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Book a Week in 2012 - week 39


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Good Morning, dear hearts! Today is the start of week 39 in our quest to read 52 books in 52 weeks. Welcome back to all our readers, welcome to all those just joining in and to all who are following our progress. Mr. Linky is all set up on the 52 books blog to link to your reviews.

 

52 Books Blog - Happy Autumn: Highlighted 3 books that have autumn in the title. Your mission, should you choose to accept it, find a book that have autumn or for you more experienced missionites, one that has fall in the title. The fall task will be more time consuming as there are so many choices. :001_smile:

 

Are you ready for October's Scary Reads month? Have you decided what spooktacular book you are going to read? Did you vote in Stacia's Vampires, Zombies and Werewolves poll? Well!:tongue_smilie:

 

 

What are you reading this glorious fall morning?

 

 

 

 

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I finished The Raw Shark Texts by Steven Hall last night. Very unique story, interesting, and really captures your imagination.

 

In a non fiction mood it seems. Reading Writing Begins with the Breath by Laraine Herring and started Journeys on the Silk Road by Joyce Morgan and Conrad Walters.

 

Listening to #25 In Death series story Creation in Death by J.D. Robb.

 

Think I've decided on one of my October Scary reads: Bram Stoker's The Snake's Pass. Have had it on the shelves for a couple years now. Time to actually read it.

 

"Arthur Severn, a young Englishman on holiday in the west of Ireland, is forced by a storm to stop for the night in a mysterious village, where he hears the legend of "The Snake's Pass." Long ago, it is said, St. Patrick battled the King of the Snakes, who hid his crown of gold and jewels in the hills near the village. But it is not only legend that haunts the town. The figure of the demonic money-lender Black Murdock looms over the village, as he searches for the lost treasure while manipulating the townsfolk to his own evil ends. Even more threatening than Murdock is the shifting bog, personified as a baneful "carpet of death," which will swallow up anything -- and anyone -- in its path. Art and his friend Dick will brave the dangers of the bog to seek out the treasure, but the sinister machinations of Murdock will lead to a deadly conclusion! Featuring a slow accumulation of terror worthy of Le Fanu, The Snake's Pass was Bram Stoker's first novel. A clear precursor to Dracula, The Snake's Pass was the only of Stoker's novels set in his native Ireland."
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Still not reading as much as I would like, but in the last few weeks I have finished...

 

#50 Searching for Hope: Life at a Failing School in the Heart of America by Matthew Tully. Tully is a journalist who did a series of newspaper columns about life at an Indiana high school. This was an engaging read about some of the struggles that the students were going through, and also about some of the institutional failures and successes. I am not sure I agree with all of his conclusions, but it was an interesting book.

 

#51 Hold on to Your Kids by someone whose name I cannot remember. I really don't like the title of this book, but the book itself made a lot of sense to me.

 

DD10

#53 Elisabeth the Princess Bride

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Finished - Scorpion House (disappointing), and Defending Jacob: A Novel (Wow!).

 

Still Reading: The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived The Great American Dust Bowl, and Don Quixote.

 

 

Books read in 2012 - in no particular order.

 

40. Defending Jacob, William Landay

39. Scorpion House, Maria Hudgins

38. The God Delusion, Richard Dawkins

37. Midnight in Austenland, Shannon Hale

36. To Kill a Mockingbird (re-read it because I assigned it to ds and wanted it to be fresh in my mind).

35. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society, Mary Ann Shaffer

34. The Poet and the Murderer, Simon Worrall

33. Nearly Departed in Deadwood, Ann Charles

32. Swan Song, Lee Hanson (not the famous one of the same title, but a mystery set in the Orlando area)

31. The Broken Token, Chris Nickson

30. The Count of Monte Cristo

29. I'd Listen To My Parents If They'd Just Shut Up: What to Say and Not to Say When Parenting Teens, Anthony E. Wolf

28. Gone, Michael Grant

27. Murder in Mykonos, Jeffrey Siger

26. The Hanover Square Affair, Ashley Gardner

25. Murder Behind the Scenes: A Victorian Mystery, Isabella Macready

24. Uneasy Spirits: A Victorian San Francisco Mystery, Louisa Locke

23. Murder in a Mill Town, P.B. Ryan

22. The Sign of the Four (Sherlock Holmes)

21. Accomplished in Murder, Dara England

20. Maids of Misfortune, Louisa Locke

19. The Butterfly Forest, Tom Lowe

18. Chasing China: A Daughter's Quest for Truth, Kay Bratt

17. Immortal in Death, J.D. Robb

16. Rapture in Death, J.D. Robb

15. The Well Educated Mind, SWB

14. Organized Simplicity: The Clutter-Free Approach to Intentional Living, Tsh Oxenreider

13. Castle Cay, Lee Hanson

12. The Cater Street Hangman, Anne Perry

11. Callander Square, Anne Perry

10. Year of Wonders: A Novel of the Plague, Geraldine Brooks

9. Cold Cruel Winter, Chris Nickson

8. Watching Jeopardy, Norm Foster

7. To the Grave: A Genealogical Mystery, Steve Robinson

6. Florida Heat, Rainy Kirkland

5. A Regimental Murder, Ashley Gardner

4. The One Minute Organizer, Donna Smallin

3. In the Blood, Steve Robinson

2. The Hangman's Daughter, Oliver Potzsch

1. Etsy 101 Sell Your Crafts on Etsy, Steve Weber

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Finished 69.) Thinking About Memoir by Abigail Thomas - Dh and I picked this up off the clearance shelf at Barnes and Noble for $2. It was better than I expected. Light and entertaining - part memoir, part how to write memoir. If I were thinking about writing a memoir, I would read it more slowly and do the exercises which are mainly Write two pages about....

