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I have a question about Planned Parenthood


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And I'm really, seriously curious. I know that PP can be a very politically heated subject, so I hope I don't get in trouble, but I've been wondering about this for a long time, so here goes....

 

Why is PP necessary? Couldn't people go and get the same treatment at the hospital?

Here's why I ask: Around here, the hospitals all offer financial screenings and financial aid applications. They're based on what you make and stuff. So I don't see how PP would be any more affordable in this case.

Now, is this not the practice everywhere? If it's not, then I do get why PP is considered so vital to women's health (along with other low cost clinics and stuff, though I really don't know what those entail - it is my understanding that the health department offers free mammograms or gives vouchers or something? Idk, I'm not really clear on it....)

Anyway, I'm not trying to be ignorant or start a debate about anything. I'm honestly asking if it is not the norm for hospitals to offer what I'm accustomed to.

Thanks! :)

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I went to planned parenthood for several years for annual exams because our insurance didn't cover them. PP had me list my income only, which was zero. They didn't require a household income. I was able to get my exams very cheap. The offices and hospitals around here seem to offer assistance in paying the bill, such as payment plans, but it was still a lot of money for us.

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They are a health care clinic, primarily dealing with routine matters. Hospital care is not, and should not be a substitute for primary care. Clinic care is much cheaper. Obviously PP isn't the only clinic but they are a clinic that specializes in women's and reproductive care. They are are hefty portion of the available low cost routine care. In many communities, they are the only option for uninsured routine care when you don't have the $ to pay in full out of pocket.

 

Most of the people I hear disparaging Planned Parenthood have never been there and used their services. I will forever be grateful for the excellent and personal care I got there in college and as a young wife. It was a PP doctor who intuitively sensed why I had a hard time with pelvic exams and found me a counselor that specialized in abuse survivors and she found a way for me to pay for it. Seriously, I wish I could find her and thank her. That woman changed, if not flat out saved, my life.

 

Most of their funds come from fees for service and private donations.

Edited by kijipt
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Offerings at one Planned Parenthood-

 

http://www.plannedparenthood.org/mbpp/free-birth-control-annual-exams-2656.htm

 

No hospitals in my area offer these services.

 

Ok. Like, they don't offer any financial aid at all?

I'm not trying to be dense, I promise! I just know that here, looking at the amount of income they have on there, you would qualify for drastically reduced bills - up to 100% - at the hospital, too.

Again, I'm NOT trying to be dense. :) Thanks!

 

ETA: Oh, and when I say the hospitals, the same applies to the doctors and offices that are part of their 'network', so to speak. Like, I go to the obgyn at ___ which is all part of a hospital, and there are tons of specialties and everything - from primary care to urology to oncology - whatever. :)

This is the only place I've lived since being married/taking care of my own bills and stuff, so I just wasn't sure if this was the norm everywhere. I know my 'normal' isn't necessarily the same elsewhere. :)

Edited by PeacefulChaos
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I used it in college, and really appreciated their services. (eta: fwiw, I worked in healthcare pre-kids and looking back I feel I was given good quality of care while using PP. I had some docs and NPs that were better than reputable private OBs I've used).

 

I can see adults utilizing PP if they have a higher deductible insurance plan, even if they aren't a low income family. PP would probably be a more affordable OOP option. I know under ACA there have been some changes to well-woman checks and covered RXs, but my CNM is out of network, so we still pay toward that. And the ACA changes only recently kicked in for well-woman coverage.

Edited by Momof3littles
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Ok. Like, they don't offer any financial aid at all?

I'm not trying to be dense, I promise! I just know that here, looking at the amount of income they have on there, you would qualify for drastically reduced bills - up to 100% - at the hospital, too.

Again, I'm NOT trying to be dense. :) Thanks!

 

But you can't just walk into a hospital and ask them for a pap smear or to discuss unusual periods or to feel the lump you found.

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But you can't just walk into a hospital and ask them for a pap smear or to discuss unusual periods or to feel the lump you found.

