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S/o "kvetching"... Doomsday Preppers?????


Heather in Neverland
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So how about you? Do you have your bunker ready??

 

 

Nah, I'm good. I recently survived 12 hours without electricity while the temps outside were -30°C. I am like Iron (wo)Man now. If I can survive that, I can survive anything.

 

That does not mean I'm going to stop stocking up on more shoes, though. ;)

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My oldes ask if Florida was a good place to be in case of a "zombie" apocalypse. I said, "No, hon, that would Texas." :lol:

 

BTW, we saw a book on just that exact topic (world catastrophe due to EMP) while at B&N yesterday. Nearly bought it just to see what it was about, but figured I could look it up online for free ;) I was in the section for Computers, between Math and Computer Languages.

 

I read "World War Z." According that book, I'm good on that front, too. Zombies don't die by freezing, but they do freeze solid and the freezing process slows them down to make them easy pickings. You just have to get 'em before Spring thaw.

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I love watching Preppers. (Though, according to the show, my family is woefully unprepared.)

We feel okay about it all, though... we have a friend who is a mechanical/electrical genius-type dude. His take on national disaster via EMP is that only electronics that are actually IN USE at the time of the pulse will be effected. So, theoretically, there will be a large # of devices that will be spared. Shew! ;) (I'm gonna hold to that theory, since it means we won't have to start eating our pets and carbon-filtering our urine to drink... :scared: )

 

Though that doesn't help with the zombie apocalypse or other global disaster scenarios.... hmmm....

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I always find it interesting which particular micro-issue people fixate on and feel the need to "prep" for. I live rurally in an earthquake region, and as an earth scientist, so obviously I've got a generator, foundation tiedowns on the house, and earthquake brackets on all my bookshelves. I don't think that's "prepping", just prudent in the cost/benefit analysis. I worry not one whit about market collapses, EMP events, or zombie apocalypses...but maybe I should and my ignorance is bliss, heh.

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http://market-ticker...www?post=216430 from today

 

 

Japan adopted an "official" 2% inflation target. At the same time the so-called "independent" BOJ said it will begin open-ended money-printing starting in January of next year, when it will begin buying a total of 12 trillion Yen of government bonds monthly.

This is about $135 billion in dollars, more or less, per month -- or about $1.6 trillion annually.

The market initially spiked on this, but then people started to contemplate: This is a fiscal devaluation of about 22% annually!

That's well beyond eating the seed corn and into the realm of burning the furniture -- and perhaps the wallpaper.

The impact of this policy on the common Japanese citizen is going to be catastrophic and will lead to the collapse of the economy and government. This is not speculation; it is mathematically certain. We are talking about a "fiscal operation" that is approximately three times what our government is doing, and the impact here has been horrifying, boosting unemployment and pressing firmly into the neck of Americans while driving food stamps and other social "program" demand to the moon.

The impact in Japan will be nothing short of cataclysmic, which leads one to wonder: Are they really that dumb or is this a promise that nobody intends to actually keep?

 

 

I would suggest using an actual news source. http://market-ticker.org/ is a bit...out there.

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http://market-ticker...www?post=216430 from today

 

 

Japan adopted an "official" 2% inflation target. At the same time the so-called "independent" BOJ said it will begin open-ended money-printing starting in January of next year, when it will begin buying a total of 12 trillion Yen of government bonds monthly.

This is about $135 billion in dollars, more or less, per month -- or about $1.6 trillion annually.

The market initially spiked on this, but then people started to contemplate: This is a fiscal devaluation of about 22% annually!

That's well beyond eating the seed corn and into the realm of burning the furniture -- and perhaps the wallpaper.

The impact of this policy on the common Japanese citizen is going to be catastrophic and will lead to the collapse of the economy and government. This is not speculation; it is mathematically certain. We are talking about a "fiscal operation" that is approximately three times what our government is doing, and the impact here has been horrifying, boosting unemployment and pressing firmly into the neck of Americans while driving food stamps and other social "program" demand to the moon.

The impact in Japan will be nothing short of cataclysmic, which leads one to wonder: Are they really that dumb or is this a promise that nobody intends to actually keep?

