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In the "feeling poorer" thread someone mentioned that, even though the economy was not getting any better, there were pockets of healthy industry and healthy local economies where people can still remain relatively untouched by the economic downturn. I have been wondering what and where these pockets are. Anyone care to share your insights on what industries/businesses/careers/jobs are doing well in this economy and where the healthy local economies are? Does anyone live in a healthy economy area and/or work or know those who work in healthy jobs/industries who would like to give some insight into this?

 

Thanks!

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I just read an article that said unemployment in my area was down because of manufacturing jobs picking up. To be honest, I am not entirely certain where they all are. DH told me there were lots of small industries (is that the right word) in our area. We also have a quarry and a Tyson chicken plant, but I don't know what to call those jobs.

 

I've seen business and construction pick up though. Every neighborhood I used to pass by that was no longer building has picked up again. New small businesses in strip malls are opening but I don't know how they are faring.

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Consider the energy sector, including utilities. Companies like Apple, certain computer software companies are doing well. Companies that have global customers--Caterpillar comes to mind.

 

My husband says "knowledge workers" have weathered the storm. This would include engineers, software developers, medical people, teachers--certainly not everyone everywhere. But odds are better that one made it through the recession as a "knowledge worker".

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Our area has weathered the economic storm fairly well. Nebraska in general has fairly low unemployment due to the large agriculture base. Of course, the drought has and will hurt everyone here. In my small town, the major employer is the nuclear power plant run by the public utility company. Wages have increased for everyone working there-about 2% a year. Our town also has 2 manufacturing plants, one making lawn mower equipment and one doing something with steel. At the beginning of the crisis, we did lose an Armstrong Cabinets factory, but many of the engineers found jobs at the power plant. We do have a large low-income population, but some speculate that is due to our close proximity to a state penitentiary (we have a lot of single moms with incarcerated husbands/significant others). Things aren't perfect here, but they definitely aren't as bad as they could be.

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My DH and I are in IT and we are swamped with work! The particular IT technologies that have a (world-wide and local) heavy demand include virtualization and "cloud" computing.

 

My computer science students are telling me all their friends who graduated in May have jobs. Many of our engineering students have firm job offers already in their junior year, many have multiple offers to choose from.

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My husband is in technology (business analyst/programmer analyst) and he still has an easy time finding a job, but the salaries have come down. it could be partly his age though . . . 47 .. it starts to be harder to compete. He is brilliant, but they'd rather hire someone cheaper or younger

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DC metro here and you would not know there was a recession here (or had been one for years). Computer IT/programming is definitely doing well, at DH's last job he helped with hiring and they had issues with no one with the knowledge they needed applying, they had jobs, but no qualified applicants.

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We got a new national farm store here last year. One of the banks is building a new branch office. There is a bit of renovating going on in a few of the old houses, and one of the churches here is in the process of building a church 3x the size of the current building.

 

I'm sure there are a few people who are not doing well. I'm not out every day to see. I do know the line for dance sign ups was longer this year than last year and all the classes are larger.

 

My friend's teen son just got hired at fast food.

 

I think the only thing that has closed since we've moved here is a chain restaurant. But it was being badly mismanaged - no food available after 6p most nights.

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Engineering is still going strong. We have not been touched by the recession. Homes are being built, bought, sold, stores and restaurants, are being built. We just got a brand new Target shopping center and WM almost finished. We are encouraging our kids to go into engineering.

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Consider the energy sector, including utilities. Companies like Apple, certain computer software companies are doing well. Companies that have global customers--Caterpillar comes to mind.

 

My husband says "knowledge workers" have weathered the storm. This would include engineers, software developers, medical people, teachers--certainly not everyone everywhere. But odds are better that one made it through the recession as a "knowledge worker".

 

:iagree: There was recently a very large layoff and closing of a large computer company near here. They specialized in special effects for movies, and 300 people were laid off. My friend's husband was laid off, and I was very worried for her. well, he got a job within a week at Dream Works in California (there are originally from there). One week. I was pretty surprised.

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Engineering is still going strong. We have not been touched by the recession. Homes are being built, bought, sold, stores and restaurants, are being built. We just got a brand new Target shopping center and WM almost finished. We are encouraging our kids to go into engineering.

 

:iagree::iagree: Same here.

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Things are pretty ok here in this part of NC for many reasons:

 

We've had a lot of movies and two TV shows filming around here and that always brings an uptick in the local economy.

 

We had a hurricane free summer and very good weather so the tourism part flourished this year.

