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Is there such thing as PVC-free action figures??


mathnmusic
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My son LOVES the Avengers and his #1 wish for Christmas is to get some action figures like Avengers to play with. After reading about how harmful PVC is to kids' bodies & the environment, I want to avoid it as much as possible. However, all the action figures I've found say that they're made of 100% PVC! Hoping someone can tell me if they've found any PVC-free action figures anywhere???

 

Thanks so much! My son thanks you too.

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Sure, here are a couple:

 

http://healthychild.org/blog/comments/toxic_toys_no_thank_you/

 

 

"There’s also the impact of toy production and disposal – a toy’s "lifecycle" – upon the health of the environment to consider, not least because it affects all our health. For example, one of the most toxic of all materials used in kids’ toys, products and packaging is PVC, also known as vinyl. Throughout PVC’s lifecycle, from production to use to disposal, PVC releases toxins into our environment and threatens the health of our children. In stark contrast to this toxic cycle, certified sustainable solid wood toys are made with fewer toxins and therefore are safer for the environment and our children’s health.

The Problem of PVC Toys

Polyvinyl chloride, also known as PVC or vinyl, is commonly used in teethers and soft squeeze toys for young children, beach balls, bath toys, dolls and other products, such as knapsacks, raincoats, and umbrellas. Health concerns for children who play with soft PVC toys center on toxic additives called phthalates (pronounced "tha-lates"). Phthalates are added to PVC as "plasticizers," which make it soft and flexible. Some phthalates have been linked to cancer, kidney and liver damage, harm to developing reproductive organs, and premature breast development in baby girls. Inhaling these chemicals can also worsen asthma in children.

Phthalates are not bonded to the plastic, but can migrate, or leach out. Since young children often put toys into their mouths, they are especially at risk. Other hazardous additives to PVC include lead and cadmium, which can be released into the environment during manufacture and as a toy degrades. Additional environmental hazards occur during PVC’s manufacture and disposal."

 

And from here:

 

http://healthychild.org/5steps/5_steps_5/?_kk=toxic%20plastic&_kt=98ecac62-6fef-4a9d-bbdd-4fe8756e1866&gclid=CM-D-fXjlbQCFQmCQgodKGgADA

 

recycle3.gif PVC (Polyvinyl Chloride, aka Vinyl): AVOID

Common Uses: Condiment Bottles, Cling Wrap, Teething Rings, Toys, Shower Curtains

Concerns: Can leach lead and phthalates among other things. Can also off-gas toxic chemicals.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Still haven't found any leads on PVC-free action figures. Playing with wooden toys doesn't hold the same appeal to him, go figure. :laugh:

 

Seriously, I would feel so much better to replace the toxic plastic toys in our house for safe and well-made options. So many of the "safe" toys are just plain ugly and none of my kids want to play with them.

 

Hoping someone will know of suggestions for PVC-free action figures... thanks!

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Personally, I bought the standard, name-brand (Mattel or Hasbro or whatever) action figures, and didn't worry about the PVC issue. My ds wasn't going to eat the toys, and I didn't think it was worth getting all worked up over the horrible dangers inherent in playing with some action figures. :rolleyes:

 

Maybe I'm in the minority here, but I think all of the fear and terror over these toys is incredibly over-blown. Kids have played with these toys for many, many years, and I just don't think that many (if any) of them have been irreparably damaged by it. Sure, if the kid is allergic to one of the materials used in the toys, that's a different situation, but as a general health risk, I just don't think the danger of playing with action figures would even enter my radar. Kids are probably exposed to more toxins every day by just walking outside in the "fresh" air.

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Maybe you could have Anne Moze make you some? She makes those knights so perhaps she could cut you the Avengers shapes and paint them like them. I don't know if she could, but it is just a thought. There are also wood toy makers on Etsy that might be able to make you something like that. I don't know about in time for Christmas though.

 

Or, if you or hubby are crafty you might be able to cut figures out of wood and Modge Podge pictures of the Avengers on it. This might inspire you.

 

I don't know if any of these ideas help. But, I thought I would reply anyway! Good luck!

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Ladies, thank you so much for your creative and thoughtful replies! Those are great suggestions and I'll pursue those leads!