 

Your link is factually incorrect in its first paragraph. The BOJ adopted the 2% inflation target AND will begin bond purchases starting in January 2014 UNTIL the goal of 2% is met. http://www.businessinsider.com/heres-why-the-yen-is-soaring-and-people-think-that-the-bank-of-japans-big-move-could-be-another-big-flop-2013-1

 

This does not fit with Stacey's current belief that Japan is heading towards hyperinflation. Quick note on inflation and hyperinflation: it is not just the amount of currency in circulation but also how quickly it circulates.

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I read a blog from one of the women who appeared in season one of the show who said that even though the show's producers created a specific fear for her family to be more dramatic, in reality they were prepping for anything. Her family knew they were much more likely to face an ice storm or earthquake or hurricane or job layoff than any sort of doomsday scenario for the entire world, but having good common sense is way less entertaining television than creating a bunch of nut jobs, and she thought the discussion would encourage people to rely on themselves more and the government less, so she agreed to appear on it.

 

We typically have 3 months food on hand - If an ice storm disrupted our food supply for three weeks we could easily feed ourselves and some of our less prepared neighbors without worry. I'd like to get to the point that we had a year on hand, but I'm not in a big rush to do so.

 

A few weeks ago at the grocery store DH and I were parked next to a woman who was filling the back of her truck with canned goods. She confided in us that she was thinking of going back for more because her uncle was "high up in the air force and called to tell her to stock up on canned food immediately." She was probably in her 50's. We figured this must either be about inflation or some military action that wasn't public yet.

 

IDK about all that, or about the yen, but I do believe it when economists say that everything we do to pad the economy creates a bubble that will eventually burst. How long that will take I don't know, but I do think several more could pop at any time.

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Ha!

 

Edited to add: Totally not sure how my post ended up so far from the towel reference that I think was to Hitchikers Guide to the galaxy, but it looks weirdly out of place where it is. It was really meant as a laugh at the towel picture, and I really am not crazy. Now back to your regularly scheduled program.

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We're working on being more prepared. Our freezers are full, we're building a stock of canned and dry goods, next year's firewood is already in the yard ready to be cut and split...But this is all just a shift to old-fashioned preparedness for us. People used to do this. We're also out in the country and get snowed in.

 

And I should add that when your husband falls and breaks his shoulder and is off work for, oh, 6 months and counting, it's wonderful to be able to dip into that stockpile when money is tight.

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We're working on being more prepared. Our freezers are full, we're building a stock of canned and dry goods, next year's firewood is already in the yard ready to be cut and split...But this is all just a shift to old-fashioned preparedness for us. People used to do this. We're also out in the country and get snowed in.

 

And I should add that when your husband falls and breaks his shoulder and is off work for, oh, 6 months and counting, it's wonderful to be able to dip into that stockpile when money is tight.

 

 

 

You sound so smart and prepared! But do you have 17 years of toilet paper stocked up??

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Everything in moderation. I try to be prepared for natural disasters and such, but we aren't as prepared as we should be.

 

I once lived in a mid size city that had a problem with the water treatment plant. There was no tap water for 2 days. The grocery store shelves were emptied of the bottled water pretty quickly.

 

My mom went without electricity for over a week last year due to a winter storm.

 

My in-laws live in a very rural area, we were snowed in for a week once at their house. Last winter after a nasty storm they also went a week without power.

 

I don't worry endlessly about what disaster or attack is coming, but I do want to be able to make it for a few weeks if I we have to without modern conveniences. I'm not worried about an EMP attack, technology fails often enough on it's own and mother nature is nasty enough.

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DH and I saw a prepper show where this man in Florida had a bunker 5 HOURS from his home in the middle of nowheresville. So the Zombie Apocalypse comes or the "government" or whatever and millions of people are going to be fleeing in terror or at WAR or nothing eletronic is going to work because god/sun spots are going to slap us back to prehistoric times and you plan is to DRIVE for 5 hours to your bunker?? DH and I watched that and laughed. There's a bit of a flaw in that plan...

 

There's a 3 acre plot of land down the road from us that's owned by an *interesting* church in North Carolina or somewhere. I've been trying to figure out what on earth they're going to do with this swampy little bit of land so far from where they are. It'd serve me right if they did show up with all their folks when the world ends and build a compound then and there.

