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We have used a variety of sources for logic stage science, mostly library books on whatever topics interested DS (astronomy and human body in 5th grade, Earth science in 6th), and lots documentaries (he is a visual learner and retains this very well)

We also used some easier high school textbooks (Tarbuck's Earth science, Hewitt's Conceptual Physics, Campbell's Exploring Life).

 

DD was taking high school level science courses in 7th grade.

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I use mostly non-textbooks for the "logic" stage. Once they are ready for high school level science, we switch to high school level books regardless of age.

 

Here is our logic stage resource list:

 

Physics (we did physics first because my son loves it)

Topics: mechanics, electronics, astronomy, flight

Text: The Way Things Work (yes, the whole book!) + library books on electricity and flight.

Scientific American's astronomy articles going back 10 years

Docos: The Way Things Work Docos, Numerous Modern Marvels on Physics/Engineering topics

Hands on: Electronics kit. Mechanical Kit

Investigation: How does the angle of attack affect the flight time of a kite depending on the wind speed?

 

Biology (topics of his choosing)

Topics: Biochemistry, Genetics, Evolution, Microbiology

Texts: The Way Life Works; The Cartoon Guide to genetics; The stuff of life; Biozone's Evolution

Docos: All of David Attenborough again (he is just great)

Hands on: Hemophilia in the royal family, lots of microscope work, gene pool and genetic drift games

Investigation: Which type of water supports the most diversity of micro-organisms, ocean, ditch, or river?

 

Earth Science

Topics: Astronomy, Oceanography, Geology, Meteorology.

Texts: Tarbuck's Earth Science, and Applications and Investigations in Earth Science

(we only did about 2/3 of the text and ½ of the applications)

Docos: TTC one of the Earth Science series (did not get through even 1/2 of the series)

Hands on: Observed night sky and moon cycles, Applications and investigations book

Investigation: How does the wind direction and speed and the orientation of the bay affect longshore transport of sand?

 

 

 

Chemistry (We started high school science this year, so here is a retrofitted "logic" level course)

Topics: Periodic Table, chemical reactions, industry uses

Texts: For a younger logic age student: Ellen Henry's The Elements and Carbon Chemistry, The Elements by Theordore Gray, and numerous library books. but for an older logic student: Conceptual Chemistry.

Docos: Numerous Modern Marvels on Chemistry topics, The Periodic Table of Videos http://www.periodicvideos.com/ , BBC's Chemistry: a volatile history, lots of you-tube to see reactions he reads about

Hands on: electrolysis, pH with red cabbage, chromatography with ink, iodine and starch, solutions and suspensions, etc., plus outsource a chemistry lab class for 2 days at the University

Investigation: What mixture of ingredients makes the most pliable and bounceable silly putty? OR the one he is currently considering. How does the design of a parking deck affect pollution levels?

 

HTH,

 

Ruth in NZ

Edited by lewelma
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For 5th grade, I'm cobbling a chemistry program together with readings from science encyclopedia and bios of famous chemists, a couple of simple chemistry books, and the ACS middle school chemistry program. It's been fun and going well, but since we added a time-consuming activity (speech club) we haven't had as much time to do labs as we'd like.

 

Our 6th & 7th graders do Rainbow Science, years 1 & 2. It has been a good fit for that age group, except our oldest dd. She did the Cornell Ornithology home study course in 6th-8th grades.

 

For 8th grade they do Apologia Biology. Doing biology in 8th leaves time to do AP science in high school.

 

HTH,

GardenMom

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We're doing our second semester (there will be 3 total) of Biology with living books, library books, etc. We have used some lessons from BFSU Vol. 2, and some of the books from their correlated reading list, others that have been recommended here in various threads, and some I've found at the library.

 

The second semester of 4th grade, we did ecology along with some Earth Science, and a Human Anatomy unit using Ellen McHenry's free download. Currently we are doing the cell & microbiology. Next "semester" will be mostly botany, again using Ellen's Botany program. Concurrently, this year we are studying Entomology using a lot of vintage books & readers, and Equine Science using the program from Winter Promise. These last two are particular interests of dd's, topics that she asked to study.

 

I'll post our book list for this year (5th grade) but it might not all fit in one message . . .

