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Anyone still using Core Knowledge?


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I was re-reading this thread this morning, and was wondering how everyone using the Core Knowledge Sequence/What Your X Grader Needs to Know books is doing!

 

I love the sequence but have avoided actually using it as we're near to or hitting middle school ages here. Finally I came up with a plan of using the topics for history, geography, art, music, and science from each of the early grades over a semester, so we'll be starting off with the 1st grade sequence, as unit studies, using higher level resources (think K12's Human Odyssey, OUP World in Ancient Times, Hakim's History of US, etc.). I think it'll provide just enough change over each semester to keep my kids really interested. I may throw in some Main Lesson Books and/or lapbooking.

 

Is anyone else still going this route?

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I don't think I posted on the thread you linked... but we use the CK books. I put together our own American History this year, pulling together all the US readings from the books in chronological order, and adding in other resources. Next year we will start Ancient History, probably using Human Odyssey, and I'm going to match up the World History readings in CK for additional independent reading for DS. I also occasionally assign some of the literature pieces to get more variety in our reading, as well as the art, music, and geography sections.

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I follow it for history & geography via the BCP (Baltimore Curriculum Project) free lesson plans. I love it & have no intention of switching away. I think I found it starting for 1st grade and I plan on using it all the way through. I also keep an eye on the general topics of language arts & science and try to make sure I cover those.

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We have used CK from K up to now, when dc are middle school age. Since both dc were in ps for elementary, we got behind on after schooling -- there are still a lot of knowledge gaps!

 

I find it is very easy to upgrade, so to speak, the CK material, since choice of books/materials is up to individual teacher. I hardly ever use the NTK books. What I greatly prefer are the grade level Teacher Handbooks. They cover the 'big picture,' fit what you are studying in the context of what has been studied and will be studied, and they contain wonderful vocabulary sections (including advanced 'Domain' vocabulary). The Teacher Handbooks are a bit expensive, but worth every penny, IMO. I also still get book ideas from Books to Build On.

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Glad to hear it is working well, in a variety of ways, for everyone! I'm excited about getting going with this - I have our spring lineup mapped out now, and the kids are excited too. I'm using all the first grade topics for history, geography, science, art, music and poetry as unit studies/blocks. We're actually just finishing up the section on Sumer (Mesopotamia) in K12's Human Odyssey, so we'll switch gears a little and move into either world religions, or prehistoric America next. And I've been flip-flopping in science... we're going to start, I think, with habitats. I may get Elemental Science's Habitats lapbook for at least dd--combine that with the One Small Square books, other books, and some documentaries.

 

By chance we've also been studying color in art, so I am expanding that. Printed up some of the recommended poems, found a book on music theory that looks pretty good... I feel [almost] ready to go!

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By chance we've also been studying color in art, so I am expanding that. Printed up some of the recommended poems, found a book on music theory that looks pretty good... I feel [almost] ready to go!

 

 

Color is the one topic so far that I have extensively supplemented. The original series skips it almost entirely. :confused: It is beautifully covered in the revised series, though.

 

Ever since I was homeless the first time, and was introduced to crayons by a talented artist who had just gotten out of prison a few days earlier, I've been fascinated with color theory and using simple crayons as an art media.

 

For anyone using the original series, Using Color in Your Art by Sandi Henri, is a great supplement.

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We're still using them! I just read a heading a day and skip the math section completely. It works out well.

 

 

I have been using Professor B and How to Tutor and the arithmetic article in A Guide to American Christian Education for math. These 3 resources all focus very narrowly and controversially on arithmetic.

 

I have been using the NtK math section for notebooking and living book ideas to cover the math strands that are not part of arithmetic.

 

I'm exploring the idea of using the NtK math section as a replacement for the $300.00 Math on the Level, 5 a day concept, and using it as my core math program.

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For anyone using the original series, Using Color in Your Art by Sandi Henri, is a great supplement.

