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S/o "kvetching"... Doomsday Preppers?????


Heather in Neverland
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I was flipping through the channels because I was bored and I landed on this show.

 

I watched it out of morbid curiosity.

 

So, apparently there is a worldwide catastrophe caused by an EMP, which will cause economic collapse and mass anarchy, coming soon... And I am definitely not ready. :)

 

I watched this guy talk about living off the grid. Ok. Fine. Not my thing, but not my business. He talked about how they raise rabbits for protein.

 

Then he proceeded to break the rabbit's neck right on camera and then his 5yo daughter SKINNED it on camera.

 

All I can think is that if there is a huge war and we are lobbing nukes, I just hope my family and I die in the initial blast and we go to be with Jesus because I am NOT drinking my own urine no matter how long it is boiled!

 

Some of them actually seemed like they WANT something bad to happen... So they can be justified in all this preparation. I knew a pastor who went so overboard with the Y2K thing that his congregation thought that he was nuts and fired him.

 

So how about you? Do you have your bunker ready??

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No. I think some of the ideas are great for living sustainably, and living though an emergency, and that I might want to copy. But to live every day of my life in prep or expectation for massive overwhelming disaster would send my anxiety to unheard of levels!

 

 

That's true. I felt very anxious just watching the show!!

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I know some preppers, but my family and I certainly aren't among them. I figure if something were to happen, we'd do just fine (considering the chaos) where we live and with our skills. If nothing happens. We'll still do just fine. They may also be prepared if something happens (but I like our location MUCH better). If nothing happens, they have a whole bunch of stuff and stress that is needless. Some of their food and supplies are already out of date... This "soon" they talk about didn't happen "soon enough" for that. They've been at it for a while.

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My oldes ask if Florida was a good place to be in case of a "zombie" apocalypse. I said, "No, hon, that would Texas." :lol:

 

BTW, we saw a book on just that exact topic (world catastrophe due to EMP) while at B&N yesterday. Nearly bought it just to see what it was about, but figured I could look it up online for free ;) I was in the section for Computers, between Math and Computer Languages.

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My brother is a prepper. But he makes me laugh. He planted 40 fruit trees on his property. The deer ate them. The deer ate them because he lured them to his yard with feed corn. He lured them to his yard so he could sit in front of his picture window, in his easy chair, and get his sights on them with his hunting rifle. He doesn't shoot them. When I asked him why, he said, "Well, then I would have to dress them, and that is more work than I really want to do."

 

He is planning on getting a cow for his wife to milk and take care of while he goes to work at his very lucrative job in the city.

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ROFL - we do have a garden and sometimes I do some food freezing and canning when tomatoes, etc are in season. I do think about living greener and more sustainably, but I'm pretty dependent on my co-ops, CSA, and farmer's market.

 

But otherwise, just hoping to go in that initial blast! LOL.

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I don't see anything kookie about learning and practicing skills that will help you get through difficult times but I don't have a bunker. I have a few weeks supply of canned/dry goods and months worth of stored grain but should the EMP happen we are SOL. No one knows how to hunt, I have a black thumb when it comes to growing food, and no one knows how to make their own clothes.

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I won't out myself here ;), but I'll say that people think my family is far enough into preparedness to let us in on their own plans. After we moved out of our old house, one of the neighbors we only saw sporadically stopped by to chat with my husband while he was finishing some work on the house. He was a nice guy, and his wife and kids were nice too. He told my husband how sad he was to see us go since we had all the animals and the big vegetable garden. Then he proceeded to tell him about his series of underground bunkers he was building. He had just finished burying an old ambulance. Apparently we had played a pivotal role in his TEOTWAWKI plans, and he was going to have to figure out what to do now that the house blocking access to his property was empty. At least now I don't have to worry about growing enough to feed the entire neighborhood!

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No. I think some of the ideas are great for living sustainably, and living though an emergency, and that I might want to copy. But to live every day of my life in prep or expectation for massive overwhelming disaster would send my anxiety to unheard of levels!

 

I agree. I like planning disaster prep stuff because I live in tornado land and I've known enough people who have lived through disasters that I think it's prudent to have a plan for what to do if you are left in such a situation. But I'm certainly not worried about an apocalypse. Lol

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That show is like a train wreck. When it's on, I can't help but turn it on! I always feel bad for the children being raised in an environment where they have "invader drills" as part of everyday life. Or the women who literally spend their days at the stove canning food for the impending apocolypse.

 

There was an episode where a family was raising earthworms as a proten source... I think it was that same dad who took the kids on a camp-out and taught them how to catch and cook a field mouse.

