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If you are a Christian, could you help me (Non-Christian input welcome too..)


Perry
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understand what that means?

 

My husband and I are having a slight disagreement about what people mean when they say they are a Christian.

 

What makes a person a Christian? Are there specific requirements? Is there a universal definition, or can everyone sort of identify as Christian however they want? Is belief in Jesus' resurrection required? Can someone be a Christian if they follow the teachings of Jesus, but don't believe that Jesus is the son of God?

 

If you aren't a Christian, how would you define it?

 

I hope this is not a stupid question. I am not a Christian, and while I have my own answers, I really don't know if Christians would agree with me. I hope we can discuss this without conflict.

 

Thanks.

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I was raised Episcopalian, then the Jesus movement hit. It basically said you have to get saved, to specifically ask Jesus into your heart to be a Christian. So it was the feeling of all I was around that I wasn't saved before that. I was active at church, prayed, lived a Christian life, so as I look back, I am not convinced that I wasn't a Christian before I prayed that specific prayer. I am suspicious that terminology is different, but the commitment is the same. One denomination may say "pray the sinner's prayer," another may say "live your life as Christ would," and so on and so forth.

 

Personally to answer your questions, I have things that are in the non-negotiable category for my beliefs, Jesus' resurrection, Jesus being the Son of God would be two of them.

Edited by Susan C.
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Perry:

 

Is belief in Jesus' resurrection required?

 

 

Yes.

 

 

 

 

Can someone be a Christian if they follow the teachings of Jesus, but don't believe that Jesus is the son of God?

 

 

No.

 

If you aren't a Christian, how would you define it?

 

 

Does that matter? If not a Christian, then doesn't really understand it. It's like asking me how I would explain being a male? I can tell you a lot about it, and even gave birth to one, but I don't really "get" it in the same way as my husband and son.

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Everyone will have a different definition here. As a non-Christian, I consider anyone who would call themselves a Christian to be one. I don't really think it's my job to define the word for others. I do get very eye-rolly when people start saying well so-and-so is not a REAL Christian because they do/don't do X. That seems judgy and silly.

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Agreeing that you will get a wide variety of answers. The early church came up with this statement of faith, called the Nicene Creed, to define and defend the Christian faith since it was relatively new still and heresies (things the church didn't believe) were starting to arise. I would say a Christian is someone who can both confess this creed and who does this creed. Since the Church is led by the Holy Spirit and is called "the body of Christ," I trust this early church and the "fence" they put around Christianity.

 

~*~*~*~*~*~

I believe in one God, the Father almighty, Maker of heaven and earth,

and of all things visible and invisible;

 

And in one Lord Jesus Christ, the son of God, the only Begotten;

Begotten of the Father before all worlds, light of light, true God of true God;

Begotten not made, of one essence with the Father by whom all things were made;

Who for us men and for our salvation came down from heaven and was incarnate

of the Holy Spirit and the virgin Mary and became man;

And was crucified also for us under Pontius Pilate and suffered and was buried;

And the third day He rose again according to the Scriptures and ascended in to heaven

and sits at the right hand of the Father;

And He shall come again with glory to judge the living and the dead;

Whose kingdom shall have no end.

 

And I believe in the Holy Spirit, the Lord and Giver of Life,

Who proceeds from the Father, Who with the Father and the Son together

is worshipped and glorified; Who spoke by the prophets.

 

And I believe in one holy, catholic, and apostolic church.

I acknowledge one baptism for the remission of sins,

I look for the resurrection of the dead and the life of the world to come.

 

Amen.

~*~*~*~*~*~

Edited by milovaný
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What makes a person a Christian? Are there specific requirements? Is there a universal definition, or can everyone sort of identify as Christian however they want? Is belief in Jesus' resurrection required? Can someone be a Christian if they follow the teachings of Jesus, but don't believe that Jesus is the son of God?

 

 

A Christian recognizes his sin and need for a savior, repents of his sin, and believes that Jesus Christ (son of God, part of the Trinity) died so that his sins are forgiven. Those would be the "requirements."

 

Yes, a Christian would believe that Jesus died and was resurrected.

 

Like all words, "Christian" has a specific meaning. I don't believe anyone can just call it whatever they want to. I don't even know why anyone would call himself a Christian if he didn't believe in Christ as savior, son of God, etc.

 

It is not up to anyone to determine who is or isn't a Christian. I assume anyone who self-identifies as a Christian is one, regardless of how they appear to me. ETA: Well, I should clarify that - if a person self-identifies as a Christian and then says that Jesus is not the son of God, was not resurrected, etc., then of course I would question their Christianity because it would seem that person did not really know what it meant.

