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I just saw a post on fb that showed crazy increases in food costs in the past four years. I've only been back in the States a couple of times in the past 5 years and haven't paid a huge amount of attention to the food prices. Can these figures really be true?

 

A gallon of milk went from $2.15 to $4.59.

A pound of butter from $1.95 to $5.19.

A pound of potatoes from $0.32 to $1.30.

5 pounds of flour from $1.97 to $3.49.

2 pounds of coffee from $5.49 to $13.69.

A pound of beef from $3.68 to $7.98.

 

Have food prices in the States really gone up that much?

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A gallon of milk went from $2.15 to $4.59.

A pound of butter from $1.95 to $5.19.

A pound of potatoes from $0.32 to $1.30.

5 pounds of flour from $1.97 to $3.49.

2 pounds of coffee from $5.49 to $13.69.

A pound of beef from $3.68 to $7.98.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Just went to store yesterday:

Gal of Milk is about $2.50 <-- didnt buy it yesterday but thats what it averages

stick butter is $.69 for 4 sticks

Potatoes are about $2-3 <-- didnt buy but thats what they avg

Flour price sounds right

Not sure on coffee

angus meat price for 1 steak + 4lb was $12

 

You can get cheaper and you can get more expensive. I think the FB post is off though- $13 for coffee!

Edited by Jpoy85
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I don't know all of the answers, but I did go to the market today.

 

Kate's Butter was 3.49/lb

Organic coffee was $6.99/lb for ground. (It's less for beans)

Grass fed beef for $4.99/lb (Local meat is $6-$8/lb ) sale

Cabot cheese was $3.33/lb sale

Kerry Gold cheese was $4/lb sale

Organic Stoneyfield Whole Milk was $ 3.69/half gallon (didn't buy, but I always check. I pay $4.50/half gallon for raw in town)

The organic potatoes at the farmer's market is $3/lb, but they really are spectacular. I did buy fingerlings last week for 1.99/lb. (I haven't had much luck growing potatoes. It's frustrating.)

We have a lot of food from our garden, so I have been a little lax in checking certain numbers.

Edited by LibraryLover
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stick butter is $.69 for 4 sticks

 

 

Do you mean margarine? I haven't seen a pound of butter for $1 or less in 15 years, easy! 4 sticks is a pound.

 

Eta: I meant less than $1. I do recall $1 butter since I have been buying my own groceries (1997).

Edited by kijipt
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Do you mean margarine? I haven't seen a pound of butter for $1 or less in 15 years, easy! 4 sticks is a pound.

 

 

Cabot is $2.50/lb (where I shop) this week. I have seen store brand butters (not margarine) at 1.99/lb pretty consistently. Not $1, obviously. :)

Edited by LibraryLover
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A gallon of milk went from $2.15 to $4.59

 

Here a gallon of milk is $2.99 conventional. $6ish organic

 

A pound of butter from $1.95 to $5.19.

 

My buy price for butter is $2-3 a pound, bought in bulk. Regular butter hits 2 pounds for $5 often around here.

 

A pound of potatoes from $0.32 to $1.30

 

Depends on the type. You can pay $2 a pound but russets are $3 for 10 pound bags usually.

 

5 pounds of flour from $1.97 to $3.49.

 

I buy flour by the 25 pound bag. It had really gone up. I pay $27ish for 25 pounds GF and about $20 for wheat the last time we bought it. I saw 5 pounds on sale today for $3.79 at Safeway.

 

2 pounds of coffee from $5.49 to $13.69.

 

We pay $18.99 for 2.5 pounds of whole beans.

 

A pound of beef from $3.68 to $7.98.

 

Cuts of beef are wildly different in price. That number is meaningless. Chuck is less, good steaks much more. We buy a side of beef and pay a bit less than $8 that when all is said once bones are factored for really good beef that would range from $4-18 a pound at Whole Foods.

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I don't have a dog in this, but 'spread' is typically not butter, but margarine.