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Cell Biology/Chemistry/Microbiology/Botany

 

 

 

 

General:

·The Way Life Works – Mahlon Hoagland

·The Magic of Reality - Dawkins

·The Fairyland of Science – Arabella Buckley

 

All Year - Entomology

·Adventures with Insects – Richard Headstrom

·MP Insects Reader

·Insectigations – 40 Hands-On Activities to Explore the Insect World

·Life in a Bucket of Soil – Elsie Wrigley

 

 

Cells/Using a Microscope:

·The Usborne Complete Book of the Microscope – Kirsteen Rogers

·A World in a Drop of Water – Exploring with a Microscope – Virginia Silverstein

·Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek: First to See Microscopic Life – Lisa Yount’

·Hidden Worlds: Looking Through a Scientist’s Microscope – Stephen Kranmer

· Broll, Brandon. Microcosmos: Discovering the World Through Microscopic Images from 20X to Over 22 Million X Magnification

· The Lives of a Cell: Notes of a Biology Watcher – Lewis Thomas

·Rainis, Kenneth G. and Russell, Bruce J. Guide to Microlife.

Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts, 1996

Chemistry:

·The Particle Model of Matter – Roberta Baxter

·Atoms: Chris Oxlade

·Experiments with Heat and Energy – Lisa Magloff

·Mixtures & Solutions – Molly Aloian

·Elements & Compounds – Lynette Brent

·Dingle, Adrian. The Periodic Table: Elements with Style! Kingfisher, 2007.

·Hill, Lisa. The Properties of Elements and Compounds. Raintree, 2009.

·Oxlade, Chris. Elements and Compounds (Chemicals in Action). Heinemann, 2007.

·Tocci, Salvatore. The Periodic Table (True Books). Children’s Press, 2005.

·Winston, Robert. It’s Elementary! DK, 2007.

·Boothroyd, Jennifer. What Floats? What Sinks? A Look at Density. Lerner, 2010.

·Oxlade, Chris. Experiments with Water: Water and Buoyancy (Do It Yourself).

·Tocci, Salvatore. Experiments with Water (True Books). Children’s Press, 2002.

·Jankeliowitch, Anne. Ships. Abrams Books for Young Readers, 2007.

·Kentley, Eric. Boat (Eyewitness). DK, 2000.

·Meredith, Susan Markowitz. Why Do Ships Float? (Science in the Real World). Chelsea

·Magloff, Lisa. Experiments with Heat and Energy (Cool Science). Gareth Stevens,

·Mahaney, Ian F. Heat (Energy in Action). PowerKids Press, 2007.

·Tocci, Salvatore. Experiments with Heat (True Books). Children’s Press, 2003.

·Walker, Sally M. Heat (Early Bird Energy). Lerne

 

Microbiology:

·Pond Water Zoo: An Introduction to Microscopic Life – Peter Loewer

·Explore the World using Protazoa – Roger Anderson

·Tales from the Underground: A Natural History of Subterranean Life – David Wolfe

· Rebecca Johnson – Mighty Animal Cells; Powerful Plant cells

· Farrell, Jeanette. Invisible Allies: Microbes That Shape Our Lives

· Latta, Sara L. The Good, the Bad, the Slimy: The Secret Life of Microbes

· Maynard, Christopher. Micro Monsters: Life Under the Microscope

· Morrison, Gordon. Pond. Walter Lorraine Books, 2002.

· Paul DeKruif – The Microbe Hunters

· Magical Mushrooms & Mischievous Molds – George Hudler

· Microcosmos: Four Billion Years of Microbial Evolution – Lynn Margulis

 

Botany:

·Living Sunlight: How Plants Bring the Earth to Life – Molly Bang

·Anatomy of a Rose – Sharman Apt Russell

·Botany for Dummies

·Essential Atlas of Botany

·Fifty Plants that Changed the Course of History

·100 Flowers and How They Got Their Names

·Photosynthesis – Alvin & Virginia Silverstein

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:bigear::bigear:

 

We are just starting Logic, and use CPO Life Science along with bFSU 2 and living books. Love the list here...so helpful!!! I have The Way Life Works, which we really like, and The Magic of Reality....since we're doing Life Science this year, I just ordered a few of the books recommended here--thanks!

Edited by Halcyon
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Biology is the easy one for me. I'm :bigear: for ideas about how to do Physical Science next year!!

 

I'll get you started, but mostly on chemistry. We'll do physics next year.

 

Chemistry:

The Disappearing Spoon

Uncle Tungsten

Napoleon's Buttons

The Mystery of the Periodic Table

Cartoon Guide to Chemistry

The Elements by Gray

Chemical Chaos (a "horrible science" book)

Eyewitness Chemistry

A Drop of Water

Science Fair projects: Chemistry by Robert Bonnet

Janice Vancleave's A+ projects in chemistry

 

Physics:

The Way Things Work (this book could take you 6 months!)

