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10yo hates IEW


mo2
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We are only on lesson 3 of SWI-A, and she balks at it every time I pull it out. She literally cried once. I tell her to write a key word outline, just like they did on the video, and she says she doesn't know how. So I remind her, just choose the words from the sentence that will help you remember what it's about. But she still says she doesn't know how. And she ends up choosing the wrong words, like "this" or "are." She gets frustrated so easily with it. What can I try to make this work for us?

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do it with her. literally, do the KWO for her as she watches (and be sure to download the extra practice sheets from the IEW website). i would stay on the idea of the KWO until you know she understands it (it shouldn't take more than a few weeks). also, use symbols, numbers, abbreviations, etc. to help you. my daughter just finished SWI-A a couple of months ago & she struggled in the beginning with the KWO too. i would sit with her & brainstorm together. we always tried to incorporate numbers & symbols because they are "free". after SWI-A we moved on from IEW, but the program really did help my daughter & she still uses those techniques when writing papers now. if it is producing tears and anxiety though, i would hold her hand through the process completely and brainstorm together. it may seem like you are doing her work, but really, you are just modeling for her the process. each time transfer a little more to her until she is creating the KWO alone. hang in there :grouphug:

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do it with her. literally, do the KWO for her as she watches (and be sure to download the extra practice sheets from the IEW website). i would stay on the idea of the KWO until you know she understands it (it shouldn't take more than a few weeks). also, use symbols, numbers, abbreviations, etc. to help you. my daughter just finished SWI-A a couple of months ago & she struggled in the beginning with the KWO too. i would sit with her & brainstorm together. we always tried to incorporate numbers & symbols because they are "free". after SWI-A we moved on from IEW, but the program really did help my daughter & she still uses those techniques when writing papers now. if it is producing tears and anxiety though, i would hold her hand through the process completely and brainstorm together. it may seem like you are doing her work, but really, you are just modeling for her the process. each time transfer a little more to her until she is creating the KWO alone. hang in there :grouphug:

 

 

 

I agree!!!

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How old is she? I am successfully using this program with 10 and 12 year old boys. You may have to help her through a bunch of the KWO for a while until she gets it. She should be looking for nouns or action verbs for her oulines. Also, you can call/email the IEW people and see if they have any suggestions. I would not let her cry about writing. Tell her you will help her with everything. That you are going to write it together. Put it away for a while and tell her you are taking a break if that's what it takes, but take it out again in the future and work through it together until she really gets it.

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While I love everything about IEW, I would just put it away for now and work on copywork or simple narration. You can just have her narrate a few sentences from a story/assignment, then write them out on a piece of paper, and then have her copy them until she is ready to begin to write the 2-3 sentences on her own. Putting words down on paper is a huge step for many children. I would take the IEW out again once these skills were solidified, but that's just me. I feel that ten is still that in-between tender age where many new skills are just being processed.

 

HTH,

 

Dee

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While I love everything about IEW, I would just put it away for now and work on copywork or simple narration. You can just have her narrate a few sentences from a story/assignment, then write them out on a piece of paper, and then have her copy them until she is ready to begin to write the 2-3 sentences on her own. Putting words down on paper is a huge step for many children. I would take the IEW out again once these skills were solidified, but that's just me. I feel that ten is still that in-between tender age where many new skills are just being processed.

 

HTH,

 

Dee

 

 

Thank you. I feel that, to some extent, even though we know better, my husband and I still judge progress by public school standards, because that is all we have known. Would it be a good idea to do a level of WWE and then go back to IEW? If so, what level should we try? (I think I'll post this question in another thread, too.)

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Thank you. I feel that, to some extent, even though we know better, my husband and I still judge progress by public school standards, because that is all we have known. Would it be a good idea to do a level of WWE and then go back to IEW? If so, what level should we try? (I think I'll post this question in another thread, too.)

 

 

 

I think that WWE would be a great go-between. I'd do as someone suggested and try somewhere between level 1 and 2. You could always make it as easy or as challenging as you would like to make it even if you chose level 2. My son did year one and two before going on to an IEW themed based book. This worked wonderfully for him.

 

Dee :)

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You could also look at Essentials in Writing. The author lays out expectations & examples very clearly and incrementally, and she might find it easier. You can always try IEW again in a year or so, or take advantage of their refund policy.

 

Can one jump in at grade level with this program?

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First I would suggest posting your question to the IEW Families Yahoo group. You have gotten some great responses here, but the help there would be fabulous too. The moderator there, Jill Pike, writes curriculum for IEW and has years of experience in using the program.

 

If you are considering making another purchase you could also try the precursor to SWI-A which is PAL Writing. Level 2 of that program works on introducing dress-ups with sentence based writing projects. For example, my second grader just finished making an ABC animal book. Every page was a who/which clause sentence. Simultaneously you introduce the concepts of strong verbs, nouns, describing words, -ly adverbs, etc. The difference in my girl's sentences from beginning to end of the project is amazing. So, a small way to get your feet wet, be successful, and begin introducing the vocabulary of the program.

 

Then Level 3 of the program (all in the same book) begins to introduce what is Units 5, 1, and 2 of SWI-A. They do keyword outlines, but the paragraphs are VERY basic. The DVD that comes with the program also has a number of good audio lectures on teaching those units in the elementary classroom (IEW is used in some schools) that have good pointers and ideas as well.

 

If you don't want to splurge on something new, then the IEW Yahoo group has tons of very basic paragraphs in their files sections (a whole set based on the Magic School Bus episodes if she is a fan and others). Three sentences, easy words. Practicing on those as you hold her hand might help as well.

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Thanks again for all the great ideas.

 

First I would suggest posting your question to the IEW Families Yahoo group. You have gotten some great responses here, but the help there would be fabulous too. The moderator there, Jill Pike, writes curriculum for IEW and has years of experience in using the program.

 

If you are considering making another purchase you could also try the precursor to SWI-A which is PAL Writing. Level 2 of that program works on introducing dress-ups with sentence based writing projects. For example, my second grader just finished making an ABC animal book. Every page was a who/which clause sentence. Simultaneously you introduce the concepts of strong verbs, nouns, describing words, -ly adverbs, etc. The difference in my girl's sentences from beginning to end of the project is amazing. So, a small way to get your feet wet, be successful, and begin introducing the vocabulary of the program.

 

Then Level 3 of the program (all in the same book) begins to introduce what is Units 5, 1, and 2 of SWI-A. They do keyword outlines, but the paragraphs are VERY basic. The DVD that comes with the program also has a number of good audio lectures on teaching those units in the elementary classroom (IEW is used in some schools) that have good pointers and ideas as well.

 

If you don't want to splurge on something new, then the IEW Yahoo group has tons of very basic paragraphs in their files sections (a whole set based on the Magic School Bus episodes if she is a fan and others). Three sentences, easy words. Practicing on those as you hold her hand might help as well.

 

Your post is quite helpful. I actually own PAL and am using it with my 5yo, but of course, we haven't gotten to levels 2 and 3 yet, so I never even thought to look there for my 10yo. I think I will spend some time tonight looking over the later levels. Thanks for pointing this out.

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We just started also. I typed out the "Booklice" paragraph and printed it out so that it was about 3 feet by 4 feet and glue all the sheets together and taped it to the wall. Then with markers I let the kids underline which words they wanted to use. My high school student joined us because outlining isn't her strong suit. The discussion on what were good words and bad words to pick was interesting. They each underlined their words and then later on were able to copy the words they picked easily. The lesson was light, it was fun and it was over before they expected it to be. Having that visual, colourful, fun, writing on the walls time distracted them from the dreaded "Writing class" they used to do.

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