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Oldschool Curricula to supplement a Bible and a library card


Hunter
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I'm starting this thread for mitzvahmommy

I'm not sure of her religion, but I'm looking for all you oldschoolers to share your favorite multilevel OOP and classic curricula designed to supplement a Bible and library card. Remember how we all spent just $100.00 a year and were told that was all we needed, because that Bible and library card were enough? Multigrade and non-bulky suggestions preferred. Higher priced as well as lower priced suggestions are both welcome.

 

This new member and newbie homeschooler, who we are all quickly getting attached to :grouphug: has a tax return to quickly spend before moving to a smaller apartment, and then won't be able to shop again for some time. Please supply links to samples, reviews, and sellers where multiple items can be purchased at the same time. Language Arts for an Aspie is a priority.

 

So again, we are talking about a few pages that can be used as a spine, or to assist a mom/teacher in being able to use their library more effectively and confidently for years to come. Multigrade "Stick-in-the-dirt" and "the teacher is the textbook" curricula.

 

What Your Grader Needs to Know 1-6, Doubleday Hardcovers from the early 1990s. I strongly recommend this set, and NOT the newer revised unfinished series.

 

How to Tutor All the add ons are nice, but I have been able to teach phonics, handwriting and arithmetic for months at a time just from this little book. The math is controversial but I love it and I think it makes a least a great quick read for everyone. The first 20 phonics/handwriting lessons are indispensable if attempting cursive-first. Don Potter has written all sorts of helps for Alpha-Phonics, the updated version of the HTT phonics section. Most work with HTT.

 

Strayer-Upton math are 3 LITTLE and CHEAP vintage books, that cover grades 3-8 (with extensive review of all of 1-2). It's hard to know what to skip in these books that is outdated or unnecessary, when using them as a core curriculum, but they make a great EXTENSIVE supplementary problem bank for ultra lean and efficient modern curricula, like How to Tutor (above) and Arithmetic Made Simple , which have been favorites with tutors for decades. All three of these curricula use a lot of the same vocabulary and methods, and play nice together. HTT and AMS are great for learning disabled and behind students, who need to focus on the priority topics. Great to have on the bookshelf with little weight and bulk.

 

Learning Grammar Through Writing Nice and thin, but so useful.

 

Dictation Resource Book Another multigrade thin and useful resource, that teaches you to teach as well as providing some open-and-go lessons.

samples

 

Writing Road to Reading 4th best for spelling and comes with cut out flashcards

Writing Road to Reading 6th best for cursive handwriting and indexed spelling list.

I recommend the 4th for now and to photocopy the cursive handwriting instruction from a 6th edition library book when you need them. Spalding cursive if my must have curriculum for Aspies and left-handed students.

 

The Well Trained Mind 1st edition Be careful. This link is to the 1st edition ISBN, but the picture is from the 2nd edition, so sellers might be a bit confused. The 1st edition (1999) is before the author began writing her own curriculum and is better at teaching you to use library and cheap used books.

 

This should get things started :D I'll post more tomorrow.

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The Complete Home Learning Source Book. Bulky as Hades, but an awesome resource. As well as list after list of books to look for at the library, there are journal entries by the author about how she taught without curricula.

 

How to Write a Low Cost No Cost Curriculum. This is my favorite checklist. Instead of telling you what you COULD cover, it mostly sticks to what you SHOULD cover, and is geared towards normal child development.

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I'm been saying this for a couple of years, but I'm pretty convinced that you could homeschool with just a good internet connection and a good library. Our library has living math books and even living grammar books. Some libraries have textbooks. There are so many online resources (and I know you're asking for old school). You really don't have to spend a lot of money. If I were going for "almost free" homeschooling for my middle school kids, I would buy this:

 

Rod and Staff English (I paid $15 for the set used last fall)

a non-consumable math

 

That's all I would buy. For young kids, I don't think you really need to buy anything. Maybe a phonics book. But, our library is filled with those, too. They have entire bookcases full of easy readers. Lol.

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Christine Miller's All Through the Ages recommends loads of excellent books for covering any particular period in history or place geographically for any school-aged child, so you can see which ones your library has. See the samples on the page linked for a better understanding of the program. And the e-book is only $20.00!

Is that the kind of thing you were asking for?

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Can I add a couple of booklists that I use?

 

If your library has The Well-Trained Mind, she has booklists at the ends of the chapters.

