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For our real go-getters, I recommend to the parents that they work on electives in the book, instead of (Wolf) requirements, during the summer. That way the requirements can be done with their den in the fall.

 

Also belt loops, but maybe not so much the pins. Then the pins are something he might work on the following summer if he is still a go-getter Cub Scout!

 

Also check out other awards: Leave No Trace, World Conservation, Summertime Activity Award, NOVA.

 

Be forewarned too that if your son comes into the meetings in the fall with a list of awards earned, your pack might ask you to pay for them yourself. We have an average that we spend for awards, and a little high and a little low evens out, but a huge list at the very beginning of the year would be out of our budget.

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HE PASSED!!!!!!!!  My oldest passed his Eagle BofR tonight!     I have an EAGLE SCOUT!

I've been following this thread for a long time but haven't posted until now.   I wanted to brag a little that my son just became an Eagle Scout! Given his learning challenges and long history of me

Middle son passed his Eagle Board of Review tonight!!!!!!!!!   I now have TWO Eagle Scouts!

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We get an extra week! Our CM had to reschedule our year end barbeque/raingutter regatta/year end ceremonies and DS is just grinning. At our service project today, the CM asked what else he could do in a week and DS just got the biggest grin. He and his little friend spent a couple hours this afternoon watching a BBC Bluray on the ocean giants and now I am supposed to help research how long a parrotfish can hold its breath while being hunted by sharks. Thanks for not giving me something TOO SPECIFIC to search for, boys! :laugh:

 

And they ate almost an entire bag of corn kernels. I'm going to have to email the Mom about the special high fiber diet... :lol:

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Our Brownie troop went camping this weekend. We went Letterboxing, hiking, cooked over a fire, ate s'mores... We were supposed to canoe, but the lake was too choppy. We had lots of fun.

 

 

 

Did you spend one night or two out and about? I'm wondering how that age does on overnights.

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And Felicity, I keep forgetting to tell you that your son is adorable! He looks so proud in the pic! :)

 

 

Thanks, he was so proud of himself. He worked very hard for those awards.

 

It's especially sweet to me that he's able to get up in front of people and accept the awards. He's my super-shy, selective-mutism kid. Scouts has worked for him just the ways it's supposed to. I was his leader for most of Wolves & Bears, but once he had different leaders, they have all been completely understanding and supportive of him. They recognize that things are more difficult for him and really push him without pushing too much. I know Scouts doesn't always measure up to it's own ideals, but in my son's experience it really has.

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Dd had the Camporee with her patrol of Venture Crew. All three of them... We have a separate patrol as we live 65 miles from the main Crew. We go when we can. They helped 3 Webs through the day and had a blast.

 

Ds needs to run out and help with willow cutting today, between classes. The ps is out, but not the college, so he won't have much time. He has another blue card to turn in! 7 more to go...

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Thanks, he was so proud of himself. He worked very hard for those awards.

 

It's especially sweet to me that he's able to get up in front of people and accept the awards. He's my super-shy, selective-mutism kid. Scouts has worked for him just the ways it's supposed to. I was his leader for most of Wolves & Bears, but once he had different leaders, they have all been completely understanding and supportive of him. They recognize that things are more difficult for him and really push him without pushing too much. I know Scouts doesn't always measure up to it's own ideals, but in my son's experience it really has.

 

 

 

Felicity, I have had the exact same experience with our local pack and council. DS is gifted and an Aspie. They have really gone above and beyond what I thought a volunteer run organization would do. And the CM and I had a good long talk about it all yesterday. They LOVE kids like ours because our kids are mellow and shy. Some of these kids are just BURSTING with energy after school and they can get out of control really fast. So having a couple of kids who always speak quietly, who use their manners, who are quieter by nature can mellow out the group as a whole. With selective mutism, your son is probably just a nice kid. That tends to be one of their positive characteristics. :)

 

With Aspies, nice is a rule. And you don't break rules. Plus, as an Aspie you have an intimate knowledge of what it feels like to be excluded by the hyper kids so you look deliberately for the fringe kids who may be overwhelmed by the hyper kids.

