Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

lynn

Is it possible to get in the Military without a high school education, GED only?

Recommended Posts

My dad thinks it's unfair that my nephew who never went to high school can't join the Navy. He was told he needed 2 years college with his GED. Anyone know?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To enlist in the U.S. Military, as a High School Graduate, they strongly prefer graduates of a "Tier 1" school. Some branches (think U.S. Army and possibly others) will also take a small percentage of people who are graduates of "Tier 2" schools. Those who are graduates of "Tier1" schools have more possibilities, regarding Technical schools they can attend, etc.

 

For one who only has a G.E.D., what you wrote is probably true. I'm not sure how many university level courses are required. The same is true, if one is a graduate of a "Tier 2" high school and wants to join a branch of the service, such as the U.S. Air Force, that does not accept graduates of "Tier 2" schools, or, if they do, very very few.

 

You might look on About.com or another web site for more information and with more accurate detail than I can provide.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest inoubliable

http://www.navy.com/joining/qualifications.html

 

"Education

Generally speaking, you must be a high school graduate, have earned a GED or have met other high school equivalency requirements to enlist in the Navy. For specific qualifying circumstances, contact a recruiter."

 

You'll probably have to talk to a recruiter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Each of the services strictly limit the number of high school dropouts (which includes GED holders) who can enlist each year. This is because years of military enlistment statistics have shown that this category of enlistees fail to complete their entire first term of military service at about twice the rate of those with a high school diploma or those with college credits. -- from the internet

 

I had a similar problem with a place I wanted to join (not the Navy) and they said a couple of CLEP tests would do the trick. If I remember correctly I paid $80 each for two tests and got in fine. Might give that a try.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

About a year ago, when I was waiting for my son's delayed flight to arrive, I started chatting with a Navy recruiter whose girlfriend was on the same flight. He told me that because so many jobs within the Navy are highly technical, they really want people with very specific skill sets.

 

If your nephew really wants to join, perhaps the recruiter can suggest an educational path at a CC (after he gets a GED, of course) that would increase his chances with the service.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

About a year ago, when I was waiting for my son's delayed flight to arrive, I started chatting with a Navy recruiter whose girlfriend was on the same flight. He told me that because so many jobs within the Navy are highly technical, they really want people with very specific skill sets.

 

If your nephew really wants to join, perhaps the recruiter can suggest an educational path at a CC (after he gets a GED, of course) that would increase his chances with the service.

 

 

This is what I have heard as well. In particular for navy and Air Force.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If he wants to enlist, he's probably better off going the CC route, but he can still get his high school diploma. Most school districts have options for adults finishing their diploma. Mine does. If he lives in the same place where he dropped out they should easily be able to apply the credits he did finish towards his diploma. There are also many accredited online high school programs. Look only at accredited programs. I work for one. We actually have students both online and onsite. I don't know about enlisting, but I've had students go to college on scholarships based on finishing our program. Since I live in an area that relies heavily on federal employment I regularly get calls to verify education completion from government facilities both for new employment and for people getting promotions (yay! I love it when I take one of those calls--people who've turned around and are moving up).

 

If he goes the cc route, I agree with the others about checking with the recruiter regarding exactly which courses they would expect in a 2 year program.

 

Is the military saying 2 years of college and expecting the equivalent of an AA or AS? Someone who has dropped out may not be able to finish that in 2 years. Without of high school diploma, he may be required to take certain placement exams and classes before taking classes for credit.

 

I don't think the decision of the military is unfair. They are down sizing. They are highly technical. They can screen out potential recruits the best way for them.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the military your jobs you will do will largely be determined by your educational level and your ASVAB score. To have the best possible options, then you need to be a competitive candidate just like for any other job. The military is downsizing and is therefore becoming more competitive. Even starting out, military members make a decent wage with wonderful benefits. Many of the jobs (especially the more competitive jobs) offer amazing training opportunities. Why would they take just anyone? Taking 30 hours of cc classes (even if some of those are via CLEPP) will make you a better candidate in the military's eyes.

