving friendship base.

 

That is good to know. I wonder if our troop does that, too. I've just read all the official requirements for activities outside the Troop, and it always says that they have to be under 18. I guess if they are an assistant scoutmaster then the age wouldn't matter. That is heartening. I know in our Troop a lot of the guys stop being active after they get their Eagle, which is unfortunate (and many get their Eagles by 15). I am hoping that my guys want to continue until they graduate.

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My older ds and dh did their OA brotherhood while little guy did his ordeal. Little guy then left a pen in his pocket and put it in the wash, so I've been busy picking off all of their patches (yes, it got on brother's too) ... another ASM's mom likes to sew and will put them back on the new shirts. Little guy needs to meet with two of his counselors to get Camping and Cit. in the World signed off, then when his shirt is ready, he can do his Star conference and board. Older brother has done nothing -- no looking into Eagle projects, no progress on any of the 3 badges he has left. Almost-15 year old boys are so frustrating. He didn't get his paperwork in on time for NYLT, so that doesn't look like it's happening. He could work the last part of the summer at summer camp (after the Philmont trip -- he'll turn 15 on his trek), but he hasn't done the emails, etc. needed to make that happen.

 

 

My almost 16 year old is frustrating too - continually dragging his feet about his Eagle requirements. The past few months have been a bit better - the dragging has been interspersed with short conversations about how/when to get his last 3 done as well as who to choose for his Eagle advisor. There is hope! I think I finally got through to him about how busy he'll be as an 11th grader and does he really want to do another merit badge (Cooking) if he doesn't get everything done by the end of this year? If he focuses, he can get his last 3 badges done at camp and do his Eagle project in August.

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That is good to know. I wonder if our troop does that, too. I've just read all the official requirements for activities outside the Troop, and it always says that they have to be under 18. I guess if they are an assistant scoutmaster then the age wouldn't matter. That is heartening. I know in our Troop a lot of the guys stop being active after they get their Eagle, which is unfortunate (and many get their Eagles by 15). I am hoping that my guys want to continue until they graduate.

 

In response to the bolded part (mine) - age does matter. As an Asst. Scoutmaster, he will no longer be able to work toward advancement (i.e. merit badges, awards, etc). He will also be required to take the required adult training sessions, esp. Youth Protection. He will become an adult and will need to act as such (not saying anything about your son specifically, but 18 yos in general). This means he will not be allowed to be alone with a scout, even if that scout is his best friend, brother, cousin, whatever. He will be required to follow two deep leadership principles, sleep in his own tent, and not be in the restrooms with the other boys.

 

Many, many boys struggle for the first few months when they become Asst. Scoutmasters. They still feel like 'one of the boys' and don't really think about the changes in their position.

 

If he wants to remain active in scouting, Venturing is a great option. Youth (both boys and girls) can be Venturers until age 21. These groups do things Troops cannot do.

 

Please, do not think I am discouraging your son from remaining with his troop once he ages out. I just want to let you know that there will be changes in his role.

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They brought in cpr mannequins. You do want to have a good feel for how hard you have to press and how awkward it is to form a seal.

 

Ds is going camping tonight...first trip without a parent present. Feeling kinda nervous as he's a severe asthmatic and it's a heavy pollen day, but he's just 15 minutes away, so I need to chill out and pray that his troop leaders will call if something pops up. He goes from fine to in the ER pretty quickly. This having a kid grow up stuff is hard!!!

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My Cub Scout son (8) will be receiving his Wolf at our pack meeting next week. He will also get the weather & citizenship belt loops and the family travel pin. These will join his Kickball, Hiking, Basketball, Physical Fitness, Family Travel, Music, Video Games, and Pet Care belt loops.

 

He has been a cub scout since the beginning of February and has been going gang busters ever since. Dh is so excited to finally have a scout! He has been involved with the scouting organization through our church for the last ten years. Dh is currently scoutmaster. Let's hope that enthusiasm continues, right?

 

Amber in SJ

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Geezle and his 13 fellow new scouts all earned their Scout rank at the spring CoH last night. There were still some scoutmaster conferences going on during the opening, but they all got them done. Trinqueta will be getting her first Journey and 5 badges at the SU's bridging ceremony. We'll have 8 Juniors next year so we'll be able to do a lot more just as Juniors without combining with the Brownies.

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My DD bridged over yesterday afternoon and is now a Junior. She's going to do that in our new local troop which is now up to 23 girls!!!

 

DS got all his badges from lone scouting and his Wolf badge at his ceremony last night. He also got his conservation good turn, his Earth Day project, his academics and sports, his Leave No Trace, and his wildlife conservation badges. He got his gold arrow, a silver arrow, 5 belt loops and 5 pins and his letter C. He did pet care, collecting, hiking, golf, and reading and writing. We're now working on art, astronomy, citizenship, communicating, geology, and good manners. DS wants 30 by the end of summer so that will be how we spend the summer of 2013 I guess. lol

 

I have a maniacal amount of sewing to do. And we decided that the focus of our den this summer will be on Nova and the new fitness stuff. So I thought we were going to do monthly meetings but we're doing twice monthly over the summer. And the new GS troop is chomping at the bit so we'll have stuff scheduled there too. I'm trying to organize a pool party for our club kickoff in June.