 

Also, Sonlight books in chronological order:

 

http://homescool-ed.blogspot.com/2007/04/sonlight-books-arranged-by-well-trained.html

 

This is a very good list of classics (some cc on the site):

 

http://www.classical-homeschooling.org/celoop/1000.html

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The "What your grader needs to know" books have a website that has a free download of the book outlines. So, for example, if you buy the book it has all the text of the poems incorporated in it, but if you go to the free download it will give you a listing of the poems on a grade-by-grade level. If you already have a lot of the curriculum materials and just want to ensure you are covering everything, the outline may be sufficient for your needs.

 

Website: http://books.coreknowledge.org/home.php?cat=314

You want the download called: "The Core Knowledge Sequence: Content and Skill Guidelines for Kindergarten-Grade 8"

 

Here is a direct link to PDF file: http://www.coreknowledge.org/mimik/mimik_uploads/documents/480/CKFSequence_Rev.pdf

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I really think that listening (and listening and listening) to SWB's audio lectures has helped me formulate a long term plan, and kept me from spending what I didn't need to. You don't have to be doing a four year history sequence and using SOTW to benefit from her Great Books lecture. Her writing lectures are excellent, and able to be done with whatever books you have on hand; the literary analysis lecture is also able to be used with what you have.

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Christine Miller's All Through the Ages recommends loads of excellent books for covering any particular period in history or place geographically for any school-aged child, so you can see which ones your library has. See the samples on the page linked for a better understanding of the program. And the e-book is only $20.00!

Is that the kind of thing you were asking for?

 

This is EXACTLY what I am looking for!

 

Thank you everyone for your links and suggestions :grouphug: There are some very good suggestions here. Keep them coming.

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The "What your grader needs to know" books have a website that has a free download of the book outlines. So, for example, if you buy the book it has all the text of the poems incorporated in it, but if you go to the free download it will give you a listing of the poems on a grade-by-grade level. If you already have a lot of the curriculum materials and just want to ensure you are covering everything, the outline may be sufficient for your needs.

 

Website: http://books.corekno...ome.php?cat=314

You want the download called: "The Core Knowledge Sequence: Content and Skill Guidelines for Kindergarten-Grade 8"

 

Here is a direct link to PDF file: http://www.coreknowl...equence_Rev.pdf

 

These links are for the new revised and unfortunately unfinished series. The revised series is expanded and more colorful and has LOTS of free and for sale resources. I prefer the original series, mainly because it's finished, but the revised series does have it's merits. The free revised scope and sequence is an awesome resource for those using the revised series or just needing a free checklist; unfortunately it is not compatible with the original series. I'm too OCD to attempt using both series side by side, and have to just hide my eyes from all of the revised series resources or by brain just starts overloading trying to align the 2 series.

 

Even though the revised book series is not complete, the free scope and sequence IS complete.

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In the thread that spawned this thread, FIAR has been mentioned a few times, and is a must have addition to this thread.

 

FIAR forum

 

Where is the best place to purchase the FIAR volumes?

 

I only own volume one. It's a delightfully slim book that provides a lot of ideas and structure.

 

I'm not sure how good the Before and Beyond series are. With no time to research, I personally would just purchase the main series. Maybe others here can give some BTDT advice about the 3 series.

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Remember the Timetables of History?!!!! :-) This is another "bulky as Hades" resource, but an oldschool staple. Donna Young review.

 

I couldn't afford them, but what books were out there, or are out there, for writing you own unit studies?

 

Thanks Crmasheppard!

 

 

Valerie Bendt's book "How to Create Your Own Unit Study," is one that comes to mind--a lot of older homeschoolers in my area recommended it to me. Sorry I can't link you in the iPad, but an Amazon search should turn it up.

 

ETA--it looks like she has several other unit study books--The Unit Study Idea Book, and Unit Studies Made Easy. I don't know what they are like though.

 

ETA again-- the Unit Studies Made Easy book is an updated and revised volume of all of the unit study books Bendt's has written combined into one volume.

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Thanks Hunter! And thanks for the hugs and support! I don't know how to use emoticons yet, but group hug right back atcha all. I really appreciate the advice. We are heavy library users, and have made it through the first 6 months of homeschooling without a ton of purchased curriculum. I feel like lining my shelves with multiple options for LA, math etc. might give me lots of teaching options, but I would also feel tons of pressure to use the curriculum, or risk feeling guilty about wasted money.

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Hunter, I think I remember you saying you didn't quite care for them, but I am having good success using Kathryn Stout's books (Natural Speller, Comprehensive Compositon, Science Scope, Critical Conditioning, Maximum Math, and History guides). If you are comfortable finding books/ sources to teach what she outlines they are great to use! They can be found used for pretty cheap too.