 

So our boys can help give a pack or den some real cohesion, just by being themselves. :)

 

DS' den leader is married to an SLP. This is great for us because DS does have a speech impairment and he speaks very quietly. I was thrilled to hear he would be moving onto Bears with us. He's a quiet man himself with a quiet little guy of his own. So DS' den is split evenly between hyper boys and quiet boys now. All the quiet boys are going on. I'm reasonably certain we are going to lose at least one hyper kid over the summer. It's hard for me not to think, "Woohoo!" over that. I have a harder time personally with the hyper kids.

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DS calculated his camping nights this weekend. Our computer crashed and he lost the initial Excel file; four years worth of tracking, down the drain. :( As he entered everything he could remember he realized that he has over 100 nights of camping and, as soon as he completes Cooking MB, he will qualify for the NOA-Camping segment with 3 gold devices. He has 17 nights to go until he has enough for the silver device.

 

His nights are all tent camping; he didn't count anything in a cabin. He wants to check with the Council to see if the nights he will have as a CIT will count as camping. CITs sleep in cabins and not in tents. DS will be a CIT for 12 nights and a camper for 6. He would love to be able to count the 12 cabin nights. He is really unsure about cabin nights, though.

 

Here is the wording from the requirements for the NOA-camping:

 

Camping. A Boy Scout or Varsity Scout may earn the National Outdoor Badge for Camping upon successfully completing the following requirements:

  1. Earn the First Class rank.
     
  2. Earn the Camping merit badge.
     
  3. Earn two of the following three merit badges: Cooking, First Aid, Pioneering.
     
  4. Complete 25 days and nights of camping—including six consecutive days (five nights) of resident camping, approved and under the auspices and standards of the Boy Scouts of America—including nights camped as part of requirements 1 through 3 above.

 

A gold device may be earned for each additional 25 nights of camping. A silver device is earned for each additional 100 nights of camping. The Scout may wear any combination of devices totaling his current number of nights camping.

 

But these are the requirements for the Camping Merit badge (bolding mine):

 

Show experience in camping by doing the following: a. Camp a total of at least 20 days and 20 nights. Sleep each night under the sky or in a tent you have pitched. The 20 days and 20 nights must be at a designated Scouting activity or event. You may use a week of long-term camp toward this requirement. If the camp provides a tent that has already been pitched, you need not pitch your own tent.

 

 

He is thinking no on cabin nights (which is totally fine; he will have more than enough campouts in the next two years that will qualify; Jambo nights alone will boost his total) but I wonder what they do for the counselors who work all summer and stay in cabins. Do six weeks of summer camp not count for anything?? We have an email in to the Council but haven't heard anything yet.

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Trinqueta and I are going to a Service Unit campout tomorrow and Saturday. The girls will be able to canoe and hike and we'll have a campfire. This is our first camping trip as a troop instead of a group of families, so it will be a new experience for us leaders too.

 

Geezle and I passed our BSA swimming test, so we're good to go to Schlitterbahn on our next campout. That should totally fun and get the new scouts excited about being boy scouts. Camporee was fun, but it got down to 36 which is very, very cold for the Houston area. We all survived with our 40 degree rated sleeping bags, but I'm glad we don't live in the North.

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Scouter mom--I'm so glad you posted that! I'd never really looked at the NOA. I just counted up--between OA and the troop, ds has exactly 100 nights of camping. I think he also has the hiking and aquatics ones! After finals next week, I'll suggest he look at his records. to add--just looked at his hiking records and just with his hiking log (quit keeping that log once the badge was earned--he then moved it over to just general troop activities) he has 105.5!

 

Thanks!

 

eta: do you know where the form is for the awards or is it a matter of having the Adv Chair just turn them in?