 

And I want to explore Messengers of Peace with a couple of DS' den mates or maybe even the pack. So I'm looking for any ideas there. Has anyone here done that one?

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Geezle and his 13 fellow new scouts all earned their Scout rank at the spring CoH last night. There were still some scoutmaster conferences going on during the opening, but they all got them done. Trinqueta will be getting her first Journey and 5 badges at the SU's bridging ceremony. We'll have 8 Juniors next year so we'll be able to do a lot more just as Juniors without combining with the Brownies.

 

So far, I have 7 juniors for next year. And I think they are going to be my favorites. They are young enough to be enthusiastic about stuff (especially when you let them chose!) but old enough that you don't have to worry about them darting into the road (Hello necessary parent volunteer ratios.)

 

Any ideas what your Juniors are going to be doing?

 

And anyone else out there doing a GS troop that does a lot of SWAPs? I tossed that out as a possibility to my girls and they went nuts for it. So we're going to start at least one meeting a month doing a cool SWAP. From the Daisies to the Cadettes, the girls loved that idea. And I like it too because Hello Pinterst! I look good for about 15 minutes worth of browsing. lol

 

DD gave a little SWAP to the troop she's leaving yesterday and she made one for everybody. I found it on Pint. We are going on our first (and last) troop overnight next week to a zoo. So we did a little SWAP that was a teddy bear wrapped in a blanket tucked into a little bag for anyone who gets a little scared. Super, super cute and easy enough that DD whipped it out for 24 girls with 1-2 hours worth of work. She worked hard on cutting the material for the blanket nicely.

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Reviving the part of the thread about sewing patches on to uniforms.

 

Use the color of thread of the garment, not the patch. Catch the threads of the back of the patch of the outline stitching, so thread will show on the back of the shirt fabric or sash fabric, not the front of the patch. Machine sewing is best for patches that are not changed out, like the council strip, and I taught my sons and some of my troop to use a sewing machine,or needle and thread if they preferred.

 

To Seranade: JUNIOR Assistant Scoutmaster is an appointed job, for 16-17 year olds, who have done it all, but still are Scout age,and want to earn more advancement. Untrained 18+ year olds cannot be Assistant Scoutmasters any more, they have to get all the training done, first, so BSA created an adult leader designation called College Reserve for boys who want to maintain active membership with a unit, but have not gotten trained yet. BSA is pretty stringent about training. Everyone active over 18 must have Youth Protection Training, at the very least. 18 year old and 17 year old buddies cannot tent together. Well, they're not supposed to.

 

Younger son is completing his Eagle project workbook write-up. We have a district advancement chairman who is very controlling, taking away much creativity from the boys, reducing the process to a series of checklists that he produced. My son's project is bigger than some, and he is less capable than some, so it is an interesting process. We are a very small troop, so his leadership is only spread over a few, which is kind of interesting, too.

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I have no idea how you would only catch the back of the patch on a sewing machine???

 

DS and I made a deal. I would sew patches onto his shirt (he's worried about ruining his shirt), and he'll sew badges to his sash. I'm going to show him how to use both the machine and hand-stitching.

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Any ideas what your Juniors are going to be doing?

 

We've got 7 badges picked out for next year (Jewelry, Product Design, Detective, Playing with the Past, Music, Customer Insight and Girl Scout Ways) and the journey with Power of One, Power of a Team and Power of Community. We'll go camping a couple of times and do two community service project. One will be our annual Christmas caroling and one will be outdoors (we hope).

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Those 18yo boys CAN be members of committee though, and sit in on BoRs. They can't be ASMs until 21yo.

 

eta: further down I was corrected on this, so I wanted to catch it here so as not to be giving incorrect info. I was taking the word of our Council--should have checked!

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In response to the bolded part (mine) - age does matter. As an Asst. Scoutmaster, he will no longer be able to work toward advancement (i.e. merit badges, awards, etc). He will also be required to take the required adult training sessions, esp. Youth Protection. He will become an adult and will need to act as such (not saying anything about your son specifically, but 18 yos in general). This means he will not be allowed to be alone with a scout, even if that scout is his best friend, brother, cousin, whatever. He will be required to follow two deep leadership principles, sleep in his own tent, and not be in the restrooms with the other boys.

 

Many, many boys struggle for the first few months when they become Asst. Scoutmasters. They still feel like 'one of the boys' and don't really think about the changes in their position.

 

If he wants to remain active in scouting, Venturing is a great option. Youth (both boys and girls) can be Venturers until age 21. These groups do things Troops cannot do.

 

Please, do not think I am discouraging your son from remaining with his troop once he ages out. I just want to let you know that there will be changes in his role.