:iagree: Hospitals are simply not set up for that type of care, generally speaking. Let alone issues with continuity of care and so forth...what kind of followup and ongoing management are you going to get if you are just walking in once a year to a hospital? eta: in most cases, if you had an issue and were seen for that, they would want you to follow up with your own doc or mw; IME they wouldn't expect to see you return to the hospital unless there was an emergent need.

Edited by Momof3littles
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No, but I can go to the obgyn that is under that hospital's 'umbrella' and do so. :)

 

Um, that is not how healthcare is set up everywhere. Not all hospital systems have low cost clinics or even access for uninsured for anything other than the ER or uncompensated IC and surgery. My midwife works out of her own office. My doctor too.

 

And PP gets people in fast, often same day. Someone who is not a patient of record is not getting in fast for routine but important care round my neck if the woods. And PP provides a much higher level of care IME than most county free clinic type places.

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I don't think this is true. At my hospital, you can apply for free or reduced fee care. Once (if) that has been granted, you can call for an appointment. Once that has been given you go and get an exam. If you need other tests, or referral, that may or may not be included in your reduced fee.

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I'm not clear on your use of "umbrella". My hospital ob/gyn/mw and pediatricians bill privately. They are not employed by the hospital under hospital billing.

 

I've always received separate bills from the hospital and dr. as well. Actually, I get a handful of bills because it seems everyone you're in contact with sends their own bill.:glare:

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I'm not clear on your use of "umbrella". My hospital ob/gyn/mw and pediatricians bill privately. They are not employed by the hospital under hospital billing.

 

Hmmm.... Let me try to be specific without being too specific (because I don't like to put my location on here :) )....

I went to the obgyn that was affiliated with a hospital in a city near us. I walked over to that hospital to have bloodwork done during my pregnancy, and it's all on one big campus, so to speak - I also had my kids at that hospital and Pink was in the NICU there. She went to follow up appointments with a pediatric cardiologist at the affiliated children's hospital, as well as NICU follow ups (which were actually at a separate place - the Children's Hospital, where her follow ups were, while all a part of the same 'network' of hospitals, is in another part of town). I also go to the opthamologist (sp? Yikes! :lol: ) that is affiliated with them, as do my boys. The obgyn and opthamologist, as well as various other specialties, are on different floors of an office building, I guess you'd call it - they call it the ____ clinic.

 

Our local hospital is similar. DH went to the doctor here, and he's actually merged with the hospital, so it's not 'Family Medicine of ___' anymore, it's 'Hospital Name Family Medicine'. So he was able to take advantage of the financial assistance that the hospital provides.

 

It's looking like this isn't the norm most places, based on the reactions? :)

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When I first got married, I used PP for birth control and check ups. We had no insurance, it was nice to go through a service designed exactly to deal only with birth control and women's health.

 

At the time their communication was very clear to the client, you knew up front what you were getting and how much it was going to cost. Regular doctors' offices drive me insane as the never will tell you the cost of anything up front. It's hard to be self-paying in those type of scenarios. In the past I've had a hard time getting the price of the office visit when I make the appointment.

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Oh, and I do still get separate bills... I get one from ___ hospital and ___ physicians. I have to call the two places and set up payments separately, but the same financial assistance info is for both of them, and whatever I receive for one is the same as what I get for the other....

I don't know if this is making any sense. :tongue_smilie:

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Hmmm.... Let me try to be specific without being too specific (because I don't like to put my location on here :) )....

I went to the obgyn that was affiliated with a hospital in a city near us. I walked over to that hospital to have bloodwork done during my pregnancy, and it's all on one big campus, so to speak - I also had my kids at that hospital and Pink was in the NICU there. She went to follow up appointments with a pediatric cardiologist at the affiliated children's hospital, as well as NICU follow ups (which were actually at a separate place - the Children's Hospital, where her follow ups were, while all a part of the same 'network' of hospitals, is in another part of town). I also go to the opthamologist (sp? Yikes! :lol: ) that is affiliated with them, as do my boys. The obgyn and opthamologist, as well as various other specialties, are on different floors of an office building, I guess you'd call it - they call it the ____ clinic.