 

I know some people think it's going overboard to care about toxicity of everyday things like toys and plastics, but I figure *something* is behind the skyrocketing cancer numbers, early puberty of our young girls, and a host of other emergent health issues. Research strongly implicates that toxins in PVC and other plastics mess with our bodies, specifically hormone disruption, and these effects aren't immediately evident...the greatest harm is in growing bodies of young children. I've read that PVC levels are highest in children ages 6-11 years old. I don't freak out over it but here's my thinking on it...if certain substances are known to be toxic, and there's something I can do to minimize my kids' exposure to them, then why in the world wouldn't I?

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Guest inoubliable

Ladies, thank you so much for your creative and thoughtful replies! Those are great suggestions and I'll pursue those leads!

 

I know some people think it's going overboard to care about toxicity of everyday things like toys and plastics, but I figure *something* is behind the skyrocketing cancer numbers, early puberty of our young girls, and a host of other emergent health issues. Research strongly implicates that toxins in PVC and other plastics mess with our bodies, specifically hormone disruption, and these effects aren't immediately evident...the greatest harm is in growing bodies of young children. I've read that PVC levels are highest in children ages 6-11 years old. I don't freak out over it but here's my thinking on it...if certain substances are known to be toxic, and there's something I can do to minimize my kids' exposure to them, then why in the world wouldn't I?

 

I get where you're coming from - I really do. I think, though, unless your child is gnawing on the action figures, that your best bet for keeping them healthy is to be vigilant about what they eat. You can't avoid GMOs much in this country, but you can limit their intake of corn, cook from scratch as often as possible with fresh and organic produce (as your budget allows - I know it can get pricey), eating grass-fed beef, filtering your water and drinking lots of it (instead of drinks with the corn syrup). Or you may have better luck with looking up what other products contain the bad chemicals and avoiding those. I just don't know that there are many plastic toys in this country that won't contain the toxins you're trying to avoid.

 

That said, I thought Norwegian countries had banned PVC. You might do some digging on what toys come out of there that you could have shipped.

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Ok, I have found another person that might be able to make something for you. They say that they can do custom work:

 

http://armadillodreams.com/

 

(Just so you know, I have been looking at all these already! I have fallen in love with Ostheimer animals and figures. But they are so expensive! So, I have been trying to find other options. I also like Holztiger, Kinderkram, and Buntspecte but they are also more. So, I have been looking for American made ones.)

 

Part of me really want to try and make them myself. :)

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I get where you're coming from - I really do. I think, though, unless your child is gnawing on the action figures...

 

 

:lol: This is what my 10 month old does to every toy in the house! As everyone probably remembers about this stage, if the baby can touch it, she'll mouth it. If we were out of the drooling, chewing, gnawing stage, I don't know that I'd be looking so closely at everything we bring into the house. But then again, like I mentioned, the highest levels of PVC were found not in babies and toddlers, but in kids age 6-11, for whatever reason.

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, but I figure *something* is behind the skyrocketing cancer numbers

 

Skyrocketing? Cancer incident rates have been declining over time.

http://progressreport.cancer.gov/doc_detail.asp?pid=1&did=2009&chid=93&coid=920&mid#trends

 

early puberty of our young girls

This still a hotly debated topic. An interesting piece from the NYT.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/01/magazine/puberty-before-age-10-a-new-normal.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

 

"While studies have shown that the average age of breast budding has fallen significantly since the 1970s, the average age of first period, or menarche, has remained fairly constant, dropping to only 12.5 from 12.8 years."

 

The theories on why this is occurring are quite interesting and spelled out later in the article.

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Personally, I bought the standard, name-brand (Mattel or Hasbro or whatever) action figures, and didn't worry about the PVC issue. My ds wasn't going to eat the toys, and I didn't think it was worth getting all worked up over the horrible dangers inherent in playing with some action figures. :rolleyes:

 

Maybe I'm in the minority here, but I think all of the fear and terror over these toys is incredibly over-blown. Kids have played with these toys for many, many years, and I just don't think that many (if any) of them have been irreparably damaged by it. Sure, if the kid is allergic to one of the materials used in the toys, that's a different situation, but as a general health risk, I just don't think the danger of playing with action figures would even enter my radar. Kids are probably exposed to more toxins every day by just walking outside in the "fresh" air.

 

This.

 

Dh worked as an environmental chemist years ago and one of the projects he worked on was PVC plastics. They are actually very stable at room temperature. It's when they are used for food and heated that the problems occur.

 

Most of the risk with toys seems to be with toxic paints or colorings.

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This.

 

Dh worked as an environmental chemist years ago and one of the projects he worked on was PVC plastics. They are actually very stable at room temperature. It's when they are used for food and heated that the problems occur.