 

betty, it doesn't really matter what the college courses are in, unless there is a specific job field desired by the candidate. We have an officer friend whose degree is in Drama.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is possible to get into the military with a parent-issued diploma. HSLDA and other homeschool organizations have been working on this for many years.

 

Here's HSLDA's page with links to its many articles regarding homeschooled grads and the military.

 

 

 

Ellie,

 

It is not like that anymore. It has changed considerably in terms of competition. The nature of that has served to exclude many homeschool/unaccredited private/GED candidates.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is possible to get into the military with a parent-issued diploma. HSLDA and other homeschool organizations have been working on this for many years.

 

Here's HSLDA's page with links to its many articles regarding homeschooled grads and the military.

 

 

Yeah, but not going to high school is vastly different than homeschooling high school. And we have enough parents using homeschool as a way to avoid having their kid educated. I'd hate it if the local loser drop out was give a "diploma" from his mom just because she has access to a computer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There was a big kerfuffle when the first GED or not,Tier 1/Tier 2 thing came out and the service found that "homeschoolers" were washing out at a higher rate than regular diploma kids. Turns out, lots were CLAIMING to be hsers who were not--they were dropouts. That really hurt the hsers for a bit. It's been an uphill battle to get that changed. I don't think it's unfair for not wanting dropouts--the days of the military jobs for unskilled kids with little aptitude are long gone. I look at pictures of those 19yos who keep my dd's helo flying and I am in awe (and they just won some award for being one of the best maintenance groups). I am grateful that it's a bunch of kids with technical skills to keep that helo in the air!

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you talking about Tiers as it relates to HIGH SCHOOL? Never mind, found it.

 

To enlist in the U.S. Military, as a High School Graduate, they strongly prefer graduates of a "Tier 1" school. Some branches (think U.S. Army and possibly others) will also take a small percentage of people who are graduates of "Tier 2" schools. Those who are graduates of "Tier1" schools have more possibilities, regarding Technical schools they can attend, etc.

 

For one who only has a G.E.D., what you wrote is probably true. I'm not sure how many university level courses are required. The same is true, if one is a graduate of a "Tier 2" high school and wants to join a branch of the service, such as the U.S. Air Force, that does not accept graduates of "Tier 2" schools, or, if they do, very very few.

 

You might look on About.com or another web site for more information and with more accurate detail than I can provide.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

About a year ago, when I was waiting for my son's delayed flight to arrive, I started chatting with a Navy recruiter whose girlfriend was on the same flight. He told me that because so many jobs within the Navy are highly technical, they really want people with very specific skill sets.

 

If your nephew really wants to join, perhaps the recruiter can suggest an educational path at a CC (after he gets a GED, of course) that would increase his chances with the service.

 

 

Dh's nephew has been trying to join the military after taking the GED. The (Marines?) recruiter said he needed to take at least "this many" credits at a CC or other accredited institution in order to join. It might have been about 12 credits, but I think he's finally gotten there. Some credits were taken at a local CC, some through an online university program (it might have been Phoenix).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To enlist in the U.S. Military, as a High School Graduate, they strongly prefer graduates of a "Tier 1" school. Some branches (think U.S. Army and possibly others) will also take a small percentage of people who are graduates of "Tier 2" schools. Those who are graduates of "Tier1" schools have more possibilities, regarding Technical schools they can attend, etc.

 

For one who only has a G.E.D., what you wrote is probably true. I'm not sure how many university level courses are required. The same is true, if one is a graduate of a "Tier 2" high school and wants to join a branch of the service, such as the U.S. Air Force, that does not accept graduates of "Tier 2" schools, or, if they do, very very few.

 

You might look on About.com or another web site for more information and with more accurate detail than I can provide.

 

 

This is partly correct. The schools are Tiered - but also based on population/school size, so the recruiters are encouraged to get X amount of Tier 1 recruits vs. smaller X amount of Tier 2. However, your school(s) possibilities are based on your ASVAB scores and if you have 3 wanting to sign on from a Tier 2 and only 1 from a Tier one, then that is what you do. Once you sign on the dotted line, it doesn't matter which school you came from. It's ALL about the ASVAB.