 

And then the photos they show sometimes of these massive storehouses of canned foods and goods. Literally, four years worth of canned goods, just sitting there on the shelves- much of it home-canned... Such a waste, in my mind.

 

Yet, there are some good nuggets to glean from that show sometimes. We are poorly prepared for any emergency, honestly. We'd manage for a few days, but the show does inspire me to want to work more towards having at least a few weeks worth of shelf-stable supplies and water on hand.

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I've got another confession. My husband and I have been trying to eat down the food in our cupboards/pantry for a year now. We found out this time last year that we might move, so we started then. We ate almost entirely out of our pantry until we moved, and we moved a lot of food with us. We've still been trying to eat all the old stuff before we replace it with new food. I just can't do it. I can't leave a store without pounds of legumes. Or wine. We go through plenty of both in our house.

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I've got another confession. My husband and I have been trying to eat down the food in our cupboards/pantry for a year now. We found out this time last year that we might move, so we started then. We ate almost entirely out of our pantry until we moved, and we moved a lot of food with us. We've still been trying to eat all the old stuff before we replace it with new food. I just can't do it. I can't leave a store without pounds of legumes. Or wine. We go through plenty of both in our house.

 

Well I can totally agree with stocking up on wine!

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I love that show too- I can't stop watching it when it's on. I remember one couple who was so convinced that the Mayan Apocolypse was true that they bought a bunch of furniture and appliances on credit. They would have to start paying it off in January 2013 and they thought they were really smart for getting this stuff for "free!"

 

I have extra toilet paper and water at my house, but that's about it. I'm trying to get some more canned foods- we are in earthquake country here in So Cal.

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And what does she think of that?

 

 

Actually, I think she's okay with that , if it happens, which it may not. She already has chickens. She is homeschooling too, and is not okay with that. She is only doing it because of my brother's anti-establishment mentality. I'm just glad I'm not married to him. :rolleyes: ;)

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Dh told me a few weeks ago that he wants to put a bunker out on the farm when we move. I told him we have to wait until the house is built. Now I know what he was watching.

 

I figure if he gets a bunker, I can use it as a root cellar.

 

I do want to be self-sustaining. That is why we bought 10 acres. I'm not ready to grow my own wheat though. Man, that is a lot of work to harvest it. With luck and planning we will have fruit trees, a humongeous garden, honey bees and berries. There is little need for us to worry about meat, but dh did hunt in bygone years so if there is a bad year with the garden we could survive on game.

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We live in the suburbs of the nations capital- no use prepping, we will go in the blast.

 

I'm not real domestic anyway, nor inclined to get that way. I am skilled in using lots of weapons,and a great shot with a compound bow (though I've never aimed at anything alive), so I suppose I could just go take all the well prepared peoples food. Maybe not a nice plan, but in a pinch (I'm assuming the apocalypse will be more than a pinch!) it would work.

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No, not a zombie apocalypse prepper (or any other type of apocalypse for that matter). But because dh works at a large investment banking firm and is close to the intel, we're pretty sure we're (the general "we") are in for another large financial crisis within 18-24 months. Not anarchy type crisis - just poorer yet crisis. Keep your eye on the Japanese yen and their bond yields. The higher the yen (against the dollar) the more likely they'll first get the inflation they crave -then possible a little hyperinflation and increasing bond yields - that would be a cataclysmic disaster.

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I think it's prudent to have some food/water/supplies on hand, because disasters and water/power inconveniences do happen. Personally I don't go beyond a well-stocked pantry and first aid kit, ways to cook food off the grid if I had to (mainly a grill), and keeping a few essentials stored in cars (more for everyday emergencies than bug-out scenarios).

 

But...when your entire life revolves around "prepping," to the point where you actually hope that something terrible will happen, because it will prove that you're wise and prepared and haven't been wasting years of your life...well, at that point it's all a bit much.

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Why should you prepare? What are we preparing for? Turn on the news, read a history book, and read Mathew 24. That's why I do it.

 

If anyone wants a pratical way to prepare, here is a great website to get you started. Store water to drink, 3 months supply of everyday food (pantry items), have a reserve of cash on home and get out of debt, and store a year supply of long-term food.

 

Long-term food is food that stays good for 30+ years: wheat, white rice, corn, rolled oats, sugar, dried beans, pasta, potato flakes, dried apple slices. You would store these in #10 cans with oxygen absorbers. You can buy this food here. You can see where the nearest cannery is to you here. You don't have to be LDS to purchase food or use the cannery. If you don't want to can food yourself, you can have it shipped to you already canned from this website. ETA: you have to be LDS to have it shipped to you. Maybe if you have an lds friend that can order it for you.