 

Our local hospital is similar. DH went to the doctor here, and he's actually merged with the hospital, so it's not 'Family Medicine of ___' anymore, it's 'Hospital Name Family Medicine'. So he was able to take advantage of the financial assistance that the hospital provides.

 

It's looking like this isn't the norm most places, based on the reactions? :)

 

Definitely not norm for me! We'e seen many specialists in 3 hospitals (1 Pennsylvania, 3 in NEw Jersey, including 2 children's hospitals) and all have been private practice. Ob/gyn, radiology, gastro, pediatrics, xray, mental health, child development, orthopedics, phlebotomy... even had an anesthesiologist bill as out of network!

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And I'm really, seriously curious. I know that PP can be a very politically heated subject, so I hope I don't get in trouble, but I've been wondering about this for a long time, so here goes....

 

Why is PP necessary? Couldn't people go and get the same treatment at the hospital?

Here's why I ask: Around here, the hospitals all offer financial screenings and financial aid applications. They're based on what you make and stuff. So I don't see how PP would be any more affordable in this case.

Now, is this not the practice everywhere? If it's not, then I do get why PP is considered so vital to women's health (along with other low cost clinics and stuff, though I really don't know what those entail - it is my understanding that the health department offers free mammograms or gives vouchers or something? Idk, I'm not really clear on it....)

Anyway, I'm not trying to be ignorant or start a debate about anything. I'm honestly asking if it is not the norm for hospitals to offer what I'm accustomed to.

Thanks! :)

 

Well, as I recall from long ago....the services are low cost, if not free and more importantly, you can have things done anonymously.

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I live in a very small city, in a rural county, with one hospital. When I didn't have health insurance, Planned Parenthood was my only source of health care. I couldn't go to the emergency room for pap smears, and no OBGYN would see me without insurance. They flat out send you to Planned Parenthood. BTW, I didn't qualify for medicaide or anything like that, I just didn't have a job that offered health insurance.

 

I also know for a fact that there are no OBGYN in my county that takes medicaide. Now, PP doesn't deliver babies, so if you are on medicaide then you will have to travel to the next county (over an hour away) but if you need regular medical care, such as paps or a breast exam, then Planned Parenthood is your only option around here.

 

Thank goodness I did have access to Planned Parenthood. When I was 23 I had a series of irregular pap smears and they did the culposcopy and removed the pre-cancerous spot. They did it on a sliding scale. My mom and my aunt have both had cervical and breast cancer, so I need to stay on top of such things. I was able to get regular screenings so it was caught early, and I didn't have to go into major debt to pay for it.

 

My sister and her family moved to town a couple years ago. About 48 hours after arriving in town she started to miscarry. PP was the only place that would see her that day. She could have gone to the emergency room, but she didn't need the emergency room. Plus, she was moving to town for her husband's new job, and their new insurance had not started yet. An unnecessary trip to the emergency room would have cost hundreds and hundreds of dollars. PP saw her right away, assured her everything was going to be ok (it was a very, very early m/c) and my sister didn't have to go into debt.

 

I am very grateful that they have been there for my family when we needed it.

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PP also advocates for women, and not just on politically charged issues. Most hospitals or private practices will not or cannot. For example, My sister lost her job shortly after becoming pregnant. Her job provided the health insurance for her and her DH. They could not afford the Cobra payments, and her regular Dr. could only offer a payment plan. State aid initially turned her down because she qualified for Cobra. The advisor at PP helped them navigate the state plans available so they could get the coverage they needed for pre and post natal care and the birth, and also helped them find regular coverage they could afford for her and DH until her DH found a new, better job with benefits.

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No, but I can go to the obgyn that is under that hospital's 'umbrella' and do so. :)

 

Not here. You can't get an appointment in my town without insurance. In fact, that's the first question that is asked. The only way you can see a doc is the after hours clinic ($80) or the emergency room.

 

PP helped me a lot in college. The local health department was dirty, crowded, and if you had any income was just as expensive as a regular doctor. There is no way I could get through one of their exams as an abuse survivor. There was no empathy at all.