 

Most of the risk with toys seems to be with toxic paints or colorings.

 

So I guess popping Batman into the microwave for a minute or two, and then eating him as a snack would be a bad thing, but just playing with him in the living room would probably be OK, right? ;)

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So I guess popping Batman into the microwave for a minute or two, and then eating him as a snack would be a bad thing, but just playing with him in the living room would probably be OK, right? ;)

 

:lol:

 

Thanks for that!

 

Thanks to other poster for interesting links, will have to check it out!

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Ok, I have found another person that might be able to make something for you. They say that they can do custom work:

 

http://armadillodreams.com/

 

(Just so you know, I have been looking at all these already! I have fallen in love with Ostheimer animals and figures. But they are so expensive! So, I have been trying to find other options. I also like Holztiger, Kinderkram, and Buntspecte but they are also more. So, I have been looking for American made ones.)

 

Part of me really want to try and make them myself. :)

 

Wow, these are gorgeous pieces! But you're right, they're pricey... I'd love to try my hand at making these too! A little project we could do in all our spare time, right? :laugh:

 

We're going up to Oregon for the Christmas break and there are some handyman/carpenters in our family who might be willing to cut out some wooden figurine shapes...not quite as exciting as the plastic stuff but far safer IMO...

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This.

 

Dh worked as an environmental chemist years ago and one of the projects he worked on was PVC plastics. They are actually very stable at room temperature. It's when they are used for food and heated that the problems occur.

 

Most of the risk with toys seems to be with toxic paints or colorings.

 

 

Gotta strongly disagree with this. Don't have much time right now, but I can't let this stand. PVC is recognized the world over, including here in the US, as a toxic material that leaches out harmful chemicals and is toxic from creation to disposal (there is no safe way to dispose of PVC). Many European and Asian countries have banned the use of PVC and for good reason.

 

http://www.chej.org/pvcfactsheets/PVC_Policies_Around_The_World.html

 

Working in a field gives you experience in working in that field...it doesn't confer all knowledge about the material you're working with. My FIL is a PhD in horticulture, a full tenured professor at a major university for 30 years specializing in weed control, natural and chemical pesticides. You'd think he'd be extra careful about the food he eats, choose organic and non-GMO...not at all, he believes GMO's are as safe as the original (a gene is a gene is a gene), and almost never buys organic (except when we come to visit him and ask him to buy organic, haha!). He's an expert in his field but it doesn't mean he's an expert in the biological effects of eating conventional (non-organic), GMO foods.

 

Check it out, PVC's are aka the "poison plastic". Saying that they're "very stable" at room temperature is misleading. Yes, PVC's stable in that it doesn't melt or degrade, but they off-gas (that new shower curtain smell) and more dangerously, leach toxins that are known carcinogens and endocrine modulators (hormone disruptors).

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Skyrocketing? Cancer incident rates have been declining over time.

http://progressrepor...=920&mid#trends

 

 

This still a hotly debated topic. An interesting piece from the NYT.

http://www.nytimes.c...wanted=all&_r=0

 

"While studies have shown that the average age of breast budding has fallen significantly since the 1970s, the average age of first period, or menarche, has remained fairly constant, dropping to only 12.5 from 12.8 years."

 

The theories on why this is occurring are quite interesting and spelled out later in the article.

 

Disagree with your conclusions from these articles. The all-cancer incidence rate, if you compare to 1975, has much INCREASED. But if you compare to the peak in the 1980's, it's leveled off. We have significantly higher cancer incidence than in 1975.

 

The second article is misquoted IMO. Here's the quote in CONTEXT (p. 2 of the NY Times article):

 

Now most researchers seem to agree on one thing: Breast budding in girls is starting earlier. The debate has shifted to what this means. Puberty, in girls, involves three events: the growth of breasts, the growth of pubic hair and a first period. Typically the changes unfold in that order, and the proc­ess takes about two years. But the data show a confounding pattern. While studies have shown that the average age of breast budding has fallen significantly since the 1970s, the average age of first period, or menarche, has remained fairly constant, dropping to only 12.5 from 12.8 years. Why would puberty be starting earlier yet ending more or less at the same time?

-----------------------------

Puberty IS starting earlier in girls. The reasons behind this aren't fully understood, but one of the culprits suspected is exposure to toxic plastics, of which PVC is the worst.