 

It has to be. 69 cents was less than the average price for any brand of real butter in the 1990s. I was gleeful for 10 for $10 sales in like 2000. Margarine spread is about $1 or so here. We do have higher than average butter prices. Store brand butter goes on sale for $2.5 around here. Tillamook or similar brand usually is on special 2 for 6 a couple times a month. I usually buy the bigger blocks at a restaurant supply store.

Edited by kijipt
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I think it's crazy that food costs vary so much in the US.

 

Some of the variations seem pretty random but some must be proximity based. I live in Washington so it seems pretty reasonable that potatoes and apples are cheap here, the same as citrus being pricier here than say Florida.

 

Some places seem to just have more expensive food because things are more expensive there in general.

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Prices vary around here, but here are my average costs:

 

Milk: Anywhere from $3.50 to $4.50 a gallon. Closer to $7 for organic.

Butter: $2.99 on sale, up to, I think, $4.59 not on sale.

Potatoes: Depends on the variety, but I can get a five pound bag of russets for a couple bucks when they go on sale, closer to $4 when they aren't.

Flour: I buy the King Arthur stuff, and I think that's around $5 for a bag.

Coffee: Ugh. If I don't buy the dirt cheap stuff, it's closer to $10 a pound around here.

Beef: Depends on the kind. Regular, non-organic ground beef is around $4 a pound here, various other cuts range from $8 to $20 per pound. Grass-fed tends to be two or three bucks more.

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I don't know what it was 5 years ago, but I do know everything went up in costs. Here is what I pay for the things on your list:

 

A gallon of milk $4.59 conventional $7+ for organic.

A pound of butter $2.99

A pound of potatoes $.71

5 pounds of flour $2.49 - King Arthur

2 pounds of coffee -I have no idea since I don't buy it. But loose tea is costing me $4.60 for 100g. That has gone up almost one dollar a tin over the last year.

A pound of beef - again I don't know since I don't buy meat anymore. But everything else has gone up per unit in the past 2 years.

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These are current prices for a few items here:

 

Milk $4/gallon

Butter $3.69/lb

Boneless chicken, $2.75/lb (15% water added)

Beef, no less than $4/lb. (ground beef is the cheapest - I could buy pale pink ground beef cheaper (70% lean, but I don't)

Sugar $3.19 for 4 lbs.

White rice $1/lb.

 

The stores here don't put prices on food, and I don't have receipts for anything else.

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Milk is about $3.50/gal for store brand. Name brand (like mayfield or pet) is closer to $5 and organic is closer to $7.

 

Eggs were $1.99/dz last week! :svengo:

 

Coffee $6-8/lb depending on brand.

 

Beef $3-8/lb depending on cut.

 

Gas $3.31/gal last night...has been tending down for a week or two.

 

Flour $2.49/5lb bag.

 

Butter $2.99/lb for store brand on sale.

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I just saw a post on fb that showed crazy increases in food costs in the past four years. I've only been back in the States a couple of times in the past 5 years and haven't paid a huge amount of attention to the food prices. Can these figures really be true?

 

A gallon of milk went from $2.15 to $4.59. 2.39-2.89 depending on fat content (regular prices not sale)

 

A pound of butter from $1.95 to $5.19. 1.99 regular 1.68 or so on sale

 

A pound of potatoes from $0.32 to $1.30. I buy in bulk from the amish and I paid about 35 cents a pound for fingerlings and baby reds. Russets are cheaper yet. From the grocery store I "think" a 10 pound bag of russets is about 4.00 and a 5 pound bag of red is about the same.

 

5 pounds of flour from $1.97 to $3.49. I only buy on sale when it's less than $2.00 for 5 lbs. I "think" regular is about $5 for 10 pounds.

 

2 pounds of coffee from $5.49 to $13.69. I have no idea, I find the smell of coffee to be so disgusting that I won't buy anything even stocked in that aisle because I don't want to go near the coffee.