 

As far as the GED goes, it is correct that college courses are also required. These days there are very FEW waivers written for any reason, either. If the kid has ANY kind of criminal history, no matter how small, they are pushed way to the back of the line, if allowed in at all. There is no such thing as anything prior to age 18 being "wiped clean".

 

I know way more than I ever cared to about military recruiting. We are just shy of one year out from the H3LL duty that is recruiting duty in a rural area. I wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I looked into enlisting (1998), that was true; however, you can enter a college ROTC program to enter the military as an officer upon graduation, with a GED/homeschool diploma, if you are accepted to a university. You can attend your chosen school and do your ROTC at another institution in the area, and there are a lot of ROTC scholarships available, depending on the needs of the military branch at that time.

 

They are looking for qualified people, just like the enlisted side, and a lot of people are not qualified. If your nephew is a good candidate (smart, in decent physical condition, no criminal history, and a citizen), he might call the nearest ROTC recruiter in his desired service and look into that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Ellie,

 

It is not like that anymore. It has changed considerably in terms of competition. The nature of that has served to exclude many homeschool/unaccredited private/GED candidates.

 

 

"What" is not like "that" any more???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

"What" is not like "that" any more???

 

 

I'm not quite sure what Joanne meant, but IME things have changed. A friend's son decided to take the GED early (he'd not finished high school at home). He was able to enlist in the Army with only a GED, and then settled into an excellent career track based on tests he took after he enlisted. That was when my son was in middle school. My son's peers who entered the military had to take the GED plus community college courses. Another friend went to a 4-year university and ROTC.

 

What changed? Between the two examples I cited there was a major kerfuffle in AF recruiting because dropouts were calling themselves home school graduates, enlisting, and washing out at high rates (as a pp mentioned). A neighbor showed me the article in the AF Times because at that point in his life ds was interested in joining the military.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"What" is not like "that" any more???

 

 

During the "surge" when they were growing the military they allowed people to join with fewer qualifications and more waivers than they are now. It is a fact. There is no reason to get defensive.

 

We know ROTC scholarship students who were not put on active duty after graduation and had no back-up plan. Soldiers who joined several years ago on waivers are not being allowed to re-enlist. A whole year group of majors just had their promotion boards to Lieutenant Colonel pushed back a year. It is all part of the *drawdown*.

 

Students who wish to join the military should be aware of the facts, and I don't care what victories HSLDA is trying to claim. Students who want to go into the military need to make themselves competitive. Dual credit. CLEPP. Languages. Technical degrees. The climate isn't anything like it was a few years ago.

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This has been brought back to life from 2013.

 

 

Yup!

 

I think someone used the search for "GED" and this popped up.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Ellie,

 

It is not like that anymore. It has changed considerably in terms of competition. The nature of that has served to exclude many homeschool/unaccredited private/GED candidates.

 

Ellie is correct that homeschool graduates are tier 1, not tier 2 like GED holders. This is a fairly recent legal change within the past few years.

 

It doesn't sound to me from the OP though that the young man mentioned graduated from homeschool, but rather that he dropped out of school. In which case he is tier 2 unless he gets enough college credits to bump him up to tier 1.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah, just saw this was a zombie thread :zombiechase:

Me too! I'm just reading along like it's new when I see Mrs Mungo's comment. I'm thinking "When did she come back?" aaaaaaaand that's when I checked the date :-/

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Me too! I'm just reading along like it's new when I see Mrs Mungo's comment. I'm thinking "When did she come back?" aaaaaaaand that's when I checked the date :-/

 

Me too....... made me miss her more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Me too! I'm just reading along like it's new when I see Mrs Mungo's comment. I'm thinking "When did she come back?" aaaaaaaand that's when I checked the date :-/

 

 

Same here!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah happybeachbum seems to be resurrecting threads with that particular theme.

 

Actually I found it in the Staring High School, Outsourcing page, but um okay

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER & RECEIVE A COUPON FOR
10% OFF
We respect your privacy.You’ll hear about new products, special discounts & sales, and homeschooling tips. *Coupon only valid for first-time registrants. Coupon cannot be combined with any other offer. Entering your email address makes you eligible to receive future promotional emails.
0 Shares
Share
Tweet
Pin
×