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Would you buy a house next to a known sex offender?


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I agree with everything you wrote and actually had a similar conversation with a friend awhile back. I was the one pointing out that the unregistered, never before caught SO worry me more. And most abusers are known to the family.

 

BUT, I don't know that I could knowingly move next door to a registered sex offender. Same neighborhood, sure. Next door... I don't know. It may not be logical, but I just don't think I could do it.

 

:iagree:It is one thing to have one move into your neighborhood when you are already settled in a home etc. Or of course the risk of nonregistered ones. But to purposely buy a home next to one with those crimes, heck no. Just like I would not knowingly buy a home next to a drug house, or a gang headquarters.

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:iagree:

 

There is little to stop a registered SO from moving in near you wherever you buy. I would not think I was increasing my safety by passing on an otherwise great house. Because I would tend to assume there are some, registered or not, in basically all areas. Sex offenses are far too common for there to be many areas with no sex offenders. The sex offender registry does little to reduce risk. You still need to be cautious and careful regardless of what you know (or don't know) about your neighbors.
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It would depend for me. We had a sex offender move into the house next to us . . . but . .. we had an empty lot between us. I was very diligent that the kids didn't play much on that side of the house but I had older kids (near double digits at the time) and made them aware that we were not going to socialize with the new neighbors and they always helped keep an eye on the youngers anyway. We never had any trouble with that neighbor at all though they lived there for about five years.

 

On the other hand, our other neighbor, who we did socialize with, who coached our daughter's softball team, . .. you get the picture, was convicted after living beside us for 10 years for molesting his step-daughter. EEEK . . . that's the one that was scarey and made us VERY DILIGENT as to who has contact with our kids.

 

The one that really scared me though was the man who began coming to our church who had been convicted twice of molesting friends of his daughter. We go to a very small church, this guy was roaming our halls, talking to my kids, attended for about two months before he confessed what was going on to our Pastor.

 

 

I'm convinced that the ones you don't know about are much more dangerous than the ones you know about. Of the three situations, the neighbor listed on the sex offenders list was much easier for me to deal with than the other two. Not sure about buying a house on purpose being aware of the situation, but we never considered selling when the guy moved into our neighborhood.

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My initial reaction is, "No, of course not."

 

But I think it is so unfortunate for the (presumably innocent) homeowners who happen to live in the house that is for sale. That's the other side of the registry laws. There are unintended consequences for people who did no wrong, who are not offenders. What do you do if your neighbor is registered, but you want to sell your house? How many potential buyers would walk away from a perfectly good house, because of its proximity to an abuser?

 

I'm not saying that we wouldn't do the same thing, with three daughters. It's just trying to see the situation from the point of view of the sellers. Hard luck.

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Yep, sex offenders moved in next door to us.

 

Yes, my point, exactly. So now what happens to you, if and when you decide to sell your house? Will potential buyers pass, because your house has a RSO living nearby?

 

FWIW, we could move into the "perfect" neighborhood, with no RSO, but that doesn't mean there wouldn't be any non-RSOs.

 

The people who are registered are those who done something, been caught, prosecuted, tried, convicted, and then registered. How many SOs never get through all those hoops to the point of being on the registry?

 

So, the moral of all this is that you might have potential abusers next door to you, no matter where you live or what the registry tells you.

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I agree with others who said No.

 

I remember having a psychology professor who went into prisons and worked with child sex offenders. He did not believe that they could be "cured" of their attraction to children.

 

As someone stated before, it is possible that a sex offender could live on my street now but I wouldn't knowingly move in next to one.

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I would not buy a house in a neighborhood in which a known sex offender lived, especially if I had young children.

 

Where we used to live, everyone thought they were safe from sex offenders (except me). Then one day, the FBI came to the largest, most beautiful house in the neighborhood. It was owned by an engineer and his very well known in the community for her good works wife.

 

He was arrested and is now in the federal pen for 20 years. His crimes for which there was enough evidence to convict him? Child pornography (sales and purchases), rape of a 4 year old boy in another state (child of another sex offender), continuing rape of his own daughter, who was 13 when he was captured.