 

For spooky reading I decided to read The Legend of Sleepy Hollow and Rip van Winkle to my children. Not sure if I'll pick out anything spooky for myself. Does A Clockwork Orange count?

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I'm reading so very slowly these days and just not enjoying it one single iota. I think I should give up on this book and move on. The chapters are horribly long. I really dislike long chapters. I can't see how this book could possibly have any semblance of a nice ending. It just gets more and more depressing. I haven't read a book that I really and truly love in quite a while. :confused:

 

9780156033473.jpg

 

Sorry to sound so negative ... :leaving:

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Journeys on the Silk Road by Joyce Morgan and Conrad Walters.

 

I don't remember if I first heard about that book on this thread or the online Kindle forum I frequent, but I've had in on my TBR list for a while.

 

 

Think I've decided on one of my October Scary reads: Bram Stoker's The Snake's Pass.

 

I'm also thinking of Bram Stoker for my October scary read, but it will be Dracula. I've never read it, so everything I know about Dracula is from the many movies.

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I am still working on re-reading Dracula! :001_smile:

 

I am also going through a quick little decorating book: Living in a Nutshell. Imo, there are some cute/fun ideas in it. I found this book because I was searching my library site for books published in 2012, just to see any new books that might be neat. I found a couple & still have a lot of the list I can go through when I have the time to add more books to my pile.

 

--------------------------

My Goodreads Page

Completed the Europa Challenge Cappuccino Level (at least 6 Europa books: #s 4, 9, 10, 11, 14, 19, & 21 on my list).

Completed Robin's Read a Russian Author in April Challenge (#24 & #26 on my list).

 

My rating system: 5 = Love; 4 = Pretty awesome; 3 = Decently good; 2 = Ok; 1 = Don't bother (I shouldn't have any 1s on my list as I would ditch them before finishing)...

 

2012 Books Read:

Books I read January-June 2012

37. Clutter Busting Your Life by Brooks Palmer (3 stars)

38. The Cat's Table by Michael Ondaatje (5 stars)

39. The Colors of Infamy by Albert Cossery (3 stars)

40. Osa and Martin: For the Love of Adventure by Kelly Enright (3 stars)

 

41. Hexed by Kevin Hearne (4 stars)

42. Soulless by Gail Carriger (3 stars)

43. The Hoarder in You by Dr. Robin Zasio (3 stars)

44. What Alice Forgot by Liane Moriarty (2 stars)

45. The Rook by Daniel O'Malley (4 stars)

46. The Nazi Séance by Arthur J. Magida (2 stars)

47. Phoenix Rising by Pip Ballentine & Tee Morris (3 stars)

48. Mr. Fox by Helen Oyeyemi (5 stars)

49. Thud! by Terry Pratchett (4 stars)

50. Wide Open by Nicola Barker (3 stars)

 

51. One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez (4 stars)

52. The Merciful Women by Federico Andahazi (3 stars)

53. The Vampyre by John William Polidori (3 stars)

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Lizzie, I've been thinking of you & your family this week. :grouphug::grouphug::grouphug:

 

Robin, how is your mom doing now?

 

52 Books Blog - Happy Autumn: Highlighted 3 books that have autumn in the title. Your mission, should you choose to accept it, find a book that have autumn or for you more experienced missionites, one that has fall in the title. The fall task will be more time consuming as there are so many choices. :001_smile:

 

Oh, could be fun. I'll have to take a look & see if I come up w/ something. Btw, Rosie, about our other reading challenge -- I now have a copy of Picnic at Hanging Rock. I got the illustrated edition & am really looking forward to reading it. I'm thinking that from the description, it will fit in just fine w/ the spooky/mystery type October reading....

 

Are you ready for October's Scary Reads month? Have you decided what spooktacular book you are going to read? Did you vote in Stacia's Vampires, Zombies and Werewolves poll? Well!:tongue_smilie:

 

 

Thanks for the plug, Robin! :D

 

I finished The Raw Shark Texts by Steven Hall last night. Very unique story, interesting, and really captures your imagination.

 

I thought that was a very neat book. I've never read Jaws, but I do wonder about the parallels between the books....

 

Think I've decided on one of my October Scary reads: Bram Stoker's The Snake's Pass. Have had it on the shelves for a couple years now. Time to actually read it.

 

Looking forward to your review of it. I've never read anything else by Stoker (other than Dracula).

 

For spooky reading I decided to read The Legend of Sleepy Hollow and Rip van Winkle to my children. Not sure if I'll pick out anything spooky for myself. Does A Clockwork Orange count?

 

I would think A Clockwork Orange would count. I've often thought about reading it but haven't because I'm a bit worried that it would be so bizarre/disturbing that I haven't tried it....

 

It just gets more and more depressing. I haven't read a book that I really and truly love in quite a while. :confused:

 

Sorry you're having a hard time finding good/fun reading, Negin! :grouphug: What types of books are you in the mood for lately?

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52 Books Blog - Happy Autumn: Highlighted 3 books that have autumn in the title. Your mission, should you choose to accept it, find a book that have autumn or for you more experienced missionites, one that has fall in the title. The fall task will be more time consuming as there are so many choices. :001_smile:

 

Thought of one (& just requested it from the library): Poe's The Fall of the House of Usher and Other Tales. Would that count? Or does 'fall' have to mean autumn?

Edited by Stacia
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52 Books Blog - Happy Autumn: Highlighted 3 books that have autumn in the title. Your mission, should you choose to accept it, find a book that have autumn or for you more experienced missionites, one that has fall in the title. The fall task will be more time consuming as there are so many choices. :001_smile:

 

 

 

What are you reading this glorious fall morning?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Don't forget that in the southern hem. it is the first of spring and not autumn. :) I suggest those who are in the spring season pick spring titled or themed books.