 

 

Thank you! My library has this, so I'll be heading off to check it out.

 

Another intriguing source for working with color is the New Augsburg Drawing Vol. 1, which has lessons on "painting" with crayons. It is a free, older book, downloadable.

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By chance we've also been studying color in art, so I am expanding that. Printed up some of the recommended poems, found a book on music theory that looks pretty good... I feel [almost] ready to go!

 

Can you tell me the name of the music theory book please? Thank you.

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Thank you! My library has this, so I'll be heading off to check it out.

 

Another intriguing source for working with color is the New Augsburg Drawing Vol. 1, which has lessons on "painting" with crayons. It is a free, older book, downloadable.

 

Many libraries have Using Color in Your Art. It was written to be used with paints, but is easy to adapt to crayons.

 

The crayon paintings in New Augsburg are great for illustrating homemade greeting cards. When using cheap crayons, do many many light layers. You can use a heavier hand with beeswax crayons. Over the past year, my apartment has had SO many blue and orange tree paintings scattered around it :lol:

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I follow it for history & geography via the BCP (Baltimore Curriculum Project) free lesson plans. I love it & have no intention of switching away. I think I found it starting for 1st grade and I plan on using it all the way through. I also keep an eye on the general topics of language arts & science and try to make sure I cover those.

 

Do you have a link to the lesson plans? Thank you!

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We have used CK from K up to now, when dc are middle school age. Since both dc were in ps for elementary, we got behind on after schooling -- there are still a lot of knowledge gaps! I find it is very easy to upgrade, so to speak, the CK material, since choice of books/materials is up to individual teacher. I hardly ever use the NTK books. What I greatly prefer are the grade level Teacher Handbooks. They cover the 'big picture,' fit what you are studying in the context of what has been studied and will be studied, and they contain wonderful vocabulary sections (including advanced 'Domain' vocabulary). The Teacher Handbooks are a bit expensive, but worth every penny, IMO. I also still get book ideas from Books to Build On.

 

What are the Teacher Handbooks? I really like this series but it only goes up to 6th grade right? What do you all plan to do after 6th grade? Are you teaching world history and American history at the same time as described in the CK series.

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The revised series is unfinished, but there is a free scope and sequence for grades 7 and 8. Most people will benefit from skimming the scope and sequence and filling in any gaps, especially in history.

 

The original series is complete in 6 books, giving a lot more freedom to use ANY middle school curriculum, or to skip right ahead to starting high school. My plan is to use a combination of High School Subjects Self Taught (1989 edition) and some remedial junior college materials. If I had any children of my own still, I'd probably sign them up with American School Correspondence School's GENERAL program as soon as they were socially ready for it, which is generally about 13 years old. I've had spectacular luck and success with AS in the past.

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I have three links for lesson plans to go along with Core Knowledge:

 

 

National Core Knowledge-Colorado

 

Core Knowledge Classic Lesson Plans

 

Baltimore Curriculum Project Lesson Plans

 

 

THANK YOU!!! I just bookmarked all 3 sites! Thanks again!!!

 

Edit - I just looked over all of these sites, and BCP lesson plans are exactly what I have been seeking. I have been looking for something to offer guidance on topics (without overwhelming me), and this is perfect. I wish that I could adequately express my level of excitement right now!!!!!

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THANK YOU!!! I just bookmarked all 3 sites! Thanks again!!!

 

Edit - I just looked over all of these sites, and BCP lesson plans are exactly what I have been seeking. I have been looking for something to offer guidance on topics (without overwhelming me), and this is perfect. I wish that I could adequately express my level of excitement right now!!!!!

 

 

What I do is at the beginning of every year I copy & paste the BCP lesson plans into a word document. Then I go through and edit it as needed - it's a draft version so sometimes the paragraphs are broken up weird. I add in paragraph breaks where needed to make it easier for me to read through during the lesson. I also add in my own materials and worksheets where needed & I make a list of books available at the library that we'll want to check out for that lesson. A typical history/geography lesson for us is me reading through the lesson plan on BCP, discussing it with the child, and then throughout the week we read through our library books on the topic.