 

For one adult, for one month, you would need 5 #10 cans of grain (wheat, rice, corn, rolled oats) and 1 #10 can of dried beans to survive. It costs about $20 to purchase and can yourself, and about $31 to have it done for you and shipped to your home.

 

For those of us that do prepare, but don't go overboard like what you are seeing on tv, we are in the practice of eating what we store. We eat beans and rice, usually on tacos, at least once a week. I grind the wheat and make pancakes, bread, and pizza with it. We have a budget and we collect spare change around the house in a jar. We keep emergency water in the car and in the garage. I have a large pantry of food that I rotate and I look for sales on the items that we eat and stock up when they come. Our long-term supply is easily kept in a couple of closets. We add to it every tax season with a portion of our tax return.

 

LDS have been asked to be prepared in this manner for almost 100 years. It provides a great deal of peace of mind and security to those that do it. I won't be killing starving people, like someone else mentioned, I'll be sharing it with them. That is the point of it. But unless you can walk to my home, you will be sore out of luck. Get some food in your home.

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I'm glad that I don't need to have eight hundred gallons of canned tomatoes in my basement to feel good about myself. Having some food and water set aside if you live in an area prone to hurricanes or earthquakes is sensible. Having enough set aside to feed the next four generations because you're waiting for the apocalypse is just loony.

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We live in an uncertain time. Prepping is something concrete that people can do to try to improve the liklihood that their family will remain safe. It is totally different from hoarding, which involves stockpiling things you don't need. Prepping involves storing things you are fairly certain you will need.

 

People do it to varying degrees. I live in a rural area that often gets bad weather that makes the roads impassible. I prep for those inevitable times that happen several times a year when we can't leave our home to go to the store or anywhere else. We have plenty of food, water, etc. to carry us through. We are also at the end of a very long electric line, so our power goes out frequently. Therefore I prep for periods of time without power, in both the winter and the summer. It would be imprudent of me to blithely skip through life ignoring the fact that these things do happen occasionally in my area. So I guess I'm a prepper.

 

Others prep against potential threats, and IMO, it is usually these preppers that get labeled crazy. If others do not agree with the liklihood of the threat coming to pass, then they cannot comprehend the wisdom of preparding to face it. You can find credible souces that indicate that the liklihood is significant and increasing that we will have a major earthquake in the US (either in the CA area or along the New Madrid fault in the midwest), that 2013 is predicted to have a record level of sunspot activity, etc. Is it wise or folly for people to do what they reasonably can now to prepare for dealing with these threats?

 

The Bible tells us to look to the ways of the ant who stores food during the growing season for she knows the winter is coming. Is prepping any different than that? Another question is whether prepping is any different than insurance? With it we are taking steps to protect ourselves and our investments against ruination from potential threats.

 

Regarding the tv show, like so many shows on tv they have selected the most colorful and outrageous people to showcase. The fact is that almost no one who is a serious prepper would ever publicly announce that fact. Remember King Hezekiah, who showed the foreign visitors everything stored up in his treasury. Not surprisingly, they came and took it all from him in a short period of time. Many real preppers are very private because they do not want the stress of having to either defend their stores from others or the heartbreak of not having enough to share with everyone who they would like to.

 

Certainly there are those individuals suffering from mental issues that are made manifest in a shocking way through prepping. But not all preppers are like that. I am just here, minding my own business with the supplies to provide what we need and to cover several of our wants, should we be stuck home or without power for an extended period. I call that smart, not crazy.

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People do it to varying degrees. I live in a rural area that often gets bad weather that makes the roads impassible. I prep for those inevitable times that happen several times a year when we can't leave our home to go to the store or anywhere else. We have plenty of food, water, etc. to carry us through. We are also at the end of a very long electric line, so our power goes out frequently. Therefore I prep for periods of time without power, in both the winter and the summer. It would be imprudent of me to blithely skip through life ignoring the fact that these things do happen occasionally in my area. So I guess I'm a prepper.

 

I would not call you a prepper. I would call you wise. We also live rural, and yes, things DO happen that one should be prepared for. Even if one lives urban there can be power outages or even illnesses that one should be prepared for. Having a couple of weeks of supplies and extra batteries and such things is just plain smart.