 

 

As I mentioned this morning I gave up on the book I started last night. I was looking forward to reading it, and I am very disappointed. This is why I don't branch out in fiction often. I'd be content to read nothing but Dickens and Austen over and over. Maybe I'll pick up a Dickens.

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This week I finished:

 

#52 - Buggies, Blizzards, and Babies, by Cora Frear Hawkins. An enjoyable biography of a doctor from a bygone era, written by his daughter.

 

#53 - Where Yesterday Lives, by Karen Kingsbury. I enjoyed this book. I was expecting a *typical* Kingsbury and in some respects, it was; nonetheless, this was good.

 

Currently reading:

 

#54 - Back When We Were Grownups, by Anne Tyler. Just started this. It seemed to start off slowly with only a stray comment here or there slightly standing out, but then I hit pages 58-59 and something with the main character suddenly *clicked*. I think this book is going to hold my attention now . . and I think it is going to make me sad . . .

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So I already mentioned that I'm reading The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived The Great American Dust Bowl. Well, quite often it has me running to Google to find out about something or someone in the book. On one of my searches I found this.

 

http://www.pbs.org/kenburns/dustbowl/

 

I love anything Ken Burns does, and can't wait to watch this.

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Btw, Rosie, about our other reading challenge -- I now have a copy of Picnic at Hanging Rock. I got the illustrated edition & am really looking forward to reading it.

 

Ooh. Snazzy! My copy is and old paperback from the op shop. Hope you like it. :) It's very flavoursome, I think, but then I know the area so perhaps I have an inbuilt cheat code, lol.

 

I'm reading Susan Coolidge's 'Katy' series to dd. When they are finished, I'll read 'Picnic at Hanging Rock' to her.

 

Rosie

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This week I read some fun stuff and one book I didn't understand all that well. :) I'm also getting ready to read a bunch of Gothic stuff in October!

 

The Snarkout Boys and the Baconburg Horror, by Daniel Pinkwater -- one of my all-time favorite funny books.

 

Telling Tales, by Melissa Katsoulis -- a collection of stories about literary hoaxes, really interesting.

 

House of Many Ways, by Diana Wynne Jones -- great fantasy

 

Days of Obligation, by Richard Rodriguez -- essays on Mexico and California.

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Thought of one (& just requested it from the library): Poe's The Fall of the House of Usher and Other Tales. Would that count? Or does 'fall' have to mean autumn?

 

erm! well! I did mean fall as in autumn however.... Poe's good for scary reading month so why not. Enjoy!

 

Don't forget that in the southern hem. it is the first of spring and not autumn. :) I suggest those who are in the spring season pick spring titled or themed books.

 

Good idea. Glad you are on top of things. It's useful having so many assistants. ;)

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Sorry you're having a hard time finding good/fun reading, Negin! :grouphug: What types of books are you in the mood for lately?

Stacia, I would love something like Middlesex. Loved that book so much. :) Last year seemed to be a better reading year overall. Bel Canto was so nice also. I wish Isabel Allende and Khaled Hosseini would hurry up and write something new. There are many others I enjoy. I just want some fabulous books that I can get totally lost in. Thank you for caring. :grouphug: :grouphug: :grouphug:

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Ooh. Snazzy! My copy is and old paperback from the op shop. Hope you like it. :) It's very flavoursome, I think, but then I know the area so perhaps I have an inbuilt cheat code, lol.

 

Since I don't have the cheat code, I figured I'd better order the illustrated version. ;) There are quite a few photos throughout....

 

erm! well! I did mean fall as in autumn however.... Poe's good for scary reading month so why not. Enjoy!

 

I figured that's what you meant. LOL.

 

Stacia, I would love something like Middlesex. Loved that book so much. :) Last year seemed to be a better reading year overall. Bel Canto was so nice also. I wish Isabel Allende and Khaled Hosseini would hurry up and write something new. There are many others I enjoy. I just want some fabulous books that I can get totally lost in. Thank you for caring. :grouphug: :grouphug: :grouphug:

 

I'd suggest trying The Cat's Table by Michael Ondaatje. I think it's a gorgeous book. It sounds like it fits the type of reading you want to do right now. You might also really enjoy Dancer by Colum McCann.

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I just want some fabulous books that I can get totally lost in. Thank you for caring.

 

 

I know you like Dickens so why not reread something of his?

 

Other than that I'm not too much help. The last fiction I tried to read was a bust so I picked up another non-fiction. I just like non-fiction better. I try to branch out into fiction....

 

I recently read The Age of Innocence and enjoyed it. Then I watched the movie.

 

For a fun light romantic read with Austen flavor I read A Weekend with Mr. Darcy.

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In between the book I posted & Winter of the World (http://www.amazon.com/Winter-World-Book-Century-Trilogy/dp/0525952926), which I am enjoying more than the last one (I liked it enough to read the whole thing, but found some of the stuff about how WW I was fomenting slow), I read Feeling Sorry for Celia by Aussie author Jaclyn Moriarty. That's plenty of her.

 

I'm reading so very slowly these days and just not enjoying it one single iota. I think I should give up on this book and move on. The chapters are horribly long. I really dislike long chapters. I can't see how this book could possibly have any semblance of a nice ending. It just gets more and more depressing. I haven't read a book that I really and truly love in quite a while. :confused:

 

9780156033473.jpg

Sorry to sound so negative ... :leaving:

I went through months of a reading slump earlier this year, and it wasn't pretty, either.

 

You could peek ahead I see if the ending is happy; that's what I did withThe Shipping News which seemed like it was just going to get more dark & depressing all the time (spoiler alert: there was light at the end of the tunnel). I'm not suggesting that book after what you've been reading, though, as much of it is very dark.