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I see!

Ok, well that makes sense then. :)

Thanks so much for all of your answers. You've cleared up a lot of confusion for me!!! :D

 

Oh, and all of these hospitals are teaching hospitals - I wonder if that has anything to do with it?

 

We have a lot of teaching hospitals here. You generally don't get into one of their clinics without proof of ability to pay- private insurance, a pre-approved (limited availability except at the children's' hospital availability) financial aid application, Medicaid or payment in full at time of service. My father was not able to see his MS and cardio docs when he was briefly uninsured and they are both in a teaching hospital system. He could go to the ER if something became life threatening or he could try and see a GP at a free clinic for a highly specialized issue. If you can't pay, they send you to a free clinic. With a long wait for appointments. So it is only reasonable that if you have a lady health issue, you might prefer a quick visit to one of many PP locations.

Edited by kijipt
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Why is PP necessary? Couldn't people go and get the same treatment at the hospital?

Here's why I ask: Around here, the hospitals all offer financial screenings and financial aid applications. They're based on what you make and stuff.

The doctors' group my family sees has a form for financial assistance. They want more than just your income. They want extensive information about your assets, too. They want copies of tax returns, pay stubs, the value of your car, all financial assets, all your household expenses, and it's only good for six months. So not really a breeze.

 

One may be able to get healthcare at a hospital. That doesn't mean it's affordable. Many people's insurance doesn't cover contraceptive coverage at all. I just got a rather unexpectedly large bill from my midwife for such coverage. The office won't negotiate the price, so I am just paying it. I regret not going to Planned Parenthood; there are local practitioners there whom I already know who work there too. I didn't even like the woman whom I saw to begin with!

 

I continue to believe that people with good health insurance (which used to be me!) have no idea how awful things are for those with no insurance or with kind of crummy insurance, and how hard it can be to pay $400 for some rather minor issue.

 

There are decent clinics catering to the uninsured near me, that either offer affordable appointments or a sliding scale, but many places don't have any.

Edited by stripe
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I see!

Ok, well that makes sense then. :)

Thanks so much for all of your answers. You've cleared up a lot of confusion for me!!! :D

 

Oh, and all of these hospitals are teaching hospitals - I wonder if that has anything to do with it?

 

yes! the only time I have seen what you are describing is t a teaching hospital, on the other side of the state.

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Some people also prefer to keep their embarrassing STD infections or whatever out of their main medical file, too. Especially in the computerized medical file world where nothing ever goes away.

 

The equivalent organisation in the UK is often used by people who would prefer to be anonymous - the clinics are often in quiet residential streets where fewer people might see you go in, and the records are kept separate from your GP file. Cost is not an issue here.

 

Laura

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PP here does deliver babies, as well as provide excellent pediatrics, on top of regular reproductive care for all adults. All for reduced or no cost based on income.

 

Ours used to deliver babies! But that was a long time ago. They did it for a couple years and then stopped. I think they were trying to do it with one OB and it was too much work.

 

If I am informed correctly, PP also provides services to teens.

Doctors won't take teen patients without a parent.

Not all teenage girls have parents they could turn to.

 

At least in my state, teenagers under the age of 18 are permitted to seek medical care without parental permission if it is pertaining to sexuality and drug addiction. However, if they use their parents insurance the parents will know. And there is the fact that doctors here won't see you without insurance.

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That is definitely not the norm here (or anywhere else I've lived)

 

Heck, when I had my 3rd, the billing was so separated, I actually had to pay for part of the hospital services as out of network because the audiologist who did his hearing test was out of network. Even though he was working at the in network hospital where I had my in network c-section with my in network OB. :glare:

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Oh, and I do still get separate bills... I get one from ___ hospital and ___ physicians. I have to call the two places and set up payments separately, but the same financial assistance info is for both of them, and whatever I receive for one is the same as what I get for the other....

I don't know if this is making any sense. :tongue_smilie:

 

I go to doctor at big NYC hospital. He teaches at hospital. His office is in hospital. His practice is 100 percent separate from the hospital.