 

A pound of beef from $3.68 to $7.98. I buy grassfed from the farmer. A half of beef worked out to $4.58 a pound. Regular ground beef in the store is around $3.00 but since I don't buy beef there I haven't paid attention to any of the other cuts.

 

Have food prices in the States really gone up that much?

 

Those prices are really high for my area. Mine are in red.

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Depends on area and store. The bolded is what I pay at Aldi's- much less than what you qute.

 

A gallon of milk went from $2.15 to $4.59. $2.89

A pound of butter from $1.95 to $5.19.$2.29

A pound of potatoes from $0.32 to $1.30. $.70

5 pounds of flour from $1.97 to $3.49. $ 1.62

2 pounds of coffee from $5.49 to $13.69. $4.99 per pound, so $10 per 2 lbs.

Of course there are more expensive stores.

 

The price of beef is meaningless - ground beef obviously costs less than NY strip steak.

Edited by regentrude
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I just saw a post on fb that showed crazy increases in food costs in the past four years. I've only been back in the States a couple of times in the past 5 years and haven't paid a huge amount of attention to the food prices. Can these figures really be true?

 

A gallon of milk went from $2.15 to $4.59.

A pound of butter from $1.95 to $5.19.

A pound of potatoes from $0.32 to $1.30.

5 pounds of flour from $1.97 to $3.49.

2 pounds of coffee from $5.49 to $13.69.

A pound of beef from $3.68 to $7.98.

 

Have food prices in the States really gone up that much?

 

Here that is about right except I am paying $3 for a lb of butter and 4.50 for cheap beef. The coffee is not that much. What I pay for most items has almost doubled from what I paid 5 years ago.

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I just saw a post on fb that showed crazy increases in food costs in the past four years. I've only been back in the States a couple of times in the past 5 years and haven't paid a huge amount of attention to the food prices. Can these figures really be true?

 

A gallon of milk went from $2.15 to $4.59.

A pound of butter from $1.95 to $5.19.

A pound of potatoes from $0.32 to $1.30.

5 pounds of flour from $1.97 to $3.49.

2 pounds of coffee from $5.49 to $13.69.

A pound of beef from $3.68 to $7.98.

 

Have food prices in the States really gone up that much?

 

I pay around

 

$3.29/gallon whole milk

$2.50/lb butter (frequent sale price for one brand or another most weeks)

$2.99-3.99 for 5lb potatoes

$1.99-2.99 for 5lb of white flour, near $5 for whole wheat

$11 for a giant tub of Folgers (no idea what that is in lbs.)

$3.29-3.99/lb of supermarket beef, depending on the quantity.

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A gallon of milk went from $2.15 to $4.59.

A pound of butter from $1.95 to $5.19.

A pound of potatoes from $0.32 to $1.30.

5 pounds of flour from $1.97 to $3.49.

2 pounds of coffee from $5.49 to $13.69.

A pound of beef from $3.68 to $7.98.

 

I'm in the Silicon Valley. This week, I spent:

 

Butter - $2.69

Potatoes - 5 lb for $3

5 lb. flour - $2.22

Beef (ground chuck) - $2.99/lb.

I don't buy coffee so I can't comment on that.

 

Gas was $4.29 at Costco the other day, but $4.49+ everywhere else.

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I seriously love that we know these prices. That is how important this stuff is to us--making sure ends meet, trying to get them to meet.

 

I mean, it could be that we didn't care (which might happen if the economy were good? Or if we were doing well?) but we obviously know.

 

 

I think it's that, as a group we are researchers. That's how we got HERE by researching education.

 

I also think that as a group, we probably think more about nutrition than the average American.

 

I will not waver on my milk choices. We buy locally raised, organic milk. It's $4.50-5.00 per half gallon glass bottle. It's gone up about a quarter in the 6 years we've been drinking it. It's a local economy though. The farmer sets his stock by how much milk he sells, and he raises his own hay. It's a careful, thought-out farming model. They don't expand beyond what sells.