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Margaret - I tried to quote and reply but I kept getting kicked out. :glare:

 

There is an application the scout has to fill in and submit. Here's the link: http://www.scouting..../430-509_WB.pdf

 

It's fairly easy to fill in. DS submitted his list of riding miles when he applied for the riding segment.

 

Here's the link to the biggie: The Outdoor Achievement Award

http://www.scouting.org/filestore/Outdoor%20Program/pdf/430-041_WB.pdf

 

This is the one DS is going for. The requirements are fairly fierce and time consuming. He hopes to be able to complete it before he ages out. These awards may not be earned by Venturers so he has a little less than two years left to complete the requirements. He has already completed LNT so that is one of the biggies. He has the Backpacking MB left for req. #4.

 

Wilderness First aid has a minimum age req. (16 years). Now that DS is old enough he wants to get that out of the way as soon as possible.

 

I hope he can do it.

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Thanks! Ds is not quite there for the adventure or the OAA--he still needs LNT. He has WFA already. He needs 20 more nights of camping for the Silver and that's probably not going to happen. He ages out this fall and isn't going to camp this year. He'll be gone too much for summer seminars at the academies. By searching records he has aquatics, riding, camping and hiking! All neat and tidy in Excel files. Ds only has 8 mbs total to go, so has all the various ones needed for awards. He needs just 3 more backpacking trips or 3 more 14ers climbed----hmmm...

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Last night ds's pack had a fund raiser at McDonald's. The leaders worked behind the counter and the boys did clean up in exchange for 10% of the profits. It took all of 20 minutes for ds to decide that it was no fun and that McDonald's wasn't the career path for him. lol

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Anyone else having a rough time fundraising this year? Seems like this year camp-card sales are much harder than last few years...

(we're exhausted trying to sell!)

Yes, I said WE-- because when the kids need to sell, it's ME that has to go along. :D

 

I confess that this year we simply did the fundraising buyout. No plans for extended camp this summer as ds will be pursuing Eagle.

 

Aaaaannnnnd.... did the buyout for my AHG girl, too. Just not our year for fundraising. :closedeyes:

 

As far as what's we're working on, fire building clinic tomorrow for some younger scouts - should be fun! I am praying for no rain and a gentle breeze, just enough to feed some flames but not enough to make it rough.

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My younger ds earned 2nd class last night.

 

He has one requirement left for 1st Class and he'll hopefully get that done this weekend. He's hoping to be Star by the end of September. He's looking forward to doing 3 merit badges over 3 weekends that a local Venturing Crew is organizing this summer.

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I'm glad this came back to the top of the forums. DS11 just joined boy scouts four weeks ago. It is our first time involved with scouting in any way so everything is still pretty overwhelming. But he is having fun and meeting boys his age. He's decided to work on astronomy and space exploration first. He's going on his first camp out next weekend where they will be working on first aid.

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I'm glad this came back to the top of the forums. DS11 just joined boy scouts four weeks ago. It is our first time involved with scouting in any way so everything is still pretty overwhelming. But he is having fun and meeting boys his age. He's decided to work on astronomy and space exploration first. He's going on his first camp out next weekend where they will be working on first aid.

 

Welcome to the joyous world of scouting! Your son, you and the rest of your family are in for a treat.

 

Astronomy and Space Explor. are two great merit badges for a young scout. He should have fun with both of those.

 

If you have any questions regarding scouting, please don't hesitate to ask.

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Welcome to the joyous world of scouting! Your son, you and the rest of your family are in for a treat.

 

Astronomy and Space Explor. are two great merit badges for a young scout. He should have fun with both of those.

 

If you have any questions regarding scouting, please don't hesitate to ask.

 

 

Thanks! We are still in the overwhelmed state but it seems to be working out fine. The troop we joined is boy lead. Most of the boys seem friendly, and he chose his patrol because they were very friendly and patient with his questions. The adults all seem friendly and helpful and patient with my questions. Our neighbor is also into scouting and has an eagle scout and another boy in scouting. Between everything, I think we are having a pretty easy start.