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Font came off funny on the quote so trying again here on the NY Times article (from p.2):

 

Now most researchers seem to agree on one thing: Breast budding in girls is starting earlier. The debate has shifted to what this means. Puberty, in girls, involves three events: the growth of breasts, the growth of pubic hair and a first period. Typically the changes unfold in that order, and the proc­ess takes about two years. But the data show a confounding pattern. While studies have shown that the average age of breast budding has fallen significantly since the 1970s, the average age of first period, or menarche, has remained fairly constant, dropping to only 12.5 from 12.8 years. Why would puberty be starting earlier yet ending more or less at the same time?

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Disagree with your conclusions from these articles. The all-cancer incidence rate, if you compare to 1975, has much INCREASED. But if you compare to the peak in the 1980's, it's leveled off. We have significantly higher cancer incidence than in 1975.

 

Actually, it has declined from the 80s.

Even if you were correct (hint: you are not), to cry "skyrocketing rates!" while incident rates are leveling off when be an outright lie.

http://www.cdc.gov/Features/dsCancerAnnualReport/

 

 

The second article is misquoted IMO. Here's the quote in CONTEXT (p. 2 of the NY Times article):

 

Now most researchers seem to agree on one thing: Breast budding in girls is starting earlier. The debate has shifted to what this means. Puberty, in girls, involves three events: the growth of breasts, the growth of pubic hair and a first period. Typically the changes unfold in that order, and the proc­ess takes about two years. But the data show a confounding pattern. While studies have shown that the average age of breast budding has fallen significantly since the 1970s, the average age of first period, or menarche, has remained fairly constant, dropping to only 12.5 from 12.8 years. Why would puberty be starting earlier yet ending more or less at the same time?

-----------------------------

Puberty IS starting earlier in girls. The reasons behind this aren't fully understood, but one of the culprits suspected is exposure to toxic plastics, of which PVC is the worst.

 

Correct. Puberty is starting early in one are - breast budding. Average age of menarche is not significantly changing.

 

Please show me a credible link that cites PVC as the primary cause of early breast budding.

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Working in a field gives you experience in working in that field...it doesn't confer all knowledge about the material you're working with. My FIL is a PhD in horticulture, a full tenured professor at a major university for 30 years specializing in weed control, natural and chemical pesticides. You'd think he'd be extra careful about the food he eats, choose organic and non-GMO...not at all, he believes GMO's are as safe as the original (a gene is a gene is a gene), and almost never buys organic (except when we come to visit him and ask him to buy organic, haha!). He's an expert in his field but it doesn't mean he's an expert in the biological effects of eating conventional (non-organic), GMO foods.

 

Or more likely, he understands GMO foods better than you do.

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Wow, these are gorgeous pieces! But you're right, they're pricey... I'd love to try my hand at making these too! A little project we could do in all our spare time, right? :laugh: We're going up to Oregon for the Christmas break and there are some handyman/carpenters in our family who might be willing to cut out some wooden figurine shapes...not quite as exciting as the plastic stuff but far safer IMO...

 

Not necessarily. It all depends on what chemicals were used to clean the wood, treat the wood, paint the wood, varnish the wood, etc.

 

Just because it's made of wood doesn't make it healthy.

 

And really, what kid wants homemade wooden Avengers? :confused:

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Not necessarily. It all depends on what chemicals were used to clean the wood, treat the wood, paint the wood, varnish the wood, etc.

 

Just because it's made of wood doesn't make it healthy.

 

And really, what kid wants homemade wooden Avengers? :confused:

 

Agree that any wood does not equal good wood. Hopefully if we go to all the trouble of getting wooden toys, we won't cover it with bad paint.

 

We must be weird, because wooden action figures don't sound so off the wall to me, and when I asked him just now, the prospect of action figures made of wood still lit up my ds's face. He did ask though, if they can be posable. Now THAT's a stretch!

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Agree that any wood does not equal good wood. Hopefully if we go to all the trouble of getting wooden toys, we won't cover it with bad paint.

 

We must be weird, because wooden action figures don't sound so off the wall to me, and when I asked him just now, the prospect of action figures made of wood still lit up my ds's face. He did ask though, if they can be posable. Now THAT's a stretch!

 

Apparently, your ds and I think alike, because when I was thinking of the wooden figures, my first thought was that they wouldn't be any fun because they wouldn't be posable! :D

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Actually, it has declined from the 80s.

