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Can I please ask a few more questions about PEANUT ALLERGIES???


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Ok, so the crisis part has abated...ds is feeling better ... And now I am just, well, angry. :glare:

 

I am not even sure if that emotion makes sense right now but it is just how I feel. I hate peanuts.

 

Even though we got the diagnosis 6 weeks ago it didn't really feel "real" until he had another reaction. Boy, does it feel real now!

 

So today I let my anger motivate me and I scoured the labels of everything in my house. I cannot BELIEVE the food items that have peanuts in them! Mayo? Really?

 

I actually MADE my own mayo today for the first time and threw the other jar away. It's small and silly but somehow it made me feel better to take action.

 

Question: do any of you use this product called Sunbutter? My ds LOVES peanut butter so I would really like to find a tasty substitute. Is it good?

 

Question: do you avoid only the foods that have peanuts in them? Some of the labels say the item was made in a factory where peanuts are used in other items but not that one. Can he still eat this?

 

Any other newbie advice?

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Was he tested for tree nuts too? We only peanut diagnosis and did sunbutter(liked it!), but 6 months later was allergic to it as well. And a host of tree nuts! Still are years later.

 

We now eat I.M.Healthy soy butter or Wowbutter(new favorite).

 

Skip anything made in a facility with peanuts. It's those little trace amounts that affect the body reaction to large exposure. For my son it's instant diarrhea and tummy aches. I can usually rule out cross contaminated food by his stomach ;-)(hugs)

 

I am still angry years later. He asked me when it would be over the other day :-(

 

He out grew dairy/egg. Had 18 months free, and then peanuts. Then treenuts /sesame/coconut/sunflower!

 

Get tree nuts tested before adding them to his daily diet.

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Ok, so the crisis part has abated...ds is feeling better ... And now I am just, well, angry. :glare:

 

I am not even sure if that emotion makes sense right now but it is just how I feel. I hate peanuts.

 

Even though we got the diagnosis 6 weeks ago it didn't really feel "real" until he had another reaction. Boy, does it feel real now!

 

So today I let my anger motivate me and I scoured the labels of everything in my house. I cannot BELIEVE the food items that have peanuts in them! Mayo? Really?

 

I actually MADE my own mayo today for the first time and threw the other jar away. It's small and silly but somehow it made me feel better to take action.

 

Question: do any of you use this product called Sunbutter? My ds LOVES peanut butter so I would really like to find a tasty substitute. Is it good?

 

Question: do you avoid only the foods that have peanuts in them? Some of the labels say the item was made in a factory where peanuts are used in other items but not that one. Can he still eat this?

 

Any other newbie advice?

 

:grouphug: Anger is sometimes good. It's a big thing you're dealing with! Hating the thing that can make your child sick is--understandable. I saw your other thread where you said Epi-Pens aren't available, and frankly I'd be a mess if I were in that position.

 

Best newbie advice is to scour every label, like you just did. When shopping, look at every label, every time (unfortunately, sometimes ingredient lists change.) I avoid any labels where the allergens are mentioned. I always figure better safe than sorry! Though I've never had to do it, call manufacturers if necessary to find out about allergen info. I don't know much about Malaysia, but when we go out to eat we usually stick to larger chains, and we look online before going to get an idea of what's safe there.

 

We use Sunbutter, and we love it. I tried some soy products back when DS6 was diagnosed, but didn't like them. DH still doesn't like it and insists on having a contraband jar of PB :glare: I only allow it (yeah, I *allow* my husband to eat PB) after the kids are in bed, and he's promised to brush his teeth afterwards. It still scares me.

 

Best of luck!

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Ok, so the crisis part has abated...ds is feeling better ... And now I am just, well, angry. :glare:

 

Ayup! BTDT, Bought the T-shirt.

 

I am not even sure if that emotion makes sense right now but it is just how I feel. I hate peanuts.

 

Even though we got the diagnosis 6 weeks ago it didn't really feel "real" until he had another reaction. Boy, does it feel real now!

 

So today I let my anger motivate me and I scoured the labels of everything in my house. I cannot BELIEVE the food items that have peanuts in them! Mayo? Really?