 

I know things are better because our county library can stay open on Sunday afternoons again. :tongue_smilie:

 

But the rural counties are hard hit. We have the beaches and the golf courses and the film industry. They don't. Prices have risen for food stuffs and of course, gas, but our taxes have not gone up. (Real Estate)

 

I'm afraid that if the energy company gets their rate hike and the insurance companies get their rate hike on homeowners it could cause is to go sharply in reverse though. :glare:

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My husband is in insurance and there is pretty much unlimited growth potential. They are branching out from just life and health to property and casualty but there is a lot of room for growth. I think it's a little hard to get started in the business but once you're up and running there is a lot of potential!

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DH's business is tied to the entertainment industry which seems to be doing well despite the various downturns. However he foresaw all this coming so he downsized and penny pinched to be prepared... they might have gone belly up otherwise.

 

The people I know personally who are still doing ok are attorneys, in health care, or specialized teachers/ therapists-- those who have lost jobs were in middle management, mortgage brokering, and construction.

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Advanced practice nurses- Nurse practitioners, Nurse-midwives and Nurse anesthetists.

 

I am a nurse practitioner and I get recruitment offers with sign on bonuses and relocation offers everyday.

 

Engineering is going strong, my brother is swamped with work and the company he works for is expanding.

 

Though none of that really helps us. My DH has a BS in mechanical engineering, a JD, a MBA, a MS Ed and is almost done with his doctorate and he can't get a call back on a resume. He publishes, he networks, and he belongs to all the right organizations, has a full-time job, and still no bites on his resume. We have looked all over the country for a new job for him. It sucks, his full-time job is not secure at all, for profit higher education is really in trouble as an industry and huge layoffs are just around the corner.

 

He is 54...so he is fighting a losing battle and at 54 it wouldn't help him to go get a degree in a booming field, he'd likely never get hired at 56 or 57 in a new field.

 

Another option is entrepreneurship, it is a good time to start a business and serve the needs of those folks in the booming industries, they still have money to spend and want people to fill their needs.

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My DH is a software engineer for an international software company. They have outgrown their current location, have built phase one of a new building and are set to move into it in a few weeks, but they've already outgrown that, so it's on to building phase two. Software is big around here, and there are lots of companies doing really well.

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DC metro here and you would not know there was a recession here (or had been one for years). Computer IT/programming is definitely doing well, at DH's last job he helped with hiring and they had issues with no one with the knowledge they needed applying, they had jobs, but no qualified applicants.

 

:iagree: What recession? DC's buzzing right along - at least for the most part. :tongue_smilie:

 

Of course, if sequestration comes, it'll be a whole 'nother ballgame.

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My DH is also in IT and it seems to be doing pretty well in the Dallas area. Believe it or not my parents who are in the new construction industry are also doing quite well. There was a slump but it all seems to be picking up now. They have more work than they can handle for the moment.

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It really depends on where you are and your niche in your field. While IT, engineering and utilities have fared well, they are not without dark spots. Civil engineering for example has been hard hit, my friend who graduated right when he recession hit is on of a handful of her peers who have been employed ft, with benefits in this area for the last 5 years. Many have seen layoffs, paycuts and hours reduction. Same in IT, but worse. I know plenty of IT grass who are not finding especially decent emolument. Depends on what you actually do. Here are many bright spots in the economy but they are not in the same sectors everywhere at all.

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I am mechanical engineering working energy sector. We are swamped.

I heard aviation is having trouble. Lots airlines are parking their airplane ans swap engine around to avoid maintainess. But I have not heard lay off yet. They are offering early retirement.

 

When does aviation NOT have trouble....

 

As my pilot husband says, aviation has it's ups and downs...:D

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I would not look for education jobs in IL. They were some of our first layoffs. I hear IT is doing well, and I've seen many job opportunities for math and nursing instructors at community colleges around the country. Biology is a runner up there. I've never seen an are that wasn't desperate for CNAs in nursing homes.

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Utah has done very well. Really no signs of a recession here. Loads of new businesses opening up and lots of hiring going on. I can't tell you how much construction there is where I live. No businesses going under either.

 

Our economy here has always been very stable. Here's an article from the Wall St. Journal examining how we've managed to avoid the carp affecting the rest of the nation. http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10000872396390444405804577559582223445656.html

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I know a lot of pharmaceutical companies are still hiring around here. Not sales but a lot of office workers for those with experience or Medical/Biological knowledge.

 

Dh works in analytical R&D for generic pharmaceuticals. He has fairly specialized knowledge and experience setting up cGMP compliant labs and following FDA guidelines. He has multiple job offers at any time.

 

I don't see age as a factor that much around here. My mother was hired by a local pharma company preparing FDA documents at 63. Dh is 56.

 

I know there are definite signs of the recession in other areas of NJ but my county seems to be doing fine. Even most of the teenagers I know can find jobs.