 

We are buying more and more locally raised produce and I am preserving more and more of it. So we're opting out of national stuff like junk foods and buying kale for chips from next door. That farmer hasn't raised his prices wither because he's concerned about the food everyone is eating. He is also retired from his "real" job and farming is his hobby. I did spend a fortune this summer on canning items.

 

Organic butter has skyrocketed here lately. I've seen it go for $12 a pound. The solution to that has been to make it from the cream from the above dairy. It's $14 a jar but I get almost 2 pounds so half the cost. :)

 

This year I bought 40 locally and ethically raised, organic chickens. It cost me $400 but I have chicken for a YEAR and it's GOOD meat so I'll make myself use every last scrap of it.

 

I would love to find local and ethical buffalo but I cannot so I just have that shipped. It's expensive but the cost is actually a good thing for me. When I'm preparing meat that cost us something tangible, it forces me as the chef to work harder to prepare it carefully and thoughtfully. If we're going to have a $30 pot roast, I want my local carrots sliced prettily in it. I want to cook it low and slow and maximize the flavors. And as a mom, I've noticed that the better stuff tastes, the less we eat of it. We savor it more. A box of Kraft mac and cheese? You shovel that stuff down your gullet and move on. :D

 

I've got a peppered ham coming from Arkansas next week. It's $80 but it's a whole HAM. So a ham dinner that first night and ham and eggs for breakfast and lunch the next day. Scalloped ham and potatoes a day or two later and then quart after quart of split pea soup! It's not local but it's the best ham we've ever had so we splurge.

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A gallon of milk went from $2.15 to $4.59.

A gallon of store brand whole milk here is around 3.50.

 

A pound of butter from $1.95 to $5.19.

I only recently started buying real butter, but the biggest difference I noticed was the price. Store brand stick butter runs a about 2.50-3.00. Dh likes something more spreadable so I get the whipped, too, which is 3.50-4.00.

 

A pound of potatoes from $0.32 to $1.30.

I honestly have no idea. I do see the 5 lb bags for like $3 if you get the certain type.

 

5 pounds of flour from $1.97 to $3.49.

Looks about right, but I don't buy flour often.

 

2 pounds of coffee from $5.49 to $13.69.

Definitely. Even store brand coffee is easily $10.

 

A pound of beef from $3.68 to $7.98.

Let me think.... 70/30 here is in the $3 range, 80/20 is easily $4, and 85/15 $4.50, etc...and that is ground beef. To buy thin sirloin for stir fry it runs $9 regularly.

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A gallon of milk went from $2.15 to $4.59.

A pound of butter from $1.95 to $5.19.

A pound of potatoes from $0.32 to $1.30.

5 pounds of flour from $1.97 to $3.49.

2 pounds of coffee from $5.49 to $13.69.

A pound of beef from $3.68 to $7.98.

 

 

A gallon of milk here is $3.69-3.99, organic is $4.99-5.99

A lb. of butter is $2.99-3.79

I'm not sure about potatoes. A 10 lb bag at Aldi is around $4, but Aldi is known to be cheaper than most grocery stores

Flour is $2.49-3.49

Coffee is anywhere from $6.99-10.99.

I'm not sure about beef in store as I buy mine from a local, grass-fed co-op. I pay around $5-6/lb.

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Some of the variations seem pretty random but some must be proximity based. I live in Washington so it seems pretty reasonable that potatoes and apples are cheap here, the same as citrus being pricier here than say Florida.

 

Some places seem to just have more expensive food because things are more expensive there in general.

 

 

I was up far too late yesterday. I don't think food costs a lot in the US, as compared to other countries, although costs are rising. What I meant to ask was why the huge range of prices in one country. I can see food being more in Alaska, for instance.

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A gallon of milk went from $2.15 to $4.59.

A pound of butter from $1.95 to $5.19.