 

I know!! Peanuts are ubiquitous, just like HFCS. It's unbelievable!

 

I actually MADE my own mayo today for the first time and threw the other jar away. It's small and silly but somehow it made me feel better to take action.

 

Question: do any of you use this product called Sunbutter? My ds LOVES peanut butter so I would really like to find a tasty substitute. Is it good?

 

What exactly was your ds tested for? If he wasn't also tested for a treenut allergy, I'd be very careful right now about introducing treenuts/treenut products. As weird as this sounds good tahini is a decent sub for PB (assuming your ds isn't allergic to sesame seeds!). My ds can eat tahini and almond butter as he's not allergic to tree nuts/sesame seeds. I found a brand of almond butter which is made by a company which does not make anything w/the common allergens, including peanuts. It's kinda expensive; so, I use it as a treat.

 

Question: do you avoid only the foods that have peanuts in them? Some of the labels say the item was made in a factory where peanuts are used in other items but not that one. Can he still eat this?

 

Some people allergic to peanuts don't seem to have as high a sensitivity and can eat things made in factories which also process peanuts. Most can't, however, and if I were you I wouldn't chance it right now. I'd be very strict about the possibility of cross-contamination. It's what we had to do w/ds.

 

Any other newbie advice?

 

(As I'm sure you're already doing) investigate how you can get some Epi, even if you go old school and use an ampule and a syringe. That's so incredibly important with anaplylactoid and true anaphylactic reactions. Keep reading those labels

 

 

And...most importantly...breathe! You'll get used to this.

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We use sunbutter and it's a pretty tasty substitute (you could also use soy nut butter--we used to but then DS developed a soy allergy--which he since outgrew--so then we switched to sunbutter and have never switched back). I read all labels and don't buy something if it was made in a peanut factory (or eggs, tree nuts, fish, or mangoes--DS's other allergies). We are very careful when we eat out. You can't just order food at a restaurant without asking to see a label if you aren't 1000% sure there aren't any peanuts in them.

 

It does become second nature eventually. Then it will only hit you every now and then that this sucks and is unfair and wish that you could take this away from your dear child who will never get to eat a snickers bar or a donut or even regular birthday cake at a party. Yes, it's inconvenient for me, but this is his life. Forever.

 

Your DS has to learn ASAP how to read labels, ask before eating anything he doesn't know for sure is safe, to say no to questionable things even if they look so darn good. It's not just a diet change, this is a skill that will keep him alive. Turn your anger toward educating your son on protecting himself. I read all labels that come into my house. If there is something that I buy that DS can't eat, I mark it with a sharpee and tell every one in the house that this is not DS-friendly.

 

But this has been my life since DS was 10 mns old, so I've had over 8 years to get used to it. To let it become second nature. To develop my habits, routines, and substitute recipes for the things that we love. You'll get there with time.

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Sun butter is safe. My kids won't eat it bc it tastes like PB, but I think it's good your son knows what it tastes like. It may save him from continuing to eat something unsafe in the future once he really understands it.

 

I do not know what the law are where you are but U.S. labeling laws only require clear labeling on top allergens when it is an INTENTIONAL ingredient. Companies are getting better about labeling for potential cross-contamination but each company has their own policy and labeling practice. Some companies won't label for cross-contamination at all. The occasional company seems to label everything as "at risk" just to CYA. You have to call to find out. Some examples of companies we personally like for labeling include Kellogs/Keebler, General Mills, Quaker and Pepsi/Frito Lay. Nestle and Hershey's seem pretty good as well, though chocolate is one of the riskiest things so we don't get to eat a lot of their stuff! We call bread companies because many don't label at all but they are usually helpful on the phone. Just beware the labeling practices can vary country to country. Canada has MUCH better labeling practices than the U.S. and therefore better efforts to make their food peanut-safe.

 

However, we NEVER NEVER NEVER eat anything with the warning label. IMO, responsible companies put it there for a reason. In fact DS had a reaction just 2 months ago bc I missed that a label had changed to "may contain". He realized it as he took the last bite. He said it tasted like peanuts and then I looked at the label and realized my error. We were on the road and had to pull over and give benadryl, then we had to find an ER while we waited to see if we would need the Epi. DS only had a stomach ache but we realized what had happened so we knew it was a reaction and had to be prepared that he would go downhill.

