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Integrating a biblical worldview with history and other subjects


Caralee

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Hello.

 

I have been searching around alot to learn about how to integrate a biblical worldview into our history, science ...basically across the board of our curriculum.

 

We use the WTM suggestions as our guide. At present, I am homeschooling a 7th and 5th grader in the 1600-1850's of history as per WTM. We are reading from the SOTW 3 and the KFE along with the literature suggestions in the WTM. We are also reading the Story of Science series to give them a sense of science in history as I find it so disjointed otherwise. I will not be buying new spines or literature books.

 

The thing I do not need is another fully planned and laid out history curriculum or a christian based curriculum that has all the spines, literature suggestions etc in it and costs lost of money. Rather, I just want a guide that (hopefully) follows history chronologically but will give me the necessary questions and discussion ideas that I can use with my children to help them think and discuss from a biblical worldview for history, science etc. And I also want it to be inexpensive.

 

I have seen suggestions for Truthquest, but I am not impressed with it enough as some have said she implies things that God did/though that one cannot imply.... I have looked at TOG, and others, but they all come with extra books and spines that one needs to buy. The thing I like about these curriculums is that they have questions listed and discussion ideas to use in their lessons to encourage a biblical worldview.

 

What about Francis Shaffeur's "I then shall live series" Is this something I should read/watch to help me to know how to integrate a biblical worldview into our studies? I understand it is for the high school year students to learn from.

 

Is there a list of questions/ideas that have been compiled that I can use that will help us think more biblically? Kind of like how the WTM book lists questions to use in discussing literature (listed in the logic stage section).

 

Should I create my own biblical history plan?...by including Trial and Triumph, christian biographies/stories, using a biblical timeline, etc? I would love to use the Bible in our lessons, but I just don't where to start or have the time to do the necessary study to compile scriptures and teaching together to apply to what we are learning (unless someone has suggestions on how to do this??? :001_smile:)

 

What about the cornerstone curriculum? Has anyone had any experience with this? Would it give me what I need?

 

The thing that gets me is how has the pioneer homeschoolers and those that homeschooled many years prior instilled a biblical worldview into their lessons without the use of the current curriculums? It can't be as hard as it appears.

 

I would really like suggestions from those who have logic or rhetoric level students as they have the experience/knowledge I am looking for.

 

So any suggestions?

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Should I create my own biblical history plan?...by including Trial and Triumph, christian biographies/stories, using a biblical timeline, etc? I would love to use the Bible in our lessons, but I just don't where to start or have the time to do the necessary study to compile scriptures and teaching together to apply to what we are learning (unless someone has suggestions on how to do this??? :001_smile:)

This is what we do, but I don't make much attempt to line them up anymore. I tried for too long, and they didn't get done with any amount of regularity. Now my big kids (7th and 8th graders) just read through one in small, regular bites. They're savvy enough to make the timeline connections themselves. Right now they're reading through the New Foxe's Book of Martyrs, just a couple/few entries each time. We'll finish it when we finish it.

 

They're also reading through R.C. Sproul's Essential Truths of the Christian Faith in the same manner, and we use Training Hearts Teaching Minds as a family. Both of these are more concerned with apologetics than the history.

 

For just reading through the Bible they use Victor Journey through the Bible, in a WTM style. Each page has verses to read, and encyclopedia like entries that cover cultural and historical context. I don't line this up to their history when they're in ancients, but it could easily be used that way. A week of this would like something like this in our house.

Day 1: read the verses

Day 2: read a page from Victor Journey

Day 3: read the other page from Victor Journey, copy key verses if there's only one page

Day 4: do something with the references boxes available, like draw a diagram or map, look up prophecy verses in the box, and such

Day 5: write at least a paragraph about it

 

In the past we've used 100 Most Important Events in Church History, Trial and Triumph, Greenleaf Press guides, and such. Your fifth grader might enjoy In God We Trust (Crater/Hunsicker) to accompany American history, but the 7th grader would probably find it too young.

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As a Christian and a Biblical person, chances are that you already have a Biblical worldview. A worldview is about a theological grid throug-which a person interprets information. It is *not* composed of information, and it is not about including 'Christian' facts into content-based learning activities.

 

What I'm trying to say is that it is of critical importance that *you* know your own personal theological views about the big questions you are asking. They are strong questions and Christian thinkers have been having the theological conversation about them for hundreds of years.

 

Important questions like,

"Is God active in daily life, and how? Is His activity large-scale (political) and/or small-scale (personal)?"

"Is everything that has happened the ideal will of God?"

"Is the record of history the record of humanity, the record of God's will, or both?"

"How is the world / creation related to the Creator?"

"Does the way the world works reveal fingerprints of God's character, and if so, to what degree?"

 

I don't think curriculum provides that for a homeschooling parent, I think the parent provides it, by demonstrating to their child how they connect new facts into their theological ideas. It happens quite naturally -- students tend to absorb the worldview of their teachers (if that worldview is consistant, cohesive and stands through challenges).

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To Bolt...yes, that was what I was thinking. It is about what you live and believe...then transfering or rather teaching it to your children.

 

I think I will do as I had thought...be an example as the Bible says, have them study the Word and have lots of discussions...all the while adding or subtracting books as I see fit to enhance our worldview.

 

Thanks for all the input everyone!:thumbup1:

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For the list of questions with guided discussions, I was thinking about Greenleaf press. They're excellent guides and you can go as in-depth or as light as you wish. Then I would just glean from the lists of read-aloud books/literature that you like--mine are MFW, Mystery of History, Biblioplan, Sonlight, etc. Right now I'm trying to decide what to do without having to buy too much other stuff. I've got this and that, how can flesh it out into something that will give the kids a good picture of what truly happened and God's purpose in it, etc.

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As a Christian and a Biblical person, chances are that you already have a Biblical worldview. A worldview is about a theological grid throug-which a person interprets information. It is *not* composed of information, and it is not about including 'Christian' facts into content-based learning activities.

 

What I'm trying to say is that it is of critical importance that *you* know your own personal theological views about the big questions you are asking. They are strong questions and Christian thinkers have been having the theological conversation about them for hundreds of years.

 

Important questions like,

"Is God active in daily life, and how? Is His activity large-scale (political) and/or small-scale (personal)?"

"Is everything that has happened the ideal will of God?"

"Is the record of history the record of humanity, the record of God's will, or both?"

"How is the world / creation related to the Creator?"

"Does the way the world works reveal fingerprints of God's character, and if so, to what degree?"

 

I don't think curriculum provides that for a homeschooling parent, I think the parent provides it, by demonstrating to their child how they connect new facts into their theological ideas. It happens quite naturally -- students tend to absorb the worldview of their teachers (if that worldview is consistant, cohesive and stands through challenges).

Yes, this exactly. I don't feel a need to a specifically 'christian worldview insertion' curriculum b/c I feel I have a strong foundation and beliefs of how my faith explains history, science, philosophy, politics, social issues, etc... If you're used to asking 'bigger questions' for logic stage and talking about your faith as it relates to various subjects then that should be all that is necessary IMO.

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