Cartoon Guide to Physics

 

Ruth in NZ

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Well, we did 4 yr of WTM style science for grammar stage. But when I read the recs for logic stage with all of the kits I just couldn't do it. I needed a break from preparing for the constant hands on in science. So we are doing less hands on and more books for science this year (our first of logic stage, so biology..) But we are using mostly living books as well. I went with MP's 5th grade science which is a unit on birds and then the rest of the year with the Tiner book, The History of Medicine. But that is not enough biology for me, so I also bought the Tiner Biology book and several of the books from the great list above (the Usborne Complete book of Microscopes, the World in a Drop of Water, the Usborne Internet Linked Encyclopedia, to name a few..) and we are kind of doing our own thing with all of it. We enjoyed the bird unit, and are moving into cells and I am about to buy a microscope for it.

DD does a science class at co-op this year for the hands on: graphing, experiements, weighing. And I am glad for it. After the last 2 yrs of WTM style experiments at home I was just not up for it this year.

 

**** ETA the Prentice Hall Explorers listed above is the text dd is using for her science class at co-op...

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We are using Joy Hakim's "Story of Science" for world history and the history of science; TOPS units and Thames and Kosmos kits for hands on chemistry; dh is doing a physics intensive with DD every other Saturday using Conceptual Physical Science and a lot of hands on (don't ask me what exactly; all I know is that there's something in the box that was delivered here yesterday, lol).

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We are using Galore Park So you Really want to Learn Science as our Spine.

 

We are doing a British approach to Science starting this year (as my husband is a Scientist and grew up there) We are doing Biology, Chemistry, and Physics all together. The easy intro stuff this year(5th grade) , then more in depth next etc... We are mixing experiments, dissections, and DVDs in with the text as well as geography (the science side rather than location, and culture side)

 

Seems to be going well, but dh is in charge of this side.

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I use mostly non-textbooks for the "logic" stage. Once they are ready for high school level science, we switch to high school level books regardless of age.

 

Here is our logic stage resource list:

 

Physics (we did physics first because my son loves it)

Topics: mechanics, electronics, astronomy, flight

Text: The Way Things Work (yes, the whole book!) + library books on electricity and flight.

Scientific American's astronomy articles going back 10 years

Docos: The Way Things Work Docos, Numerous Modern Marvels on Physics/Engineering topics

Hands on: Electronics kit. Mechanical Kit

Investigation: How does the angle of attack affect the flight time of a kite depending on the wind speed?

 

Biology (topics of his choosing)

Topics: Biochemistry, Genetics, Evolution, Microbiology

Texts: The Way Life Works; The Cartoon Guide to genetics; The stuff of life; Biozone's Evolution

Docos: All of David Attenborough again (he is just great)

Hands on: Hemophilia in the royal family, lots of microscope work, gene pool and genetic drift games

Investigation: Which type of water supports the most diversity of micro-organisms, ocean, ditch, or river?

 

Earth Science

Topics: Astronomy, Oceanography, Geology, Meteorology.

Texts: Tarbuck's Earth Science, and Applications and Investigations in Earth Science

(we only did about 2/3 of the text and ½ of the applications)

Docos: TTC one of the Earth Science series (did not get through even 1/2 of the series)

Hands on: Observed night sky and moon cycles, Applications and investigations book

Investigation: How does the wind direction and speed and the orientation of the bay affect longshore transport of sand?

 

 

 

Chemistry (We started high school science this year, so here is a retrofitted "logic" level course)

Topics: Periodic Table, chemical reactions, industry uses

Texts: For a younger logic age student: Ellen Henry's The Elements and Carbon Chemistry, The Elements by Theordore Gray, and numerous library books. but for an older logic student: Conceptual Chemistry.

Docos: Numerous Modern Marvels on Chemistry topics, The Periodic Table of Videos http://www.periodicvideos.com/ , BBC's Chemistry: a volatile history, lots of you-tube to see reactions he reads about

Hands on: electrolysis, pH with red cabbage, chromatography with ink, iodine and starch, solutions and suspensions, etc., plus outsource a chemistry lab class for 2 days at the University

Investigation: What mixture of ingredients makes the most pliable and bounceable silly putty? OR the one he is currently considering. How does the design of a parking deck affect pollution levels?