 

Try this website for support, ideas and info. And maybe there's even someone in Malaysia who can help!

http://foodallergysupport.olicentral.com/index.php

 

Brownie

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I don't know if this is helpful--

 

My df's dd has a life-threatening potato allergy. She can't go to any restaurants that serve potatoes, even if she doesn't order them, because servers/food preparers could touch them or the surfaces they've come into contact with and then touch her plate or her food. Even that trace amt can trigger anaphylaxis. And of course, many processed foods contain potato starch. :glare:

 

So, cross contamination is really dangerous to some kids. Be as careful as you can.:grouphug:

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My ds was diagnosed at 19 mos, but I had had suspected it since about 15 mos. We eat sunbutter, good stuff. I stay away from anything with soy in it so no soy butter. As far as labels go we don't eat tons of packaged stuff, but we do get things made in a factory, etc. We didn't for while and I stay away from tree nuts with him, even though he is not allergic to almonds and cashews. No Chinese, Thai around here unless dh and I go out. We have only had problems with direct ingestion of peanuts. Ds is also very aware and has always asked before eating something, even as a toddler.

 

He is overdue for his 6 yr old panel which will give us the lowdown on his levels. I guess they don't change much after 6. The Dr. thought ds "might" "tolerate" them as an adult, but I don't think that sounds too appealing.

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We prefer Soy nut butter to the sunbutter. And I recently found chocolate flavored soy nut butter do the kids are loving that:). Dd is peanut/tree nut allergic. It's such a scary thing. We have our safe staples and anything not on that "list" results in a call to the manufacturer to be safe. It sucks. No nice way to say it. It just sucks. But, it eventually becomes second nature. You will get over the shock and anger and all of this label reading, etc. will become second nature.:grouphug:

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We don't eat things that are manufactured in facilities with peanuts. I know some families are fine with it thoug, so it's really a question for the allergist.

 

 

Am I reading right that you cannot get an epi pen? If so, that is a major major problem. Epi pens can be the difference between life and death.

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We avoid soy (one dd has Hashimoto's), but they love Almond butter and sun butter. My 4 yo is allergic to peanuts and cashews, but not anaphylactic about peanuts. Se gets pretty nasty and sometimes severe GI issues and a rash. I try to avoid "made in the same facility as...", and ALWAYS avoid the "May contain" foods. Many restaurants use peanut oil, too, so keep that in mind. It doesn't seem to be an issue for most, but we do avoid it here. Luckily places like Chick fil a just switched to canola oil. :)

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We avoid soy (one dd has Hashimoto's), but they love Almond butter and sun butter. My 4 yo is allergic to peanuts and cashews, but not anaphylactic about peanuts. Se gets pretty nasty and sometimes severe GI issues and a rash. I try to avoid "made in the same facility as...", and ALWAYS avoid the "May contain" foods. Many restaurants use peanut oil, too, so keep that in mind. It doesn't seem to be an issue for most, but we do avoid it here. Luckily places like Chick fil a just switched to canola oil. :)

 

Just an FYI. Anaphylaxis is not just airway constriction. Here's a good explanation of what exactly anaphylaxis is/could be.

http://www.foodallergy.org/section/a

How can I determine if I’ve had anaphylaxis?

Anaphylaxis is highly likely to be occuring when any ONE of the following happens within minutes to hours after ingestion of the food allergen:

1. A person has skin symptoms or swollen lips and either :

Difficulty breathing, or

Reduced blood pressure (e.g., pale, weak pulse, confusion, loss of consciousness)

2. A person was exposed to a suspected allergen, and two or more of the following occur:

Skin symptoms or swollen lips

Difficulty breathing

Reduced blood pressure

Gastrointestinal symptoms (i.e., vomiting, diarrhea, or cramping)

3. A person was exposed to a known allergen, and experiences:

reduced blood pressure

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Just to add to what the PP said, anaphylaxis can occur at anytime, even with no prior history, so even though reactions are minor at this point, it doesn't mean your child is not going to have anaphylaxis at some point.