 

So, any neighborhood can contain sex offenders. I'd rather keep my children (and other children who visit us) safe from known sex offenders, and put in place rules to keep them safe from the hidden ones. Living in an upscale neighborhood is no guarantee of safety.

Edited by RoughCollie
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The closest I have ever lived to one since the registries came out was 1/4 mile away. In the last two houses, there were none in a one mile radius and now not even two miles away.

 

Someone asked how you help make sure you don't get them in your neighborhood-- it isn't foolproof but living in more upscale neighborhoods tends to do it. Criminals of all sorts but particularly ones that are involved in sex crimes, tend not to make that much money. As I said, it isn't foolproof- the old man a 1/4 mile away probably lived in that home when house prices were 1/3 of what they were when I moved in. But we knew where he was and what he looked like and my kids kept away.

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:iagree:It is one thing to have one move into your neighborhood when you are already settled in a home etc. Or of course the risk of nonregistered ones. But to purposely buy a home next to one with those crimes, heck no. Just like I would not knowingly buy a home next to a drug house, or a gang headquarters.

 

:iagree:

 

Even at my kids older ages, I wouldn't knowingly buy next door to a SO.

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The closest I have ever lived to one since the registries came out was 1/4 mile away. In the last two houses, there were none in a one mile radius and now not even two miles away.

 

Someone asked how you help make sure you don't get them in your neighborhood-- it isn't foolproof but living in more upscale neighborhoods tends to do it. Criminals of all sorts but particularly ones that are involved in sex crimes, tend not to make that much money. As I said, it isn't foolproof- the old man a 1/4 mile away probably lived in that home when house prices were 1/3 of what they were when I moved in. But we knew where he was and what he looked like and my kids kept away.

 

Not true. Not true at all.

 

Sex offenders come from all backgrounds, ages, income levels, and professions.

 

Most convicted sex offenders have committed many, many assaults before being caught.

 

Most sex offenders report that they have committed multiple types of sexual assault (i.e., exhibitionism, voyeurism, oral sex, vaginal penetration, attempted penetration, fondling, & incest).

 

 

http://unioncounty.ky.gov/index.php/sex-offenders/65-safetyknow

 

http://sor.state.co.us/?SOR=home.youshouldknow

Edited by Sahamamama
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I don't think I could do it knowing the circumstances. True, I can't stop someone moving in near my home but it just seems different than specifically choosing such a situation. That's unfortunate. I'd also have to consider the proximity. What radius do I use as a marker for houses I would consider viewing that would be away from his house.

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The thing is that even if one doesn't live right in your neighborhood they live somewhere and can go to your neighborhood just as easily as anyone else. We live directly next to a school so registered sex offenders cannot live in our neighborhood but I am not at all under the illusion that my dd is safe. I just did a check and there are 4 offenders in a 2 mile radius of our house. One of them live in a very upscale neighborhood. I think that everyone needs to be cautious but honestly I don't know how anyone could feel completely safe. However, I probably wouldn't purchase a house next to a sex offender just because I would be concerned about not being able to sell it.

 

ETA: and I wouldn't take that risk with my dd.

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Until 20 min ago I was ecstatic about a house we have the chance to purchase. That is until I found out the next door neighbor is a sex offender. I'm not even positive that he still lives there, it's just the last reported address.

 

His convictions were in 2003 for lewd conduct under 16 and two prior charges of molestation in the late 90's. He is in his late 40's.

 

I highly, highly doubt we will buy the house now (unless of course he has moved) but I was curious to know what others would do/thoughts.

 

NEVER

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Someone asked how you help make sure you don't get them in your neighborhood-- it isn't foolproof but living in more upscale neighborhoods tends to do it. Criminals of all sorts but particularly ones that are involved in sex crimes, tend not to make that much money. As I said, it isn't foolproof- the old man a 1/4 mile away probably lived in that home when house prices were 1/3 of what they were when I moved in. But we knew where he was and what he looked like and my kids kept away.