Even if you were correct (hint: you are not), to cry "skyrocketing rates!" while incident rates are leveling off when be an outright lie.

http://www.cdc.gov/F...erAnnualReport/

 

 

The second article is misquoted IMO. Here's the quote in CONTEXT (p. 2 of the NY Times article):

 

 

 

Correct. Puberty is starting early in one are - breast budding. Average age of menarche is not significantly changing.

 

Please show me a credible link that cites PVC as the primary cause of early breast budding.

 

The summary of all-cancer rates show that all-cancer rates are higher in 2008 than 1975. Yes, if you compare 2008 to the peak in the 1980's, it is lower in 2008 than in the 80s. But compared to 1975, cancer rates are significantly higher in 2008.

 

Ok, so we can agree that the NY Times article states that breast budding is starting earlier in girls now than before. Breast budding is a sign of puberty. Therefore, girls are starting puberty earlier now than in the past. Correct?

 

Ah, there's the rub - no one knows for certain the cause of early puberty. The NYT article lists several plausible culprits of early puberty, one of which is exposure to toxic plastics. What we know is that chemicals leach from PVC, bad stuff like phthalates and BPA. There's debate about just how bad these things are, but it's looking pretty bad IMO, and I don't need to wait til more countries ban the stuff before making decisions to avoid it for my own family.

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The summary of all-cancer rates show that all-cancer rates are higher in 2008 than 1975. Yes, if you compare 2008 to the peak in the 1980's, it is lower in 2008 than in the 80s. But compared to 1975, cancer rates are significantly higher in 2008.

 

I didn't compare them to anything. Rates that are declining over a period of 20 years cannot be called "skyrocketing". Your initial post was incorrect. Just accept that and move along.

 

Ok, so we can agree that the NY Times article states that breast budding is starting earlier in girls now than before. Breast budding is a sign of puberty. Therefore, girls are starting puberty earlier now than in the past. Correct?

 

Yes, but it is ending at the same time, and is not the public health scare you are making it out to be.

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I didn't compare them to anything. Rates that are declining over a period of 20 years cannot be called "skyrocketing". Your initial post was incorrect. Just accedpt that and move along.

 

 

 

Yes, but it is ending at the same time, and is not the public health scare you are making it out to be.

 

 

 

I was just going based on your cited article, but took a quick look at the World Health Organization and according to them, cancer rates are increasing:

 

http://www.who.int/features/qa/15/en/index.html

 

"Q: Are the number of cancer cases increasing or decreasing in the world?

A: Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide and the total number of cases globally is increasing.

The number of global cancer deaths is projected to increase 45% from 2007 to 2030 (from 7.9 million to 11.5 million deaths), influenced in part by an increasing and aging global population. "

"your initial post was incorrect. Accept that and move along." Now that you concede that girls are starting puberty earlier now, may I ask you to consider your words? I think more people are concerned about the early age of puberty onset, rather than the end of it.

I never said early puberty is a public health threat. I stated that girls are starting puberty earlier now than before, and that PVC, ubiquitous in toys and everyday plastics, contain known hormone disruptors and I suspect, have a link to that.

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This is just the beginning then. There's of course fire retardants in sofas, arsenic in brown rice....

 

 

There's reasonable and there's obsessive. There's known risks and suspicions. Each person's ruler is different. Trying to avoid PVCs in things that my kids might put in their mouths or spend hours in contact with, yeah, it's worth it for me to try to avoid. Not being to sit on a couch or eat brown rice for fear of whatever contaminant, that's not *living* in my book.

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There's reasonable and there's obsessive. There's known risks and suspicions. Each person's ruler is different. Trying to avoid PVCs in things that my kids might put in their mouths or spend hours in contact with, yeah, it's worth it for me to try to avoid. Not being to sit on a couch or eat brown rice for fear of whatever contaminant, that's not *living* in my book.

 

 

Personally, I don't think it's obsessive to avoid brown rice. I believe there are a number of reasonable people on the forum who are avoiding brown rice and switching to rice grown outside the US.

 

I did avoid plastic toys while DD was a baby and only bought HABA or similar brands. But she's older now, but still I try to buy toys made in the US or toys without phthalate.

 

I also don't think it's obsessive to avoid fire retardants. There was a study released recently showing a link between these toxins and cancer, hormone disruption, and lowered IQ. Of course not everyone can buy a new sofa. It's just easier and cheaper for most of us to think about replacing toys versus replacing sofas and mattresses. But the toxins are still there.