 

Others prep against potential threats, and IMO, it is usually these preppers that get labeled crazy. If others do not agree with the liklihood of the threat coming to pass, then they cannot comprehend the wisdom of preparding to face it. You can find credible souces that indicate that the liklihood is significant and increasing that we will have a major earthquake in the US (either in the CA area or along the New Madrid fault in the midwest), that 2013 is predicted to have a record level of sunspot activity, etc. Is it wise or folly for people to do what they reasonably can now to prepare for dealing with these threats?

 

Prepping for these things is 100% different than the preppers I know who are essentially planning for total anarchy. There are major disasters that happen worldwide every single year. We have not seen absolute anarchy happen in a developed nation and I don't believe a natural disaster will change that. Yes, people should be prepared, but not "prepper" prepared for such things.

 

The Bible tells us to look to the ways of the ant who stores food during the growing season for she knows the winter is coming. Is prepping any different than that? Another question is whether prepping is any different than insurance? With it we are taking steps to protect ourselves and our investments against ruination from potential threats.

 

The ant stores for one season - the known length for which they will need food. I freeze things from my garden each season. Neither the ant nor myself feel the need to store food now for the rest of eternity. The Bible doesn't speak too highly of the man who saw that he had more than he could store and opted to build another barn for it. ;)

 

The fact is that almost no one who is a serious prepper would ever publicly announce that fact. Remember King Hezekiah, who showed the foreign visitors everything stored up in his treasury. Not surprisingly, they came and took it all from him in a short period of time. Real preppers are very private because they do not want the stress of having to either defend their stores from others or the heartbreak of having to not have enough to share with everyone who they would like to.

 

The real preppers I know do share as they think others should be preppers too. It's kind of an evangelical thing I suppose - not unlike the doomsday folks of May or Dec.

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I've never seen the show, but I imagine they pick the whackadoos because the normal people who are doing sane things in preparation for various weather problems, earthquakes, or whatever, are fairly boring. I'm sure no one wants to see me strap my water heater to the wall to prep for an earthquake, or look at the canned goods in my neighbor's basement. It would be a snooze-fest.

 

I've got another confession. My husband and I have been trying to eat down the food in our cupboards/pantry for a year now. We found out this time last year that we might move, so we started then. We ate almost entirely out of our pantry until we moved, and we moved a lot of food with us. We've still been trying to eat all the old stuff before we replace it with new food. I just can't do it. I can't leave a store without pounds of legumes. Or wine. We go through plenty of both in our house.

 

So was choice #2 for your username "Winers"? Except then we would've wondered if you meant "Whiners", and been giving you the side-eye.

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I will just take my chances. If I did have food stock piled, I wouldn't feel right about eating it while my friends and neighbors starved to death, and I can't stock pile enough for everyone I care about, so I figure if something bad happens, we will all be in it together. Or it will be "each man for himself" but I don't want to live that way. I will be the radical who shares.

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We are not preppers in the sense that these people are. We do prepare though.

 

For example, I have enough hay till summer for the horses and bought enough grain for the next 3 weeks as it is winter and we can't always get out when you think you might.

 

We have enough food on hand to eat for 2-3 weeks without scrimping at all. We have a wood pellet stove for extra heat and a generator for power outages (can be frequent occurances here). We always keep our gas tanks at least 1/2 full so in case we need to make an emergency run somewhere (like ER, etc) we don' have to worry about running out of gas right away.

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I don't know how to categorize myself, but I do enjoy keeping my home and family prepared for very real "disaster" possibilities from extended power outages (our area averaged 2 weeks from Sandy, and we're nowhere near the ocean) to job loss to (even more) food price inflation.

We're hoping to move in a year or so to a property that's more conducive to self reliance.

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I've never seen the show, but I imagine they pick the whackadoos because the normal people who are doing sane things in preparation for various weather problems, earthquakes, or whatever, are fairly boring. I'm sure no one wants to see me strap my water heater to the wall to prep for an earthquake, or look at the canned goods in my neighbor's basement. It would be a snooze-fest.

 

Exactly. The same way the always present wackadoodle homeschoolers.

 

I've not understood the fascination with wackadoodles over the past 5 years.

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DH and I saw a prepper show where this man in Florida had a bunker 5 HOURS from his home in the middle of nowheresville. So the Zombie Apocalypse comes or the "government" or whatever and millions of people are going to be fleeing in terror or at WAR or nothing eletronic is going to work because god/sun spots are going to slap us back to prehistoric times and you plan is to DRIVE for 5 hours to your bunker?? DH and I watched that and laughed. There's a bit of a flaw in that plan...