 

Hey Beaners, Ha! I like that, and for our next playday, we may have to dip into that!

 

Absolutely! We can drink wine and I'll give the kids a tour of our secret underground bunker.

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I am just curious why you believe hyperinflation is imminent in Japan when there current inflation rate is roughly 1%.

 

 

They'd jump for joy if their rate of inflation was 1%. They've been in or near deflation for nearly 20 years.

 

Not necessarily imminent, but a distinct possibility.

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=JUc8-GUC1hY

 

http://www.project-s...artin-feldstein

 

http://www.telegraph...ld-affairs.html

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There's a 3 acre plot of land down the road from us that's owned by an *interesting* church in North Carolina or somewhere. I've been trying to figure out what on earth they're going to do with this swampy little bit of land so far from where they are. It'd serve me right if they did show up with all their folks when the world ends and build a compound then and there.

 

Oh good grief. Let's hope it's for investment purposes!!! :D

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Hey Beaners,

Ha! I like that, and for our next playday, we may have to dip into that!

 

 

 

I'm replying to you again because I'm trying to send you a PM and I don't think it's working. I promise it isn't because I've been getting into my wine stockpile! I'll try again tomorrow and see if it's working then.

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They'd jump for joy if their rate of inflation was 1%. They've been in or near deflation for nearly 20 years.

 

Not necessarily imminent, but a distinct possibility.

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=JUc8-GUC1hY

 

http://www.project-s...artin-feldstein

 

http://www.telegraph...ld-affairs.html

 

 

Not imminent or a distinct possibility. Based on your choice of sources I can see why you are stockpiling beans in your basement.

The Internet will fully mature when anyone citing YouTube videos as a source is instabanned. :p

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I have a good friend who is Japanese. This "crashing Yen" thing drives her nuts. She believes it's just another attempt by the rich white people to blame economic crashes on the evil "slant eyed" people. There does have to be a bit of racism to the argument that it will be Japan's fault when the world ends. Let's all go back to internment camps of Japanese Americans and start rehanging the WW2 posters depicting the vile Japanese men descending upon America again. :glare:

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I'm replying to you again because I'm trying to send you a PM and I don't think it's working. I promise it isn't because I've been getting into my wine stockpile! I'll try again tomorrow and see if it's working then.

 

 

Yeah, it wasn't working for me either. The board is acting strangely for me. I had this "Ha" reply to the picture of towels, thinking it was a reference to the Hitchikers Guide to the Galaxy, and it showed up in a really weird place and made no sense with the post above it, or made plenty of sense if I were a little strange. I felt a little dumb when I came back to check this thread.

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Not imminent or a distinct possibility. Based on your choice of sources I can see why you are stockpiling beans in your basement.

The Internet will fully mature when anyone citing YouTube videos as a source is instabanned. :p

 

 

 

Right, because a hugely successful hedge fund manager, a professor emeritus from Harvard, and a highly respected economist and journalist for a major British paper are suspect sources. Riiight. And goodnight.

 

You might like to reflect on your own level of maturity. Those who live in glass-houses and all that.

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Not imminent or a distinct possibility. Based on your choice of sources I can see why you are stockpiling beans in your basement.

The Internet will fully mature when anyone citing YouTube videos as a source is instabanned. :p

 

The same source you posted a link to earlier recommends watching the same speaker from another session at that conference.

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I know some and yes it does appear that they hope that bad stuff happens. I think it is prudent to be more self-sustainable and we are working our way there but we will not totally bankrupt ourselves doing so because we are so sure that it will come to pass.

 

When I was semi-young and working in our family garden (and complaining about the task) my dad took my sister and I aside and told us we should always be prepared to feed ourselves and take care of basic needs. That was in the poor economic times of the early 70s. He mentioned having a generator and gas for it, then food. He reminded us that we could live without a lot of things, but food wasn't one of them. He wasn't in any way at all thinking of world apocalypse, just normal life with its financial ups and downs and natural weather issues. I've never forgotten his advice and I've passed it on to our own boys. We have a garden. My boys hunt (and can clean animals). We have a generator and gas in the gas cans. We know basic first aid (not something he mentioned).

 

When the ice storm of a decade or so ago hit the northeast and things were disrupted for a month or so, my parents did fine. If something similar were to happen here, we'd do fine. I can't say it would be "fun," but I'm seriously not worried. I like having that level of preparedness.

