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Reaction to Ron Paul's homeschooling comment


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If this has already been posted, sorry about the repeat. I haven't had much luck getting back on here until yesterday.

 

In Ron Paul's farewell speech to Congress he made a brief statement about homeschooling. I'm very interested in your gut reactions to it whether it's positive, neutral, or negative. I'm not interest in people's thoughts on Ron Paul's political views-just homeschoolers' reactions to what he says about homeschooling in this speech. (Feel free to start a different discussion about his political views if you want to comment on those.)

 

The transcript:

 

http://washingtonexa...44#.UKsBdcXZfTo

 

I assume you can google the video if you prefer that format.

 

I'm always wary of reading quotes out of context for obvious reasons, but because some people have asked (very understandable because it's a long speech and this is a short quote) I am quoting it here:

 

"Expect the rapidly expanding homeschooling movement to play a significant role in the revolutionary reforms needed to build a free society with Constitutional protections. We cannot expect a Federal government controlled school system to provide the intellectual ammunition to combat the dangerous growth of government that threatens our liberties." Ron Paul Nov. 15, 2012

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Is this the quote?

 

"Expect the rapidly expanding homeschooling movement to play a significant role in the revolutionary reforms needed to build a free society with Constitutional protections. We cannot expect a Federal government controlled school system to provide the intellectual ammunition to combat the dangerous growth of government that threatens our liberties."

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You can also hit ctrl-F and then search for "homeschooling" to find the quote.

 

Wow...thanks for that tip! Learn something new every day. :)

 

Since I now know how to search for something, I thought I would add in Ron Paul's quote about homeschooling:

 

Expect the rapidly expanding homeschooling movement to play a significant role in the revolutionary reforms needed to build a free society with Constitutional protections. We cannot expect a Federal government controlled school system to provide the intellectual ammunition to combat the dangerous growth of government that threatens our liberties.

 

My opinion... :thumbup: Sounds good to me!

 

ETA: Oops...too slow!

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It definitely irks me that he assumes that because I choose not to send my dd to a public school, I must be a Libertarian. I get stereotyped enough as it is when I tell people that we homeschool. I'm not going to automatically be a good little soldier for the Paul family in their ongoing fight against all things governmental based on my educational philosophy, you know?

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It definitely irks me that he assumes that because I choose not to send my dd to a public school, I must be a Libertarian. I get stereotyped enough as it is when I tell people that we homeschool. I'm not going to automatically be a good little soldier for the Paul family in their ongoing fight against all things governmental based on my educational philosophy, you know?

 

 

I agree.

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It definitely irks me that he assumes that because I choose not to send my dd to a public school, I must be a Libertarian. I get stereotyped enough as it is when I tell people that we homeschool. I'm not going to automatically be a good little soldier for the Paul family in their ongoing fight against all things governmental based on my educational philosophy, you know?

 

 

Hmm... I didn't read it as "everyone that homeschools believes this." I don't think he was stereotyping at all. It is true that many of us believe it though. I do.

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Well, I think it is quite generalized to lump all public school children in lacking the intellectual ammunition.. but I think his point is can we trust our government, that pays and mandates school standards to allow a small government mentality? and with that I do agree it is foolish to assume that our children will learn from a government institution beliefs that may be contrary for the current political mindset, etc.. It falls back on the shoulders of the parents to open their children's minds to all points of view of a situation and allow them to make their own choice personally. However, this also goes with other topics of heated debate such as evolution, etc... There will always be the parents that are ultimately responsible for the education of their children...no matter who the teacher is. Now, does someone assume their responsibilities?! Well, naturally you can't force someone to be responsible.

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Hmm... I didn't read it as "everyone that homeschools believes this." I don't think he was stereotyping at all. It is true that many of us believe it though. I do.

 

 

It was specifically the part where he talks about combating the "dangerous growth of government that threatens our liberties," or whatever. The way I'm reading it is that he assumes we all think that way. I don't. I know other hsers who don't.

 

I wouldn't normally get all up in arms over hearing that. But the op did ask. ;)

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"Expect the rapidly expanding homeschooling movement to play a significant role in the revolutionary reforms needed to build a free society with Constitutional protections. We cannot expect a Federal government controlled school system to provide the intellectual ammunition to combat the dangerous growth of government that threatens our liberties." Ron Paul Nov. 15, 2012

 

 

He is painting all homeschoolers with his brush, and thus denegrates us. Not all, yea not even a majority I believe homeschool for political reasons.