 

I get some preparedness thinking. I'm rural. I have about 500 cans of stuff left in my basement from my work this summer. We have a small generator than we can run the furnace and a few other applianes on. I make my own food because I don't like participating in the Monsanto/agribusiness food system and because everything I make tastes better than their crap. But we lost power for five days last winter and so far for 24 hours this winter and I have to have water for ducks and dogs and kids to drink.

 

We have a little homestead we plan on putting a windmill on and I've been talking to our local solar panel people about the house and someday soon the barn. We want "off the grid" because I think the grid is going nuts. I want nothing to do with fracking and coal is just stupid. Plus our grid isn't 100%reliable. Power outages are fun for about the first 18 hours. And then I NEED a bath.

 

I cross paths with extreme preppers in canning forums, homesteading, etc. What disturbs me the most about these people is the, "I'll blow the heads off anyone who comes near my stash!" mentality. Really? Because I give a ton of my food away to neighbors, friends, and family and they often do the same for me. You'd really KILL someone who just came to you because they were hungry?? If the system fails so badly that no more food can ever be produced on our planet again, then no matter what you have stored in your bunker - it is FINITE. Why would I want to make it 10 days longer than my neighbor if I have to look out in my yard and see dead relatives and friends? I'd rather we ALL lived 5 days together and went down hugging.

 

If that cataclysmic event doesn't happen and you need to make it to the next growing season, then SHARE and next season grow more (probably with the help of the people you saved!) Everyone will get a bit skinnier but since more than half of us are fat anyway, who cares? Everyone has more than they think they do in their cupboards, even non-preppers. In an emergency, I bet that pancake batter made with water instead of milk would do just fine.

 

I also love the people with a lifetime supply of dumb stuff taking up major space in their homes. I like toilet paper. Don't get me wrong. I think i last used some about 10 minutes ago. But if the carp REALLY hits the fan and no more toilet paper will ever be produced again... Well toilet paper has been around for what? 100 years? So we humans made it hundreds of thousands of years without it and you chose to save something like toilet paper? If I were going to use up all the spare space in my home, I'd have the chocolate stash to end all chocolate stashes and books and wine or something just more "fun." These preppers just don't ever think about the "fun." They want to live 100 years on toilet paper and canned beans. I'd like to live about 2 days on that. :laugh:

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Exactly. The same way the always present wackadoodle homeschoolers.

 

I've not understood the fascination with wackadoodles over the past 5 years.

 

 

 

I think it's because there are so many of them. And they are all so different. You have the Kardashians, Westboro Baptist, the freaks from the "reality" TV on MTV, etc. etc. It's like "nutball of the week" out there right now!

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I am not a prepper, but I do not see the problem about the rabbit. Many people raise animals for meat, and it is only our city dwelling coddled self that is grossed out by seeing an animal slaughtered but OK with eating meat when it comes nicely packaged.

When I grew up, my Grandma's neighbors raised rabbits to eat, and their children were involved in the whole process.

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Some of them do seem positively giddy. But, I'm sure craziness is what gets you on tv, not normal emergency preparedness behavior.

 

I have a friend who is sort of into this stuff. But, in reality? She would never even hurt someone's feelings. She is the type that apologizes to walls when she walks into them. And she is way out of shape, she couldn't outrun my 14 year old cocker spaniel. So, the idea that she is going to kill people who try to get her stuff? That's pretty absurd to me.

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I think some of the crazy "I wish it would happen" kind of stuff can stem from a kind of unhappiness. Like maybe with the hand they were dealt, or with how "powerful" they feel in their chosen community, or with self esteem. If everything went crazy, then that prepper guy who works at the gas station and is trying to support his family on $8 an hour will feel like the playing field is leveled and he ends up being "bigger" than the business man who stops in to his station everyweek driving a cadillac and paying in hundred dollar bills.

 

* Obviously I don't know every crazy prepper, so it doesn't apply ot them all, and I am not trying to offend anyone with my example.

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I know some and yes it does appear that they hope that bad stuff happens. I think it is prudent to be more self-sustainable and we are working our way there but we will not totally bankrupt ourselves doing so because we are so sure that it will come to pass.

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No, not a zombie apocalypse prepper (or any other type of apocalypse for that matter). But because dh works at a large investment banking firm and is close to the intel, we're pretty sure we're (the general "we") are in for another large financial crisis within 18-24 months. Not anarchy type crisis - just poorer yet crisis. Keep your eye on the Japanese yen and their bond yields. The higher the yen (against the dollar) the more likely they'll first get the inflation they crave -then possible a little hyperinflation and increasing bond yields - that would be a cataclysmic disaster.

 

 

I do not see the Yen leading to global financial collapse. Your synopsis of the cause and effect is quite poor.

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