 

(BTW, repenting of sins doesn't mean never sinning again. There are no perfect sinless Christians.)

Edited by marbel
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I don't consider myself Christian. I consider myself agnostic. I don't know if Jesus actually existed, and haven't seen proof that convinces me of his existence. I'm not sure there is a god (or multiple gods, etc).

 

I would expect a Christian to believe in a Judeo-Christian definition of God, and that Jesus was a real person. I would expect them to have a decent understanding of the Bible, but I don't necessarily expect them to use a literal interpretation of the Bible. I used to expect a trinitarian belief (because that's how I was raised), but I've learned that there are denominations that don't strictly believe this, so I excluded it from my definition.

 

Those are my big generics for "Christian." Within that umbrella label, I expect that people who then use clarifying subsets of Christian (United Methodist, LDS, Jehovah's Witness, LCMS, whatever) to know the finer points of their particular belief system - what makes them different from each other, or if they don't know about all the other system they know enough to say that "the United Methodist church believes...." or whatever. I also, honestly, expect that if you're going to wrap yourself in the label that you personal adhere to the beliefs of your denomination and run your life as such.

 

As an agnostic it's a little confusing for me to deal with "cafeteria" believers - people who say that they're a certain denomination and then when asked about a specific tenet say basically, "Yeah, that's the rule, but I don't follow it."

Edited by amey311
adding comment about Trinity in second paragraph
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Yes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

No.

 

 

 

Does that matter? If not a Christian, then doesn't really understand it. It's like asking me how I would explain being a male? I can tell you a lot about it, and even gave birth to one, but I don't really "get" it in the same way as my husband and son.

 

:iagree:

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If you aren't a Christian, how would you define it?

 

Does that matter? If not a Christian, then doesn't really understand it. It's like asking me how I would explain being a male? I can tell you a lot about it, and even gave birth to one, but I don't really "get" it in the same way as my husband and son.

But I'm not asking what it's "like" to be Christian. I'm looking for how people define it.

 

I can define what it is to be male and what the requirements are. :)

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I would say that the Biblical definition of a Christian is someone whose heart has been regenerated by the Holy Spirit which is followed by faith/belief and repentance. A person cannot truly follow Christ (the technical definition of "Christian") if these have not happened.

 

A more generic definition of a Christian is someone who believes that there is a God and more or less agrees with the teachings of the Bible/Jesus.

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Really? So just saying that I am something makes me one?

 

Something as vague and personal as religion? Yes. I believe that you are more able to define YOUR OWN belief system than I am. Especially for Christianity which has about a bazillion different subsets, often disagreeing on very fundamental principles of the faith. "Christian" is a vague word with a definition that varies depending on one's beliefs. Claiming to have the "one true definition" of the word seems...a bit over-reaching.

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Something as vague and personal as religion? Yes. I believe that you are more able to define YOUR OWN belief system than I am. Especially for Christianity which has about a bazillion different subsets, often disagreeing on very fundamental principles of the faith. "Christian" is a vague word with a definition that varies depending on one's beliefs. Claiming to have the "one true definition" of the word seems...a bit over-reaching.

 

:iagree:

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Not everyone is going to agree on a definition. Thus there is no universal definition. There are reasons why certain people have certain definitions but they aren't reasons that everyone embraces.

 

I so appreciate this question, and this is exactly where i am tripped up right now. I so look forward to reading the responses, I feel it might really help me in my own journey right now.

:grouphug:

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I so appreciate this question, and this is exactly where i am tripped up right now. I so look forward to reading the responses, I feel it might really help me in my own journey right now.

 

 

:grouphug:

 

Wherever we all are on our Christian journey, we all long for communion with Christ. May your journey lead you to communion with Him.

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:grouphug:

 

Wherever we all are on our Christian journey, we all long for communion with Christ. May your journey lead you to communion with Him.

 

Thank you, I find within myself very often, a struggle between what I learn from and see in Christ, and what seems to be the rest of it.

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Another thought... differing answers to this very question have caused many of the splits in the various Christian denominations. It has been a theological debate of great importance for probably about 2000 years. I guess I do not think that I, personally, (or any other individual) possess the answer to a question that many scholars and religious men and women have been debating for centuries.

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:grouphug:

 

Wherever we all are on our Christian journey, we all long for communion with Christ. May your journey lead you to communion with Him.