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Are you teaching world history and American history at the same time as described in the CK series.

 

 

I'm setting it up as units or blocks of study, rotating between world and American history, with a unit/block on world religions thrown in. I set up all the other topics we're covering the same way - science, art, music, geography, and poetry.

 

How do you use this with multiple children in various grades?

 

 

Since I am only using the sequence itself as a guideline, not the NtK books so much, it isn't that hard. I'm using resources at their level(s) to cover the topics from each grade in the CK sequence. For example, when we get to a study of Egypt, I'll be using the Oxford University Press Ancient Egyptian World for both, with some (lighter) topical books thrown in that appeal to each kid.

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Well, darn. Showed my plans to dh and the kids, and was shot down.

 

Dh says it is "too much jumping around" and ds11 says "can't we just keep doing what we're doing? I was really looking forward to the Middle Ages in fall." (If we went with the CK plans, it would be another year and a half before we hit the Middle Ages)

 

>:( All that planning for nada. Oh well, such is life. I did manage to convince dh that we could at least use the music, art, and poetry parts of CK!

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Well, darn. Showed my plans to dh and the kids, and was shot down.

 

Dh says it is "too much jumping around" and ds11 says "can't we just keep doing what we're doing? I was really looking forward to the Middle Ages in fall." (If we went with the CK plans, it would be another year and a half before we hit the Middle Ages)

 

> :( All that planning for nada. Oh well, such is life. I did manage to convince dh that we could at least use the music, art, and poetry parts of CK!

 

My head is just spinning looking at your plans. You weren't going to be using the books themselves or the order of instruction? So, you weren't really going to be using NtK? JUST your PLANS have been vetoed? Sorry, I'm so confused.

 

I've done lots of planning I never used :D

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A lot of people use the revised series for art, music and literature. In fact, I think that is the most common use of them.

 

I don't like the history and science in the revised edition. The main reason I use the original edition is because of the social studies and science.

 

Your new plan sounds good to me!

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  • 2 months later...
Guest emiddleton

I've been on the fence about several packages, and Core Knowledge seems to have the bulk of what I like in all the others (Charlotte Mason, WTM, and a little Waldorf for good measure). My only concern is language arts - specifically grammar, spelling, and comprehension, especially as I start thinking about the older grades. Do you use any programs to supplement in these areas, or is it covered in Core Knowledge in a way I don't see?

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I use NtK almost exclusively for the content subjects, but have other curricula for the 3Rs.

 

This is what I'm planning to use this year.

 

ORIGINAL Doubleday hardback What Your _ Grader Needs to Know series grades 1-6. The covers are sponge painted and there are no children on them. There are not pre-school or kindergarten books in the original series.

 

How to Tutor

Alpha-Phonics

Don Potter's free supplemental pdfs for Alpha-Phonics and more here

First Readers Anthology published by Don Potter

American Heritage Student Thesaurus (matches DP phonograms)

American Heritage Student Dictionary (matches DP phonograms)

 

Simply Charlotte Mason Delightful Handwriting teacher's manual.

WRTR 6th edition Handwriting instructions

 

Spelling Plus

Dictation Resource Book

Write On! by Karen Newell

Writer's Toolbox by Nancy Loewen

 

McGuffey's Eclectic Readers (the blue and gold hardcovers)

McGuffey's Audios from audible.com or CBD

Reading and Thinking Book 1

 

Arithmetic Made Simple

Ray's Arithmetic

How to Tutor workbooks and the main text mentioned above

 

National Geographic Beginner's Atlas

Draw Write Now (especially the geography)

Using Color in Your Art

Ed Emberley's Funprint Drawing Book

Let's Draw Happy People

Jumbo Book of Music

 

Berlitz Self Teacher French

Say It Right in French

See it and Say it in French

 

GrapeVine Stick Figuring Through the Bible Level 1-2 teacher's manuals.