 

ETA: I forgot to add we are having good success with using The Blue Book of Grammar and Punctuation for our grammar studies. I am going through it section by section with my oldest and using the quizzes written in the back. I try to find passages from our current read alouds to do copywork and dictation that involve the section we are studying. For dd7 we are doing copywork/ dictation from read alouds along with listening to Grammarland on librovox and adding in books by Ruth Heller and Brian Cleary from the library.

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Other ideas, some of which have probably been mentioned:

 

WRTR, 4th edition

SOTW--if kids ONLY read this over and over until 8th grade they'd still know more about history than a lot of ps kids but it is a great spine to be supplemented at the library

Cuisenaire rods and an abacus and maybe the LOF series

McGuffey Readers for learning to read, copywork, dictation

A really big book of great poetry like this. Read and memorize like crazy.

Honestly with the above, a library card, I think you could probably survive until fourth grade. You'd want more math by middle school but if screen time were limited, creativity nurtured, and outdoor time made available I think kids with only the above would do okay. I have zero knowledge of middle grade math.

 

I'm almost talking myself into this program of study :laugh:

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Along with the recommendation for Draw Write Now, I really am liking the Draw and Write through History series. Same idea as Draw Write Now, but using cursive writing and covering the history cycle. Both of those together could be used as art/handwriting/history supplement for many years.

 

 

We like DWN, so I looked into D&W through History, but the creation one was YE Creationist and that turned me off. There may be other religious nuances as well...

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We like DWN, so I looked into D&W through History, but the creation one was YE Creationist and that turned me off. There may be other religious nuances as well...

 

 

I'm pretty sure that the religious references are only in that first book, so you could certainly skip over those parts if they aren't what you're interested in.

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Jay3fer, do you have any Hebrew suggestions? I've dabbled in it over the years, but it's just been dabbling, as I was so overwhelmed with Greek, Latin and modern languages. Being able to pronounce and copy Hebrew words correctly from Strong's Concordance is about all I'm capable of.

 

urpedonmommy, thank you so much for the unit study guide suggestion. Anyone else?

 

How to Teach Spelling is slim and I wouldn't give mine away for anything. I keep not using it, to use other things, but I start planning to use it every couple months and need it on my shelf. I could teach with this. Maybe I SHOULD teach with it. See what I mean? :-)

 

I love Draw Write Now! I use that SO much even with adults, especially the map drawing. Mitzvahmommy, if there was ONE thing I'd tell you to buy no matter what, I'd suggest Draw Write Now, seconded by a Paperwhite Kindle (but that's a topic for another thread). There are yellow pages in DWN that give more advanced instruction in the topics covered. Sometimes I use the yellow pages more than the main lessons. Often we use the backgrounds drawings instead of the main subject, for biome studies. I just use and use and use those books.

 

McGuffey is a low bulk and multipurpose resource, that no modern publisher has yet improved upon. They can be a bit weird and offensive at times to modern tastes, but...there isn't anything else to replace them.

 

Yes! The Stout books! I'm too OCD to use them, but they have been a stand by for many people for many years. I WANT to like them. I do :crying:, but...I end out slinging them across the room in frustration when I try to use them. I love love love her Movies as Literature curriculum, though.

 

Why don't I have All through the Ages??? I do not know why. Hmmm. :confused:

 

Rod and Staff English and Sonlight. I never had money to burn when I was looking at them. If I didn't already have the Amish CGE I would have bought R&S for sure, but I do have CGE. As for sonlight, I never looked that hard at it. I'm such an OCD check list maker, and have never done much literature. I try to PLAN to do more lit, but...that is as likely to happen as Art Robinson gathering his brood around him for a read aloud, instead of the way he does teach. :lol: Which reminds me, we MUST add the Robinson Curriculum to the list.

 

Ellie and couple other oldschoolers like Konos Unit Studies, based on character traits. Weaver was another old school unit study based on the Bible, and has too much NT for the Mitzvamommy. And the curriculum that I have been messing around with for about 14 years is Students of the Word, which again is not for Mitzvamommy, but belongs on this list.

 

Handbook of Nature Study and Reader's Digest North American Wildlife, used to be in EVERY homeschool catalog, but I don't think they are essential by any means. Handbook of Nature Study did teach me how to observe everyday lifeforms though, like grass and a store bought chicken. And that book was taken along on the infamous goat poetry lesson field-trip that turned into goat MATING poetry. :scared:

 

Bible Study Guide For All ages is old and new at the same time. I hate EVERY single one of the new updates and my favorite parts are all OOP and not available now, though. BIG sigh!