 

:iagree: Amen

 

Maybe that is the key to a good simple definition. A Christian is one who is in communion with Jesus Christ.

 

May God bless your journey Jeninok.

Edited by JenniferB
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Thank you, I find within myself very often, a struggle between what I learn from and see in Christ, and what seems to be the rest of it.

 

I understand. I struggled internally for many, many years before I found a place where I could just rest and be. I don't feel like I have to make things make sense anymore, I don't have to figure it all out; I just press in worship and communion. I hope you find the same.

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I have found that many people say they are a Christian because that is how they identify, but they might not belong to any specific church or Christian organization, may or may not have ever been baptized and may or may not have any actual knowledge of anything in the bible other than there is a god and a Jesus in there somewhere. These are what I have heard referred to elsewhere as "cultural Christians." In other words, they aren't what a "believer" would call a Christian, yet they identify themselves as such nonetheless.

 

I pretty much take people at their word as far as self-identification goes. If they say they are a Christian, then they are one as far as I'm concerned, despite how other people or groups may define them.

Edited by Audrey
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What makes a person a Christian? Are there specific requirements? Is there a universal definition, or can everyone sort of identify as Christian however they want?

 

There is not an agreed upon definition and many people do not agree that other people who call themselves Christians are. This is usually based upon differences in beliefs. For example, I had a friend from my old religion tell me, after I had changed religions, that their homeschooling group was "inclusive and even included a Catholic family." She didn't believe either the Catholic family or ours would be saved because we weren't Christians in her opinion.

 

And there are people who think that people can identify as Christian however they wish.

For that matter, there are people who think that people can identify themselves with God with whatever religion floats their boat.

 

But *I* believe God had the scriptures written, wants us to understand Him, and wants us to put his "manual" to use in our lives for our benefit.

Edited by 2J5M9K
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I think that 's for God to decide. I certainly have an opinion and have questioned the Christianity of others, but I keep it to myself and consider it something for me to work on. I generally take people at their word regarding spiritual beliefs, even if my beliefs are different.

 

In general, I think people who acknowledge their need for a savior and that being Jesus are close enough for me to not be bothered - barring any grossly unorthodox beliefs.

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[ETA Ooooh, geez. I'm totally rambling here--]

 

 

I take folks at their word, too. Basically. I'm not a Christian anymore, though I was a Jesus loving/following Evangelical for a couple of decades.

 

Basically.

 

If they say, I'm a Christian, I believe in a God, that Jesus is his son and He died to save people from their sins. I follow him.

 

I think they're Christian.

 

Now, there are a LOT of denominations that really get off into what I viewed as "far out" stuff, when I was an Evangelical. And I really had a hard time accepting certain denoms as Christian.

 

Now, I try to view it from the point of comparative religious studies, rather than strict theology.

 

I did once know a guy in college who called himself a Christian but didn't believe in the existence of Jesus, or really a specific god. He might be my exception. I don't know that he could actually be considered a Christian, except in his own mind. I guess I don't think of Him as a Christian.

 

Uh, which is to say, there are lots of definitions--as many as there are denominations, practically. Evangelicals might say that anyone who has repented and called on Jesus for salvation is saved and is a Christian. . . but really, there are hang-ups. Ohh, except for these folks because of this certain works-based idea. . . or, they don't baptize right. . . or, they don't recognize this aspect of God. . . or. . . they have extra holy books, or. . . it goes on and on.

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While scholars will differ on what some Bible passages mean, it does seem rather obvious that it would not make sense (for example) for someone to call Jesus a liar, and yet still want to be called a Christian.

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Be baptized, and believe in the Nicene Creed.

 

Where ever they are from that point is between them and God. And, it takes a lifetime (Which a very smart nun was teaching on tonight).

 

( I was talking with an incredible priest this past week and he was reiterating that All Jesus said to do was to be baptized, and believe. So, the Nicene creed would be kind of a statement of faith, that this is what 2000 years of Christians believe)

Edited by justamouse
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A Christian recognizes his sin and need for a savior, repents of his sin, and believes that Jesus Christ (son of God, part of the Trinity) died so that his sins are forgiven. Those would be the "requirements."

 

Yes, a Christian would believe that Jesus died and was resurrected.

 

Like all words, "Christian" has a specific meaning. I don't believe anyone can just call it whatever they want to. I don't even know why anyone would call himself a Christian if he didn't believe in Christ as savior, son of God, etc.