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Awesome. Welcome to the adventure.

 

Be sure and start a binder for record keeping.....he'll need to keep track of his camping nights, hiking hours,swimming hours, riding hours, and service hours as well as have a place to put his merit badge and rank advancement cards. Also grab some tan thread so he can sew his merit badges on when he gets them.

 

Thanks for this. No one has suggested that I need to keep track of this stuff. He's already been swimming with the troop, and I didn't know I needed to keep track of it.

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After much frustration, our troop now hands each new boy a notebook with spots to track camping nights, meetings, PoRs, hiking, camping, CS hours, etc. YOU don't need to keep track of this stuff--HE needs to! Our notebooks have a few pages of those plastic sleeves for trading cards--blue cards just fit nicely (hint: suggest he stick a piece of tape over the top as they do slide out), paper protectors to stick Camporee notices in, and several photo sleeve pages. It's not uncommon for a boy to come to me and say, "Mrs. C, I don't like your system. MINE works this way!" Yay! The boy has owned A system! I'm waiting for a boy to whip out his phone with his record keeping on it! Eagle record keeping has become more and more online--and that's a good thing if it helps a boy do it.

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YOU don't need to keep track of this stuff--HE needs to!

I agree with this. Let the boy do it.

 

Here's what I did. I bought some of the baseball card holders and put them into a binder we had at home. To the binder I added some lined paper, some dividers and a copy of an Excel sheet DS and I created at the beginning of every school year (we used merit badge activities to support DS's academic interests and to provide that all important socialization during the school day. Plus we met some pretty neat people and went on some awesome field trips). The Excel sheet had a month by month Merit Badge goal, which badge he wanted to work on, where he would do it and the name and contact info of the merit badge counselor. The dividers were used to divide the binder into three sections: 1) blue cards and advancement cards in the baseball card protectors; 2) copies of notices, menus, etc of everything used for troop outings; and 3) worksheets or work he did for merit badges at clinics, summer camp or with the MBC.

 

When DS was a Tenderfoot, I would guide him to fill in the appropriate information after every campout and outing. We would sit down and write in number of nights camped, where he camped etc. As soon as he would earn a MB, the card was slid into the protector. He learned to do it immediately and not to let the cards sit. After about two years he began to ask me to do the additions with him. It became a time for us to sit and discuss his outings and share in some mother-son time. I wanted the BSA excursions to be time when DS was able to be a boy without my influence so I never went. The time spent recording info with DS was dear to me. Now he just does it on his own(has since about Life Rank). No help from mom needed. :( I guess I should be happy, though, it means he's learning and growing as a scout.

 

The binder was a great system and worked well for him; most of it still does. The only problem is he took the handwritten sheets and entered them into a computer file, after which he promptly threw away the handwritten sheets. Now that our computer crashed and the scouting file was unable to be saved, DS no longer has a complete record. :( Lesson learned: keep all handwritten documents if they are even remotely important.

 

The best part about his binder (well, now it's actually two, one binder for blue cards and important documents and one for the MBC worksheets and other paperwork he has completed for merit badges and special trips, like Sea Base) is that if and when he completes Eagle we will have a ready made chronology of his Boy Scout years. I hear that the binders make it much easier to complete the Eagle application, too.

 

 

ETA: I can't stop talking about scouts. I am random and pathetic, I know. I think it comes from being an Advancement Chair and watching so many boys lose their info or not know what they are eligible for.

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Thanks for this. No one has suggested that I need to keep track of this stuff. He's already been swimming with the troop, and I didn't know I needed to keep track of it.

 

JoAnn, you are going to end up with a binder full of notebooks on how to earn everything and the charts... Oh, the charts you will make. :laugh:

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Just a hint--when your ds goes to sew on badges--it's the color "kiwi" that matches the elective badges... He'll also need a very slightly purple-ish grey for Eagle-requireds.