 

HTH,

 

Ruth in NZ

 

:w00t: Stealing this all and running away!!! :leaving:Seriously though, I love this list, and it is totally the way my ds learns!

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I'll get you started, but mostly on chemistry. We'll do physics next year.

 

Chemistry:

The Disappearing Spoon

Uncle Tungsten

Napoleon's Buttons

The Mystery of the Periodic Table

Cartoon Guide to Chemistry

The Elements by Gray

Chemical Chaos (a "horrible science" book)

Eyewitness Chemistry

A Drop of Water

Science Fair projects: Chemistry by Robert Bonnet

Janice Vancleave's A+ projects in chemistry

 

Physics:

The Way Things Work (this book could take you 6 months!)

Cartoon Guide to Physics

 

Ruth in NZ

 

These are great!

 

My current plan (subject to constant revision ;)) is to go through Hakim's Story of Science books over the next 3 years, 6th-8th grade, for about half our science time, and to cover related topics in depth the other half. So next year, 6th, would be a gentle introduction to physics and how the principles apply to everyday life - The Way Things Work is good for that, and some DK/Eyewitness type books, and lots of video/docos, and I will read aloud from For THe Love of Physics by Lewin, and we'll probably do LOF Physics as well - my girl loves LOF.

 

Then in 7th, when we do the Newton book, we can do Astronomy in the first half, I have a great booklist started for that, and then do more hands on/applied physics with some actual math, measurements, graphing, etc. (when we are reading about Newton & Newton's laws in SOS).

 

Then in 8th I think we will do Chemistry alongside, and your suggestions are duly noted! ;)

 

Part of the problem - well, ok, the whole problem - is me! I am, well, daunted by teaching Physics. I mean, I am a reasonably intelligent, well-educated & well read person. I have a PhD from MIT, for goodness sakes (it's in Neuroscience, so I didn't have to take Physics ;)). I think about and wonder ALL THE TIME about how living things work. I can explain in great detail what happens to sound after it hits your pinnae, or light after it passes through your cornea, or how the autonomic nervous system controls breathing, but I have NEVER EVEN WONDERED, until I started reading Lewin's book, why my lungs don't collapse from the atmospheric pressure!!!! GAHHHHHHH! Now I can hardly breath!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

Seriously, I'm like one of those Harvard grads they interviewed that has a degree from the nation's top college but can't explain why we have seasons. I mean, I can explain why we have seasons, but I can't explain the forces that act on a ball when you throw it in the air! No matter how many times I have read about it!!!! My mind just grasps things biological, but not things physical. So I am nervous, and really, really overthinking how to teach physics. I actually am kind of tempted to reach for a curriculum for this one, but I am also determined that my attitude not influence dd, so I am doing everything I can now to get up to speed. You should see my bedside reading table. The good thing is, reading about Physics really, really helps me get to sleep! ;):D:001_huh:

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Here's the thing, Rose. Your last two paragraphs are so full of energy and enthusiasm for what you don't know and want to learn that this interest will naturally and easily communicate itself to your dd. And that I think is what science is about in the elementary grades, cultivating interest so that the desire for further study will naturally follow.

Edited by shukriyya
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We did! Here are things we used:

 

 

Life Science Spines: (gr. 6)

- Usborne Internet Linked Library of Science: Animal World (Howell)

- Usborne Internet Linked Library of Science: World of Plants (Howell)

- Usborne Internet Linked Library of Science: Human Body (Rogers)

 

Life Science Other Resources:

- Dorling Kindersley: Ultimate Visual Dictionary

- Kids Discover Magazines

- Exploring the History of Medicine (Tiner) (there is also "Exploring the World of Biology")

- Rader's Biology 4 Kids website

- library books, videos, science shows

 

 

Earth Science Spines: (gr. 7)

- Reader's Digest How Earth Works

 

Earth Science Other Resources:

- Dorling Kindersley: Ultimate Visual Dictionary

- Kids Discover Magazines

- Exploring Planet Earth (Tiner)

- TOPS #23 Rocks & Minerals (and supply kit)

- Rader's Geology 4 Kids website

- loads of internet video clips on different topics

- library books, videos, science shows

 

 

Physical Science (Chemistry/Physics) Spines: (gr. 8)

- Reader's Digest How Science Works

 

Physical Science Other Resources:

- Dorling Kindersley: Ultimate Visual Dictionary

- Exploring the World of Chemistry (John Tiner)

- Exploring the World of Physics (John Tiner)

- Rader's Chemistry 4 Kids website

- Rader's Physics 4 Kids website

- TOPS #10 Analysis (and supply kit)

- TOPS #13 Adhesion and Cohesion

- Educational Insights: Adventures in Science Kit: Electricity

- Educational Insights: Adventures in Science Kit: Simple Machines

- an optical science kit

- library books, videos, science shows

 

 

We also used part of an older Abeka 8th grade text, Matter and Motion the year we did Physical Science.

