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Miquon is driving me crazy, and I don't get it! However, I think it is working.


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I taught my daughter fractions today. My kindergarten daughter. I was baffled afterwards, and thought "wow, that was easy." I still don't understand why or how, but it seems to work.

 

Anyone else out there? I am not a mathy person, I plain old do not get Miquon. I am struggling, and never sure of what I am doing, and my daughter is learning. I really hope a light bulb goes off at some point, but I think it is just so different I might just always find it uncomfortable. Just wanted to share. Oh, and I have watched education unboxed (which I love):D

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I'm using Miquon too, and although I don't quite "get it" either (I own and have read Lab Annotations, First Grade Diary), I'm using this with dd5 and I'm crossing my fingers it goes better than with ds. She thinks differently, is visual, intuitive, artsy. I think it will work for her.

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Interesting, because I taught the same lesson today to my K son, and got a deer in the headlights look. I'm not sure he understands the concept of "half" spatially. I don't know it was a frustrating day with him in general. I'm off to watch the videos, maybe I missed something.

 

FWIW, I'm pretty sure my younger kids (possibly even including ds6, not sure) do not associate a "half" with splitting into two equal pieces. They seem to think it's just a part of a whole, of any size. It may be necessary to be explicit about that.

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FWIW, I'm pretty sure my younger kids (possibly even including ds6, not sure) do not associate a "half" with splitting into two equal pieces. They seem to think it's just a part of a whole, of any size. It may be necessary to be explicit about that.

 

That is a good point. I should probably point that out to him tomorrow. I'm thinking of trying it Rosie's way and starting out with two halves lined up under various rods. :D

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That is a good point. I should probably point that out to him tomorrow. I'm thinking of trying it Rosie's way and starting out with two halves lined up under various rods. :D

 

I was surprised how fast she got half. Now 2 oranges plus a dark green, that she is having trouble with. I just went and watched a bunch more of Rosie's videos.

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I had the same sort of moment with multiplication awhile back and posted about it here. FWIW, I am NOT a mathy person at all but have been singing Miquon's praises. It has worked wonders here and yes- I still feel "exposed" with it but my dd is definitely thriving.

 

Your blog is wonderful and one that I have poured over. I "get" why there is no nice teacher manual telling what to do when....but I still wish there was one. Exposed is a good word for it!

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Your blog is wonderful and one that I have poured over. I "get" why there is no nice teacher manual telling what to do when....but I still wish there was one. Exposed is a good word for it!

 

I agree. I am still recovering from my mathphobia and oftentimes I still wonder if I'm doing it right or thoroughly enough. For me, Singapore gives me the sense of "complete-ness". Singapore- you complete me! :D

 

But all joking aside- I wouldn't quit Miquon for anything; yet for this non-mathy mom Singapore adds a deeper sense of security to our mathematical progress.

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This is interesting as we have recently started Miquon as supplementary math with my DS and he is not getting it at all. Someone mentioned deer in the headlights and that's exactly how I'd describe my DS while we're doing Miquon. I'm not sure if it's the way I'm teaching it as I don't really understand it either. I'll persevere with it for this book though and hopefully he'll get it eventually. We are also using Singapore Math and he totally gets it, but maybe it's because I get it and am able to explain it to him clearly.

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so it's possible to teach miquon without getting it? how? we play around with the videos, but when it comes to the actual curric... *shrugs* *crickets*

 

We seem to be managing it.

 

This is interesting as we have recently started Miquon as supplementary math with my DS and he is not getting it at all. Someone mentioned deer in the headlights and that's exactly how I'd describe my DS while we're doing Miquon. I'm not sure if it's the way I'm teaching it as I don't really understand it either. I'll persevere with it for this book though and hopefully he'll get it eventually. We are also using Singapore Math and he totally gets it, but maybe it's because I get it and am able to explain it to him clearly.

The deer in the headlights is me:lol:

 

We used the staircase of getting the baby to the mommy as a way to go up to 20 today, and she figured it out. Then we started some addition. I am copying the videos, and going through the first grade diary. I just still really don't know what on earth I am doing. So, it sounds like this might not go away?

 

I guess I am just going to provide the materials, give her some ideas, and then just let her explore and play?

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But if you as the teacher don't get it and the kid doesn't get it, then after a trial, then why continue? I do think there's something special about Miquon, but it's not the only good (or even great) curriculum out there.

 

The Orange book is the only one that made me at all confused. Once we had gotten into it, I felt like it was mostly intuitive. Every once in awhile, I have to check that I understand something in the Annotations. And now that we're up to Yellow, I find I use the Annotations more because the teaching ideas are less intuitive to me, but the math seems mostly obvious.

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But if you as the teacher don't get it and the kid doesn't get it, then after a trial, then why continue? I do think there's something special about Miquon, but it's not the only good (or even great) curriculum out there.

 

The Orange book is the only one that made me at all confused. Once we had gotten into it, I felt like it was mostly intuitive. Every once in awhile, I have to check that I understand something in the Annotations. And now that we're up to Yellow, I find I use the Annotations more because the teaching ideas are less intuitive to me, but the math seems mostly obvious.