And homeschooling will not keep expanding forever. It is hard work, and too much for many families. It has rapidly expanded recently, but I don't expect this bull market to go on and on (and many go back to public school at some point), especially not for political reasons.

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I don't think he speaks for all homeschoolers, nor do I think he intended to, IMO. There are certainly many reasons that people homeschool. Homeschooling does continue to expand, though, for a variety of reasons. Even if people don't agree with Paul politically, it's certainly true that government schools don't fit every child, and when you send your child there you lose control over the circumstances of what and how they learn.

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I don't think he speaks for all homeschoolers, nor do I think he intended to, IMO. There are certainly many reasons that people homeschool. Homeschooling does continue to expand, though, for a variety of reasons. Even if people don't agree with Paul politically, it's certainly true that government schools don't fit every child, and when you send your child there you lose control over the circumstances of what and how they learn.

 

Yes, this was the point.

 

He is right, right, right about almost everything.

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I don't think what he's saying is that homeschoolers are pushing/educating with a political ideology in mind. His comment brought to mind some interesting points that yes, the federal government is going to have to deal with:

 

-1000 children educated 1000 ways are going to affect society more than 1000 children educated 10 ways.

-the emphasis homeschoolers place on individualized learning will shape who they are as adults.

 

As a norm, homeschoolers go against the status quo and that has a trickle down effect. I'd say that the comfort level of not doing everything exactly like our peers is higher. The studies that have been done on social relationships of homeschoolers have shown that there is a higher percentage of those holding onto internal values rather than peer pressure. I would not be surprised at all to see more of a backlash against the taking of personal liberties as the homeschooling movement grows.

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Yes, I agree that it's about homeschooling laying the foundation for people who are able to think for themselves. Ron Paul is great friends with many liberals, such as Dennis Kucinich. I don't think he looks down on liberals the way some people seem to be implying. The psychopathic establishment that he condemned in his speech is something everyday Americans on both sides of the spectrum should be concerned about. There are liberals and conservatives, and then there are corrupt statists in Washington who are basically pretending to be liberals and conservatives. I think the most liberal homeschooler respects the Constitution a heck of a lot more than your average liberal public high school student. Ron Paul is guilty of making a generalization, but I contend that as far as generalizations go, it's a pretty good one.

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I'd have to read his entire speech to (hopefully) figure out what he's really getting at with that quote. But just taking the quote as a stand-alone, I find it rather repugnant. I despise it when any politician tries to co-opt a group of very unique individuals to suit their political purpose. IMO his statement is an insult to homeschoolers and public schoolers alike. I know we all like to pat ourselves on the back for raising kids who have the ability to think for themselves, but here's the truth . . . . lots of public and private schooled kids are perfectly capable of that, too.

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I think he did it as a parting shot at the government the way it stands now. I feel like he is saying "people are sick of the way things are run and they are trying to raise kids with more individuality and thought than a cookie cutter PS education will provide." In that respect he is right in my opinion. We are really challenging one of the biggest and most accepted social norms. I think is was a smack in the face and he used homeschooling as an example. I said the same thing about the election. Certain parts of society, who have previously felt they have no voice, have come on strong and been able to effect the the outcome of an election. I think it speaks to the success of homeschooling.

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I know we all like to pat ourselves on the back for raising kids who have the ability to think for themselves, but here's the truth . . . . lots of public and private schooled kids are perfectly capable of that, too.

 

You truly believe that statistically, homeschooled students are not more likely to have a higher ratio? As far as I can tell, public schools effectively teach children that thinking for oneself is a bad thing through their punishments and rewards system. That was my experience, anyway. I don't think for myself because public school in any way encouraged it, but in spite of the strict social conditioning that permeates institutional environments. No one is saying that there are absolutely no students in public school who think for themselves. But let's not equivocate by pretending that homeschooling and public schooling are the same in creating strong individuals with a firm grasp of the Constitution. There will always be exceptions (public school students who goon to be constitutional scholars and homeschooled students who couldn't tell you the difference between the Constitution and the Gettysburg Address), but it is a very reasonable observation when speculating on statistical trends.

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You truly believe that statistically, homeschooled students are not more likely to have a higher ratio?

 

Based strictly on my own observations, no.