 

 

I really like this checklist, I think it's thorough yet easy to read. Every food allergic child should have access to emergency medication at all times. http://www.kidswithfoodallergies.org/resourcespre.php?id=136&title=checklist_for_managing_food_allergy_lifestyle

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First, :grouphug::grouphug:, Heather.

 

Food allergies stink! My ds9 was 6 when he was diagnosed with tree nut allergies.

 

I felt the same thing you did. I grieved for the loss of what I thought was a "normal" life. I was angry that we couldn't buy most generic food at a time when we were dealing with unemployment and no money. I worried so much about turning into the kind of mom that was overly cautious to the point of overbearing.

 

Then. I took a deep breath. I quit reading the scary stuff on line. I got a doctor we trust and started learning about our limitations. And I realized how lucky we were to live in an age that most foods are labeled and many restaurants have on-line allergy information. I understand that may not apply much to you where you live.

 

I did go through and donate all packages that had a warning not just foods containing. My ds has reacted 3 times since his original diagnosis. All 3 of those times have been from food containing no nuts but "Processed in a plant/on equipment that processes...." So we avoid all of those foods. It depends on your son's sensitivity levels. At first, I would start by eliminating everything that may cause a reaction, especially seeing as I know from your other thread that you are having a hard time getting an epipen.

 

I don't get angry anymore, it's more that I'm irritated. I hate not being able to just stop by a restaurant when we're out and about. We have combated that by having a list of "safe" restaurants (never completely safe though) that we all enjoy and that we check on-line once a month for changes in menu. It helps that we're not big on eating out.

 

I get irritated because no matter how many times you buy a product, you still have to read every label, every time. They may have changed their plant, added a new line of food, etc.

 

You will get used to this, as will your son. Mine won't eat any food without reading. He hates reactions! They hurt and are scary. We do bring our own cupcakes to every party. I pack his own snacks when we go to friends' houses. I keep it on the down low and never ask friends to accomodate.

 

I count myself lucky that his allergy is not as severe as some. I also am grateful that it's not wheat or soy. Those are in nearly everything! And I feel for those of you out there that do have those allergies. I can't imagine how much more difficult your lives may be. But, I am careful not to voice these ideas with my son because he may develop other allergies at some point. These are just thoughts in my own head and shared with my dh.

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I count myself lucky that his allergy is not as severe as some. I also am grateful that it's not wheat or soy. Those are in nearly everything! And I feel for those of you out there that do have those allergies. I can't imagine how much more difficult your lives may be. But, I am careful not to voice these ideas with my son because he may develop other allergies at some point. These are just thoughts in my own head and shared with my dh.

 

My DS is allergic to dairy, soy, eggs, wheat, peanuts, tree nuts, white potato, peas, barley, chickpeas, celery, Lima beans, and lentils. Don't get me wrong, it's HARD. Forget restaurants, I'd like to be able to stop at a gas station on a road trip! But, I do think that whether you are dealing with one allergy or several, it's the same fear and stress.

 

 

Personally, I do find the nut allergies easiest to deal with as far as avoidance, its labeled well in the US, and people "get" nut allergies (the majority anyways.) it's his class 6 potato allergy that I have a hard time dealing with. Having said that, the nut allergies are found to be the most dangerous, I think something like 50% of cases of anaphylaxis are due to nuts.

 

 

I'm rambling now, but I just wanted to say that food allergies suck, whether you have 1 or 20. :grouphug:

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It is crazy what has peanuts in them.

 

We don't eat things with any type of warning about peanuts. May contains, made in a facility, made on equipment with peanuts have a 10-20 percent chance of actually containing peanuts. DS has reacted to cross contamination, in fact all of his reactions have been because of this and so we don't take any chances.

 

There are online support groups for parents of kids with food allergies. Kids with Food Allergies is one but they are a paid forum and I co-mod a Facebook/Yahoo group for parents also. PM and I can send you a link.

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Question: do any of you use this product called Sunbutter? My ds LOVES peanut butter so I would really like to find a tasty substitute. Is it good?