 

 

I completely disagree with this. Less likely to be caught? Probably. Less likely to be convicted if they are caught? Yes. But not less likely to live in a nice area.

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Once I would have said no way. However, we now have a family member who ended up on the registry. He was 20 and girlfriend was 19 (so everyone thought). She lied to him, to his family and friends, on facebook, etc. She sent him pictures unfortunately. Her dad didn't say anything until 5 months into the relationship. Final outcome: The young man is on the registry for 15 years, the girl is still out there lying about her age on facebook, etc. She had NO ramifications for lying and so she is still doing it. Unfortunately, more young people are ending up on the registry lately, I've noticed.

So I would say it depends on the situation.

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No. I would NOT buy a house next to a known sex offender or any house that could be a danger to my family. Yes, there are people all around that do things I'm unaware of, but that doesn't justify purchasing a place next to something I was fully aware existed.

 

Susan

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It would depend on the person/crime. We've all heard the stories of the young guy who dated the younger girl and eventually married her and started a family. But somewhere along the way he was busted for dating the younger girl simply because of her age. If they'd been 25 and 20 no one would bat an eye but because he was 20 and she was 15 things didn't go so well.

 

But if it was truly a pervert (and from the dates/current age is sounds that way) no. I wouldn't deliberately move in next door. There is the safety issue and not to mention trying to unload the house later would be a nightmare.

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No. Not unless it was one of those angry parents of 17 year old girl when he was 18 or something type situations.

 

I also wouldn't let my kids blindly spend time with neighbors I didn't know or have Michael Jackson style sleepovers.

 

I had a registered sex offender (with one arm) who lived across the street from me but just moved away. And I found out after the fact that a neighbor sent a young man who was a registered sex offender over to pick up a tv from our house. Neither made me happy.

Edited by stripe
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With the charges you've described, no.

 

If it were some stupid frat boy peeing in a bush or an 18 year old dating a 15, maybe. But not molestation and lewd conduct with a youngster.

 

Here's my thing:

 

I would never deliberately buy property near a toxic waste dump. Is it possible that after buying, a discovery could be made of one nearby? Sure it is. But, I'd never *knowingly* raise my kids next to one.

 

Same thing w/a sex offender.

 

I agree with these. With the situation described, I would not knowingly buy into that.

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No. I would NOT buy a house next to a known sex offender or any house that could be a danger to my family. Yes, there are people all around that do things I'm unaware of, but that doesn't justify purchasing a place next to something I was fully aware existed.

 

Susan

 

:iagree:

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Until 20 min ago I was ecstatic about a house we have the chance to purchase. That is until I found out the next door neighbor is a sex offender. I'm not even positive that he still lives there, it's just the last reported address.

 

His convictions were in 2003 for lewd conduct under 16 and two prior charges of molestation in the late 90's. He is in his late 40's.

 

I highly, highly doubt we will buy the house now (unless of course he has moved) but I was curious to know what others would do/thoughts.

 

No, is there any question! :confused:

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I don't know if I would buy the house or not, honestly, but I don't think it would be 100% out of the question.

 

A) There are probably SO's in everyone's neighborhood - they are the ones you don't know about yet and IMHO are far more dangerous than the ones you do know about.

B) Could be a rental situation. The guy could move out in a few months, move into a new rental. Or he could be staying with family, etc.

C) Like someone else said - there is nothing stopping a SO from buying or renting a house next door after you've already moved in somewhere.

 

Being aware of the situation, warning the kids, letting the guy know (without intimidation or harassment) that you are aware of the charges and are watching - would be top priorities if you did buy. Is there anyway you could speak to your possible future neighbors who may know more about the situation?

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With the charges you've described, no.

 

If it were some stupid frat boy peeing in a bush or an 18 year old dating a 15, maybe. But not molestation and lewd conduct with a youngster.

 

This. Also, I would check to find out if he is indeed still living there. If he is, that house would be out of the question.

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NOt in that situation. My parents are buying a house on the same street as a listed offender, but his crime was against an adult, was 20 years ago, and he is now about 300lbs and on oxygen, basically confined to his house. So it just isn't the same thing.