 

I think ds is up to five binders--wait, more than that because of Venture and OA. He has his travelin' binder with current stuff and then 4 or so of completed mb sheets and one binder of blue cards and cool patches that he doesn't want on his patch blankets...

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JoAnn, you are going to end up with a binder full of notebooks on how to earn everything and the charts... Oh, the charts you will make. :laugh:

 

Maybe you should just send me the files for blank charts and save us the work. :tongue_smilie:

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Maybe you should just send me the files for blank charts and save us the work. :tongue_smilie:

 

You can google most of them!! That's what I did.

 

DS was supposed to track his personal hygiene for a week or two and some other CS mom out there made the chart for me. Voila! Then we needed pet chore charts and regular chore charts and a hiking chart and a biking chart... You're going to have a LOT of charts, my dear.

:laugh:

 

But it's SUPER easy to sit down with the CM or SM with all the charts and go over stuff. I found out yesterday DS qualified for another badge because I had charted everything. We're well on our way to Nova! :)

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Well, that's where he needs to be taught! I hold a sewing clinic two weeks before every CoH, and the older boys teach the youngers, too.

 

 

Care to do a Youtube version for those of us here at WTM? I need to start sewing DD's GS stuff on instead of using Badge Magic, as her hair sticks to the edges where the Badge Magic shows. But I haven't a clue how to sew on patches and have them look good!

 

I do sew though, both machine and hand sew. It's just the patches that scare me!

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Care to do a Youtube version for those of us here at WTM? I need to start sewing DD's GS stuff on instead of using Badge Magic, as her hair sticks to the edges where the Badge Magic shows. But I haven't a clue how to sew on patches and have them look good!

 

I do sew though, both machine and hand sew. It's just the patches that scare me!

 

 

Badge Magic is evil. I used it for my dd's Brownie badges and they all fell off. There must be something in the fabric of the sashes and smocks that does that. So I ended up sewing them all on after paying an obnoxiously high amount for the Badge Magic.

 

Our GS Service Unit had a membership drive this afternoon--they invited any interested girls to come and have a "day in the life" of a GS. Only three of our ten girls could make it, but given the turn out of potential GS, it was very successful. It was also run incredibly well. I'm so used to activities that start twenty minutes late and just are haphazardly done, that this was a breath of fresh air.

 

Of course, the most exciting thing of all was that my three 7yo girls got up and led all of the girls there in a song. I was so proud of them for wanting to get up there and doing a great job. It says a lot about the organization that they've created a space where the kids can be silly and they don't think twice about it. Okay, that's my gush of the day. And my two cents about Badge Magic.

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So, if a boy (hypothetically) loses a blue card, what happens? Not that it's happened. (Whistling while I walk off with my hands behind my back. Nothing to see here. Nosireebob.)

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Badge Magic is evil. I used it for my dd's Brownie badges and they all fell off. There must be something in the fabric of the sashes and smocks that does that. So I ended up sewing them all on after paying an obnoxiously high amount for the Badge Magic.

 

Hmm...we've used Badge Magic for 3 years now and never had that problem. For us, it stays TOO sticky - thus why dd's hair sticks to the edges of her patches. Plus our council raised the price on it yet again, and it's just too costly at the rate dd earns badges - we can go through an entire sheet in 2 months easily.

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Hmm...we've used Badge Magic for 3 years now and never had that problem. For us, it stays TOO sticky - thus why dd's hair sticks to the edges of her patches. Plus our council raised the price on it yet again, and it's just too costly at the rate dd earns badges - we can go through an entire sheet in 2 months easily.

 

That's great that the Badge Magic works, sorry about your dd's hair. My dd's isn't long enough to reach her sash, so she doesn't have that problem. I wish the Badge Magic worked, it would make my life so much easier.