 

Total anarchy never happened with any of the natural disasters in recent history. I just can't see it happening now - for financial or natural disasters. If something even more dramatic were to happen (Yellowstone exploded or nuclear winter, etc) I'd be with those knowing ANY resources are finite if one can't grow more stuff, so we'd be enjoying what we had until we all keel over. That's more preferable to me than seeing friends die while we "kept ours."

 

I'm slowly starting to stockpile (if that's even the right term to use here). I'm thinking just an extra-extra-full pantry. Normal foods that I can use daily, oldest first then replace what we use, etc. To me, the most concerning "disaster" is being out of work again. We've been hungry and I really don't want to go back to that. If the economy goes south again, it may likely happen for an extended period of time. I would feel a little less depressed not having to worry when my next meal was coming from. And I would likely know people who were out of work as well, so I would have food to share (since there's only two of us). So that's my reasoning. I refuse to concern myself with being off the grid, self-defense, complete society collapse or zombies.

 

To me, this is quite reasonable. Having food is better than having $$ to buy food, because in a true natural disaster, food gets cleared out of the grocery stores incredibly quickly - AND/OR - it's tough to get to. The way inflation is going, it's not such a bad investment to buy now anyway.

 

We're working on being more prepared. Our freezers are full, we're building a stock of canned and dry goods, next year's firewood is already in the yard ready to be cut and split...But this is all just a shift to old-fashioned preparedness for us. People used to do this. We're also out in the country and get snowed in.

 

And I should add that when your husband falls and breaks his shoulder and is off work for, oh, 6 months and counting, it's wonderful to be able to dip into that stockpile when money is tight.

 

:iagree:

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I have never seen that show.

we live a pretty much self sufficient lifestyle. Nothing to do with the world ending, we live it because it is fun... plus we can then survive on a very low income. We have a couple of months supply of food at all times, we grow just about all our own fruit and veggies,and produce our own milk and meat. it is very rewarding.

 

I know people who have bunkers. They build them to BUSHFIRE protection, a very realistic threat in Australia.

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Watching the show made me realize that there really are worse things than death.

 

That's exactly what I was thinking. Don't get me wrong, I love my life. But I'm also not afraid of death. If I am going to live then I want to LIVE not just barely survive. If I felt the need to live in constant fear of a worldwide catastrophe like the people on that show do, I'd rather just go to heaven. There are definitely worse things than death!

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we live a pretty much self sufficient lifestyle. Nothing to do with the world ending, we live it because it is fun... plus we can then survive on a very low income. We have a couple of months supply of food at all times, we grow just about all our own fruit and veggies,and produce our own milk and meat. it is very rewarding.

 

 

This would not count as "prepping." Prepping is all about preparing months of stable food and water storage that would not easily become tainted.

 

http://gettingprepped.com/

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When I was semi-young and working in our family garden (and complaining about the task) my dad took my sister and I aside and told us we should always be prepared to feed ourselves and take care of basic needs. That was in the poor economic times of the early 70s. He mentioned having a generator and gas for it, then food. He reminded us that we could live without a lot of things, but food wasn't one of them. He wasn't in any way at all thinking of world apocalypse, just normal life with its financial ups and downs and natural weather issues. I've never forgotten his advice and I've passed it on to our own boys. We have a garden. My boys hunt (and can clean animals). We have a generator and gas in the gas cans. We know basic first aid (not something he mentioned).

 

When the ice storm of a decade or so ago hit the northeast and things were disrupted for a month or so, my parents did fine. If something similar were to happen here, we'd do fine. I can't say it would be "fun," but I'm seriously not worried. I like having that level of preparedness.

 

Total anarchy never happened with any of the natural disasters in recent history. I just can't see it happening now - for financial or natural disasters. If something even more dramatic were to happen (Yellowstone exploded or nuclear winter, etc) I'd be with those knowing ANY resources are finite if one can't grow more stuff, so we'd be enjoying what we had until we all keel over. That's more preferable to me than seeing friends die while we "kept ours."