 

Yesterday's Classics ebooks

Heritage History ebooks

Free and $0.99 Whispersync audiobooks from audible.com

Magic School Bus videos

 

Quality mechanical pencils

Prang 64 Crayons (I buy mine from Rainbow Resource)

School Smart Cursive Notebook Paper

Simply Poly Binders (only shown in colors here, but I buy clear ones)

 

And for ME:

TWTM first edition 1999 (Amazon is showing the wrong cover so be careful!)

Teaching the Trivium

Guide to American Christian Education

How to Write a low-cost/no-cost Curriculum

The Complete Home Learning Source Book

The Core

Simply Charlotte Mason Mathematics

Waldorf Essentials Kindergarten and Early Years

African Waldorf Pdfs (Christian friendly and low cost ideas)

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I've been on the fence about several packages, and Core Knowledge seems to have the bulk of what I like in all the others (Charlotte Mason, WTM, and a little Waldorf for good measure). My only concern is language arts - specifically grammar, spelling, and comprehension, especially as I start thinking about the older grades. Do you use any programs to supplement in these areas, or is it covered in Core Knowledge in a way I don't see?

 

 

You are right -- CK does not cover LA skills. LA skills, math, science labs, music & art skills are not covered by CK. In schools CK is designed to take up a percentage of the day, not the entire school day.

 

For reading/LA, CK has developed its own program for K-3. It's new -- I have not seen it, but samples are available.

 

http://www.coreknowledge.org/ckla

 

On the CK website, there are some specific reading program suggestions. Link and quote:

 

http://www.coreknowl...mmendations.pdf

 

 

What are your recommendations for a reading program?

 

Teachers need to remember that reading requires two abilities—the ability to turn print into language (decoding) and the ability to understand what the language says. Achieving the first ability requires a sequential program, structured to provide guided practice in various formats and frequent review throughout the year. Decoding programs that are premised on scientifically-based research are:
Jolly Phonics and Jolly Grammar
(Jolly Learning),
Open Court
(SRA/McGraw-Hill),
Read Well
(Sopris West), and
Reading Mastery Signature Edition
(SRA/McGraw Hill). For more information on these programs, please review the Core Knowledge Foundation
.

 

 

 

In addition to teaching decoding skills, a good language arts program will include coherent and interesting readings in nonfiction content that enhance comprehension ability. Currently, commercially available language arts programs fail to address this need. Although some programs do include nonfiction selections, they do so in a random, nonintegrated manner in which nonfiction selections have no coherency or relation to one another. Therefore, to ensure true literacy, in addition to teaching the language arts topics in the Core Knowledge
Sequence
, Core Knowledge teachers are encouraged to substitute nonfiction readings or read alouds based on the Sequence history and science topics for many of the short, fragmented fictional stories that may be included in their basal reading program. See the
for more information on why the coherent integration of nonfiction in the language arts block is critical.

 

Having said that, I would add that you should feel free to use whatever program works for you. I found the CK book (short book), Reading Instruction: The Two Keys to be helpful. It's especially good describing how to implement the idea of paragraph 2, in the above quote.

 

http://books.corekno...ome.php?cat=309

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The revised CK is quite different than the original CK. The original CK was meant to be the portion of curriculum that ALL students should cover, and left room for additional individualization and specialization. The newer CK is taking up more and more of the day.

 

Both Ntk sets of books cover language arts and math. I do use those sections, but have dedicated curricula as well.

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The revised CK is quite different than the original CK. The original CK was meant to be the portion of curriculum that ALL students should cover, and left room for additional individualization and specialization. The newer CK is taking up more and more of the day.

 

Both Ntk sets of books cover language arts and math. I do use those sections, but have dedicated curricula as well.

 

 

Were you responding to me, sort of? I should have been clearer in answering the pp (emiddleton). I think she was asking if she would need anything besides CK....