 

Stacia, I would love something like Middlesex. Loved that book so much. :) Last year seemed to be a better reading year overall. Bel Canto was so nice also. I wish Isabel Allende and Khaled Hosseini would hurry up and write something new. There are many others I enjoy. I just want some fabulous books that I can get totally lost in. Thank you for caring. :grouphug: :grouphug: :grouphug:

 

I loved Bel Canto, but did not care at all for Middlesex. A literary novel I enjoyed around the same part of my life as Bel Canto was The Republic of Love, which is not dark the way most of Carol Shields' writing is. http://www.amazon.com/Republic-Love-Carol-Shields/dp/0007166753/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1348509239&sr=1-1&keywords=Republic+of+Love

 

One of my favourite literary novels isSnow Falling on Cedars which is a literary historical mystery that also has romance in it (trial is in the 1950s, but goes back to WW II & pre WWII). I give this book 5 stars and have read it twice; I rarely knowingly read a novel twice that I'm not reading to or with my dc or because we're going to do it for school. http://www.amazon.com/Snow-Falling-Cedars-David-Guterson/dp/067976402X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1348509429&sr=1-1&keywords=snow+falling+on+cedars

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I'd suggest trying The Cat's Table by Michael Ondaatje. I think it's a gorgeous book. It sounds like it fits the type of reading you want to do right now. You might also really enjoy Dancer by Colum McCann.

These both looks really good, Stacia. Thank you so much. :grouphug:

I read the other Colum McCann book last year or so. It wasn't my favorite. This one looks more interesting, I think.

 

I know you like Dickens so why not reread something of his?

Other than that I'm not too much help. The last fiction I tried to read was a bust so I picked up another non-fiction. I just like non-fiction better. I try to branch out into fiction....

Thank you also. I have tried so hard to read Dickens several times in the past few years. Funnily enough, I was able to focus on a few and enjoy them when the dc were babies and toddlers. Now, I have a very difficult time focusing on his stuff. I definitely plan on reading most/all of his books in the years to come. Now doesn't seem to be the time. :tongue_smilie:

 

Thank you for this. Looks good. :)

 

One of my favourite literary novels isSnow Falling on Cedars

Read this years ago and liked it a lot. :)

 

Thank you all for caring and for the great suggestions. :grouphug:

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This week...

 

Started Reading:

Sin and Syntax: How to Craft Wickedly Effective Prose

 

 

Still reading:

Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy

Alone With God by John MacArthur

 

Completed:

31. Frankenstein

30. The Lotus and the Cross

29. Desiring God

28. Blood Feud: The Hatfields and the McCoys

27. Among the Gods

26. The Deadliest Monster

25. Faith of My Fathers

24. A Good American

23. They Say/I Say:The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing

22. Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking

21. Insurgent

20. Stand: A Call for the Endurance of the Saints

19. The Strength of His Hands

18. The Meaning of Marriage

17. Funny in Farsi

16. The Constantine Codex

15. What the Dog Saw

14. What is the Mission of the Church?: Making Sense of Social Justice, Shalom, and the Great Commission

13. Gods and Kings

12. A Skeleton in God's Closet

11. My Hands Came Away Red

10. The Omnivore's Dilemma

9. Dead Heat

8. Redeeming Love

7. Family Driven Faith: What it Takes to Raise Sons and Daughters Who Walk with God

6. Organized Simplicity

5. Year of Wonders

4. The Holiness of God

3. The Paris Wife

2. The Peach Keeper

1. Relic

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I read the other Colum McCann book last year or so. It wasn't my favorite. This one looks more interesting, I think.

 

Do you mean "Let the Great World Spin"? I tried reading that about a year ago, but just couldn't get into it & didn't finish it. I was disappointed because I had really enjoyed "Dancer" & think McCann is an excellent writer. I keep thinking I'd like to try his book "Zoli" (just haven't gotten around to it yet because my to-read pile is so huge). So, for me, McCann has a 50% rate -- loved one book, didn't finish the other. That's the same as Michael Ondaatje for me -- loved one book ("The Cat's Table) & didn't love another one ("The English Patient"). He's another guy I consider an excellent writer but w/ whom I've had varied success. :tongue_smilie:

 

Have you ever read "The Remains of the Day" by Kazuo Ishiguro? Another gorgeously-written book, imo.

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Completed:

Book #52 - "America: The Story of Us, Book 1 - The World Comes to America" by Kevin Baker, et. al. The first of the three eBooks to go with the Television series. Quick read, good overview. Not enough depth to use as a spine, but I enjoyed it for myself.

 

Book #51 - "The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains" by Nicholas Carr.

Book #50 - "Pride and Prejudice" by Jane Austen.

Book #49 - "Gulliver's Travels" by Jonathan Swift.

Book #48 - "No Regrets: How Homeschooling Earned me a Master's Degree at Age Sixteen" by Alexandra Swann.

Book #47 - "What to Read When" by Pam Allyn.

Book #46 - "60 Hikes Within 60 Miles: Salt Lake City" by Greg Witt.

Book #45 - "Freeing Your Child From Anxiety" by Tamar Chansky.

Book #44 - "A Nation Rising" by Kenneth C. Davis.

Book #43 - "The Pilgrim's Progress" by John Bunyan.

Book #42 - "The School for the Insanely Gifted" by Dan Elish.

Book #41 - "The Eye of the Sun - Part One of Blackwood: Legends of the Forest" by Les Moyes.

Book #40 - "The Fallacy Detective" by Nathaniel Bluedorn and Hans Bluedorn.

Book #39 - "Don Quixote" by Miguel de Cervantes. Translated by John Ormsby.