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If the boy loses the blue card before he's done, he'll be hoping his mbc will be kind and help him recreate it. Once it's finished, the mbc should be keeping his third of it. The rest goes to the Adv Chair and she should return the boy's third at CoH. She retains her third. By that time, it's been recorded at Council. As of a month ago, Councils do not require a photocopy of the blue cards in the Eagle book (though not all Councils may have gotten that memo). So, make sure, boys, your records are up-to-date and correct at Council! A lost blue card is not the end of the world, but it IS a hassle! You might want to have your Scout pick out one of those zippered binders and keep all his blue cards zipped up. Encourage him to NOT fold them as then they fall apart.

 

As to the sewing--with a clumsy new Scout, I prefer the boy use a doubled knotted thread. Not too long, or it will tangle. Trying to get a boy to get the end from pulling through with a single thread is an exercise in frustration. Have him staple the badge on (not through the embroidery or it snags) and the needle under the edge of the badge. Make sure he's stitching front to back--every once in awhile, you'll get a boy try to go AROUND the whole thing, sewing the sleeve in there too! If he's on the clumsier side, have him start from the back--yeah, the knot will show on the inside of the shirt, but it's easier. Then, as small of stitches as you can get him to do. If he's getting the hang of it, have him take three small stitches in the same spot to anchor it. If he's struggling, just help him to knot it on the back and then pull the knot down. If he's really struglling, you do a stitch or two and then he's does some. That way, the badge will stay on even though his stitches will be all over the place. You'll be amazed how much better the third badge will look over the first!

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So, if a boy (hypothetically) loses a blue card, what happens? Not that it's happened. (Whistling while I walk off with my hands behind my back. Nothing to see here. Nosireebob.)

 

Scouts lose blue cards quite often. It really isn't something to fret over and can be easily fixed if caught early.

 

These are my first thoughts about a missing blue card:

 

It depends on where in the process the scout lost it.

 

If it is at the beginning or in progress and he has just begun working on the requirements, I would have him go back to the SM and request a new one and give it to the merit badge counselor to fill in with work completed up to that point.

 

If the merit badge was complete, and the card was not yet submitted to the Advancement Chair, I would request a copy of the MBC's portion of the blue card. There's a good reason those blue cards go to three different people (MBC, Scout, Advancement Chair).

 

If the merit badge was completed and already presented to the boy and the card was in need of being put aside for record keeping, two things could happen. A copy of the record could be obtained from the Advancement Chair or the merit badge counselor (again the three parts come in handy). The merit badge should have been presented to the scout with a small card of merit. This is an acceptable form of proof of having earned the badge.

 

If the blue card is from a local merit badge counselor, getting a copy should be easy; simply contact the MBC and ask for a copy of the record. If the blue card was from a merit badge university or an MBC outside of your district, it might take a bit more leg work.

 

HTH

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Thank you both. I've been panicking slightly. He's in the middle of his badge--this is the first one he's done on his own. I kept reminding/nagging him to put it in the notebook he has for them and because he's twelve he just never did. I'm going to talk to his Scoutmaster tomorrow and see if he can recreate it.

 

Really, thank you. I'm keeping your advice in a special folder, seriously.

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Thank you both. I've been panicking slightly. He's in the middle of his badge--this is the first one he's done on his own. I kept reminding/nagging him to put it in the notebook he has for them and because he's twelve he just never did. I'm going to talk to his Scoutmaster tomorrow and see if he can recreate it.

 

Really, thank you. I'm keeping your advice in a special folder, seriously.

 

No, HE needs to speak to his SM.

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DS calculated his camping nights this weekend. Our computer crashed and he lost the initial Excel file; four years worth of tracking, down the drain. :( As he entered everything he could remember he realized that he has over 100 nights of camping and, as soon as he completes Cooking MB, he will qualify for the NOA-Camping segment with 3 gold devices. He has 17 nights to go until he has enough for the silver device.

 

His nights are all tent camping; he didn't count anything in a cabin. He wants to check with the Council to see if the nights he will have as a CIT will count as camping. CITs sleep in cabins and not in tents. DS will be a CIT for 12 nights and a camper for 6. He would love to be able to count the 12 cabin nights. He is really unsure about cabin nights, though.