 

Those TWTM audio files look really good! I really wish I liked SOTW book 1 better, but I do NOT, unfortunately. I'm 1st edition TWTM all the way. But what would you all expect from an oldschooler. :D It's in my bones I guess.

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Thanks Hunter! And thanks for the hugs and support! I don't know how to use emoticons yet, but group hug right back atcha all. I really appreciate the advice. We are heavy library users, and have made it through the first 6 months of homeschooling without a ton of purchased curriculum. I feel like lining my shelves with multiple options for LA, math etc. might give me lots of teaching options, but I would also feel tons of pressure to use the curriculum, or risk feeling guilty about wasted money.

 

 

I know it's hard to not feel guilty about wasting money. :grouphug: Sometimes these multigrade teacher resources and reference books are easier to tolerate. But, TRAINING, even when it's in the form of reading a consumable work book that we never "use" is a valuable activity that makes us a better teacher. Sometimes we pay for the chance to EXPERIENCE reading a curriculum, rather than for the paper it is printed on, or the direct use of the student.

 

And also, if you just ENJOY reading certain books, that is important. The single biggest mistake I made in raising my boys and in my marriage was putting everyone else first and neglecting myself. Yes, others believed I was an expendable robot, but I believed that too. And I broke, because the necessary upkeep wasn't performed. Just thinking the word "pleasure" makes me twitch. But, I guess pleasure is a human requirement along with shelter, water and food. The doctors tell me we need it to survive, and if I don't come to terms with this, my future is bleak. Twitch, twitch," Not today!" is what I usually say to them. But seriously, you are doing your family a good thing if you pick some things out that YOU would ENJOY. You don't want to risk having to check in with someone once a week to document your progress in scheduling and experiencing "pleasure". :lol:

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The Complete Home Learning Source Book. Bulky as Hades, but an awesome resource. As well as list after list of books to look for at the library, there are journal entries by the author about how she taught without curricula.

 

How to Write a Low Cost No Cost Curriculum. This is my favorite checklist. Instead of telling you what you COULD cover, it mostly sticks to what you SHOULD cover, and is geared towards normal child development.

 

 

I love Rebecca Rupp. She also has Home Learning Year by Year, about $10 new, less than $5 used.

And Hirsch has Books to Build On about $17 new, less than $5 used.

 

Either coould be used to design a curriculum, and both feature books that are readily available in libraries.

 

Did someone mention the Ambleside website -- there is so much, including detailed book lists. Or are websites a rabbit trail not yo go down in this thread?

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Other ideas, some of which have probably been mentioned:

 

WRTR, 4th edition

SOTW--if kids ONLY read this over and over until 8th grade they'd still know more about history than a lot of ps kids but it is a great spine to be supplemented at the library

Cuisenaire rods and an abacus and maybe the LOF series

McGuffey Readers for learning to read, copywork, dictation

A really big book of great poetry like this. Read and memorize like crazy.

Honestly with the above, a library card, I think you could probably survive until fourth grade. You'd want more math by middle school but if screen time were limited, creativity nurtured, and outdoor time made available I think kids with only the above would do okay. I have zero knowledge of middle grade math.

 

I'm almost talking myself into this program of study :laugh:

 

 

The Helen Ferris Favorite Poems book is an absolute favorite here. The selection is wonderful and includes some charming 4 line poems for new learners. I have multiple copies ($1 or so at used book sales).

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Question for you all - I just looked at Learning Grammar Through Writing on Amazon. It seems to me that I could use that book solely as a LA curriculum - adding in poetry, literature etc. of course, I mean in terms of productive language arts - grammar, writing style etc.... would you say that is true?

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I would also stock up on History and Science encyclopedias, We love having various options in our Usborne, DK and Kingfisher encyclopedias. Although they cover a lot of the same material they do it with very different visual styles and levels of depth. I have bought them all either at a local used bookstore or on amazon for steeply discounted prices!

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Question for you all - I just looked at Learning Grammar Through Writing on Amazon. It seems to me that I could use that book solely as a LA curriculum - adding in poetry, literature etc. of course, I mean in terms of productive language arts - grammar, writing style etc.... would you say that is true?

 

I would think you would need a little something in the way library books, free vintage book pdfs, or free online lesson plans. I think you could do it as the only thing you owned. I could teach grammar and composition for years with nothing but LGTW and a library card.