Book #38 - "Organizing Solutions for People with Attention Deficit Disorder" by Susan C. Pinsky.

Book #37 - "Growing Up: A Classic American Childhood" by Marilyn vos Savant.

Book #36 -"A Young People's History of the United States" by Howard Zinn.

Book #35 - "Organizing the Disorganized Child: Simple Strategies to Succeed in School" by Martin L. Kutscher & Marcella Moran.

Book #34 - "Turn Right at Machu Picchu" by Mark Adams.

Book #33 - "The Lightening Thief" by Rick Riordan.

Book #32 - "Thunder Dog: The True Story of a Blind Man, His Guide Dog, And the Triumph of Trust at Ground Zero" by Michael Hingson.

Book #31 - "America's Hidden History" by Kenneth C. Davis.

Book #30 - "The Diamond of Darkhold†by Jeanne DuPrau.

Book #29 - "The People of Sparks†by Jeanne DuPrau.

Book #28 - "Mockingjay" by Suzanne Collins.

Book #27 - "Well-Educated Mind" by Susan Wise Bauer.

Book #26 - "The Prophet of Yonwood" by Jeanne Duprau.

Book #25 - "City of Ember" by Jeanne Duprau.

Book #24 - "The Last Lecture" by Randy Pausch.

Book #23 - "Who Moved My Cheese" by Spencer Johnson.

Book #22 - "Deconstructing Penguins" by Lawrence and Nancy Goldstone.

Book #21 - "Stargirl" by Jerry Spinelli.

Book #20 - "Catching Fire" by Suzanne Collins.

Book #19 - "Hunger Games" by Suzanne Collins.

Book #18 - "Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close" by Jonathan Safran Foer.

Book #17 - "Frozen Assets: Cook for a Day, Eat for a Month" by Deborah Taylor-Hough.

Book #16 - "Miserly Moms: Living Well on Less in a Tough Economy" by Jonni McCoy.

Book #15 - "The Highly Sensitive Person" by Elaine N. Aron, Ph.D.

Book #14 - "Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking" by Susan Cain.

Book #13 - "Chasing Vermeer" by Blue Balliett.

Book #12 - "The Highly Sensitive Person" by Elaine N. Aron, Ph.D.

Book #11 - "Extraordinary, Ordinary People" by Condoleezza Rice.

Book #10 - "The Pig in the Pantry" by Rose Godfrey.

Book #9 - "The Virgin in the Ice" by Ellis Peters.

Book #8 - "The Leper of St. Giles" by Ellis Peters.

Book #7 - "St. Peter's Fair" by Ellis Peters.

Book #6 - "Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother" by Amy Chua.

Book #5 - "Monk's Hood" by Ellis Peters.

Book #4 - "Flash and Bones" by Kathy Reichs.

Book #3 - "Spider Bones" by Kathy Reichs.

Book #2 - "One Corpse Too Many" by Ellis Peters.

Book #1 - "A Morbid Taste for Bones" by Ellis Peters.

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I finished The Secret of Contentment by William B Barcley. I enjoyed it a lot; I was on retreat last week on that subject and the book and retreat went well together.

 

2012 Books Reviews

1. Lit! by Tony Reinke

2. Loving the Little Years by Rachel Jankovic

3. Words to Eat By by Ina Lipkowitz

4. How to Tutor Your Own Child by Marina Koestler Ruben

5. Evening in the Palace of Reason by James R Gaines (spectacular)

6. The Cat of Bubastes by GA Henty (Audio from Librivox)

7. The Last Battle by C S Lewis (Audiobook)

8. A Praying Life by Paul E Miller

9. Emotional Intensity in Gifted Students by Christine Fonesca

10. Little Britches: Father and I Were Ranchers by Ralph Moody (fantastic read aloud)

11. The Bronze Bow by Elizabeth George Speare

12. The Abolition of Man by C.S. Lewis

13. How to Write a Sentence by Stanley Fish

14. The Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion

15. The Rich Are Different by Susan Howatch

16. The Masqueraders by Georgette Heyer

17. Sylvester by Georgette Heyer

18. Understood Betsy by Dorothy Canfield Fisher (great read aloud)

19. Sins of the Fathers by Susan Howatch (wow!)

20. Half Broke Horses by Jeannette Walls (very good)

21. Mansfield Park by Jane Austen (favorite)

22. The Toll Gate by Georgette Heyer

23. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl (audio book)

24. The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick (audio book)

25. Penmarric by Susan Howatch

26. Cashelmara by Susan Howatch

27. The Grand Sophy by Georgette Heyer

28. Pawn of Prophecy by David Eddings

29. Queen of Sorcery by David Eddings

30. Magician's Gambit by David Eddings

31. Castle of Wizadry by David Eddings

32. Enchanter's End Game by David Eddings

33. Persuasion by Jane Austen

34. Surprised by Oxford by Carolyn Weber (phenomenal)

35. A Circle of Quiet by Madeleine L'Engle

36. My Man, Jeeves by PG Wodehouse

37. Right Ho, Jeeves by PG Wodehouse

38. The Summer of the Great-Grandmother by Madeleine L'Engle

39. Moonwalking with Einstein by Joshua Foer

40. Never Gone by Laurel Garver

41. The Secret of Contentment by William B Barcley

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I finished Living in a Nutshell. I thought this was a really fun decorating book w/ some neat, workable ideas. (A few seemed pretty hard &/or needing out-sourcing, though.) This is not traditional style decorating & is a more modern, hip, fun Euro style for small spaces.