A pound of potatoes from $0.32 to $1.30.

5 pounds of flour from $1.97 to $3.49.

2 pounds of coffee from $5.49 to $13.69.

A pound of beef from $3.68 to $7.98.

 

Have food prices in the States really gone up that much?

 

I live in the ex-urbs of DC (still considered Northern VA, but about half-way between DC and Richmond).

 

A gallon of Costco milk is $3.59 (that's whole milk).

 

I buy 4# of butter at a time, and it's about $2/lb

 

Potatoes at Wegmans are $1/lb for their russet 5# bags. Walmart actually charges more for potatoes here.

 

5 pounds of flour (King Arthur Brand) is about $3.50 (I bought this at Wal Mart, because I don't have a BJs membership, and it's cheaper there. I don't buy off-brand flour, because it isn't consistent...)

 

I have no idea what coffee costs, as we don't drink it, but it seems expensive when I've had to price it out for concession work.

 

Ground beef (regular, not organic) is $2.89/lb at Costco (that's 80/20, I believe). Ribeye runs about $7.89 a pound, and Sirloin (NY Strip) is about $6.89/lb. Bacon (Kirkland, regular) runs about $3 a pound, which is what Wal Mart sells it for on-sale, the really good bacon can run closer to $7 a pound.

 

None of these prices are for organic anything... we have a choice of eating something, or trying to be really picky and being hungry. I would rather have Kirkland butter than make it a choice between organic butter or margarine. We are really trying to avoid hydrogenated fats...at least I have a supplier for real lard.

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I was up far too late yesterday. I don't think food costs a lot in the US, as compared to other countries, although costs are rising. What I meant to ask was why the huge range of prices in one country. I can see food being more in Alaska, for instance.

 

Transportation/labor costs. On the coasts, some foods will be cheaper because of easy access to shipping ports -- in the mid-west, certain foods will be cheaper because it's grown there.

 

It's really like comparing the cost of growing your own green beans (one package of good seeds costs me $4, and will yield roughly 25# of green beans...but if I buy those green beans in the store, I'll be lucky if I only pay $1/pound in-season...even if they are sourced locally).

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A gallon of milk went from $2.15 to $4.59.

A pound of butter from $1.95 to $5.19.

A pound of potatoes from $0.32 to $1.30.

5 pounds of flour from $1.97 to $3.49.

2 pounds of coffee from $5.49 to $13.69.

A pound of beef from $3.68 to $7.98.

 

 

 

I pay:

 

$3.69 for half gallon (organic)

$4.69 for lb of butter (not organic)

$14-$18 for 4 lbs of flour (gluten free)

 

beef depends mostly on cut but is usually around $7.99-$9.99 lb and more for organic.

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Saw this thread before I headed to the store this morning, so I checked all the prices. This is at Albertson's, which is more expensive than Walmart or Winco, where I usually shop. And we are in Southern Oregon.

 

A gallon of milk went from $2.15 to $4.59.

Cheapest brand 2% milk: $3.19. The brand I like: $4.19. Neither brand is organic.

 

A pound of butter from $1.95 to $5.19.

Store brand butter was $3.19 on sale, $3.69 regular price.

 

A pound of potatoes from $0.32 to $1.30.

Regular non-organic russet potatoes: 49 cents/lb.

 

5 pounds of flour from $1.97 to $3.49.

Gold Medal Brand white flour: $3.79

 

2 pounds of coffee from $5.49 to $13.69.

Coffee beans out of the bulk bins: $9.99/lb.

 

A pound of beef from $3.68 to $7.98.

Regular 93/7 ground beef: $4.79/lb. Top Sirloin steak: $7.49 lb. Chuck Roast: $2.99 lb.

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I just saw a post on fb that showed crazy increases in food costs in the past four years. I've only been back in the States a couple of times in the past 5 years and haven't paid a huge amount of attention to the food prices. Can these figures really be true?