 

I like Sunbutter a lot, but it tastes nothing like peanuts. It's kind of creamy and sweet. My kids don't really like it. It is way way better than Wowbutter which no one liked at my house.

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My dd has lots of allergies. I alternately cry about it and become angry about all the foods we can't eat. I even have days where I am totally overwhelmed and even depressed. Every few months I have to take a night off and go have a good cry. Hubby takes over with the kids and lets me have some time. Food allergies are awful and they can make you have crazy emotions. It's very stressful!

 

Yes, you have to read and reread every label. You have to check everything. I feel so OCD all the time. But it's important.

 

I would avoid things that say they are manufactured in a facility with peanuts.

 

I've learned from experience that each reaction is more severe than the one before. You will want to be so vigilant.

 

My older kids and I both like Sunbutter. But my dd is allergic to sunflower so it's out for us.

 

We use Golden Pea Butter for some things. It's ok. The texture is not the same but it was good in cookies. It's all I've found that we can use so we just make it work.

 

Good luck as you figure it out. It is so challenging!

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It is crazy what has peanuts in them.

 

We don't eat things with any type of warning about peanuts. May contains, made in a facility, made on equipment with peanuts have a 10-20 percent chance of actually containing peanuts. DS has reacted to cross contamination, in fact all of his reactions have been because of this and so we don't take any chances.

 

There are online support groups for parents of kids with food allergies. Kids with Food Allergies is one but they are a paid forum and I co-mod a Facebook/Yahoo group for parents also. PM and I can send you a link.

 

Only a few forums are paid on kids with food allergies now. Most are free. :)

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Anger is normal and will likely come and go over time. My DS has had a peanut allergy for 9 of his 10 years and there are still grocery shopping trips where I end up angry and sad. Grocery shopping is no longer the mindless task it used to be.

 

I know you have the added stress of being in a foreign country but know that even in the US the labeling requirements are not ideal. Manufacturers are required to list peanuts as an ingredient, but the FDA does not require cross contamination labeling - that is voluntary.

 

"The FDA does not legally require manufacturers to report if a food may have become contaminated with an allergen due to production on shared equipment. Some manufacturers include a warning like, "May contain wheat and soy" or "Manufactured on equipment that may have also processed peanuts." Unfortunately, the FDA requires no standardization of the language as of 2010, though it is currently working on the issue."

 

This makes chasing the "mystery reactions" so difficult. Some manufacturers are good, some stink. Labels change all the time so a product you may buy for months and is safe, suddenly the next month will have a warning label. Different items from the same company are made in different plants so some may be safe some may not. Hershey is a classic example of this. The mini bars carry a cross contamination label, while the full size milk chocolate bars do not.

 

FAAN recommends you read every label 3 times. When you buy it, when you put it away and when you use it. Even after doing this for years an item occasionally slips into my cart that is not safe. It is usually something I have bought many times and just didn't look at as closely as I should have.

 

 

Be very careful of soaps and lotions especially if you are staying away from tree nuts. Almond oil is a common ingredient in many of these.

 

As for Sunbutter, it is a staple at our house, but watch the brand you buy. The "Sunbutter" brand is nut free, but some of the sunflower butter brands have cross contamination labels. Seth Ellis Choclatier makes Sun butter cups, which is a decent imitation of a Reeses peanut butter cup. The website Peanut Free Planet has lots of other products that are safe.

 

It is a journey. As you have read from others over the years even with diligence there can be reactions. My DS had a bad reaction that turned out to be some cross contaminated ranch dressing. Don't be afraid to call a manufacturer if you aren't sure. Most are helpful.

 

:grouphug: for you as you adjust to a new way of shopping, cooking and eating out. I sometimes long for the days we could go any where without "do you have the epi-pen?" and sit down at any restaurant without worries. It does get easier though as you form new habits to deal with the allergies and there is some promising research being done at Duke and Hopkins, among other places, about desensitizing kids to these allergans.

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Does your area require mandatory labeling like the US? If not, that be a potentially big issue. In any event, if it is made on the same line, a may-contain, don't eat it. In your mibd, just substitute "cyanide" for peanuts and decide. If it was may contain cyanide, would I serve it? That helped me decide.