 

I don't live in a small space, but I think most of these ideas are great ones for tight living quarters. I like that the author addresses making minimal nail holes, keeping things portable, etc... (aimed for those who tend to rent/lease apartments). I also appreciate the resource list at the back of the book w/ website links, paint colors, and so on listed.... I think one weakness is that there were a few projects where instructions were limited & it's not very clear how to do something; that type of oversight can lead to frustrations & multiple do-overs from someone attempting to do the same. Some ideas are fairly frugal, while others have a heftier price tag.

 

My verdict is a well-done, fun, inspirational decor book, both for just looking at the photos to actually finding & implementing a few changes in your current living space. (For those who may be wondering -- 3 stars is about the max rating I give for this genre of book; I tend to save 4 & 5 star ratings for literature.)

 

--------------------------

My Goodreads Page

Completed the Europa Challenge Cappuccino Level (at least 6 Europa books: #s 4, 9, 10, 11, 14, 19, & 21 on my list).

Completed Robin's Read a Russian Author in April Challenge (#24 & #26 on my list).

 

My rating system: 5 = Love; 4 = Pretty awesome; 3 = Decently good; 2 = Ok; 1 = Don't bother (I shouldn't have any 1s on my list as I would ditch them before finishing)...

 

2012 Books Read:

Books I read January-June 2012

37. Clutter Busting Your Life by Brooks Palmer (3 stars)

38. The Cat's Table by Michael Ondaatje (5 stars)

39. The Colors of Infamy by Albert Cossery (3 stars)

40. Osa and Martin: For the Love of Adventure by Kelly Enright (3 stars)

 

41. Hexed by Kevin Hearne (4 stars)

42. Soulless by Gail Carriger (3 stars)

43. The Hoarder in You by Dr. Robin Zasio (3 stars)

44. What Alice Forgot by Liane Moriarty (2 stars)

45. The Rook by Daniel O'Malley (4 stars)

46. The Nazi Séance by Arthur J. Magida (2 stars)

47. Phoenix Rising by Pip Ballentine & Tee Morris (3 stars)

48. Mr. Fox by Helen Oyeyemi (5 stars)

49. Thud! by Terry Pratchett (3.5 stars)

50. Wide Open by Nicola Barker (3 stars)

 

51. One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez (4 stars)

52. The Merciful Women by Federico Andahazi (3 stars)

53. The Vampyre by John William Polidori (3 stars)

54. Living in a Nutshell by Janet Lee (3 stars)

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I finished Living in a Nutshell. I thought this was a really fun decorating book w/ some neat, workable ideas. (A few seemed pretty hard &/or needing out-sourcing, though.) This is not traditional style decorating & is a more modern, hip, fun Euro style for small spaces.

 

 

I have been looking for a book like this! How timely for you to recommend it. Thanks.

 

Finished Very Good, Jeeves by PD Wodehouse for Ladies Book Club. LOVED IT. There were parts that had me laughing so much my sides hurt. Disclaimer, I dearly love British humor. If you aren't into British humor you might not find it as funny as I did. Everyone in book club loved it also except for the gal who read the wrong book and didn't realize it until she started talking about her favorite part and nobody remembered that section. :lol: Poor thing.

 

In progress:

 

Time and Again by Jack Finney (recommended by DH)

Gone-Away Lake by Elizabeth Enright (reading along with DD)

Carry on, My Bowditch by Jean Lee Lantham (read aloud)

 

2012 finished books:

 

100. Very Good, Jeeves by PD Wodehouse (*****)

99. All Creatures Great and Small by James Herriot (*****)

98. How to Get Your Child to Love Reading by Esme Codell (****)

97. Harris and Me by Gary Paulsen (***)

96. The Cat Who Played Brahms by Lillian Jackson Braun (****)

95. Bringing Up Bebe by Pamela Druckerman (**)

94. Surviving Hitler by Andrea Warren (****)

93. The Lady in the Lake by Raymond Chandler (***)

92. Playful Learning by Mariah Bruehl (***)

91. The Cat Who Ate Danish Modern by Lillian Jackson Braun - audiobook (****)

90. The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven by Sherman Alexie (***)

89. Catherine, Called Birdy by Karen Cushman - YA (****)

88. The Mirror Cracked Side to Side by Agatha Christie (***)

87. The Princess Bride by William Goldman (*****)

86. Crocodiles on the Sandbank by Elizabeth Peters (***)

86. The Tattooed Potato and Other Clues by Ellen Raskin - YA (***)

84. Supermarket by Satoshi Azuchi (**)

83. Kitchen by Banana Yoshimoto (*****)

82. Stein on Writing by Sol Stein (****)

81. Order from Chaos by Liz Davenport (**)

 

Books 41 - 80

Books 1 - 40

 

Amy's Rating System:

 

***** - Fantastic, couldn't put it down

**** - Very good

*** - Enjoyable but nothing special

** - Not recommended

* - Horrible

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Last call if you want me to mail you The Merciful Women. (Please PM me through this board. The copy does have some underlining from a previous owner.) Otherwise I'll be donating it to the library in a few days.

 

Also, fyi, if you were interested in reading Mr. Fox by Helen Oyeyemi & you're on PaperbackSwap, they have a pretty good deal on it (imo) -- $2.79 + 1 credit, plus shipping (I think it's $3.45), for a new, hardcover copy. Even though I rarely buy books for myself, I got this one because I loved it so much. It's definitely already on my list of favorite books for 2012.

Edited by Stacia
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Do you mean "Let the Great World Spin"?

Stacia, yes, didn't like this one that much. Glad it's not just me.

 

loved one book ("The Cat's Table) & didn't love another one ("The English Patient").

I never read The English Patient, but I really didn't care for the movie.

 

Have you ever read "The Remains of the Day" by Kazuo Ishiguro? Another gorgeously-written book, imo.