 

A gallon of milk went from $2.15 to $4.59.

A pound of butter from $1.95 to $5.19.

A pound of potatoes from $0.32 to $1.30.

5 pounds of flour from $1.97 to $3.49.

2 pounds of coffee from $5.49 to $13.69.

A pound of beef from $3.68 to $7.98.

 

Have food prices in the States really gone up that much?

 

Gallon of milk $3-$3.50

Pound of butter $2-$3

Potatoes $2 for a 10lb bag right now, hmmm I think $3-$4 for a 10lb bag in the summer

Not sure about flour since we buy it so rarely

I know coffee is expensive but not that expensive, maybe $8-$9

A pound of beef (I assume ground) $3-$4

 

Now, I can believe those prices if I was in, let's say, Omaha and shopping at Whole Foods. Or maybe if I lived in Chicago, I could see prices like those (the prices in Chicago scare me). Out here in Iowa, prices seem to be a bit lower than other areas, although I've been told parts of Arizona are cheaper than here. :001_huh:

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I dug out my last few receipts to get accurate numbers--I was starting to doubt my numbers after seeing some of the prices listed.

 

At Costco, I buy two gallons of 2% milk for 4.88, two dozen eggs for 3.49, and a 20 pound bag of russet potatoes for 6.49. We haven't bought butter for a while, but I think the last time I bought it at Costco, it was still between 2.00 and 2.50 a pound. It has probably gone up since then. The coffee prices seem about right, but we only buy coffee when we can get a good deal on one of the more expensive brands like Tully's--not more than 5-6 dollars a bag. Flour is still fairly cheap, but I have noticed that sugar has gone up quite a bit. Beef is all over the place. 2.99 for pink slime special gb and up.

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Coffee has increased a lot here. We are in a low cost of living area too. We buy popular brands, like maxwell house. They have decreased package size and we buy the cheaper blend at about 8$ for the larger size. The richer flavors used to be comparble in price, now they are 13$ at least.

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Transportation/labor costs. On the coasts, some foods will be cheaper because of easy access to shipping ports -- in the mid-west, certain foods will be cheaper because it's grown there.

 

It's really like comparing the cost of growing your own green beans (one package of good seeds costs me $4, and will yield roughly 25# of green beans...but if I buy those green beans in the store, I'll be lucky if I only pay $1/pound in-season...even if they are sourced locally).

 

 

I love my garden.

 

However, the cost doesn't always seem consistent with shipping or availability. I find the cost of food astronomical when I visit FL. You would think FL produce etc would be cheaper than in MA because of the long growing season, but it's not. When I go to CA, I am also struck by the higher prices. Is flour always cheaper in wheat producing areas?

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I don't see that. I find the cost of food astronomical when I visit FL. You would think FL produce etc would be cheaper than in MA because of the long growing season, but it's not. When I go to CA, I am also struck by the higher prices.

 

 

I wonder how much of that is from megacorporations setting the prices? If you've been buying oranges from a local farmer for the past 10 years, what have the prices been like?

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Well, here in the CA valley, food has definitely risen quite a bit over the last four years. I did contribute it mainly to rising gasoline prices as it seems to correlate. I buy some through a CSA like arrangement and some through an organic co-op. Overall the food budget has risen and is rising - while it should have gone down when ds moved out. :glare:

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Well, here in the CA valley, food has definitely risen quite a bit over the last four years. I did contribute it mainly to rising gasoline prices as it seems to correlate. I buy some through a CSA like arrangement and some through an organic co-op. Overall the food budget has risen and is rising - while it should have gone down when ds moved out. :glare:

 

 

I have a different perspective. I've read a lot of homesteading/farming/foodie books and one of the things that is frequently mentioned is that in the 70s, 80s, 90s... the percentage of money we spent on food went DOWN. It's like we invented that box of Kraft macaroni and cheese and we began to believe that dinner should cost 79 cents. As a society, we started spending more and more on "stuff" like fancier cars, smart phones, designer jeans, etc. and less on actual food.