 

 

 

To me, this is quite reasonable. Having food is better than having $$ to buy food, because in a true natural disaster, food gets cleared out of the grocery stores incredibly quickly - AND/OR - it's tough to get to. The way inflation is going, it's not such a bad investment to buy now anyway.

 

 

 

:iagree:

 

 

Also in a domesday scenario, paper money could very well be useless. Having something of value to barter with on hand is much more desirable than a fat bank account one can't access because the ATM was taken out by the EMP.

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We're not preppers by any stretch of the imagination. But our property would lend itself well to setting up a zombie-defense compound. So, my plan is to have my city-dwelling friends come out here to the safety of my compound in exchange for bringing supplies. Mainly wine. And toilet paper. Lots of toilet paper. :p

 

In all seriousness, I think it's good to be prepared. But some people just take it to the extreme.

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Dh told me a few weeks ago that he wants to put a bunker out on the farm when we move. I told him we have to wait until the house is built. Now I know what he was watching.

 

I figure if he gets a bunker, I can use it as a root cellar.

 

I do want to be self-sustaining. That is why we bought 10 acres. I'm not ready to grow my own wheat though. Man, that is a lot of work to harvest it. With luck and planning we will have fruit trees, a humongeous garden, honey bees and berries. There is little need for us to worry about meat, but dh did hunt in bygone years so if there is a bad year with the garden we could survive on game.

 

The first couple of times I went to Nepal I got a glimpse of this lifestyle. Every family had a garden on any spot of ground more than 100 square feet. Most of it was wheat and people would send their kids out to pick up manure to fertilize it. There were animals everywhere in Kathmandu but you never stepped in manure, lol. People would spread their harvested wheat on the road to be driven over to thresh it. The Maoists changed that culture a lot because they are the only people other than the police to have guns, so they just demand your extra food, and that put a stop to a lot of extra self reliance people there used to have.

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We're not preppers by any stretch of the imagination. But our property would lend itself well to setting up a zombie-defense compound. So, my plan is to have my city-dwelling friends come out here to the safety of my compound in exchange for bringing supplies. Mainly wine. And toilet paper. Lots of toilet paper. :p

 

In all seriousness, I think it's good to be prepared. But some people just take it to the extreme.

 

 

Our property lends itself well too. We've told our boys they can bring anyone they want here if the world truly ran into issues and we'd all work together to make things work out. If they could bring supplies or skills, even better! If not, they'd learn the skills rather quickly as one rule we would have is, "He who doesn't work, doesn't eat." Our farm already has that rule. ;)

 

But honestly? I'm not at all worried and we're planning on selling our farm to go nomadic when the youngest heads off to college (a year and a half). A big segment of our lives will change dramatically at that point... Our small RV won't have much room for stockpiles - TP or otherwise. Like I said, I'm not that worried about world collapse.

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Speaking of selling our farm... I wonder if I should advertise it during the preppers show? We don't have bunkers, but we live off the beaten path (it'd take a while for city folks to find us), have a 1 acre stocked pond, land along a "never dries up" creek, a barn (& house, but they may not want that I suppose), room for critters, room for plants/gardens, wooded areas, plenty of game, and great neighbors - all for what will probably be in the 450K range. They'd just have to install their own bunker, but there's plenty of room for one (or more). Like I said, our property would lend itself well to such a time. Do these folks have publications one can advertise in?

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They'd jump for joy if their rate of inflation was 1%. They've been in or near deflation for nearly 20 years.

 

Not necessarily imminent, but a distinct possibility.

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=JUc8-GUC1hY

 

http://www.project-s...artin-feldstein

 

http://www.telegraph...ld-affairs.html

 

http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/topic/298586-the-end-of-the-world-as-we-know-it/page__hl__+collapse?do=findComment&comment=3001573

 

I am just curious what you have to say about your "end of the world as we know it" thread back in 2011?

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Speaking of selling our farm... I wonder if I should advertise it during the preppers show? We don't have bunkers, but we live off the beaten path (it'd take a while for city folks to find us), have a 1 acre stocked pond, land along a "never dries up" creek, a barn (& house, but they may not want that I suppose), room for critters, room for plants/gardens, wooded areas, plenty of game, and great neighbors - all for what will probably be in the 450K range. They'd just have to install their own bunker, but there's plenty of room for one (or more). Like I said, our property would lend itself well to such a time. Do these folks have publications one can advertise in?