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DH and I are self-employed in a field that doesn't limit our clients by geographical area (writing and graphic design), so we were able to keep ahead of the recession by simply broadening our client base. Most of those I know who are thriving right now are self-employed, or in a science, tech or engineering field and not afraid to move to follow the jobs. Thinks are picking up here in Eastern Washington, according to the news. There aren't enough homes on the market for people looking to buy, so construction is picking up again.

 

Medical is big as well, although I think the lower level medical fields (such as Xray techs and others that required shorter schooling) are over flowing with applicants because that's what everyone went back to school for two years ago after they went on unemployment. We desperately need more nurses, I've heard.

 

As for anecdotal evidence, all the empty slots in the strip malls are filling up with mom and pops. I told DH when the recession first got rolling to watch those storefronts. That there were plenty of people living without debt that would bide their time until leases hit rock bottom then they would pounce on the opportunity to start or expand their business. Judging by the amount of small businesses popping up, I was right. I'm also pleasantly surprised to see they aren't all restaurants!

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My dh is an electrician/instrumentation technician and, although he has had to travel away from home some, we've seen his income increase steadily for the past 4 years.

 

He may soon be traveling to North Dakota--I'm against it, but the money offered for Superintendents there is obscene.

 

For him, the key has been having a skill set that is in high demand, yet somewhat scarce. In addition, he has had to be willing to travel to where the large jobs currently are (Eastern WA, here-Intel, and now, possibly North Dakota).

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My company is in consulting for developers, public utilities, and municipalities. Our work has not dried up, but there were some bobbles as we had to shift a bit to focus on our different 'client sectors' as money shifted around. A few years ago when the economy first faltered, the government pushed a lot of money into states and cities for civic projects, and that's where most of our work was a couple years ago. As those were finished or dried up, we were carried by transportation sector company work (like railroads) and utilities (like power companies) that have a long view and needed some of that municipality work to be done first. We're now seeing private and commercial development stuff pick up again.

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In the "feeling poorer" thread someone mentioned that, even though the economy was not getting any better, there were pockets of healthy industry and healthy local economies where people can still remain relatively untouched by the economic downturn. I have been wondering what and where these pockets are. Anyone care to share your insights on what industries/businesses/careers/jobs are doing well in this economy and where the healthy local economies are? Does anyone live in a healthy economy area and/or work or know those who work in healthy jobs/industries who would like to give some insight into this?

 

Thanks!

 

Anything to do with the elderly or funerals will always be healthy. People will still get old and die, and the baby boomers are a huge, huge group, so that's pretty safe for the next 20 years, I'd guess.

 

Tech and Science-related fields will continue to remain strong.

 

I'm a landlord, and people always need a place to live, though this has been pretty tough the last decade (of course the decade we decided to jump in). Hardly any appreciation has taken place at all, but at least the houses are being paid off.

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Anything to do with the elderly or funerals will always be healthy. People will still get old and die, and the baby boomers are a huge, huge group, so that's pretty safe for the next 20 years, I'd guess.

 

Tech and Science-related fields will continue to remain strong.

 

I'm a landlord, and people always need a place to live, though this has been pretty tough the last decade (of course the decade we decided to jump in). Hardly any appreciation has taken place at all, but at least the houses are being paid off.

 

I second the funeral thing except to say that is one EXPENSIVE business to get up and running if you aren't inheriting it. The equipment, licensure, creamtorium, you name it. The capitol investment is HUGE. So, maybe it would be good to be an employee of someone who already owns a funeral home, but opening one would be much more difficult. The funeral areas in our neck of the woods do pay well...they have a hard time finding employees because it creeps many people out quite a bit. They treat good employees well and hold on to them for a long time.

 

Faith

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If you head south from DC about an hour...you will find the recession still exists. It's not as bad as in some places, but most of the jobs hiring are low-skill, low-wage jobs. Construction has not rebounded. Retail sales haven't rebounded. People are still losing jobs. And, it still feels as if more businesses are still closing rather than opening. They are building a new Aldi's not too far from me, and I have *no* idea how the other stores are going to make it. There aren't enough houses in our area to support five grocery stores (Target, Wal-Mart, Food Lion, Giant and Aldi's). Our Giant took a huge hit when Wal-Mart opened...it was never what I'd term 'overly busy' before Wal-Mart...and the Giant is in a shopping center that is virtually empty. Even our Lowe's is slow. The Food Lion will be fine because it's within walking distance from apartments/townhomes/hotels, and central to denser-population housing, close to I-95. The Aldi's, Wal-Mart and Giant are further back, closer to the rural homes. It's just nuts.

 

There are exceptions, of course, even out here in the ex-urbs of DC.

 

The election will bring more people to the DC area, and more people to my area as a result...I guess time will tell.