Edited by Lori D.
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You've already been given lots of good book suggestions, so I'll just give a quick overview of our approach.

 

We are doing a combo of textbooks, living books (both for shared reading and assigned reading), nature study, and various labs (such as dissections).

 

Each type of resource has a different purpose--basic facts, skills practice, more in-depth learning, inspiration, application, etc.

 

I like to think that textbooks give us roots, living books give us wings, and labs/nature studies allow us to fly.

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Here's my current plan...

 

Note: I'm listing mainly the spine texts for our studies, but I'll be adding in documentaries, a few living/topical books, etc. I'm roughly aiming to do this in three years, but I know it could take longer!

 

Biology (in progress):

How Nature Works (Burnie)

How the Body Works (Parker) + The Body Book (Silver)

Topical/living books

Additional hands-on from Biology/Human Body for Every Kid (VanCleave) as needed/desired

 

Earth & Space:

How the Earth Works (Farndon)

How Weather Works (Allaby)

How the Universe Works (Couper)

Additional hands-on from Earth Science/Astronomy/Weather for Every Kid (VanCleave) as needed/desired

 

Chemistry/Physics:

How Science Works (Hann)

How Things Work (Ardley)

Eyewitness Chemistry (Newmark)

Additional hands-on from Chemistry/Physics for Every Kid (VanCleave) as needed/desired

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  • 2 months later...

To date we have adjusted the timeline and started middle school science in later elementary and then started high school science in middle school. These are the textbooks and online programs that we have used.

 

PLATO Life Science

PLATO Earth and Space Science

PLATO Physical Science

Glencoe Life Science

Glencoe Earth Science

Glencoe Physical Science with Earth Science

CPO Earth Science

parts of Hewitt Conceptual Physics

PLATO Biology

Miller and Levine Biology 2010

 

The book list is a mile long since I have very science loving kids but one thing we did as a family last year that I really liked was to go through the entire The Way Things Work book. We used the Mammoth Island videos that go along with it that we got from the library for the younger kids.

 

We watch a lot of science shows including How It's Made, Myth Busters, Modern Marvels, How Do They Do It?, Head Rush, just about anything on Animal Planet, and every science documentary that I find of interest. I go through once a month and set up the DVR for everything science and history related that could be of interest, it's one of the main reasons we keep cable.

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For life science, we used Holt Science and Technology Life Science, a weekly class at the local nature center and participation in Science Olympiad.

For earth/space, we used the HST Earth Science, a unit from Intellego for space, and the Great Courses My Favorite Universe as well as NOVA Science Now.

 

For physical science, I'm in planning mode. I'm strongly considering using PLATO Physical Science as the basis, along with a Thames and Kosmos Physics Workshop kit and videos from various sources---primarily the Annenberg Foundation website http://www.learner.o...ces/browse.html and Georgia Public Broadcasting's chemistry and physics courses. Another option is the American Chemical Society's Middle School Chemistry http://www.middleschoolchemistry.com/. I'm leaning strongly toward the PLATO as our intro to physical science, then see if we need to go further right now. I've also got a plethora of physical science/conceptual chemistry/conceptual physics books as well. Ironically, this is my background (my degree--about a million years ago :rolleyes: -- was in physics), but she is so not a science/math kid and processes it so differently than I do that I'd really love to outsource physical science so that we have less potential drama. Unfortunately for us, the only text the local classes aimed at homeschooled middle schoolers use is Apologia, and that isn't a fit for us at all.

 

Given the way our year is working, it looks like we'll have an extra semester next year for science, at minimum, as I don't want to go straight into high school science. My daughter's passion is for art, particularly drawing people, and biology is her favorite science, so I am trying to rough out an Anatomy for Artists course for her to fill the gap, with a focus on the skeletal and muscular systems.

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This year (7th grade) we're doing CPO Earth Science. I love it. I'm teaching it at a co-op.