 

It is not up to anyone to determine who is or isn't a Christian. I assume anyone who self-identifies as a Christian is one, regardless of how they appear to me. ETA: Well, I should clarify that - if a person self-identifies as a Christian and then says that Jesus is not the son of God, was not resurrected, etc., then of course I would question their Christianity because it would seem that person did not really know what it meant.

 

(BTW, repenting of sins doesn't mean never sinning again. There are no perfect sinless Christians.)

 

:iagree:

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It would not be possible for a human to determine in each case who is, or who is not a Christian (that is, a Christian as defined in the Bible). Only God's Word can form definitions of a Christian. Going through the New Testament (like starting in John) would be the best answer for a definition wouldn't it? :) I think the Bible makes it clear for starters that being a Christian is about what you believe, and not about what you do/don't do.

While scholars will differ on what some Bible passages mean, it does seem rather obvious that it would not make sense (for example) for someone to call Jesus a liar, and yet still want to be called a Christian.

It's probably obvious that not everyone's definition of a Christian can be right at the same time! The only place that won't have "zillions" of definitions, is the Bible. And in the end, what God says is all that matters, right?

 

Depends on how you frame, read, and relate with the Bible.

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A Christian recognizes his sin and need for a savior, repents of his sin, and believes that Jesus Christ (son of God, part of the Trinity) died so that his sins are forgiven. Those would be the "requirements."

 

Yes, a Christian would believe that Jesus died and was resurrected.

 

Like all words, "Christian" has a specific meaning. I don't believe anyone can just call it whatever they want to. I don't even know why anyone would call himself a Christian if he didn't believe in Christ as savior, son of God, etc.

 

It is not up to anyone to determine who is or isn't a Christian. I assume anyone who self-identifies as a Christian is one, regardless of how they appear to me. ETA: Well, I should clarify that - if a person self-identifies as a Christian and then says that Jesus is not the son of God, was not resurrected, etc., then of course I would question their Christianity because it would seem that person did not really know what it meant.

 

(BTW, repenting of sins doesn't mean never sinning again. There are no perfect sinless Christians.)

 

It seems to me that one half of this post contradicts the other.

 

I believe that being a Christian is a self-identifier not tied to the dogma and creeds of others; it, by definition, involves some faith, relationship, or belief in Jesus Christ as an entity.

 

Beyond that, including areas that could be mythological and hyperbole by intent, I would not feel comfortable hanging requirements of faith.

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Ah, *puts on asbestos suit* well ... not all Christians agree with the Nicene Creed. Only a select few leaders of the early church were invited to the council and even then only half of the invited showed up. Many self-identified Christians do not believe in the doctrine of the trinity. Not all Christian denominations agree on what writings make up the Christian Bible. Some Christians have extra teachings in addition to the Christian Bible.

 

In my personal view the distinction of what makes someone a "real" Christian is actually the work of the Devil. Yes, I said it - the Devil. People can get so obsessed with who is and is not a Christian that they forget what Jesus taught us to actually *do*. The in-fighting ties up so much energy that little is actually done.

 

To me it's like this - say you have a groups of homeschoolers. All the homeschoolers get together and hang out to learn how to be better homeschoolers. But then people start saying that only one curriculum is the *right* curriculum, or that people who use a charter aren't "real" homeschoolers. Then someone comes along who has kids in public school but does home supplementation comes along. Everyone starts to argue about if the new person belongs. On and on it goes and factions form and people create secret groups and so on and so forth. So it is with Christianity IMO.

 

Another example - think of all the divisiveness between Jews, Christians and Muslims. Everyone focuses on the differences. Very few people stand back and realize that every one in those three groups call God Almighty. I mean really, think about it - we all call God Holy. That is some powerful truth there, but we're all worried about pigs and creeds and who was in which line of succession.

 

So, there. That's my religious rant for the day. It's been bouncing around in my head for a while. Maybe I'll sleep better now that it's out.

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Ah, *puts on asbestos suit* well ... not all Christians agree with the Nicene Creed. Only a select few leaders of the early church were invited to the council and even then only half of the invited showed up. Many self-identified Christians do not believe in the doctrine of the trinity. Not all Christian denominations agree on what writings make up the Christian Bible. Some Christians have extra teachings in addition to the Christian Bible.

 

In my personal view the distinction of what makes someone a "real" Christian is actually the work of the Devil. Yes, I said it - the Devil. People can get so obsessed with who is and is not a Christian that they forget what Jesus taught us to actually *do*. The in-fighting ties up so much energy that little is actually done.