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It is worth it to call around and see if a given event is allergy-safe. We just came from a fall festival run by a church which explicitly uses nothing that contains peanuts, tree nuts, or gluten. It was organized by a mom who was on the church staff who's child was unable to participate in pretty much ANY party-sort of activity, so she agreed to take on coordinating it, provided that she could make it allergy-safe. It ends up being a great experience for the kids, who ordinarily end up excluded from a lot of things due to fears of cross-contamination.

 

As someone who is anaphylactic to cinnamon, (I live on heavy doses of antihistamines all fall long simply due to airborne exposure, because I can't avoid it) I empathize-and Cinnamon isn't nearly as ubiquitous as many other allergens.

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I love Sunbutter! And yes, we do avoid "may contains" and "made in a facility." I suspect that my DS is actually more allergic to cat and dog dander as far as which one would put him in the hospital first. But statistically, peanuts are the most dangerous. There's a website and discussion forum dedicated to peanut allergies,http://www.peanutallergy.com/ that probably can help you out. Be aware that the forum discussion will probably scare you into never wanting to leave the house or letting your child eat again. :confused:

 

But honestly, with peanut allergy, if you aren't that scared, you don't understand the allergy well enough. Once you get that scared, you start working real hard real fast to find safe alternative, switch your lifestyle and learn to say "no" really firmly. My allergy friends call it growing your allergy "backbone."

 

Your child also, may need to be a little scared depending on his personality. Kids want what they want and may do foolish things to fit in or enjoy what everyone else has. It's a delicate balance between not creating unnecessary anxiety and making sure the child really, really gets that this isn't a "do over" situation. (The hives now may actually save you a lot of grief later as your guy is old enough to remember the effect of eating the forbidden food.:grouphug:) My Ds really got it when DH had to go to the hospital for a reaction (40 years old and developed a shellfish allergy.)

 

KWFA.org (Kids With Food Allergies) is also an excellent site, as is FAAN.org.

 

Sorry, it is a horribly steep learning curve and very anxiety inducing all around.

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As someone who is anaphylactic to cinnamon, (I live on heavy doses of antihistamines all fall long simply due to airborne exposure, because I can't avoid it) I empathize-and Cinnamon isn't nearly as ubiquitous as many other allergens.

 

 

My goodness, you must have to avoid craft stores for months! It is just everywhere this time of year. :tongue_smilie:

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Be very careful of soaps and lotions especially if you are staying away from tree nuts. Almond oil is a common ingredient in many of these.

 

 

I wanted to highlight this. I can't tell you how many times I've been told that my dc "can't" be allergic to the peanut oil in a commonly prescribed scalp oil, Derma-Smoothe, but they weren't there when dd had a horrifying reaction, I was.

 

Infusium 23 products use arachidic acid, which is the fat from peanuts. And treenut allergies add a whole layer to the shampoo/lotion label reading. :grouphug: I remember the anger, and sometimes 8 years into this it still comes in brief flashes, but mostly it will become a normal part of life eventually.

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I get angry, cry, etc...sometimes too, but it is much better since I started homeschooling. I control our environment and make the decisions. I don't have to fight with someone to make it safe. Also, it has gotten better now that they're older and can use an epi in an emergency and use a cell phone, etc...

 

On the other hand, what I usually get upset and stressed over is the social stuff. You really need to just take on the attitude that "it's just food". Your kids will pick up that attitude and it's psychologically healthier for them that way. I never let them see my frustration. I model how I want them to handle it. The stuff that made me crazy was always having to explain to EVERY mom on every playdate about the allergy and the rules and whether they were willing to take the epi. Having to refuse food at social occasions. Having to contact every summer camp ahead of time to address the food allergies. Having to be at every party planning meeting for school parties, being the party pooper who had to tell everyone "that's not safe for my kid". But much of that is all really behind the scenes stuff, not the food itself.

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Just to add to what the PP said, anaphylaxis can occur at anytime, even with no prior history, so even though reactions are minor at this point, it doesn't mean your child is not going to have anaphylaxis at some point.