 

Last year dd did Shepherd's Life Science at the co-op. She didn't die from it, but I don't know that it was optimum. It was better than Apologia, but that's not setting the bar really high.

 

Next year I'd like to do a physics-chem combo. I'm thinking ACS plus Hewitt's Conceptual Physics, but I'm cruising these threads for other ideas. I know ACS has been mentioned a couple of times upthread -- it's an amazing FREE resource. I taught the elementary level to the little kids at co-op one semester, and it was wonderful.

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For physical science, I'm in planning mode. I'm strongly considering using PLATO Physical Science as the basis, along with a Thames and Kosmos Physics Workshop kit and videos from various sources---primarily the Annenberg Foundation website http://www.learner.o...ces/browse.html and Georgia Public Broadcasting's chemistry and physics courses. Another option is the American Chemical Society's Middle School Chemistry http://www.middleschoolchemistry.com/. I'm leaning strongly toward the PLATO as our intro to physical science, then see if we need to go further right now. I've also got a plethora of physical science/conceptual chemistry/conceptual physics books as well. Ironically, this is my background (my degree--about a million years ago :rolleyes: -- was in physics), but she is so not a science/math kid and processes it so differently than I do that I'd really love to outsource physical science so that we have less potential drama. Unfortunately for us, the only text the local classes aimed at homeschooled middle schoolers use is Apologia, and that isn't a fit for us at all.

 

Thank you for sharing your plans and these links! Awesome!

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Thank you for sharing your plans and these links! Awesome!

 

I'm liking the Annenberg website. So far I've only used the American Cinema one for our film literacy and some of the Art through Time for art appreciation (though you do have to be aware that these are aimed at adults, so some of the examples may be outside of your comfort zone for kids watching alone). I'm planning on using the American Passages literature as well as the American and world history videos to add to our remaining history studies (again, not aimed at middle school, so they may benefit from prescreening). I'd been using the Great Courses Early American History, but we've just finished that. Annenberg also has foreign language videos here http://www.learner.org/resources/browse.html?discipline=3 for French, Spanish and ESL.

 

WGBH http://www.wgbh.org/programs/NOVA-ScienceNOW-390 has shorts from NOVA ScienceNow to watch online

 

For the chemistry and physics from GPB, the link to their online educational videos is here http://www.gpb.org/education, including Spanish and Japanese. For the chemistry and physics ones, if you are outside of Georgia, the information they gave me was to purchase one of the dvds ($29.95) in either series and they will then send you the teacher's materials for both courses, for free IIRC. You may be able to just order the teacher's materials directly, but I'm not sure, as it's been a while since I emailed them.

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Rose, can you give us a list like this for the other areas of science? :drool5:

 

 

 

Cell Biology/Chemistry/Microbiology/Botany

 

 

 

 

General:

·The Way Life Works – Mahlon Hoagland

·The Magic of Reality - Dawkins

·The Fairyland of Science – Arabella Buckley

 

All Year - Entomology

·Adventures with Insects – Richard Headstrom

·MP Insects Reader

·Insectigations – 40 Hands-On Activities to Explore the Insect World

·Life in a Bucket of Soil – Elsie Wrigley

 

 

Cells/Using a Microscope:

·The Usborne Complete Book of the Microscope – Kirsteen Rogers

·A World in a Drop of Water – Exploring with a Microscope – Virginia Silverstein

·Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek: First to See Microscopic Life – Lisa Yount’

·Hidden Worlds: Looking Through a Scientist’s Microscope – Stephen Kranmer

· Broll, Brandon. Microcosmos: Discovering the World Through Microscopic Images from 20X to Over 22 Million X Magnification

· The Lives of a Cell: Notes of a Biology Watcher – Lewis Thomas

·Rainis, Kenneth G. and Russell, Bruce J. Guide to Microlife.

Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts, 1996

Chemistry:

·The Particle Model of Matter – Roberta Baxter

·Atoms: Chris Oxlade

·Experiments with Heat and Energy – Lisa Magloff

·Mixtures & Solutions – Molly Aloian

·Elements & Compounds – Lynette Brent

·Dingle, Adrian. The Periodic Table: Elements with Style! Kingfisher, 2007.

·Hill, Lisa. The Properties of Elements and Compounds. Raintree, 2009.

·Oxlade, Chris. Elements and Compounds (Chemicals in Action). Heinemann, 2007.

·Tocci, Salvatore. The Periodic Table (True Books). Children’s Press, 2005.

