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how much do you expect your third grader to read? How much do they read on their own


momsuz123
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I have twin youngish 3rd graders. This is what we do...

 

* They read daily books of their own choosing, usually before bed for 15-45 mins. They often choose graphic novels or things that are a bit below their level (like, one of mine recently finished the latest Ivy and Bean book). Sometimes they read something more challenging or something blurby, like an almanac or a joke book.

* I occasionally require them to read something for history or science, probably once or twice a week on average.

* We do poetry teas which essentially requires them to read aloud once a week.

* I have a list of required reading books for this year - chapter books ranging from easy (like Tornado by Betsy Byars) to harder (like Charlie and the Chocolate Factory). They have to pick one and finish it each month. If they needed it, I would have made the list all easier books.

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I had a problem with my 3rd grader because her reading level is quite high, but her emotional sensitivity is as well. She was reluctant to try new books and authors. But, she has finally started to realize that most books end just fine even if there is a bit of difficulty in the middle. So, she has finally broadened her interests.

 

I'm not sure how I got her to this point. I basically just started gathering books I knew were "safe" from the library--range of things like fiction, non-fiction, science, history and told her she had to try them.

 

I assign some non-fiction history or science regularly. In many cases once I get her hooked on a particular author, she deems that author "safe" and will read absolutely anything by him/her.

 

At this point she is going through books like crazy..she reads whenever she has a free second. But, we had to get past those emotional issues to get her here.

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My struggling 4th grader (reads on a mid second grade level) is reading: 15 minutes a day with me (every other paragraph), 20 minutes a day to himself (anything he wants--it's usually VERY below his challenge level) and one history/science reader a week. I would like it to increase, but he's pretty resistant--he's been struggling with learning to read for so long that he's killed his love of reading (boo, hoo!)

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If I recall correctly, my last one read for about 30 minutes a day from good literature (his choice from a shelf I supply), and he often read on his own. His free reading went in spurts, sometimes skipping a week, and others he was so immersed I barely saw his nose. (This year he's a fourth grader. He started with the 30 minutes, with plans to ease it up to 40 by the halfway mark of the year.)

 

My current second grader reads just as much, and more. But she's been a bookworm since before she could tell a letter A from her elbow.

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Third grade twin boys--one a bit ahead of his grade level in reading and one right at and not enthusiastic (he's a math guy, he really is).

 

Reading daily for 30 minutes after lunch. This is free reading time, so both get to pick their books. Usually their choices are above grade level because they both like books on science and are not content with the content in some of the ones written for kids. So I get a lot of visits for help with a word.

 

I also assign books or selections from readers at or below grade level for my less enthusiastic reader. Because he'd just rather be out building something, or drawing power transfer stations he just dislikes the whole idea of reading a story, even if it contains elements I think he'd like. So his easy reading gets assigned and his free reading is the harder stuff. It's a little backwards but it seems to help. With this child I also keep up the phonics work--right now we're into three and four syllable words. Actually, I've been thinking that the better reader is ready to start doing syllable division, so I'll be working with him some too.

 

 

Reading aloud for me happens with writing. We use Aesop, so I will have both boys read the model aloud, sometimes alternating with days to work on pronunciation and appropriate pauses at punctuation.

 

Time breakdown:

30 minutes free reading

20-30 minutes assigned reading

15 minutes oral reading in combination with writing lesson

15-20 minutes phonics work

 

They also read all directions and any sentences for grammar aloud, alternating.

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i ask that he read a chapter a day, but he almost always reads much more. he goes through a book a week usually. i'm not sure if he actually loves reading or knows it delays other work, lol. either way works for me.

 

oh. outside of school he reads a lot too. not just books, but gaming stuff. he reads very well and has excellent comprehension.

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I don't assign any reading to my 3rd grader, but she normally reads between 4-6 hours per day. She loves to read and can read anything, so I try to guide her toward age-appropriate books.

 

I also have a 2nd grader. I have a time set aside for him to read each day and that's usually the only time he reads. He can read whatever he wants during his silent reading time, but I try to make sure that there are plenty of books available at his reading level (3rd-4th). He averages 1-2 hrs per day total reading.

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Thrid grade: My eldest read as much as I'd let her, my middle one at that age might have read 1-2 hours for fun most days, but my ds didn't like to read for fun. He'd look at books on his interests, though, and would read the captions. He has only started to really enjoy reading in the past year or so since doing vision therapy.

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My child has a list of 16 "assigned reading" books for the year, which are the only chapter books she is required to read from beginning to end. We also occasionally require picture books for history or science.

 

She also reads quite a bit on her own, although that seems to go in cycles - for a while she'll read omnivorously, then there will be a phase when free time is more taken up by playing and crafts, then reading every spare minute again. She always reads at bedtime, but when she's in a low-reading phase it's Calvin and Hobbes strips rather than, say, Harry Potter.

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