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I think ChocolateReign was saying that puberty isn't starting early. ONE indicator for puberty is being seen earlier.

 

I'll look for some links but I've seen medical articles that "blame" early puberty on better nutrition (compared to 50 to 100 years ago), and the early onset of breasts being due to children weighing more than they used to.

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I was just going based on your cited article, but took a quick look at the World Health Organization and according to them, cancer rates are increasing:

 

http://www.who.int/f...5/en/index.html

 

 

"Q: Are the number of cancer cases increasing or decreasing in the world?

A: Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide and the total number of cases globally is increasing.

The number of global cancer deaths is projected to increase 45% from 2007 to 2030 (from 7.9 million to 11.5 million deaths), influenced in part by an increasing and aging global population. "

"your initial post was incorrect. Accept that and move along."

 

You are comparing apples to oranges. As your quote states, a greater population with a higher average age is expected to have more cases of cancer. However, in the US, the number of cases of ALL cancers per 100,000 people (incident rate) is on the decline. I don't believe there are accurate figures to compare incident rates worldwide over a period of time due to the differing access to healthcare in various parts of the world over 20-30 years.

The incident rate for certain cancers is expected to fall during the time period you cited, and the increase you cite is *projected* based on certain trends in developing parts of the world among a couple of cancers (breast, prostate, and colorectal). Diet and a more "western" lifestyle is considered to be the key factor in that rise.

http://publications....FS_WORLD_A4.pdf

 

 

 

Now that you concede that girls are starting puberty earlier now, may I ask you to consider your words? I think more people are concerned about the early age of puberty onset, rather than the end of it.

 

One element of puberty is starting earlier. Nothing more than that.

I never said early puberty is a public health threat. I stated that girls are starting puberty earlier now than before, and that PVC, ubiquitous in toys and everyday plastics, contain known hormone disruptors and I suspect, have a link to that.

 

Applying some logic, why are breasts budding earlier but menarche is not starting earlier? Why are we not seeing a significant change among boys? You can suspect what you wish, but you have nothing to back up your beliefs.

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One element of puberty is starting earlier. Nothing more than that.

 

 

Applying some logic, why are breasts budding earlier but menarche is not starting earlier? Why are we not seeing a significant change among boys? You can suspect what you wish, but you have nothing to back up your beliefs.

 

Boys ARE hitting puberty earlier, too. I'm not making up this stuff for fun.

 

http://www.cnn.com/2012/10/20/health/boys-early-puberty/index.html

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Boys ARE hitting puberty earlier, too. I'm not making up this stuff for fun.

 

http://www.cnn.com/2...erty/index.html

 

Interesting. I will review later.

 

I noticed you did not address your inaccuracy on cancer statistics.

 

ETA: Interesting point in the article - as with girls, development is starting earlier and ending at the same time.

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Interesting. I will review later.

 

I noticed you did not address your inaccuracy on cancer statistics.

 

ETA: Interesting point in the article - as with girls, development is starting earlier and ending at the same time.

 

 

There was no inaccuracy. Cancer incidence IS increasing worldwide. As I posted above, The World Health Organization replies and posts answers to common questions, and to the question "Are the number of cancer cases increasing or decreasing in the world?", they answered "Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide and the total number of cases globally is increasing." They went on to enumerate some key risk factors, including environmental carcinogens. The entire text here:

 

http://www.who.int/features/qa/15/en/index.html

 

The WHO document that you cited also says the same thing. The westernization of developing countries includes exposure to the chemical toxins of the west.

 

If you have an issue with me saying that cancer incidence is increasing, then you have an issue with the info coming out from the World Health Org.

 

The reason why I didn't go into this before is because (I'm only saying this because you asked why I didn't address the "inaccurate" cancer stats again) I'm getting rather tired of interacting with you on this topic. So instead of going into it again, I sent you a link as reply to your question of why precocious puberty isn't happening in boys - it IS. The article goes into the reasons scientists strongly suspect environmental chemicals having a role in accelerating puberty.

 

Feel free to reply but I've got way too much to do to keep cyber-arguing with you further.

 

Many thanks to everyone for their helpful suggestions for my son's toys!

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Guest Tedesca

I don't think they have Avengers in their catalog, but for other figurines, Disney characters and cool animal replicas you can check out the Bullyland brand. My kids have a number of Bullyland figures and they are of equal detail and quality as Schleich, Papo and Safari, but made of safer materials.