·Winston, Robert. It’s Elementary! DK, 2007.

·Boothroyd, Jennifer. What Floats? What Sinks? A Look at Density. Lerner, 2010.

·Oxlade, Chris. Experiments with Water: Water and Buoyancy (Do It Yourself).

·Tocci, Salvatore. Experiments with Water (True Books). Children’s Press, 2002.

·Jankeliowitch, Anne. Ships. Abrams Books for Young Readers, 2007.

·Kentley, Eric. Boat (Eyewitness). DK, 2000.

·Meredith, Susan Markowitz. Why Do Ships Float? (Science in the Real World). Chelsea

·Magloff, Lisa. Experiments with Heat and Energy (Cool Science). Gareth Stevens,

·Mahaney, Ian F. Heat (Energy in Action). PowerKids Press, 2007.

·Tocci, Salvatore. Experiments with Heat (True Books). Children’s Press, 2003.

·Walker, Sally M. Heat (Early Bird Energy). Lerne

 

Microbiology:

·Pond Water Zoo: An Introduction to Microscopic Life – Peter Loewer

·Explore the World using Protazoa – Roger Anderson

·Tales from the Underground: A Natural History of Subterranean Life – David Wolfe

· Rebecca Johnson – Mighty Animal Cells; Powerful Plant cells

· Farrell, Jeanette. Invisible Allies: Microbes That Shape Our Lives

· Latta, Sara L. The Good, the Bad, the Slimy: The Secret Life of Microbes

· Maynard, Christopher. Micro Monsters: Life Under the Microscope

· Morrison, Gordon. Pond. Walter Lorraine Books, 2002.

· Paul DeKruif – The Microbe Hunters

· Magical Mushrooms & Mischievous Molds – George Hudler

· Microcosmos: Four Billion Years of Microbial Evolution – Lynn Margulis

 

Botany:

·Living Sunlight: How Plants Bring the Earth to Life – Molly Bang

·Anatomy of a Rose – Sharman Apt Russell

·Botany for Dummies

·Essential Atlas of Botany

·Fifty Plants that Changed the Course of History

·100 Flowers and How They Got Their Names

·Photosynthesis – Alvin & Virginia Silverstein

 

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We did! Here are things we used:

 

 

Life Science Spines: (gr. 6)

- Usborne Internet Linked Library of Science: Animal World (Howell)

- Usborne Internet Linked Library of Science: World of Plants (Howell)

- Usborne Internet Linked Library of Science: Human Body (Rogers)

 

Life Science Other Resources:

- Dorling Kindersley: Ultimate Visual Dictionary

- Kids Discover Magazines

- Exploring the History of Medicine (Tiner) (there is also "Exploring the World of Biology")

- Rader's Biology 4 Kids website

- library books, videos, science shows

 

 

Earth Science Spines: (gr. 7)

- Reader's Digest How Earth Works

 

Earth Science Other Resources:

- Dorling Kindersley: Ultimate Visual Dictionary

- Kids Discover Magazines

- Exploring Planet Earth (Tiner)

- TOPS #23 Rocks & Minerals (and supply kit)

- Rader's Geology 4 Kids website

- loads of internet video clips on different topics

- library books, videos, science shows

 

 

Physical Science (Chemistry/Physics) Spines: (gr. 8)

- Reader's Digest How Science Works

 

Physical Science Other Resources:

- Dorling Kindersley: Ultimate Visual Dictionary

- Exploring the World of Chemistry (John Tiner)

- Exploring the World of Physics (John Tiner)

- Rader's Chemistry 4 Kids website

- Rader's Physics 4 Kids website

- TOPS #10 Analysis (and supply kit)

- TOPS #13 Adhesion and Cohesion

- Educational Insights: Adventures in Science Kit: Electricity

- Educational Insights: Adventures in Science Kit: Simple Machines

- an optical science kit

- library books, videos, science shows

 

 

We also used part of an older Abeka 8th grade text, Matter and Motion the year we did Physical Science.

 

 

 

You have the best lists! :)

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We've used a few different things for science, but it's Apologia stuff that actually gets done. This year I let my 5th grader do her own, Botany. I'm doing Astronomy with my 2nd grader and my 7th grader is doing General Science. They're all really enjoying the courses and doing well, though the timing for several botany projects has been difficult due to the weather. We're not young earth, but we just discuss the different beliefs in that area. We like the journals alongside the elementary books.

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We are using Galore Park So you Really want to Learn Science as our Spine.