 

 

I really like this checklist, I think it's thorough yet easy to read. Every food allergic child should have access to emergency medication at all times. http://www.kidswithfoodallergies.org/resourcespre.php?id=136&title=checklist_for_managing_food_allergy_lifestyle

 

Yes, I know how it works. We've been to a Pediatric Allergist and my oldest has an Epi pen for her bee sting allergy. For some reason they won't give my 4 yo one, but I do have my 11 yo's just in case. I am a trained EMT.

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Question: do any of you use this product called Sunbutter? My ds LOVES peanut butter so I would really like to find a tasty substitute. Is it good?

 

Yes! My kids love Sunbutter. Except, of course, for the one allergic to peanuts - he wouldn't try it (but then, he won't eat bread anyway :tongue_smilie:). The joke's on me. A couple months ago, we found out he was also allergic to tree nuts, sesame seeds and ... sunflower seeds. So, he can't eat it anyway (he said to the allergist, "so that's why I threw up after eating a whole bag at school," which he hadn't mentioned to me). Still, my non-allergic kids will continue with Sunbutter for the time being until I figure out what to do. They like it better than the butter made from soy, and it's hopefully a bit less dangerous than peanut re: accidental exposure.

 

From the time his peanut allergy was diagnosed, we did not allow tree nuts either, due to the possible cross-contamination issue and the fact that something like 50% of peanut-allergic people are also allergic to tree nuts. As for labels, it depends. If it says "processed on equipment" that came into contact with peanut (or tree nut) products, then no, I will not let him have it. If it's "manufactured in a facility" with products containing peanuts, then I usually don't allow it but I've been known to bend the rule, depending on what the product is.

 

At this time of year, with Halloween approaching, I am reminded of the time I picked up a bag of Hershey's miniatures. Peanut was not included in the bold allergy information near the ingredient section, even though peanuts were included in the fine print - I had done a double-take because the bag contained Mr Goodbar candybars. I called their customer service number to let them know, while standing right there in Target, and the guy was rude.

 

That reminds me, I was thinking of buying some special chocolate to trade out for much of his trick-or-treat load... He hates feeling like he's missing out - he gets sad (ice cream parlors are not so fun).

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Thank you all so much for all this great advice. It is a little overwhelming still but I now have someone in the states who is going to ship me some epipens. So that's a start. Now I just have to pray they don't get stopped in customs. I suppose the next thing is to have him tested for tree nuts to be safe.

 

I'm not sure if they are related but it seems like his allergic reaction caused his eczema (which he has had for a while) to flare up. Poor kid.

 

Today we were talking about all the things he cannot eat and surprisingly enough it was no more satay that really upset him. :tongue_smilie:

 

 

.

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I'm not sure if they are related but it seems like his allergic reaction caused his eczema (which he has had for a while) to flare up. Poor kid.

 

I usually know when my allergy kiddo has been exposed from her skin and then it shows up GI a couple of hours later. Her eczema flares are almost solely allergen exposure related.

 

We use Sunbutter and love it. We also have dairy and soy allergies, so our options are limited.

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We also have a peanut/treenut allergy kid here and my kids love sunbutter. I actually make my own as it is cheaper to do so, and easier to get away from the "may contains". Just get some raw sunflower seeds, roast them in the oven with a little oil (we use olive oil) and salt until they are light brown. Puree them with additional oil (sunflower or another not too flavorful oil) in a food processor or blender. You want it to look like creamy peanut butter, but a little softer. Then put it in tupperware or a jar and store it in the fridge. It keeps a long time and tastes great!

 

One thing I did learn the hard way...Sunbutter and baking soda have a harmless chemical reaction that turns them green. I made my great grandmother's peanut butter cookie recipe for a bake sale, but substituted the peanut butter with sunbutter. I doubled the amount and kept half for my family. Imagine my horror when the cookies were turning green the next day! I looked it up on the internet and was relieved to find that it wouldnt hurt anything..but all I could think about was the poor family that bought the other half of the batch at the bake sale the day before. :lol: They probably thought they had moldy cookies!