 

From their website: "Parents concerned about the safety of their children’s toys need look no further than Bullyland’s collectible hand-painted figurines made from earth friendly and toxin-free materials. This unique line of award winning toys from Germany is made without harmful phthalates and are PVC-free!

 

Bullyland has been working hard for over 30 years to ensure their high quality figurines are as authentic and real looking as possible. They work in partnership with Stuttgart’s Museum of Natural History and Hannover’s Zoo in Germany to make sure their replications are authentic. Bullyland has been recognized internationally with the Spiel Gut Award of Excellence. Spiel Gut is an independent association consisting of psychologists, teachers, doctors, toy development experts and parents with very discriminating standards who award prizes for toys that they consider the best for stimulating a child's development.

 

Bullyland’s Soft Play line is made from natural latex that is filled with polyester fiber. Flexible bending elements encourage creative play. The natural latex is biodegradable, hypoallergenic and resistant to mold, mildew and bacteria.

 

Bullyland manufactures all their toys in Germany or Sri Lanka and prides itself in providing a safe and ethical working environment for all its production employees. Bullyland makes several different lines of figurines including prehistoric animals, farm animals, pirates, fairies, licensed characters and more."

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Debate about PVC dangers aside, you asked about Avengers figures that are PVC free, and I believe Lego makes buildable, poseable PVC-free figures. I cannot hyperlink, but google Lego and Avengers. There are actual Lego sets, with little minifigs, but also larger buildable figures. (As far as I can tell on just a few minutes research online, Lego is PVC-free.)

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  • 11 months later...
Guest Silvia95

Hi all!

 

I realize that it's been a year but was curious if anyone had any new updates. I'm definitely opposed to having PVC inside our home, and generally keep away from plastic toys (except Lego). DS has now reached an age where he desperately wants super hero action figures likes his friends', and I'm at a loss for options.

 

We looked at Lego's buildable figures (thank you urpedonmommy for the idea) but all the super hero ones seem to have been retired.

I did a general Google search for "PVC-free action figures", which is how I came across this post. :)

 

TIA!

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Hi all!

 

I realize that it's been a year but was curious if anyone had any new updates. I'm definitely opposed to having PVC inside our home, and generally keep away from plastic toys (except Lego). DS has now reached an age where he desperately wants super hero action figures likes his friends', and I'm at a loss for options.

 

We looked at Lego's buildable figures (thank you urpedonmommy for the idea) but all the super hero ones seem to have been retired.

I did a general Google search for "PVC-free action figures", which is how I came across this post. :)

 

TIA!

Honestly, I don't think any child has ever been harmed by playing with plastic action figures, and my opinion is that it's a ridiculous thing to worry about ,unless your child eats his toys.

 

I don't mean to be rude, but I truly believe that there is nothing to worry about if you let your child have some regular action figures.

 

By the way, welcome to the forum! I hope you'll decide to stay and get to know us! :)

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Guest Silvia95

Thanks for the welcome!

 

My concern is mostly around stuff that off-gas at this point. :( He's definitely old enough to not be "eating" his toys. Undoubtedly, PVC is pretty pervasive in life in general but I've been working towards minimizing exposure for our family as much as it can be helped. It also helps to solidify my stance that various companies/brands are eliminating PVC in their products (e.g. some car companies, hospitals), although I guess I don't actually know if the alternatives/replacements are any better. I know PVC as the "poison plastic" (and it's actually banned (!!) in some countries & cities) and it's really baffling that I can't find action figures in something that's more "safe". 

 

Curious what action figures the European kids are playing with... :)

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Thanks for the welcome!

 

My concern is mostly around stuff that off-gas at this point. :( He's definitely old enough to not be "eating" his toys. Undoubtedly, PVC is pretty pervasive in life in general but I've been working towards minimizing exposure for our family as much as it can be helped. It also helps to solidify my stance that various companies/brands are eliminating PVC in their products (e.g. some car companies, hospitals), although I guess I don't actually know if the alternatives/replacements are any better. I know PVC as the "poison plastic" (and it's actually banned (!!) in some countries & cities) and it's really baffling that I can't find action figures in something that's more "safe". 

 

Curious what action figures the European kids are playing with... :)

 

Are you certain PVC is banned completely in Europe?  I can only find where the use of phthalates in toys intended for use by children under the age of 3 are banned.  You seem to have some strong opinions on something you seem to only be educated on around the margins.

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