 

I think the ability to think independently/critically is more a product of ones intelligence level and the home environment in which one was raised than it is to the type of schooling one experienced.

 

I'd guess that the majority of the homeschooling parents on this board are products of the public school system, and yet we pride ourselves on our ability to think independently. I'm a product of the public school system, raised by parents who were public schooled. But indepent/critical thinking was (and is) a trait that's always been highly valued and encouraged within our immediate and extended family. Within my extended family we have a pretty good representation of homeschooled and public schooled kids, as well as a handful who attend(ed) private schools, and I can't tell any significant difference in their critical/independent thinking skills. My conclusion is it's because, regardless of how they are or were schooled, they were all raised in a family environment that values education and encourages independent thinking. We'd like to think that ALL homeschooling homes do that, but I've met some homeschooled kids who couldn't think their way out of a dead-end alley.

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I don't think there are enough homeschoolers to make that kind of difference. We're vastly outnumbered. Not to mention that a lot of homeschoolers aren't constitutionalists/ conservatives/ or even worried about politics. Where I live most homeschoolers are hippy types who want their kids to in touch with nature and don't like the idea of them locked up in an institutional building all day. It has nothing to do with values/ patriotism/ politics for them.

 

That being said I won't be surprised if some intellectual and moral leaders do arise from the homeschooling movement in one way or another. But I don't necessarily think it will change the world. I wish it would though.

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I agree with him 100%, and it's true that to escape your child being inundated with what the Education Establishment believes, you probably need to homeschool them. After all, when you send your child to a government school, do you really think they will speak about limited government as a good thing? It would be like sending a child to a Catholic School and expecting that child to be taught that Catholicism should be marginal in his or her life. Just isn't going to happen. The #1 thing a person can do to start to change the way the society is drifting is to get the kids out of the public schools. That does NOT mean that all homeschoolers will believe or teach that way...it just means if you want your child taught that way, the public schools are not the way to go.

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It does beg the question of where most of his own followers were educated? Most of them grew up long before hsing was a viable option and attended institutional schools where they somehow became revolutionaries. I don't think hsing is primarily a political statement for most hsers, it's just an excellent practical option for lots of families today because of changes in available technology. Without the internet, I don't think we'd see the explosive growth we've seen in hsing, it would be too hard and isolating.

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I'm not sure if I'm understanding you correctly, but I think a big problem for some comes from assuming values/patriotism/politics belongs to one side, and "hippie" nature lovers the other. That's a huge fail.

 

 

:iagree: I don't know if the OP of this comment intended it that way, but I don't think it's fair or helpful to categorize folks into one of those two camps. I embrace certain values, consider myself patriotic, and am very involved in politics...albeit in a very different way than someone who considers themselves conservative. For this, I get pegged as a "hippie." Truth be told, I don't fall into either stereotypical homeschool camp.

 

 

I agree with him 100%, and it's true that to escape your child being inundated with what the Education Establishment believes, you probably need to homeschool them. After all, when you send your child to a government school, do you really think they will speak about limited government as a good thing? It would be like sending a child to a Catholic School and expecting that child to be taught that Catholicism should be marginal in his or her life. Just isn't going to happen. The #1 thing a person can do to start to change the way the society is drifting is to get the kids out of the public schools. That does NOT mean that all homeschoolers will believe or teach that way...it just means if you want your child taught that way, the public schools are not the way to go.

 

 

Plenty of folks from public school backgrounds believe in limited government. And I know several people educated in Catholic schools who not only are not Catholic, they are atheist (including my husband)

 

I agree, but I don't think it's as dire as some people spin it. Meaning, I still think when it comes to values, that family has a bigger influence over kids than schools. At least I feel like my family influenced me much more than my schools.

 

But if you are referring to the specifics of which topics are covered and how, then yeah of course one has little control over that. And I do think that's somewhat irritating. On the other hand, how practical is it to allow parents to vote on every topic that will be covered, or every textbook that will be used, etc.

 

I guess I don't see it as a total conspiracy. Not that I don't love the fact I can do what I want and have a lot of control.

 

I kind of like RP, and that's odd, but he is a little too alarmist for my taste. I guess the message I take from him is that the individual is not as stupid as the government would have us believe. We supposedly need every aspect of our life controlled in case there are too many people too stupid to think for themselves. I don't like that sentiment.