 

If I was going lean and mean, I'd really really really like to have Write On! too, though. Samples and another sample. It's available at Amazon.com. If I just had the chance to READ the TM, the two free samples in the TM and the last link, that would be enough though. The rest of the curriculum is just gravy to me.

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Love Rebecca Rupps Home Learning Year By Year. I got mine years before I actually started homeschooling, and it made me feel like I *could* do this!

 

I like this book better for the early grades than the later ones. If I'm going to use a checklist that complex, I need it to be based off of specific books that have those topics all in one place. I prefer How to Write a Low Cost... better to own, but I was very happy to read a library copy of this book. Thanks Gentlemommy, for posting it.

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I love Rebecca Rupp. She also has Home Learning Year by Year, about $10 new, less than $5 used.

And Hirsch has Books to Build On about $17 new, less than $5 used.

 

Either coould be used to design a curriculum, and both feature books that are readily available in libraries.

 

Did someone mention the Ambleside website -- there is so much, including detailed book lists. Or are websites a rabbit trail not yo go down in this thread?

The Helen Ferris Favorite Poems book is an absolute favorite here. The selection is wonderful and includes some charming 4 line poems for new learners. I have multiple copies ($1 or so at used book sales).

 

OOPS Allesandra, was the one that posted first about the Rupp Book. Allesandara, thanks for the suggestions. I need to look up the poetry book. It sounds good!

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I would also stock up on History and Science encyclopedias, We love having various options in our Usborne, DK and Kingfisher encyclopedias. Although they cover a lot of the same material they do it with very different visual styles and levels of depth. I have bought them all either at a local used bookstore or on amazon for steeply discounted prices!

 

The infamous white Kingfisher book suggested in the 1st edition of TWTM, is a book that some of us have gotten cheaply and others have paid dearly for. Thanks for the reminder about these type of books. I sometimes forget how handy these are for students learning to write reports. I tend to only think about multivolume sets of encyclopedias, for that.

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OOPS Allesandra, was the one that posted first about the Rupp Book. Allesandara, thanks for the suggestions. I need to look up the poetry book. It sounds good!

 

Oh, and oops, UrbanSue, not I, was the one who first suggested the poetry book. It seems as though everyone on this thread is of a like mind, lol.

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Learning Grammar Through Writing Nice and thin, but so useful.

 

 

.

 

 

I had never heard of this but this just MIGHT solve my grammar woes for my ds.

 

I know this thread was originally for someone else, but it's really made me think about how to simplify things around here and focus on the important things with my young kids.

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Other ideas, some of which have probably been mentioned:

 

WRTR, 4th edition

SOTW--if kids ONLY read this over and over until 8th grade they'd still know more about history than a lot of ps kids but it is a great spine to be supplemented at the library

Cuisenaire rods and an abacus and maybe the LOF series

McGuffey Readers for learning to read, copywork, dictation

A really big book of great poetry like this. Read and memorize like crazy.

Honestly with the above, a library card, I think you could probably survive until fourth grade. You'd want more math by middle school but if screen time were limited, creativity nurtured, and outdoor time made available I think kids with only the above would do okay. I have zero knowledge of middle grade math.

 

I'm almost talking myself into this program of study :laugh:

 

 

You're almost talking me into it as well and the best thing is that I have most of the books except the WRTR 4th edition, I have the 5th edition.

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I only linked to it without naming it which was kind of dumb of me, sorry :) I don't claim to have a corner on the knowledge of how great that book is. I was glad to see that it is still east to find a copy--ours is a very old copy acquired for about fifty cents at a library sale.

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I would like to humbly point out that a textbook is not a curriculum, and that a lot of the appeal of the "oldschool" materials isn't necessarily that they teach in a different way, but that they teach towards a different curriculum. If I were in the enviable position of needing to spend money now for the long haul, the first thing I'd want to do is review my curricular goals for the next few years -- what do I want them to learn? I'd then think about how I best teach and how they best learn, and only then think about materials that meet at this intersection.

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  • 2 months later...

I'm just dragging this out of the depths to say I love this thread. I know it was originally meant for Mitzvahmommy, but it's awesome.

 

I'm looking for multi-level "jump off" points. Books that are just books, and stick to being able to be used for years, rather than one grade, and stuff that isn't graded.