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My DS is allergic to dairy, soy, eggs, wheat, peanuts, tree nuts, white potato, peas, barley, chickpeas, celery, Lima beans, and lentils. Don't get me wrong, it's HARD. Forget restaurants, I'd like to be able to stop at a gas station on a road trip! But, I do think that whether you are dealing with one allergy or several, it's the same fear and stress.

 

 

Personally, I do find the nut allergies easiest to deal with as far as avoidance, its labeled well in the US, and people "get" nut allergies (the majority anyways.) it's his class 6 potato allergy that I have a hard time dealing with. Having said that, the nut allergies are found to be the most dangerous, I think something like 50% of cases of anaphylaxis are due to nuts.

 

 

I'm rambling now, but I just wanted to say that food allergies suck, whether you have 1 or 20. :grouphug:

 

Not counting the eggs and white potato (which I can eat in limited quantities, but should be avoiding as they're nightshades) your son's restrictions sound much like mine. Thankfully, there is a whole world of recipes out there that accomodate these restrictions (usually called Paleo or GAPS or SCD), so there is hope for a varied and tasty diet... just not, you know, from a restaurant. Having carried an entire backpack of food with me on our last flight from Germany to the US, I understand that it would be nice sometimes to just be able to eat...whatever. But, no such luck.

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I am the oddball here. My kids eat things labeled that they "may" be contaminated. Bad mom, I know. I just avoid the obvious peanut labeled as ingredients items. DD is severe but has no issue with packaged cookies and such.

 

I will use the "made in the same factory as" but not the "may contain." We already had a case of hives from that one.

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I'm not sure if they are related but it seems like his allergic reaction caused his eczema (which he has had for a while) to flare up. Poor kid.

 

Likely it did. We were told by our allergist, and it has been our experience that exposure to his allergans can cause both his eczema and asthma to flare up. We were cautioned to make sure that what may initially appear to be an asthma attack is not in fact an allergic reaction.

 

:grouphug:

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I will use the "made in the same factory as" but not the "may contain." We already had a case of hives from that one.

 

I thought they were the same thing. I wonder what the regs are.

 

ETA: I just did a quick search & it seems like anything beyond "contains:" is voluntary. So who knows what "may contain" or " processed in a facility" or any of the other ones actually mean. To my understanding, they all indicate a higher chance of cross-contamination - so they essentially mean the same thing. We do allow products with this on the label but so far, we're comfortable with this level of risk. DS has outgrown his peanut allergy so peanuts themselves are no longer an issue for us. He is still allergic to tree nuts, peas, cantaloupe, bananas, & cucumbers. Tree nuts are the only ones that are mandatory labelled anyway.

Edited by momoflaw
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It is company dependent. You can better make a decision if you understand the company policy. For example, Hersheys is supposed to have a multi-leveled, very specific labeling protocol from contains traces to made in a facility. Other companies label for cross-contamination but only have one warning statement. Others have none (ie Kraft).

 

Brownie

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We love Sunbutter! My nut-allergic child will not eat anything that even looks like peanut butter, so I don't know how he'd do with actually eating it. He is so sensitive to peanuts that he cannot touch anything with nut residue or he will have a serious reaction though. We are messy with the Sunbutter, and he's never had a reaction from it...topically.

 

 

Asthma/Allergies/Eczema usually go hand-in-hand.:iagree: It holds true for my ds.

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Thank you all so much for all this great advice. It is a little overwhelming still but I now have someone in the states who is going to ship me some epipens. So that's a start. Now I just have to pray they don't get stopped in customs. I suppose the next thing is to have him tested for tree nuts to be safe.

 

I'm not sure if they are related but it seems like his allergic reaction caused his eczema (which he has had for a while) to flare up. Poor kid.

 

Today we were talking about all the things he cannot eat and surprisingly enough it was no more satay that really upset him. :tongue_smilie:

 

 

.

When you get him tested for tree nuts, see about testing for other legumes too. There is often an allergy to multiple things in the legume family. My younger dd is allergic to peas and soy. Our allergist recommended coming in at least once a year to retest tree nuts and the rest of the legumes to make sure she doesn't develop an allergy to more of the same type of allergen (peanuts, garbanzo beans, lentils.....).

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