 

:iagree: espcially with the bolded parts. And while I think RP is batcarp crazy (and yes, way too alarmist), and while I don't believe in the libertarian views on just how limited government should be, I do agree with some of what he says--but not in the case of the quote the thread is based on. I personally am not homeschooling for political reasons, and I don't think that government-funded schools are totally evil.

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HSLDA likes to spin this story from their perspective as well. And now Ron Paul. The thing is, there was a study last year... argh... I wish I could find it... that showed that homeschoolers on the whole are actually less politically engaged than some other groups.

 

So even just beyond the fact that there are all these assumptions about how homeschoolers would change politics when we're actually a very heterogeneous group, there's the fact that homeschoolers aren't more politically engaged and active than other groups. Again, I'm sure some are, but the idea that there's some army of homeschoolers waiting to change the world together just isn't true at this time.

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It definitely irks me that he assumes that because I choose not to send my dd to a public school, I must be a Libertarian. I get stereotyped enough as it is when I tell people that we homeschool. I'm not going to automatically be a good little soldier for the Paul family in their ongoing fight against all things governmental based on my educational philosophy, you know?

 

 

One of my pet peeves is when sweeping statements are made about an entire group of people. Public school didn't work well for my kid. I'm seeing it working well for some friend's kids. I know homeschooled kids who are NOT being taught to think for themselves either. I think the end result has to do with how much a parent values education and how they apply that at home. My personal reasons for homeschooling have everything to do with my kids, and the fact that it's working for us as a family at this moment in time. Our choice has nothing to do with politics (which happen to be not conservative or liberatarian).

 

ETA - My oldest attended PS for 2 years and I still follow our local public schools. I really think the schools at least locally have their hands full with budgets, testing, dealing with behavoiral problems, large class sizes, and trying to cover their teaching points. I didn't see any mass brain washing encouraging large government control by any stretch, and I live in a very liberal area.

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Based strictly on my own observations, no.

 

I think the ability to think independently/critically is more a product of ones intelligence level and the home environment in which one was raised than it is to the type of schooling one experienced.

 

I'd guess that the majority of the homeschooling parents on this board are products of the public school system, and yet we pride ourselves on our ability to think independently. I'm a product of the public school system, raised by parents who were public schooled. But indepent/critical thinking was (and is) a trait that's always been highly valued and encouraged within our immediate and extended family. Within my extended family we have a pretty good representation of homeschooled and public schooled kids, as well as a handful who attend(ed) private schools, and I can't tell any significant difference in their critical/independent thinking skills. My conclusion is it's because, regardless of how they are or were schooled, they were all raised in a family environment that values education and encourages independent thinking. We'd like to think that ALL homeschooling homes do that, but I've met some homeschooled kids who couldn't think their way out of a dead-end alley.

 

 

I agree. There are loads of the girls should not go to college type of homeschoolers. There are plenty of public charter school types. There are plenty of moderates who have other reasons for homeschooling. There are plenty of not so smart homeschoolers, just like there are not so smart people in every segment of society.

 

I don't think there are enough homeschoolers to make that kind of difference. We're vastly outnumbered. Not to mention that a lot of homeschoolers aren't constitutionalists/ conservatives/ or even worried about politics. Where I live most homeschoolers are hippy types who want their kids to in touch with nature and don't like the idea of them locked up in an institutional building all day. It has nothing to do with values/ patriotism/ politics for them.

 

I am highly engaged in politics; I am extremely patriotic; I consider myself an intellectual; we have strong personal values; and disagree both with Ron Paul's personal version of the constitution (mainly because it necessitates ignoring sections of the constitution and the writings of the founding fathers) and the extreme right. You find homeschoolers on all points of the political spectrum.

 

 

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It definitely irks me that he assumes that because I choose not to send my dd to a public school, I must be a Libertarian. I get stereotyped enough as it is when I tell people that we homeschool. I'm not going to automatically be a good little soldier for the Paul family in their ongoing fight against all things governmental based on my educational philosophy, you know?

 

For some reason, my enter key isn't working -random! Anyway, I haven't read the whole thread, but just knowing some about Ron Paul - I don't think the statement means homeschooling = libertarian. I think it's just that willingness to not accept that what the gov. offers is the best and the willingness to do something about it that that will lead to hsers making differences in our country. KWIM?
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I agree, but I don't think it's as dire as some people spin it. Meaning, I still think when it comes to values, that family has a bigger influence over kids than schools. At least I feel like my family influenced me much more than my schools.