 

We are doing a British approach to Science starting this year (as my husband is a Scientist and grew up there) We are doing Biology, Chemistry, and Physics all together. The easy intro stuff this year(5th grade) , then more in depth next etc... We are mixing experiments, dissections, and DVDs in with the text as well as geography (the science side rather than location, and culture side)

 

Seems to be going well, but dh is in charge of this side.

 

 

Where do you purchase GP Science in the US?

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We like to study science every day. Reading and/or videos on some days with hands on once or twice a week.

 

 

For 5th grade bio I used a few different things. Mostly I used Otter's Life Science from Guest Hollow. That was a really fun year

 

6th grade we used CPO Earth and Space. I worked really hard and we managed almost every single exploration. That was also a great science year.

 

7th grade: We are using Middle School Chemistry along with Guest Hollow's chemistry. She incorporates McHenry's The Elements and Carbon Chemistry. This year isn't feeling as fun as the past couple years.

 

8th grade: I am planning on using Prentis Hall Physical Science: Concepts in Action. I also own CPO, but their explorations for physical science are difficult to manage in a home setting. I have the Prentis Hall text, the teacher's book, a lab workbook and the teacher's lab workbook. I got them all pretty cheap on Amazon. I noticed that Kolbe Academy has lesson plans etc for Concepts so I might get those and make it easy on myself. I am a little concerned because there doesn't seem to be any required materials for the Kolbe class, so I am wondering how they handle the labs. It is possible that I am just expected to figure it out.

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7th grade: We are using Middle School Chemistry along with Guest Hollow's chemistry. She incorporates McHenry's The Elements and Carbon Chemistry. This year isn't feeling as fun as the past couple years.

 

 

 

We are doing The Elements now. You probably know all about these ideas, but I wanted to share a few videos that might add to the fun element (pun definitely intended). Nova has a show called Hunting the Elements and a 4 part series called Making Stuff. We love the Royal Institution Christmas Lectures and this year's lectures were called The Modern Alchemist. You can also search through Nova and Modern Marvels episodes for chemistry episodes. Bill Nye does a great job with his Greatest Discoveries series.

 

On youtube, we enjoy U. of Nottingham's Periodic Table videos and

.

 

Once we are done with The Elements, ds will read through The Cartoon Guide for Chemistry. Chemistry Basics in the Stop Faking It Series is also lots of fun. We got ours out of the library, but the others in the series I got used on Amazon.

 

We are only doing a bit of Chemistry, so I am fortunate that I don't need to fill an entire year with fun stuff. Ds doesn't love chemistry, but it helps him understand astronomy, which he adores.

 

How do you like Middle School Chemistry?

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How do we like Middle School Chemistry? Hmmm... I ask myself that question all the time, lol.

 

Honestly, I think it is too easy. But then I think maybe I am using it wrong. I haven't been reading the teacher pages, just going over the student instruction pages and the experiments and having him do the student reading at the end of each unit. But, so far he has been able to predict every single question or demonstration correctly. It feels like busy work. At first I just chalked it up to the intro unit. It was giving basic information and so wouldn't be particularly advanced. But, did my 7th grader really need to compare how food colouring moves in hot water as compared to cold? Really? My second grader had the same experiment. Now, he liked the animated molecules etc, but...really?

 

We are halfway through, we just finished unit 3 and it has pretty much all been like that. Now, I am hoping things will pick up soon. Unit 4 is on the periodic table and bonding. We have been covering that in The Elements so it will be familiar. It will be good to have some actual hands on stuff with that. I find hands on is lacking in The Elements. Unit 5 is about the water molecule and dissolving and it looks like we work with sugar. Again, really? I am hoping to be really wrong about that. The last unit is called Chemical Change and looks to discuss precipitates and energy changes. That might have some new information.

 

I am feeling like I should have stuck to TOPS units. I have a couple in reserve and I might just pull them out. We are whipping through Middle School Chemistry, and that is even with my dragging it out. I will have time for at least one TOPS science unit before the end of the year.

 

My kid isn't really a STEM kid, but we do take math and science very seriously. I am sensitive to the idea that good science education can't be done at home. I really try to put in the effort (and spend the $$) to get those labs done. But, I can't imagine any real middle school science teacher thinking that this is adequate science education. But, then I think that most middle school students prob only get a couple weeks of the most basic chemistry instruction.

 

I am going to read the teacher pages for unit 4 this week and hope that there is more substance in there to be shared with the student.

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