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Someone asked how you help make sure you don't get them in your neighborhood-- it isn't foolproof but living in more upscale neighborhoods tends to do it. Criminals of all sorts but particularly ones that are involved in sex crimes, tend not to make that much money.

 

Jimmy Savile, it seems now, abused tens, maybe hundreds of children. He died with £4.3 million in assets. I think that your view that only the poor abuse is dangerous. It was Savile's wealth and celebrity that gave him access to victims.

 

Laura

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With those charges, I would not buy the house (while I had children at home). With some 'sex offender' charges, I would be much more flexible. Some teenage streaking / underage dating / peeing in public stuff is different to me, but this is *clearly* child predation.

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Has anyone asked if the OP has called her local police? Ihad a good friend marry a sex offender and I was worried. So I called our local police department and got definitions less legal definitions for what happened. I also had a great talk with a cop about the morals and ethics of this kind of thing. It put my mind at considerable ease.

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No, I am not claiming that only the poor abuse victims. I know that wealthy do too. I am talking only about people on the sex offender list, which is totally different from the whole group of sex offenders- known and unknown. Neither Jimmy Savile nor Sandusky nor the field grade officer we knew nor many others who actually do sexual crimes are on the sex offender lists. In fact, I think that child pornography cases are more common with wealthier individuals. I don't think that wealth= innocence or goodness.

 

The reason people on the sex offender registries are less likely to live in wealthier areas is the same reason all felons are also less likely to live in those same areas (Felons implies convictions, not merely doing the crimes). Why? Because once you have been convicted of a felony, it becomes much, much harder to obtain gainful employment. So where do you tend to find sex offenders- in cheap apartments, living with their parents, low rent motels, etc. Also, while as far as I know , no one checks criminal records before issuing a mortgage, they do inquire about absences from employment history. I am fairly sure that most mortgage brokers would not issue a mortgage to a registered sex offender since those people are unreliable (very high recidivism rate) and even if the guy was employed, once arrested again, the mortgage wouldn't be paid.

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NOt in that situation. My parents are buying a house on the same street as a listed offender, but his crime was against an adult, was 20 years ago, and he is now about 300lbs and on oxygen, basically confined to his house. So it just isn't the same thing.

 

Well . . . he could still sit in his front window in his underwear and stare at the kids as they get off the bus. :ack2: A creeper is a creeper, even if he's not a physical threat.

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Do you feel creeped out knowing that information?

 

My husband and I were talking that its possible for offenders to be anywhere we move. Most don't report their status so there's no way to know for sure. Still I don't know that it eases my mind enough to do it.

 

A neighbor across the street works for the county sheriff dept. Dh said he would go talk to him and see if there have been any problems since they moved to the community.

 

I just don't know though.

 

Oh sorry. I mean no I wouldn't but that doesn't mean they won't move in next door.

 

We only know about the Level 3 offender. It appears to be a group home and so we suspect there are others at lesser levels. I looked up all the offenders in our area and there are 7 more withing a mile - one a woman.

 

I was very, very mad when they moved in. I've gotten over it for the most part. The kids around here do not walk alone on our street anymore.

 

Our worst offender next door raped a 3 year old. :(

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No, I am not claiming that only the poor abuse victims. I know that wealthy do too.

 

You said that criminals were less likely to live in upscale areas. I think you mean 'convicted criminals'. In that case, I agree with you. Conversely, however, I suspect that wealth and prestige mean that there might be more unconvicted sex offenders in that same 'nice' area.

 

Laura

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Well . . . he could still sit in his front window in his underwear and stare at the kids as they get off the bus. :ack2: A creeper is a creeper, even if he's not a physical threat.

 

yes, but he wasn't ever convicted of anything with kids, it was sexual battery against an adult.

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With those charges, I would not buy the house (while I had children at home). With some 'sex offender' charges, I would be much more flexible. Some teenage streaking / underage dating / peeing in public stuff is different to me, but this is *clearly* child predation.

 

:iagree: And think about selling that house in the future. If you need to sell and a buyer knows this, it very likely will not sell.

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