 

To me it's like this - say you have a groups of homeschoolers. All the homeschoolers get together and hang out to learn how to be better homeschoolers. But then people start saying that only one curriculum is the *right* curriculum, or that people who use a charter aren't "real" homeschoolers. Then someone comes along who has kids in public school but does home supplementation comes along. Everyone starts to argue about if the new person belongs. On and on it goes and factions form and people create secret groups and so on and so forth. So it is with Christianity IMO.

 

Another example - think of all the divisiveness between Jews, Christians and Muslims. Everyone focuses on the differences. Very few people stand back and realize that every one in those three groups call God Almighty. I mean really, think about it - we all call God Holy. That is some powerful truth there, but we're all worried about pigs and creeds and who was in which line of succession.

 

So, there. That's my religious rant for the day. It's been bouncing around in my head for a while. Maybe I'll sleep better now that it's out.

 

I really like this post.

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In my personal view the distinction of what makes someone a "real" Christian is actually the work of the Devil. People can get so obsessed with who is and is not a Christian that they forget what Jesus taught us to actually *do*

 

While I don't agree with your thoughts on the ecumenical councils that produced the Nicene Creed, and other key points in your post, I whole-heartedly agree with this statement, if it means what I think it means. I don't need to worry about whether anyone else is a Christian or not. My only concern ought to be "Am I?" And since I don't believe becoming and being a Christian happens at just one point in time, I will have enough to keep me busy for a long time (for I have so very far to go to be like Christ; yet I press on to take hold of this for which He took hold of me).

Edited by milovaný
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My husband recently preached a message called, "Why I don't want to be a Christian". In it he explained how the term, "Christian" (which only appears THREE times in the entire Bible) has become so generic and watered-down that it in no way even comes close to meaning what it should. I agree. Many, many people call themselves Christians. I call myself a Christian. As I do not have the mind of God and am not able to see into the heart of man, I have no authority to judge whether or not one is or is not a Christian. To me? To me a Christian is at the most basic a follower of Jesus Christ. A Christian is a DISCIPLE of Jesus Christ (the disciples where the first "group" of people to be called Christians). I honestly prefer the term "disciple" over Christian b/c it more fully explains what it MEANS to BE a Christian. The Bible is very clear the path of salvation. Romans 10:9 says that if you "confess with your mouth, "Jesus is Lord", and believe with your heart that God raised Him from the dead, you will be saved". I believe this is where the "Sinner's prayer" gets its origin though there is no specific prayer one must pray in order to be saved. And I wonder sometimes if salvation and being a "Christian" are 2 different/separate things. (this is just me pondering). What I DO know for sure is that when I say I am a Christian, I am saying this: "I am a sinner, saved by the grace of God. I am and was completely incapable of saving myself and needed Jesus Christ to save me. I am not perfect nor will I ever be. Thus the reason for needing a Savior. I mess up. I say all the wrong things and do all the wrong things...every day. I am completely reliant on the saving grace of God who forgives my sins and the blood of Christ which washes away all my stains. I am saying that I will do my very best to follow the example set by Jesus Christ while He was on this Earth, though I will fail. I will stand up for the things that Jesus stood for...no matter if it is the "popular" opinion of the day or not. I will do as Jesus commanded in Luke 9:23 when He said, "whoever wants to be my disciple must deny themselves and take up their cross daily and follow me." You see, I think to be a Christian means a heck of a lot more than just "believing Jesus is the Son of God". This is why I am pondering if there really IS a difference btwn salvation and being a Christian or a disciple of Jesus Christ. Does that make sense? Any believers want to chime in with their opinion on that? :)

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Ah, *puts on asbestos suit* well ... not all Christians agree with the Nicene Creed. Only a select few leaders of the early church were invited to the council and even then only half of the invited showed up. Many self-identified Christians do not believe in the doctrine of the trinity. Not all Christian denominations agree on what writings make up the Christian Bible. Some Christians have extra teachings in addition to the Christian Bible.

 

In my personal view the distinction of what makes someone a "real" Christian is actually the work of the Devil. Yes, I said it - the Devil. People can get so obsessed with who is and is not a Christian that they forget what Jesus taught us to actually *do*. The in-fighting ties up so much energy that little is actually done.

 

Well said.

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Ah, *puts on asbestos suit* well ... not all Christians agree with the Nicene Creed. Only a select few leaders of the early church were invited to the council and even then only half of the invited showed up. Many self-identified Christians do not believe in the doctrine of the trinity. Not all Christian denominations agree on what writings make up the Christian Bible. Some Christians have extra teachings in addition to the Christian Bible.