Added it to my wish list. Thank you. :D

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I haven't posted in a few weeks but I finished the entire Dresden Files re-read because the new one comes out in November and last night I finished the last of the Torchwood novels. I keep better track on Goodreads because I have an app for it on my phone. Now reading Jim C. Hines Libriomancer and loving it.

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I posted on one of these threads recently. Can someone explain how this works. Are there rules? Do you all read an entire book every week or just post your progress? Does the reading have to be solely for yourself, or do you post about books you are reading for school too? Why do some of you have a numbered list and some don't? I'd like to join in on these threads, but don't want to step on any toes. :tongue_smilie:

 

I'm currently working on The Hidden Hand by EDEN Southworth - It's a great read. Makes me think of Dickens with all the plot twists and turns but without the long descriptions. Lots of suspense and gothic elements too.

 

Also reading Pride & Prejudice aloud with both Dc. Of course, I've read it a gazillion times, but I'm still finding new things and making interesting observations. I've decided Lady Catherine De Bourgh has NPD based on the thread that is still running. :tongue_smilie:

 

I finished The Lives of the Muses: Nine Women and the Artists They Inspired by Francine Prose ---It was depressing. Not a single long term happy relationship in the entire book. Not what I needed as the wife of an artist, but I did find some things i could identify with.

 

Still working on .....At Large and At Small: Familiar Essays by Anne Fadiman ---I put this aside to start The Hidden Hand. I don't want to rush this book anyway b/c I enjoy the essays so much that I'm going to be sad when I finish it.

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I posted on one of these threads recently. Can someone explain how this works. Are there rules? Do you all read an entire book every week or just post your progress? Does the reading have to be solely for yourself, or do you post about books you are reading for school too? Why do some of you have a numbered list and some don't? I'd like to join in on these threads, but don't want to step on any toes. :tongue_smilie:

 

I don't think you'll step on any toes! The thread is pretty open & people post in different ways. I guess the most basic rule is to read & post what you're reading or what you've finished. Some stick to just that, others post reviews. Some read more than a book a week, others read a book over many weeks & just post when they finish or post a progress report. Some people post multiple times a week (uh, like me, :blushing: because I'm just verbose on book threads :tongue_smilie:) & others pop in every few weeks to provide an update. Anything you're reading qualifies; if you're reading books to/for/with your dc, some people post that (as long as the books are reasonably long chapter books). The numbered lists are just personal preference. I like doing them because I like keeping up w/ what I've read; also, on an old book thread, some people said they liked them because others will mention interesting books & the list is a good way to go back & get ideas from others (esp. if you don't have time to get/read the book when someone first posts about it).

 

It's pretty free-form. Jump in & don't worry about it. :001_smile: Glad you're posting!

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I don't think you'll step on any toes! The thread is pretty open & people post in different ways. I guess the most basic rule is to read & post what you're reading or what you've finished. Some stick to just that, others post reviews. Some read more than a book a week, others read a book over many weeks & just post when they finish or post a progress report. Some people post multiple times a week (uh, like me, :blushing: because I'm just verbose on book threads :tongue_smilie:) & others pop in every few weeks to provide an update. Anything you're reading qualifies; if you're reading books to/for/with your dc, some people post that (as long as the books are reasonably long chapter books). The numbered lists are just personal preference. I like doing them because I like keeping up w/ what I've read; also, on an old book thread, some people said they liked them because others will mention interesting books & the list is a good way to go back & get ideas from others (esp. if you don't have time to get/read the book when someone first posts about it).

 

It's pretty free-form. Jump in & don't worry about it. :001_smile: Glad you're posting!

 

Thanks! I went back to week 37 (I should have done that a while ago--I was busy getting school and extras started for the fall.)where I first posted and saw that I was welcomed and somebody liked one of the books I posted, so guess I'm officially joining in. I like the numbered lists, so I think I'll do that as soon as I have enough to list---unless I try to figure out what else I've read recently.

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#100 No Exit (Jean-Paul Sartre; play)

GARCIN: Will night never come?

INEZ: Never.

GARCIN: Will you always see me?

INEZ: Always.

[...]

GARCIN: [A]nd I understand that I'm in hell. I tell you, everything's been thought out beforehand. They knew I'd stand at the fireplace stroking this thing of bronze, with all those eyes intent on me. Devouring me.
[He swings around abruptly.]
What? Only two of you? I thought there were more; many more.
[Laughs.]
So this is hell. I'd never have believed it. You remember all we were told about the torture-chambers, the fire and brimstone, and the "burning marl." Old wives' tales! There's no need for red-hot polers. Hell is -- other people!

#99 Waiting for Godot (Samuel Beckett; play)

VLADIMIR: I missed you... and at the same time I was happy. Isn't that a queer thing?

ESTRAGON:
(shocked).
Happy?

VLADIMIR: Perhaps it's not quite the right word.

ESTRAGON: And now?

VLADIMIR: Now? ...
(Joyous.)
There you are again...
(Indifferent.)
There we are again...
(Gloomy.)
There I am again.

Currently reading:

 

The Uncoupling (Meg Wolitzer; fiction)

The Stranger (Albert Camus; fiction)

 

Complete list of books read: here.

 

I tried commenting on your site, but the word verification defeated me. What an amazing month you all have had. I wish my son loved literature that much, but alas. I am introducing him to The Hobbit this year. Think it's time. Glad you guys are having so much fun learning.

I'm sorry that happened, Robin, but I was glad to read your note here. Yes, it *has* been an amazing run. Don't think for a moment that I fail to appreciate having had three students who love lit (nearly) as much as I do. I hope you folks enjoy your Hobbit journey.

 

Karin, to answer your question from last week's thread, R&G is a delight, alternately sad and comic, silly and profound. We *love* it. And the film is a treasure, too.