 

Things like: Nebel's Elementary Education, Building Foundations of Scientific Understanding, Three R's (beechick), Math on the Level, Konos, Rightstart (okay, well its sort of graded, but its more about starting where your child is at, rather than right out stating "grade 1-do this", Home Learning Sourcebook, Home Learning year by Year, WTM, Konos, Waldorf Reading List (I have the new one, but have forgotten what its called).

 

Stuff where its more one book, used over numerous years. I've sat there searching things like "multi-level" "multi-age" "multi-grade" "multi-year" and they are more about teaching several levels at once (which is also very handy) but it seems to be hard to find resources that are just buy-once, rather than buy year-to-year. Stuff that just gives you ideas, and backbone, rather than planning every detail out for you (I don't like things that are over planned I found out, rofl).

 

So thanks for this thread. :D

 

Off to do more searching.

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I'm just dragging this out of the depths to say I love this thread. I know it was originally meant for Mitzvahmommy, but it's awesome.

 

I'm looking for multi-level "jump off" points. Books that are just books, and stick to being able to be used for years, rather than one grade, and stuff that isn't graded.

 

Things like: Nebel's Elementary Education, Building Foundations of Scientific Understanding, Three R's (beechick), Math on the Level, Konos, Rightstart (okay, well its sort of graded, but its more about starting where your child is at, rather than right out stating "grade 1-do this", Home Learning Sourcebook, Home Learning year by Year, WTM, Konos, Waldorf Reading List (I have the new one, but have forgotten what its called).

 

Stuff where its more one book, used over numerous years. I've sat there searching things like "multi-level" "multi-age" "multi-grade" "multi-year" and they are more about teaching several levels at once (which is also very handy) but it seems to be hard to find resources that are just buy-once, rather than buy year-to-year. Stuff that just gives you ideas, and backbone, rather than planning every detail out for you (I don't like things that are over planned I found out, rofl).

 

So thanks for this thread. :D

 

Off to do more searching.

Don't know which number I am - #720? - But thinking and doing some researching. Thank you for all the posts and old homeschool wisdom. As a newbie I can use some grounding every so often! Thanks.

 

1120 views of this thread so far :D

 

Ecclecticmum, thanks for bumping this thread. There a few things I needed to reread as I'm tweaking this year's plans. What Waldorf list are you talking about?

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The Waldorf Student Reading List used to be the best $8 you could spend (a little booklet): http://www.amazon.com/Waldorf-Student-Reading-Pamela-Fenner/dp/0964783207

 

Its now been updated (its small enough to fit in your handbag, but nice and fat and filled with LOTS of book reccs) to Make Way for Reading: Great Books from Kindergarten to Eighth Grade: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0964783258/ref=pd_lpo_k2_dp_sr_1?pf_rd_p=1535523702&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=0964783207&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=0BYPASD320KC9X3C0QSZ

 

 

 

 

A unique, age-appropriate collection of familiar and little-known gems.

 

This annotated resource is a treasury of recommended reading for families, teaches, librarians, booksellers and anyone who wants to share a love of books with children.

 

This list helps families to select the right book for the right moment to accompany their child's changing interests and development.

 

Contents include:

Picture Books; Grades 1-3, 4-5, 6-8;

Biographies; Mythology Legends and Folklore; Celebrations, Games, Music, Crafts and Other Activities. Indexes of Titles, Authors, Illustrators, Series, Anthologies, Subjects and Waldorf Curriculum Blocks.

 

 

Its indexed and cross-referenced very well. I love my book, its over 300 pages of brilliant suggestions. I actually ended up going on a rabbit trail through suggested books (looking up the books I liked on Book Depository, and then looking at books by that same author)

 

I found this: Mr Goethe's Garden

 

Mr. Goethe's Garden tells the story of a unique friendship between an inquisitive young girl, Irena, and her neighbor--the elderly, world-famous play-wright, artist and natural scientist, Johann von Goethe. Irena visits Mr. Goethe in his well-tended garden where he teaches her to draw and to observe the world of nature in a special way. Set in the 1830s, this book was inspired by Goethe's life and his botanical treatise "The Metamorphosis of the Plant. Exquisitely sensitive illustrations and elegant text reveal the intricate wonders of the plant kingdom. As the bonds of friendship deepen between Irena and her wise neighbor, she experiences a new way of seeing the natural cycle of the plant--from seed to flower to fruit and to seed again. "Like friends, plants tell you their secrets only when they know you care. Just practice listening with your eyes, and one day when you least expect it, you will see with your heart and be swept up into nature's dance." An informative afterword describes the life of Goethe and his many accomplishments.

 

Its a sweet little book, and I love the magical side of it, so do my kids :)

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