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I hear mixed things about IT. If you have skills & experience in mobile app development or social media related stuff, there is apparently a huge bidding war for talent. OTOH, my DH just told me on Friday that the big tech companies like Intel, Cisco, HP, etc. are going to be cutting jobs big time soon because of the shift away from PCs to mobile devices.

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I hear mixed things about IT. If you have skills & experience in mobile app development or social media related stuff, there is apparently a huge bidding war for talent. OTOH, my DH just told me on Friday that the big tech companies like Intel, Cisco, HP, etc. are going to be cutting jobs big time soon because of the shift away from PCs to mobile devices.

 

 

So true for HP. They came too late to the game in terms of mobile devices so there will definitely be huge cutbacks there. However, if they continue to get rid of their techies in favor of off-shoring for positions where the off-shore workers are badly undertrained, then they may as well put a yard sale sign out front and let the best offer take them. The company is in very bad shape and management keeps making truly ignorant decisions. Well, they appear ignorant to us but the corruption being so thick, I'm certain some of them are making money from it somehow.

 

Faith

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I hear mixed things about IT. If you have skills & experience in mobile app development or social media related stuff, there is apparently a huge bidding war for talent. OTOH, my DH just told me on Friday that the big tech companies like Intel, Cisco, HP, etc. are going to be cutting jobs big time soon because of the shift away from PCs to mobile devices.

 

Intel headquarters are here and they just finished building a new fab. There are talks of this type of expansion here over the next decade or so.

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We are in a small town in rural MO. Construction business must be booming. We have a rather large home improvement project we want to do (kitchen, all floors, patio door + build a deck) - the contractor we had selected turned us down because he is swamped with work. Our job is sizable, so it's not a question of it being not worth it.

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Intel headquarters are here and they just finished building a new fab. There are talks of this type of expansion here over the next decade or so.

 

Actually Intel corporate headquarters is still in Santa Clara, California. The new fab in Oregon has been in the works for a long time and is to replaced the old closed fab in Santa Clara. Intel is also building a new fab in Arizona.

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Actually Intel corporate headquarters is still in Santa Clara, California. The new fab in Oregon has been in the works for a long time and is to replaced the old closed fab in Santa Clara. Intel is also building a new fab in Arizona.

 

Correct--sorry-they have a large manufacturing/research presence here and, supposedly, have plans to build more large (or larger) facilities here as well.

 

Word on the street is that the project in Arizona is not going well.

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North Dakota!

 

Their unemployment rate is 3.0% - lowest in the nation - due to the oil boom in the state.

 

When we lived there in 2008-2010, we were untouched by the recession/depression.

 

Now they are starting to pull out a lot of the rigs from ND. They hit this 'boom' way too hard and fast. Many many people I know are being effected from this, they could not rent there and had high hopes bought homes. Now they are without jobs to keep up that hefty payment.

 

Wyoming has done fair, but I would not say we were not effected. The small town I live in has very few unemployed families and people. Also there seems to be more jobs being added here this last year or so. Sawmill, stores, hotels, etc. Now this is a small town of 1600 people and pay rate is not bad. Most teens are able to get jobs here for decent pay. For example my 16 yr old has a dish washing job that pays him $8.50 hr. Which I think is great for someone of that age.

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I just think it's a combo of industry and location. In my dh's industry (graphic design) companies outsource so much of what they need you would think freelancing would be a snap. Not necessarily. The volume of freelancers for every job is unreal. They are also younger and cheaper than he is. Or they outsource jobs like creating a logo overseas. There are scams on Craigslist like "make a new corporate identity for our company - logo, brochure, web, etc and win us as a client!". They pay the winner $300 for all that work and you never hear from them again.

 

But we live in an area (TX) that is doing very, very well. If my dh was in IT like just about all our friends we would not be struggling. He was not gifted in that way and I guess chose the wrong profession. It makes me so sad because he is SO GOOD at what he does. Really incredible.

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In the "feeling poorer" thread someone mentioned that, even though the economy was not getting any better, there were pockets of healthy industry and healthy local economies where people can still remain relatively untouched by the economic downturn. I have been wondering what and where these pockets are. Anyone care to share your insights on what industries/businesses/careers/jobs are doing well in this economy and where the healthy local economies are? Does anyone live in a healthy economy area and/or work or know those who work in healthy jobs/industries who would like to give some insight into this?

 

Thanks!

The military. I live near Ft. Hood, and the soldiers that are coming back from deployments have lots of money to spend. They get paid extra during deployments, and all of it is tax-free. They come back and have money to spend on a house and a brand new car. In all my years here I have never gone out to lunch at a restaurant and not seen tables full of soldiers in uniform. If I were to start a business (retail, restaurant, construction), I would start it near a military base.

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