 

Thanks for your input. Both of my boys are a long ways from aging out, it's just that my younger son will turn 18 in November of his senior year. It does sound that the kids then are, in fact, sorta kicked out, unless they become some type of asst. scoutmaster. Which is kind of unfortunate, IMO. The rules you outlined above are tough, and I think many boys would have difficulties with them. Seems to me like the BSA should work something out for boys who turn 18 before they graduate. And what about all the boys who were held back in school in order to mature? They would age out even earlier. It just doesn't make sense to me. What other kid organization kicks members out before they graduate?

 

But, it's too far in the future for me to worry about now. Maybe my boys won't even want to be involved anymore at that point.

 

Our Troop does have an affiliated Venture Crew, which I have mixed feelings about, LOL. When the Venture Crew was started up a year or two ago, many boys (and some leaders) put their attention to the Crew instead of scouts, really depleting the ranks of older scouts available to mentor the younger ones. We were having SPLs who were 13 and 14 years old, and who were often not mature enough to handle that roll.

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Council told me that they have to be 21 to be an ASM. However, seems like they muddied the waters with this:

 

 

 

 

SCOUTMASTER QUALIFICATIONS

 

 

All Jamboree Scoutmasters, First, Second and Third Assistant Scoutmasters must meet the following requirements:

  • Must have a current BSA membership with a Boy Scout troop or Varsity Scout team.
  • Scoutmasters and First Assistant Scoutmasters must be at least 21 years of age by the first day of the jamboree.
  • Second Assistant Scoutmasters must be at least 18 years of age by the first day of the jamboree.
  • Third Assistant Scoutmasters must be at least 18 years of age by the first day of the jamboree but not yet 21 years of age by the last day of the jamboree.
  • Scoutmaster applicants must be currently serving as a Scoutmaster or Varsity Coach.
  • First, Second and Third Assistant Scoutmasters must currently be serving in any adult troop or team leadership position.
  • Scoutmaster applicants must have completed Scoutmaster or Varsity Scout Coach leader specific training.
  • All adult leaders must complete Youth Protection Training within one year of the last day of the jamboree.
  • Meet the medical and BMI (Body Mass Index) requirements.
  • All adult leaders must have filed a Jamboree Personal Health and Medical record with the council jamboree committee before the pre-jamboree training.
  • All adult leaders must be approved by the local council.
  • All adult leaders must submit all registration fees per the local council's payment schedule.

So it looks like there's special spot for "Third Assistant SM" for Jambo!

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Those 18yo boys CAN be members of committee though, and sit in on BoRs. They can't be ASMs until 21yo.

 

On this I believe you are incorrect. Every document I have states that Asst. Scoutmasters must be 18 or over. I cannot find anything with the 21 years old requirement. The adult application even states that Assistant Scoutmasters must be over the age of 18.

 

Our district and council has many, many 18-20 year old ASMs. DS's current troop has 2. The old troop had 5 or 6, depending upon the season.

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Okay merit badge .org says this:

 

 

An Assistant Scoutmaster is an adult leader age 18 or over who assist the Scoutmaster in delivering the troop program.

 

 

But, mb.org is not a National site. Perhaps Council is wrong---hm....

 

Maybe they are not 'wrong' but stress their preference in a way that discourages 18-20 year old ASMs. I am curious to know what your council does with the 18-21 year olds who want to remain active with the Troop and not go into Venturing.

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Just wondering, how did your pack (anyone) handle the mouth-to-mouth and CPR instructions for Webelos? Our book said to not practice Heimlich on a real person, and I'm assuming they don't have to do "real" mouth to mouth, either. Or not? What does it mean to show you know how to treat such things?

 

My next door neighbor is an EMT. He did all of he first aid/CPR with our boys. He brought the manikin to do CPR. Our boys loved it.

 

You could call your local fire department and see if one of their EMT's would do this for you. They could a least point you to someone. CPR, even done correctly has the potential to hurt someone (broken ribs, etc.) so you only want to ot on a love person hen they need it.

 

 

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Maybe they are not 'wrong' but stress their preference in a way that discourages 18-20 year old ASMs. I am curious to know what your council does with the 18-21 year olds who want to remain active with the Troop and not go into Venturing.

 

Yeah, that's where ds is going to be at in November. Council refused to accept an ASM adult app at recharter for a 20yo college student--I was told he HAD to be 21! So, I said, make him a MC then and she dropped him altogether. We've had some problems with recharter this year...

 

Ds is registered as a Venturer too, but our Crew is 65 miles away and he simply isn't going to have time to travel. Plus, we had a MAJOR fire last night on the only road between here and there, in a deep canyon. It's going to add over an hour of travel time as the entire road is going to have to be bulldozed out, canyon walls blasted and the asphalt repoured. A semi of fuel tipped over and exploded! I can't see us making that trip too often once the snow flies. Ds should finish his last 6 mbs in the next few weeks and then is due for his next Palm in June and the last in September. His focus is on applying to engineering schools these days. We'll see what he wants to do.

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