 

We forgot that the only things you really need to survive are food and shelter. No one will DIE without a cell phone. You're dead in 24 hours without potable water.

 

This happened right around the time women started working (I have a hard time typing this as a feminist!!) too. It was like the perfect storm of a nutritional nightmare. It's like Monsanto actually said, "Hey everybody! Look at this shiny iphone! Don't you all want one too? All you have to do is quit growing your own gardens and get a job. We'll cover dinner. Don't worry! It will be fast and cheap."

 

Except here we are in Monsanto's grip. And more and more of our children are allergic to things like soy and preservatives. And Monsanto can raise the price of that box of mac and cheese whenever they want. So we are at their mercy and utterly dependent upon them.

 

I was born in 1971. My mom was so proud of working and frankly, so were we kids proud of her. And we had a lot more toys than some of our friends. Mom tried not make every meal from a box but she was kind of proud of not having the time to make real dinners every night too. She was proud as heck of her dirty house. She was too busy to clean. :001_smile:

 

When I talk to her now about it though, she admits it's not a sustainable life. There will always be a better car around the bend, a new phone, etc. But once you're dead from diabetes at the age of 50, it's done. Game over.

 

I truly believe that the only way the system will change is if enough people tell the megacorp system, "No thanks!" and buy everythign they can from a local farmer or grow it themselves. Every time you make your chips from local kale instead of Lay's potatoes, you hurt them and help yourselves.

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I just saw a post on fb that showed crazy increases in food costs in the past four years. I've only been back in the States a couple of times in the past 5 years and haven't paid a huge amount of attention to the food prices. Can these figures really be true?

 

A gallon of milk went from $2.15 to $4.59. $2.99

A pound of butter from $1.95 to $5.19. $2.75

A pound of potatoes from $0.32 to $1.30. $.75

5 pounds of flour from $1.97 to $3.49. $3.09/white, $3.69/whole wheat

2 pounds of coffee from $5.49 to $13.69. $12.00 (fair trade)

A pound of beef from $3.68 to $7.98. $3.99 (94%lean)

 

Have food prices in the States really gone up that much?

 

What I've paid in the past week are in blue, above. Most are below the prices you've mentioned.

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We've seen higher prices, but nothing like what's in that meme.

 

Milk and butter are both $2.49/gallon and $2.49/pound.

 

I just paid $6.99 for 1 pound 14.6 oz. of Maxwell House coffee :glare:. They're no longer 2 pound cans.

 

Angus beef is $3.49/pound

 

Potatoes $.40/pound

 

Flour is about right.

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I just saw a post on fb that showed crazy increases in food costs in the past four years. I've only been back in the States a couple of times in the past 5 years and haven't paid a huge amount of attention to the food prices. Can these figures really be true?

 

A gallon of milk went from $2.15 to $4.59.

A pound of butter from $1.95 to $5.19.

A pound of potatoes from $0.32 to $1.30.

5 pounds of flour from $1.97 to $3.49.

2 pounds of coffee from $5.49 to $13.69.

A pound of beef from $3.68 to $7.98.

 

Have food prices in the States really gone up that much?

 

These prices are high for Indiana. Average prices here would be:

A gallon of milk: $3.00 to $3.50

A pound of butter: about $2.50

A pound of potatoes: ? I think I can get 10 lbs of potatoes for $3-4

Coffee: Of course this varies wildly. Folgers in a can, or Starbucks? I get Folger gourmet or Dunkin Donuts, usually $7-10 a pound.

A pound of beef: Steak or ground beef? Just a bit of price variation there! 90% lean ground beef is $3.00 to $3.50 here.

 

So not quite the huge increase, but prices have definitely gone up overall.

 

It doesn't surprise me at all that moms here know these prices well. I'm feeding six people on one income, and with growing boys, I am learning to watch grocery prices very closely!

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