 

But if you are referring to the specifics of which topics are covered and how, then yeah of course one has little control over that. And I do think that's somewhat irritating. On the other hand, how practical is it to allow parents to vote on every topic that will be covered, or every textbook that will be used, etc.

 

I guess I don't see it as a total conspiracy. Not that I don't love the fact I can do what I want and have a lot of control.

 

I kind of like RP, and that's odd, but he is a little too alarmist for my taste. I guess the message I take from him is that the individual is not as stupid as the government would have us believe. We supposedly need every aspect of our life controlled in case there are too many people too stupid to think for themselves. I don't like that sentiment.

 

<nods head rapidly in agreement>

 

Regarding the practicality of having parents involved in the choice of curricula: I think the control of schools needs to be returned entirely to local school districts. "Teachers" don't teach anymore. They try to maintain a state of controlled chaos in their classrooms. Why? Because the state gives them mandates on how/what things should be done, and the federal government gives them mandates on how/what things should be done. They're too busy trying to obey all of the absurd regulations (or, heaven forbid! lose state or federal funding) while preparing those students they can to score high on a meaningless standardized test to impart knowledge to anyone! I think we'd see far greater results with public schools if we allowed local school boards and -gasp!- parents to make decisions about what was to be taught and how. A parent could choose *not* to be involved, but at least those who truly want to take an active roll would be allowed to do so.

 

Gosh....I could type more, but I think this thread is probably going to get deleted anyway, and I really, really, really have to shrink my to-do list today! Y'all have fun debating! But not too much fun. If this thread devolves into kilt-land, will someone please look up my phone number and give me a ring so that I don't miss it?

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It definitely irks me that he assumes that because I choose not to send my dd to a public school, I must be a Libertarian. I get stereotyped enough as it is when I tell people that we homeschool. I'm not going to automatically be a good little soldier for the Paul family in their ongoing fight against all things governmental based on my educational philosophy, you know?

 

No one has ever stereotyped me as a libertarian. But, most believe I must be an ultra conservative Christian. I remember going to a dinner party for dh's work and quite a few people I'd never met (but knew we homeschooled) told me they were surprised by me. One brave sold said he was excpecting a long jean jumper and a bad perm.

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-1000 children educated 1000 ways are going to affect society more than 1000 children educated 10 ways.

-the emphasis homeschoolers place on individualized learning will shape who they are as adults.

Really? Why? There is certainly a contingent of homeschoolers who believe women should stay at home and raise kids. They, therefore, won't be having huge impacts on society aside from their own family. There are also people who live "off the grid" and want nothing to do with the government or society.

 

Does the style of education matter? I mean, just because two or three or five people were educated in the same manner, hardly means they will end up in the same place or doing the same things. In my high school class, let's take a random sample - one became a dentist, one girl was already pregnant at graduation and never went to college, one became a nurse, a few have office/secretarial jobs, one dropped out of college and works in a coffee shop....how are these people the same when their families also were not the same? Some families placed a huge emphasis on education and/or guided their kids towards certain professions. I just don't see how my high school made this HUGE impact on my life more than anything else, or that I have everything in common with kids I went to k-12 education with. Or for that matter, that I am a big loser because I wasn't homeschooled myself.

 

I find this idea that all homeschoolers are libertarian to be somewhat irritating. Maybe it's because I just got an ad from a certain CM content provider with a libertarian book as their sole economics offering, and a certain other wellknown CM free content provider also has a serious libertarian slant to their economics offerings in high school. I have no clue if most homeschoolers are libertarian, but I doubt it. I would be equally offended at the idea that everyone who sends their kid to private school shares some market-based ideology, or that everyone who sends their kid to public school must be either a communist or extremely poor. People are way more complex than this.

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HSLDA likes to spin this story from their perspective as well. And now Ron Paul. The thing is, there was a study last year... argh... I wish I could find it... that showed that homeschoolers on the whole are actually less politically engaged than some other groups.

 

So even just beyond the fact that there are all these assumptions about how homeschoolers would change politics when we're actually a very heterogeneous group, there's the fact that homeschoolers aren't more politically engaged and active than other groups. Again, I'm sure some are, but the idea that there's some army of homeschoolers waiting to change the world together just isn't true at this time.

 

But, larger studies show the opposite to be true, homeschoolers are more likely to vote and be politically active than the general population.