 

In my personal view the distinction of what makes someone a "real" Christian is actually the work of the Devil. Yes, I said it - the Devil. People can get so obsessed with who is and is not a Christian that they forget what Jesus taught us to actually *do*. The in-fighting ties up so much energy that little is actually done.

 

To me it's like this - say you have a groups of homeschoolers. All the homeschoolers get together and hang out to learn how to be better homeschoolers. But then people start saying that only one curriculum is the *right* curriculum, or that people who use a charter aren't "real" homeschoolers. Then someone comes along who has kids in public school but does home supplementation comes along. Everyone starts to argue about if the new person belongs. On and on it goes and factions form and people create secret groups and so on and so forth. So it is with Christianity IMO.

 

Another example - think of all the divisiveness between Jews, Christians and Muslims. Everyone focuses on the differences. Very few people stand back and realize that every one in those three groups call God Almighty. I mean really, think about it - we all call God Holy. That is some powerful truth there, but we're all worried about pigs and creeds and who was in which line of succession.

 

So, there. That's my religious rant for the day. It's been bouncing around in my head for a while. Maybe I'll sleep better now that it's out.

:hurray:
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Another example - think of all the divisiveness between Jews, Christians and Muslims. Everyone focuses on the differences. Very few people stand back and realize that every one in those three groups call God Almighty. I mean really, think about it - we all call God Holy. That is some powerful truth there, but we're all worried about pigs and creeds and who was in which line of succession.

 

I agree with everything you said before the point above. While all 3 groups might call God "Holy", the difference lies in who each group says JESUS is. And Jesus is the KEY. If He isn't who He says He is...there is no eternal life. Christians believe in a triune God...they believe that Jesus IS God. A Muslim does not...Jesus was simply a prophet (I know I am drastically simplifying this so please forgive me...my intent is not to misrepresent). And a Jew does not believe that Jesus is the Messiah (they are still waiting for the Messiah). So, there IS a difference. HOWEVER, I do agree that we focus too much on the differences btwn people and not what could possible bind us together. That part makes sense. But to say that we all believe in the same God? It simply isn't true. And that's MY rant for the day, lol. Though I doubt I'll sleep better thanks to that Pumpkin Spice Latte I had earlier. :D Sure was yummy though. :tongue_smilie:

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I agree with everything you said before the point above. While all 3 groups might call God "Holy", the difference lies in who each group says JESUS is. And Jesus is the KEY. If He isn't who He says He is...there is no eternal life. Christians believe in a triune God...they believe that Jesus IS God. A Muslim does not...Jesus was simply a prophet (I know I am drastically simplifying this so please forgive me...my intent is not to misrepresent). And a Jew does not believe that Jesus is the Messiah (they are still waiting for the Messiah). So, there IS a difference. HOWEVER, I do agree that we focus too much on the differences btwn people and not what could possible bind us together. That part makes sense. But to say that we all believe in the same God? It simply isn't true. And that's MY rant for the day, lol. Though I doubt I'll sleep better thanks to that Pumpkin Spice Latte I had earlier. :D Sure was yummy though. :tongue_smilie:

 

Not all people who call themselves Christian believe that Jesus is God. Not all believe that Jesus said he was God. There are a great many who believe that discipleship alone is what makes someone a Christian , and that members of other religions have valid paths to holiness as well. They also believe that there is one God, but he is manifested in different ways in different religious practices. You can believe that is not true, but others believe just as firmly that it is.

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While I don't agree with your thoughts on the ecumenical councils that produced the Nicene Creed, and other key points in your post, I whole-heartedly agree with this statement, if it means what I think it means. I don't need to worry about whether anyone else is a Christian or not. My only concern ought to be "Am I?" And since I don't believe becoming and being a Christian happens at just one point in time, I will have enough to keep me busy for a long time (for I have so very far to go to be like Christ; yet I press on to take hold of this for which He took hold of me).

 

 

Exactly :D I also agree that being Christian, it's a living thing. In my own life I try and live my beliefs moment by moment. Some moments are better than others, but I strive.

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Exactly :D I also agree that being Christian, it's a living thing. In my own life I try and live my beliefs moment by moment. Some moments are better than others, but I strive.

 

:cheers2:

 

Reading the book Father Arseny put me in my place. Oh, that I could have such love and humility and concern for others. Oh, that I would love and not condemn.

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