 

I think I am confused as we are just starting Orange. I am hoping that I will understand it more as I go along.

 

In answer to the bolded. I don't get it. My dd5 on the other hand seems to be getting it. That is what confuses me. She loves it! It is her favorite subject and she is constantly asking to do it. She is easily spending an hour on math a day. She gets the things out on her own to play with again later in the day on some days.

 

We have been working on it for 2 weeks now. She is doing fractions, addition, multiples of numbers, patterns, etc... Just eating it up. I find it confusing in an amusing way that I am teaching a program that I feel totally lost it and the student seems to be excelling.

 

Most curriculums that I have used, after I read through them and get started, it usually clicks into place within the first week. With Miquon I am still waiting. I do feel better knowing that I am not the only one, and the replies here are giving me the confidence to keep stumbling forward in the dark:D

Edited by Northwest_Mama
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Have you all who "don't get it" read the First Grade Diary? For me there was "lightbulb moment" after lightbulb moment.

 

These days the Education Unboxed videos are a good way to see this style of teaching "in action," but I would not neglect reading the FGD.

 

Bill

 

Twice!:blushing: and the teacher's notes, and parts of the annotations. I really am that bad at math! I think I will get there, I am slow when it comes to math. If you want me to write you a 20 page paper on the significance of the color red in Jane Eyre I could whip that out in about 2 hours :D

 

Two weeks isn't that long. I guess I was more reacting to the idea that someone would do a curriculum they didn't get and that left their kid confused for months and months.

 

no worries. I would not keep trying to understand it if my dd didn't love it.:D

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Twice!:blushing: and the teacher's notes, and parts of the annotations. I really am that bad at math! I think I will get there, I am slow when it comes to math. If you want me to write you a 20 page paper on the significance of the color red in Jane Eyre I could whip that out in about 2 hours :D

 

 

Got ya. I would suggest digging into the "topical" sections in the Annotations book as time permits. These sections IMO are quite good at breaking down the mathematics behind the basic operations in ways that make it easy to understand.

 

It is cool that you keep going knowing that your daughter loves it—even if it isn't something that comes naturally to you. Just stay open to the idea that it may yet "click" for you too :001_smile:

 

Bill

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Got ya. I would suggest digging into the "topical" sections in the Annotations book as time permits. These sections IMO are quite good at breaking down the mathematics behind the basic operations in ways that make it easy to understand.

 

It is cool that you keep going knowing that your daughter loves it—even if it isn't something that comes naturally to you. Just stay open to the idea that it may yet "click" for you too :001_smile:

 

Bill

 

Thanks Bill, I am going to keep at it. Maybe teaching my kids will finally help me understand math. I will spend some more time in the topical sections. As long as she is progressing, I will keep trying.

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Have you all who "don't get it" read the First Grade Diary? For me there was "lightbulb moment" after lightbulb moment.

 

These days the Education Unboxed videos are a good way to see this style of teaching "in action," but I would not neglect reading the FGD.

 

Bill

 

 

I didn't get the FGD or Miquon. Well, I understood what they were doing in FGD, but it didn't really translate into me deciding what to do today in math, if that makes sense? I am good at math and understand math easily. It's using manipulatives that is harder for me to understand. :tongue_smilie: I naturally do mental math like Singapore, which is why Singapore (and Math Mammoth) made sense to me. I'm a linear thinker and like things to be straight forward. Miquon left me confused and not knowing what to do.

 

Now since I have one child that needs manipulatives (DS2) and who does really well with C-rods, I just use C-rods in the context of Singapore, and all is good. I love the Education Unboxed videos for good demonstrations of how to use the manipulatives. Thankfully, adding and subtracting and missing addends were easy to figure out on my own, and that's all I've had to do with my 5 year old so far. ;) Well, we've made 10s and added across 10s also. But looking at Miquon pages left me going :001_huh:. And reading the FGD just didn't do it for me. But again, I think the problem is that I hate using manipulatives in math, since I've never needed them myself (and my oldest son is the same way). Give me a picture, and I understand.

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  • 1 month later...

I'm glad that others feel a little overwhelmed by Miquon. My ds just finished Singapore Essentials B & I wanted to wait until T least the new year to start 1A. Miquon does scare me a little, but when I was looking over it, ds came in the room & said, "This looks fun. Can I do this page?" I explained, as best as I could, what to do & he did it. This thread helped me to see I need to stick with it & evaluate my son's progress.

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I'm glad that others feel a little overwhelmed by Miquon. My ds just finished Singapore Essentials B & I wanted to wait until T least the new year to start 1A. Miquon does scare me a little, but when I was looking over it, ds came in the room & said, "This looks fun. Can I do this page?" I explained, as best as I could, what to do & he did it. This thread helped me to see I need to stick with it & evaluate my son's progress.

 

Having math seem like a "fun" subject is half the battle, methinks. Yes, it looks different to adult eyes, and that can make us reel a bit. I did too at first glance. But once one "gets it" is is really quite a simple approach.

 

Bill

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