 

Here is the wording from the requirements for the NOA-camping:

 

Camping. A Boy Scout or Varsity Scout may earn the National Outdoor Badge for Camping upon successfully completing the following requirements:

  1. Earn the First Class rank.
     
  2. Earn the Camping merit badge.
     
  3. Earn two of the following three merit badges: Cooking, First Aid, Pioneering.
     
  4. Complete 25 days and nights of camping—including six consecutive days (five nights) of resident camping, approved and under the auspices and standards of the Boy Scouts of America—including nights camped as part of requirements 1 through 3 above.

A gold device may be earned for each additional 25 nights of camping. A silver device is earned for each additional 100 nights of camping. The Scout may wear any combination of devices totaling his current number of nights camping.

 

But these are the requirements for the Camping Merit badge (bolding mine):

 

Show experience in camping by doing the following: a. Camp a total of at least 20 days and 20 nights. Sleep each night under the sky or in a tent you have pitched. The 20 days and 20 nights must be at a designated Scouting activity or event. You may use a week of long-term camp toward this requirement. If the camp provides a tent that has already been pitched, you need not pitch your own tent.

 

 

He is thinking no on cabin nights (which is totally fine; he will have more than enough campouts in the next two years that will qualify; Jambo nights alone will boost his total) but I wonder what they do for the counselors who work all summer and stay in cabins. Do six weeks of summer camp not count for anything?? We have an email in to the Council but haven't heard anything yet.

Margaret - I tried to quote and reply but I kept getting kicked out. :glare:

 

There is an application the scout has to fill in and submit. Here's the link: http://www.scouting..../430-509_WB.pdf

 

It's fairly easy to fill in. DS submitted his list of riding miles when he applied for the riding segment.

 

Here's the link to the biggie: The Outdoor Achievement Award

http://www.scouting..../430-041_WB.pdf

 

This is the one DS is going for. The requirements are fairly fierce and time consuming. He hopes to be able to complete it before he ages out. These awards may not be earned by Venturers so he has a little less than two years left to complete the requirements. He has already completed LNT so that is one of the biggies. He has the Backpacking MB left for req. #4.

 

Wilderness First aid has a minimum age req. (16 years). Now that DS is old enough he wants to get that out of the way as soon as possible.

 

I hope he can do it.

Thanks! Ds is not quite there for the adventure or the OAA--he still needs LNT. He has WFA already. He needs 20 more nights of camping for the Silver and that's probably not going to happen. He ages out this fall and isn't going to camp this year. He'll be gone too much for summer seminars at the academies. By searching records he has aquatics, riding, camping and hiking! All neat and tidy in Excel files. Ds only has 8 mbs total to go, so has all the various ones needed for awards. He needs just 3 more backpacking trips or 3 more 14ers climbed----hmmm...

 

Just wanted to say that this is beyond impressive!

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Just a hint--when your ds goes to sew on badges--it's the color "kiwi" that matches the elective badges... He'll also need a very slightly purple-ish grey for Eagle-requireds.

 

I think ds is up to five binders--wait, more than that because of Venture and OA. He has his travelin' binder with current stuff and then 4 or so of completed mb sheets and one binder of blue cards and cool patches that he doesn't want on his patch blankets...

 

I don't have a Boy Scout, but for my Girl Scout's badges, we use invisible thread. The color doesn't matter, then.

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Just wanted to say that this is beyond impressive!

 

 

Thank you very much. I just want to share, though, that every scout can earn these awards. A scout who participates in a year round program from age 10 or 11, attends summer camp and plans his merit badges should be able to complete most of the requirements for 3 of the NOA segments - camping, hiking and aquatics. Riding is actually easier for some boys than Aquatics. The most difficult, and most expensive segment, is Adventure.