 

The hospital takes my insurance and I make co-payment. Doctor does not take my insurance and I pay in full. He doesn't care if you are rich or poor. Either you have insurance that pays him, you self pay or you don't use him.

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Wow, PP must really be different based on location. When I was a late teen without health insurance, I went to a PP office for irregular periods, and a host of other symptoms, I was told they could not help me. I didn't even get an exam, the receptionist informed me that is was not for women's general care or problems, but only related to birth control resources.

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Hmmm.... Let me try to be specific without being too specific (because I don't like to put my location on here :) )....

I went to the obgyn that was affiliated with a hospital in a city near us. I walked over to that hospital to have bloodwork done during my pregnancy, and it's all on one big campus, so to speak - I also had my kids at that hospital and Pink was in the NICU there. She went to follow up appointments with a pediatric cardiologist at the affiliated children's hospital, as well as NICU follow ups (which were actually at a separate place - the Children's Hospital, where her follow ups were, while all a part of the same 'network' of hospitals, is in another part of town). I also go to the opthamologist (sp? Yikes! :lol: ) that is affiliated with them, as do my boys. The obgyn and opthamologist, as well as various other specialties, are on different floors of an office building, I guess you'd call it - they call it the ____ clinic.

 

Our local hospital is similar. DH went to the doctor here, and he's actually merged with the hospital, so it's not 'Family Medicine of ___' anymore, it's 'Hospital Name Family Medicine'. So he was able to take advantage of the financial assistance that the hospital provides.

 

It's looking like this isn't the norm most places, based on the reactions? :)

 

Do you have health insurance? PP takes those with and without insurance and provides low cost care unlike most doctors and hospitals. Many doctors will not take those without insurance and cost $100 and up usually to see them. Then good luck getting a quick appointment with an OB/GYN for a regular pap smear and maybe birth control. The doctors I knew of were booked for 6 months or more out unless you were pregnant or had a medical problem in a city with plenty of doctors and plenty of hospitals.

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Wow, PP must really be different based on location. When I was a late teen without health insurance, I went to a PP office for irregular periods, and a host of other symptoms, I was told they could not help me. I didn't even get an exam, the receptionist informed me that is was not for women's general care or problems, but only related to birth control resources.

 

It often varies according to what the state allows them to do and what they have the resources to offer. I went to PP in college for heavy, irregular periods. They saw me the same day. They did a pap, tested it, tested my iron and everything right there in the office. My iron was extremely low, so they ran some other tests. They gave me a bcp Rx to help even out my periods and make my flow lighter (which worked) and gave me iron supplements. I think they charged me $60 for everything, except my Rx, which only cost around $15/month.

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Do you have health insurance? PP takes those with and without insurance and provides low cost care unlike most doctors and hospitals. Many doctors will not take those without insurance and cost $100 and up usually to see them. Then good luck getting a quick appointment with an OB/GYN for a regular pap smear and maybe birth control. The doctors I knew of were booked for 6 months or more out unless you were pregnant or had a medical problem in a city with plenty of doctors and plenty of hospitals.

 

No, no health insurance. :(

 

And I just want to say thanks to everyone on here for being so helpful, for real! I was afraid my question would come off the wrong way, but everyone has been really nice and everything. I REALLY appreciate it! :) You guys have no idea how much I've learned from here on the boards...:)

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Wow, PP must really be different based on location. When I was a late teen without health insurance, I went to a PP office for irregular periods, and a host of other symptoms, I was told they could not help me. I didn't even get an exam, the receptionist informed me that is was not for women's general care or problems, but only related to birth control resources.

 

I always assumed it was solely for birth control resources. This is the first I've heard about them offering regular care.

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Sometimes you can get things at PP for a lower cost than what you would pay with your insurance company and not all things are covered by every insurance. A friend of mine would have paid $800 for an IUD *after* insurance. Another friend's insurance didn't cover IUDs at all. So both went to PP and were able to afford their BC choice based on what they could pay.

 

A hospital would not do that. Not here.

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Hmmm.... Let me try to be specific without being too specific (because I don't like to put my location on here :) )....