 

Shari (also in that last thread), thanks for the heads-up on Stoppard and AK. Because of you, I picked up the Pevear translation and am toying with adding it to the Misses' (neverending!) list.

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Completed:

Book #53 - "Oliver Twist" by Charles Dickens. I thought I'd read this until I got going. Must have just seen one of the movies. I know I read "David Copperfield" and attempted, twice, "Great Expectations." My mom is a huge Dickens fan, so I tried them in High School.

 

Book #52 - "America: The Story of Us, Book 1 - The World Comes to America" by Kevin Baker, et. al.

Book #51 - "The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains" by Nicholas Carr.

Book #50 - "Pride and Prejudice" by Jane Austen.

Book #49 - "Gulliver's Travels" by Jonathan Swift.

Book #48 - "No Regrets: How Homeschooling Earned me a Master's Degree at Age Sixteen" by Alexandra Swann.

Book #47 - "What to Read When" by Pam Allyn.

Book #46 - "60 Hikes Within 60 Miles: Salt Lake City" by Greg Witt.

Book #45 - "Freeing Your Child From Anxiety" by Tamar Chansky.

Book #44 - "A Nation Rising" by Kenneth C. Davis.

Book #43 - "The Pilgrim's Progress" by John Bunyan.

Book #42 - "The School for the Insanely Gifted" by Dan Elish.

Book #41 - "The Eye of the Sun - Part One of Blackwood: Legends of the Forest" by Les Moyes.

Book #40 - "The Fallacy Detective" by Nathaniel Bluedorn and Hans Bluedorn.

Book #39 - "Don Quixote" by Miguel de Cervantes. Translated by John Ormsby.

Book #38 - "Organizing Solutions for People with Attention Deficit Disorder" by Susan C. Pinsky.

Book #37 - "Growing Up: A Classic American Childhood" by Marilyn vos Savant.

Book #36 -"A Young People's History of the United States" by Howard Zinn.

Book #35 - "Organizing the Disorganized Child: Simple Strategies to Succeed in School" by Martin L. Kutscher & Marcella Moran.

Book #34 - "Turn Right at Machu Picchu" by Mark Adams.

Book #33 - "The Lightening Thief" by Rick Riordan.

Book #32 - "Thunder Dog: The True Story of a Blind Man, His Guide Dog, And the Triumph of Trust at Ground Zero" by Michael Hingson.

Book #31 - "America's Hidden History" by Kenneth C. Davis.

Book #30 - "The Diamond of Darkhold†by Jeanne DuPrau.

Book #29 - "The People of Sparks†by Jeanne DuPrau.

Book #28 - "Mockingjay" by Suzanne Collins.

Book #27 - "Well-Educated Mind" by Susan Wise Bauer.

Book #26 - "The Prophet of Yonwood" by Jeanne Duprau.

Book #25 - "City of Ember" by Jeanne Duprau.

Book #24 - "The Last Lecture" by Randy Pausch.

Book #23 - "Who Moved My Cheese" by Spencer Johnson.

Book #22 - "Deconstructing Penguins" by Lawrence and Nancy Goldstone.

Book #21 - "Stargirl" by Jerry Spinelli.

Book #20 - "Catching Fire" by Suzanne Collins.

Book #19 - "Hunger Games" by Suzanne Collins.

Book #18 - "Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close" by Jonathan Safran Foer.

Book #17 - "Frozen Assets: Cook for a Day, Eat for a Month" by Deborah Taylor-Hough.

Book #16 - "Miserly Moms: Living Well on Less in a Tough Economy" by Jonni McCoy.

Book #15 - "The Highly Sensitive Person" by Elaine N. Aron, Ph.D.

Book #14 - "Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking" by Susan Cain.

Book #13 - "Chasing Vermeer" by Blue Balliett.

Book #12 - "The Highly Sensitive Person" by Elaine N. Aron, Ph.D.

Book #11 - "Extraordinary, Ordinary People" by Condoleezza Rice.

Book #10 - "The Pig in the Pantry" by Rose Godfrey.

Book #9 - "The Virgin in the Ice" by Ellis Peters.

Book #8 - "The Leper of St. Giles" by Ellis Peters.

Book #7 - "St. Peter's Fair" by Ellis Peters.

Book #6 - "Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother" by Amy Chua.

Book #5 - "Monk's Hood" by Ellis Peters.

Book #4 - "Flash and Bones" by Kathy Reichs.

Book #3 - "Spider Bones" by Kathy Reichs.

Book #2 - "One Corpse Too Many" by Ellis Peters.

Book #1 - "A Morbid Taste for Bones" by Ellis Peters.

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I finished Under the Loving Care of the Fatherly Leader by Bradley K. Martin last night. I liked it and I have an even broader picture of North Korea.

 

I'm listening to Frankenstein by Mary Shelley for book club and also for the spooky value. Oy, a story within a story within a story? :lol: I didn't really know the story other than the barest of outlines and it is very strange.

 

I'm also on day 12 of the Moby Dick Big Read, and thus chapter 12. How do you eat a whale [elephant]? One bite at a time!

 

I've just started 1491 by Charles C. Mann. Rosie, I also have Picnic at Hanging Rock now and I'm going to read it!

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I finished Under the Loving Care of the Fatherly Leader by Bradley K. Martin last night. I liked it and I have an even broader picture of North Korea.

 

 

I've just started 1491 by Charles C. Mann. Rosie, I also have Picnic at Hanging Rock now and I'm going to read it!

 

Oh, you reminded me to put a hold on Escape from Camp 14, about North Korea. Thanks!

 

I just got a used copy of 1491. Don't plan to read it for a bit, but it sure looks interesting.

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