 

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505145_162-37242551/can-homeschoolers-do-well-in-college/

http://www.homeschoolfacts.com/index.php

http://www.home-school.com/Articles/the-facts-are-in-homeschoolers-excel.php

 

That doesn't mean that there is a large army of homeschoolers out there taking over; but we do tend to be more politically active than average. A study of,eek forgot, 87? people does not compare to studies that include thousands.

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Really? Why? There is certainly a contingent of homeschoolers who believe women should stay at home and raise kids. They, therefore, won't be having huge impacts on society aside from their own family. There are also people who live "off the grid" and want nothing to do with the government or society.

 

A group of people choosing a strong nuclear family over government intervention won't have an impact on society? Are you serious? One-income families on the rise won't have an impact on society?

 

Impact does not equal marching on Washington.

 

Does the style of education matter? I mean, just because two or three or five people were educated in the same manner, hardly means they will end up in the same place or doing the same things. In my high school class, let's take a random sample - one became a dentist, one girl was already pregnant at graduation and never went to college, one became a nurse, a few have office/secretarial jobs, one dropped out of college and works in a coffee shop....how are these people the same when their families also were not the same? Some families placed a huge emphasis on education and/or guided their kids towards certain professions. I just don't see how my high school made this HUGE impact on my life more than anything else, or that I have everything in common with kids I went to k-12 education with. Or for that matter, that I am a big loser because I wasn't homeschooled myself.

 

 

 

Immersion in an educational style is more effective than partial immersion. Homeschoolers tend to educate the way they parent, without changing ideology at 8am. This will, and does, have an effect on children as they grow up. The rest of your statement is null and has no bearing on the topic at hand. No one has said anything about being a "loser" or perfectly conforming, only that peer pressure does not have the same effect on people who are not around their age-mates all day.

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But, larger studies show the opposite to be true, homeschoolers are more likely to vote and be politically active than the general population.

 

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505145_162-37242551/can-homeschoolers-do-well-in-college/

http://www.homeschoolfacts.com/index.php

http://www.home-school.com/Articles/the-facts-are-in-homeschoolers-excel.php

 

That doesn't mean that there is a large army of homeschoolers out there taking over; but we do tend to be more politically active than average. A study of,eek forgot, 87? people does not compare to studies that include thousands.

 

 

Two of the links there are about college performance - a different issue. The other quotes a study where the participants were picked by the study author, not randomly chosen like in the Cardus study. Yes, it's a small sample, but it also doesn't have a lot to match up against in well done research.

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Yes, I agree that it's about homeschooling laying the foundation for people who are able to think for themselves. Ron Paul is great friends with many liberals, such as Dennis Kucinich. I don't think he looks down on liberals the way some people seem to be implying. The psychopathic establishment that he condemned in his speech is something everyday Americans on both sides of the spectrum should be concerned about. There are liberals and conservatives, and then there are corrupt statists in Washington who are basically pretending to be liberals and conservatives. I think the most liberal homeschooler respects the Constitution a heck of a lot more than your average liberal public high school student. Ron Paul is guilty of making a generalization, but I contend that as far as generalizations go, it's a pretty good one.

I don't think what he's saying is that homeschoolers are pushing/educating with a political ideology in mind. His comment brought to mind some interesting points that yes, the federal government is going to have to deal with:

 

-1000 children educated 1000 ways are going to affect society more than 1000 children educated 10 ways.

-the emphasis homeschoolers place on individualized learning will shape who they are as adults.

 

As a norm, homeschoolers go against the status quo and that has a trickle down effect. I'd say that the comfort level of not doing everything exactly like our peers is higher. The studies that have been done on social relationships of homeschoolers have shown that there is a higher percentage of those holding onto internal values rather than peer pressure. I would not be surprised at all to see more of a backlash against the taking of personal liberties as the homeschooling movement grows.

 

:iagree: :iagree: :iagree:

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I think it is an interesting quote. I homeschool because it is what works for our family. I would prefer to remain off the grid when it comes to homeschooling but he is not 100% wrong that there is the possibility of long term effects as the number of homeschoolers increase and those kids grow up and start families.

 

I also don't think that government run schools are an institution designed to usurp parental authority and just create little worker bees. It is definitely a system in need of some changes. I know many successful kids who attend public school. Public, private, charter, home it all boils down to one thing imho, parental involvement. Parents invested in making sure their kids are civic minded independent thinkers will shape the future.

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