I went to the obgyn that was affiliated with a hospital in a city near us. I walked over to that hospital to have bloodwork done during my pregnancy, and it's all on one big campus, so to speak - I also had my kids at that hospital and Pink was in the NICU there. She went to follow up appointments with a pediatric cardiologist at the affiliated children's hospital, as well as NICU follow ups (which were actually at a separate place - the Children's Hospital, where her follow ups were, while all a part of the same 'network' of hospitals, is in another part of town). I also go to the opthamologist (sp? Yikes! :lol: ) that is affiliated with them, as do my boys. The obgyn and opthamologist, as well as various other specialties, are on different floors of an office building, I guess you'd call it - they call it the ____ clinic.

 

Our local hospital is similar. DH went to the doctor here, and he's actually merged with the hospital, so it's not 'Family Medicine of ___' anymore, it's 'Hospital Name Family Medicine'. So he was able to take advantage of the financial assistance that the hospital provides.

 

It's looking like this isn't the norm most places, based on the reactions? :)

 

I would say that's not the norm historically, but it's a trend that is definitely occurring where I live. Thinking back to my childhood and up to my mid-30's, drs and hospitals were completely separate entities ime. OTOH, when I had my 3rd child (now 11), I went to the OB office with HPB, and they literally sent me upstairs to L&D in the hospital for bloodwork and further evaluation; however, the OB practice was not owned by or named for the hospital.

 

Most of the newer clinics (~7 yrs or less) in our area are directly affiliated with a local hospital and bear the hospital's name. So, for example, my oncologist is at Hospital Cancer Center of Community, and it's 20 miles from the hospital. My bills are from the hospital, not the doctor. The hospital lists 14 locations on its website, but only one of them is actually a hospital and 4 of them are wellness centers (gyms with medical oversight and therapy services included). My dh and kids go to a dentist whose office is in Other Hospital North Healthplex. That hospital has 12 locations including hospitals, medical office buildings, diagnostic centers, and day surgery centers, plus it has therapy and rehab services offered at 4 YMCAs.

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Why do people keep thinking that you can get free care at an emergency room? It's just not happening anymore. And they only stabilize you and get you out. It really isn't working for ongoing care anymore. Not that it was ever optimal.

 

I didn't see anyone say that?

It certainly wasn't what I was implying. Obviously, if we needed the emergency room we wouldn't hesitate to go, which is made less stressful by the financial aid available where I live. But so far I've only gone a few times, DH has gone once, and Astro is the only kid to have gone. The kids have insurance, though. :)

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I always assumed it was solely for birth control resources. This is the first I've heard about them offering regular care.

I am not sure it's quite regular care, but anything related to the health of the reproductive system. So irregular periods, for example, would be covered, although it's not a contraceptive service. The PP website lists things like UTIs, yeast infections, breast cancer screenings (remember the deal with the Komen foundation?), and pelvic exams. These are not strictly about contraception.

 

Why do people keep thinking that you can get free care at an emergency room? It's just not happening anymore. And they only stabilize you and get you out. It really isn't working for ongoing care anymore. Not that it was ever optimal.

Not to mention, many people have some ongoing condition that is not an emergency. Like, say, diabetes or cancer or something. These need regular medical intervention. So having an emergency service doesn't even help.

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I am not sure it's quite regular care, but anything related to the health of the reproductive system. So irregular periods, for example, would be covered, although it's not a contraceptive service. The PP website lists things like UTIs, yeast infections, breast cancer screenings (remember the deal with the Komen foundation?), and pelvic exams. These are not strictly about contraception.

 

Not every office. Like I posted above, they would not help me with irregular periods, and even though that was 10+ years ago, I checked and that same office still only offers help with contraceptive care.

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No, no health insurance. :(

 

And I just want to say thanks to everyone on here for being so helpful, for real! I was afraid my question would come off the wrong way, but everyone has been really nice and everything. I REALLY appreciate it! :) You guys have no idea how much I've learned from here on the boards...:)

 

:grouphug:I hope you can get health insurance soon.:grouphug:

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