 

I don't know about preppers but hobby farms are often advertised in Mother Earth news and the other publications of their parent company.

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Speaking of selling our farm... I wonder if I should advertise it during the preppers show? We don't have bunkers, but we live off the beaten path (it'd take a while for city folks to find us), have a 1 acre stocked pond, land along a "never dries up" creek, a barn (& house, but they may not want that I suppose), room for critters, room for plants/gardens, wooded areas, plenty of game, and great neighbors - all for what will probably be in the 450K range. They'd just have to install their own bunker, but there's plenty of room for one (or more). Like I said, our property would lend itself well to such a time. Do these folks have publications one can advertise in?

 

 

If you say, "Flat area for an airplane runway," dh would show up tomorrow with a checkbook.

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But would it not be much more effective to simply set the money aside for that scenario instead of converting it to groceries now?

 

 

I believe the assumption is that your money won't be any good after a major disaster. Or, a loaf of bread will cost you about $350,000. :D

 

In the case of a zombie apocalypse, we'll be moving to MN to live with my brother and sil - they have a 5 acre organic plot of land with a solid well, and an AK47; and we'll have the frozen winters to spend preparing for the zombie thaw. I suppose I should tell them that we may be coming. :D

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Last night I was awake thinking of zombies and the fact it was -20 outside.

 

Now, assuming zombies can be real - do us Canadians have to worry about them? Wouldn't they all just freeze in winter and die. (or is that die again?) I would imagine having there brains freeze solid and explode would kill them. Wouldn't that happen?

 

Can any zombie winter brain experts help me out here?

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Last night I was awake thinking of zombies and the fact it was -20 outside.

 

Now, assuming zombies can be real - do us Canadians have to worry about them? Wouldn't they all just freeze in winter and die. (or is that die again?) I would imagine having there brains freeze solid and explode would kill them. Wouldn't that happen?

 

Can any zombie winter brain experts help me out here?

 

 

 

According to World War Z, they just freeze and then thaw out in the spring. Apparently they are just Zombicles that can't move and are easily dispatched while frozen.

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If you say, "Flat area for an airplane runway," dh would show up tomorrow with a checkbook.

 

Hmm, doubtful. We're in rolling hills area. There are small plane airports around, but I can't see an airstrip fitting on our land itself. Sorry! My kids flew a good amount of rockets from our back yard and fields... ;)

 

I believe the assumption is that your money won't be any good after a major disaster.

 

It's not all that helpful in a normal disaster either when the stores are already emptied of their shelves, the gas stations don't work, and it's hard to get anywhere. It's really better to have a supply of food, water, and gas. Of course, if you don't have those on hand, having a good amount of money (to pay for the increased 'scalping' prices) would be necessary, but even then, stores can't sell what they don't have. Generators are hard to come by AFTER the disaster.

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According to World War Z, they just freeze and then thaw out in the spring. Apparently they are just Zombicles that can't move and are easily dispatched while frozen.

 

So one could easily dispense with them during winter. Clear who area, houses, towns.

 

Since you are an expert, (or seem to be) another question.

 

How can zombies easily bit into people so well. On "The Walking Dead" they seem able to take a chunk out of someone with one bite. I have had people bit me before, okay kids to be specific. And no one was every able to get a chunk. Zombies also seem able to bit off a chunk through clothes. Should some thick leather pants, jacket, gloves, high hiking boots, a neck protector of some kind and a motorcycle helmet protect a person?

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So one could easily dispense with them during winter. Clear who area, houses, towns.

 

Since you are an expert, (or seem to be) another question.

 

How can zombies easily bit into people so well. On "The Walking Dead" they seem able to take a chunk out of someone with one bite. I have had people bit me before, okay kids to be specific. And no one was every able to get a chunk. Zombies also seem able to bit off a chunk through clothes. Should some thick leather pants, jacket, gloves, high hiking boots, a neck protector of some kind and a motorcycle helmet protect a person?

 

 

 

Yes, it should. Zombies for some reason seem to be stronger than humans and their bites seem to be more vicious. In World War Z they developed a Kevlar type uniform to be zombie-resistant. The problem is they don't need to take a chunk - they just need to break the skin.

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