 

What I should have said is that the CK materials do not include a full math program, with worksheets, etc. or a full LA program with phonics, spelling lessons and so on. I think that, even if you got everything CK currently publishes, you would still need additional materials for LA (the LA that is not CK 'literature') and math, whether it's your suggestions, or CK's suggestions, or something else.

 

I'll be very interested i seeing what the upcoming CK LA program looks like. Even though my dc are way beyond that, I'm still curious.

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I too am interested in the new updates. When is it due out?

 

The original science is broken up into 3 strands each year: living, physical and scientists. The revised series isn't so organized and the scope and sequence is not finished in the pre-6 NtK books. The topics are listed in the 7-8 scope and sequence but there is no book for them. Also the social studies scope and sequence is finished in the original 1-6 books, but is NOT finished in the revised pre-6 books. Again the TOPICS are listed in the 7-8 scope and sequence but there is no book.

 

The original series is FINISHED in just 6 books. The revised series is 8 books and STILL not finished. The series was designed to prevent gaps, but the revised series is not finished. :confused1: I just do NOT understand this! AT. ALL. That is an abandoned mission statement if I ever saw one.

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I too am interested in the new updates. When is it due out?

 

 

 

This is from the CK site:

 

CKLA Goes Nationwide

 

 

With the successful pilot and these New York teacher-driven endorsements,
CKLA
for preschool–3 is ready for nationwide distribution. For that, the Core Knowledge Foundation has signed an exclusive licensing agreement with Amplify Education, Inc., a leader in teacher-friendly, rigorous, digital educational resources.

 

Amplify will offer a print version of
CKLA
and related professional development and support beginning in the 2013-2014 school year.

 

And this is from the CK store on the site:

 

Core Knowledge Language Artsâ„¢

 

 

 

Core Knowledge Language Arts
â„¢

 

Core Knowledge is pleased to announce that we have just signed an agreement with a major publisher to make the
Core Knowledge Language Arts
(CKLA) program widely available. We look forward to issuing more information concerning this partnership in the coming weeks.

 

For additional purchasing information,
.

 

 

I love CK, but am not a big fan of the Pearson CK history (at least not the ones that I have seen). So I am hoping CK will have some good LA samples -- or that someone here will do a review, as my dc are too old for k-3 materials.

 

 

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I love CK, but am not a big fan of the Pearson CK history (at least not the ones that I have seen). So I am hoping CK will have some good LA samples -- or that someone here will do a review, as my dc are too old for k-3 materials.

 

 

 

 

Thanks for all the info!

 

As for quality K-3 materials. I don't think I will ever be too old for them even for my own self-education. :lol: I just learn SO much about teaching in general and about the most important topics in any subject by reading K-3 curricula.

 

There is plenty in K-3 chemistry books that I still have not adequately mastered and little of it was in my AP chemistry textbook. And in every other subject, I'm learning to keep reading K-3 books. I just love them.

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Thanks for all the info!

 

As for quality K-3 materials. I don't think I will ever be too old for them even for my own self-education. :lol: I just learn SO much about teaching in general and about the most important topics in any subject by reading K-3 curricula.

 

There is plenty in K-3 chemistry books that I still have not adequately mastered and little of it was in my AP chemistry textbook. And in every other subject, I'm learning to keep reading K-3 books. I just love them.

 

:iagree:

 

But if I actually bought K-3 materials (with dc in 6th & 7th grade), I would qualify as a true curriculum junkie, lol. Plus bookshelf space is limited -- I have old things I will never be able to get rid of, like Frog and Toad.

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:iagree:

 

But if I actually bought K-3 materials (with dc in 6th & 7th grade), I would qualify as a true curriculum junkie, lol. Plus bookshelf space is limited -- I have old things I will never be able to get rid of, like Frog and Toad.

 

 

Yup, I too am trying to keep the bookshelves a little emptier. I too wish I could just see things instead of having to buy them to see them.

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