 

Now the NOA Medal, that one is impressive. Much more work and pre-planning is needed. The trick is getting the info about the awards to the boys. There is so much focus on Eagle that many of the other awards are dismissed or overlooked.

 

I wish more units, districts and councils would discuss these awards, either through unit presentations, Merit badge university classes, or what have you.

 

Light bulb moment - I am beginning Wood Badge next year and I think I will ask if I can do this for one of my tickets. DS is the first in our district to attempt the NOA (and the Hornaday) and we are educating people as we go along. I think doing presentations at all three levels (unit, district and council) woudl be an awesome ticket. Now I must be patient and wait until the next wood badge class begins.

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Thank you very much. I just want to share, though, that every scout can earn these awards. A scout who participates in a year round program from age 10 or 11, attends summer camp and plans his merit badges should be able to complete most of the requirements for 3 of the NOA segments - camping, hiking and aquatics. Riding is actually easier for some boys than Aquatics. The most difficult, and most expensive segment, is Adventure.

 

Now the NOA Medal, that one is impressive. Much more work and pre-planning is needed. The trick is getting the info about the awards to the boys. There is so much focus on Eagle that many of the other awards are dismissed or overlooked.

 

I wish more units, districts and councils would discuss these awards, either through unit presentations, Merit badge university classes, or what have you.

 

Light bulb moment - I am beginning Wood Badge next year and I think I will ask if I can do this for one of my tickets. DS is the first in our district to attempt the NOA (and the Hornaday) and we are educating people as we go along. I think doing presentations at all three levels (unit, district and council) woudl be an awesome ticket. Now I must be patient and wait until the next wood badge class begins.

 

I am also considering Woodbadge next year (depends on how my job/work schedule shakes out) and will tuck away this idea. [ETA fwiw, my application would be different, in that I primarily work with AHG girls, whose highly motivated members need more of a tracking system than their handbooks can provide.]

 

For you moms of newer scouts, just wanted to share a mb resource I don't think has been mentioned here. If your son likes mb worksheets, you might want to take a look at this site for merit badge "passports."

 

http://members.relia.net/thedane/passports.html

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I am also considering Woodbadge next year (depends on how my job/work schedule shakes out) and will tuck away this idea. [ETA fwiw, my application would be different, in that I primarily work with AHG girls, whose highly motivated members need more of a tracking system than their handbooks can provide.]

 

For you moms of newer scouts, just wanted to share a mb resource I don't think has been mentioned here. If your son likes mb worksheets, you might want to take a look at this site for merit badge "passports."

 

http://members.relia.net/thedane/passports.html

 

What a great resource. Thank you! I'm printing the Aviation one today. That is going to be my sons first MB. One of our leaders is a pilot for Alaska and every other year they do an Aviation day at Alaska Air. The get behind the scenes tours and all kinds of cool hands on stuff. I'm so excited for him.

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I don't have a Boy Scout, but for my Girl Scout's badges, we use invisible thread. The color doesn't matter, then.

 

Where do you find this? Is there a particular type / brand that works best? GS mama here, and the idea of matching thread to every single patch is daunting - they are so many colors!

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Where do you find this? Is there a particular type / brand that works best? GS mama here, and the idea of matching thread to every single patch is daunting - they are so many colors!

 

I just looked at the Joann Fabric website and they carry it. http://www.joann.com/search/_invisible%20thread/

 

I am so glad she posted about this. I am going to pick some up today. DS and I will be working on his uniforms for Jambo this afternoon. We were going to use Badge Magic but I think invisible thread is the better choice.

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The scout can sew it on anyway he wants.

 

One of the older boys showed my son to use a staple to affix it in place, then needle/thread.

 

Remember, he's not just learning how to sew a badge on, he's learning that he's competent. He'll use this skill later to maybe fix a rip in something or make his own piece of equipment.

 

 

Good point...about the learning he's competent. I think I'll teach him how to do both ways so he can do both. Hand-stitching is useful, though I find sewing badges really hard on the fingers because of the thickness.

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