Jump to content

Menu

If your DC does/did Ballet


Recommended Posts

Actually, those are really good prices. My daughter has danced for about 15 years. Ballet shoes run around $20.00-30.00. Where did you find shoes for $8.50? I will shop there!

 

If you want to compare, you can go to Discount Dance Supply and see what they have. But I think that your Ballet shoes, and outfit is a pretty good price.

 

Good thing she isn't taking Pointe or Tap. Pointe shoes can run over $100.00. And the same with Tap.

 

Have a fun year!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I didnt know if that was considered cheap? I did Ballet when i was very young and my grandma paid for it so i dont know what a good price is.

 

They had ballet legwarmers for $7.50, but i didnt get them. Didnt see a need?

Had Ballet tights for $4. I went with nude pantyhose for $2. (just for practice, ill get the real ones when they have their recital)

Had ballet shoes for $8.50. I bought them.

They had outfits (1 pc, tutus, leotards, etc) for $10-$18. I did not buy any yet. At practice they have been wearing loose skirt and t-shirt but the teacher is asking i get an outfit.

 

Also would it be worth it to get a bag for them to carry their shoes and water bottles in? (not a specific ballet bag, but a bag)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

yes, a bag is a good idea. that way, you always know where the shoes are. i'd put their names in their shoes, too, so when they get dropped, they can tell which are theirs.

 

our studio has a shoe trade bin, where you put in your outgrown shoes, and help yourself to any that are there that fit you now. so its po

 

ssible to buy only one pair every few years, when there are no donated ones to grow up to. tights rarely last long enough to be donated, but lots of ballet leotards find their way to goodwill, etc.

 

here's a link to a ballet leotard on amazon.

http://www.amazon.com/Capezio-Sleeve-Leotard-Ballet-2-4/dp/B002R0FA38/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1347764552&sr=8-1&keywords=children%27s+ballet+leotards

 

target and walmart also carry leotards

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Danskin-Now-Girls-Tutu/21095690

this one is a two-pack, which might work well

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Danskin-Now-Girls-Long-Sleeve-and-Short-Sleeve-Leotard-2-Pack/14540429

 

hth,

ann

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pantyhose may get runs really quick. Tights are thicker and harder to mess up. A bag is a good idea. We ordered DD a cute one off of discountdance for her birthday.

 

I hope they dont, but ill look into find the ballet ones cheap.

 

yes, a bag is a good idea. that way, you always know where the shoes are. i'd put their names in their shoes, too, so when they get dropped, they can tell which are theirs.

 

our studio has a shoe trade bin, where you put in your outgrown shoes, and help yourself to any that are there that fit you now. so its po

 

ssible to buy only one pair every few years, when there are no donated ones to grow up to. tights rarely last long enough to be donated, but lots of ballet leotards find their way to goodwill, etc.

 

here's a link to a ballet leotard on amazon.

http://www.amazon.com/Capezio-Sleeve-Leotard-Ballet-2-4/dp/B002R0FA38/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1347764552&sr=8-1&keywords=children%27s+ballet+leotards

 

target and walmart also carry leotards

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Danskin-Now-Girls-Tutu/21095690

this one is a two-pack, which might work well

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Danskin-Now-Girls-Long-Sleeve-and-Short-Sleeve-Leotard-2-Pack/14540429

 

hth,

ann

 

Good idea with their names. I didnt think to ask about a bin, maybe i could start that idea if there isnt one!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We bought our shoes from our studio $$$, but we could try them on because sizing varies by brand. Payless has a dance shoe selection. We got our leotards from Discount Dance online. One thing that is important to me about leotards is that the front needs to be lined. Otherwise they could be see through.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I didnt know if that was considered cheap? I did Ballet when i was very young and my grandma paid for it so i dont know what a good price is.

 

They had ballet legwarmers for $7.50, but i didnt get them. Didnt see a need?

Had Ballet tights for $4. I went with nude pantyhose for $2. (just for practice, ill get the real ones when they have their recital)

Had ballet shoes for $8.50. I bought them.

They had outfits (1 pc, tutus, leotards, etc) for $10-$18. I did not buy any yet. At practice they have been wearing loose skirt and t-shirt but the teacher is asking i get an outfit.

 

Also would it be worth it to get a bag for them to carry their shoes and water bottles in? (not a specific ballet bag, but a bag)

Does your school have a dress code?

At our school, girls must wear ballet pink tights and a black tank leotard.

No legwarmers or tutus!

 

http://www.allaboutdance.com

has prices similar to Discount Dance Supply and they have free shipping on all orders.

 

Bloch Endura tights are $6.40 and they are extremely durable.

Bloch tank leotard is $13.52.

Bloch Dansoft ballet slipper is 13.45.

 

Good Luck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would get real dance tights, because they'll last so much longer. Those Bloch tights last forever, I swear. I buy them as standard tights for my DD now.

 

DD's ballet class has a strict dress code: pink sleeveless leotard, pink tights, pink shoes. I bought them online at Discount Dance Supply.

 

I would definitely buy a real leotard. The teacher has to be able to see the girls' bodies to make sure that they are in the correct positions and have the correct posture. It's very important to start out on the right foot, instead of trying to fix poor posture later. I do find that leotards are so stretchy that they last for years and years.

 

I don't think a bag is necessary. My kids keep their dance things in old backpacks. I would make sure they have some sort of dedicated dance bag, to make it easier to keep track of their dance things, but there's no reason it can't be a paper bag.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

~ Your studio might have a hand-me-down box for ballet shoes. Check there first. Make sure they fit properly. Payless carries them also. You might also see what a local dance shop has to offer; sometimes you can luck out with a discontinued shoe.

 

~ I would not bother with cheap tights - you'll end up spending the same in the long run. Tights by Bloch or Capezio cost more like $10-$15, but they last a full year if you treat them well. I always buy a size larger than the box suggests; they are more comfortable and last longer. New tights for recital can become next year's class tights. You can get tights at a dance store or from an online seller like Discount Dance.

 

~ Check eBay or local consignment shops for second-hand leotards. They usually hold up well at that age. Check with the studio to understand their dress code first. Again, Discount Dance or other online vendors are another option. I'd choose one without a built-in skirt for that age, as they are more for younger kids.

 

~ Generally speaking, a ballet skirt is usually optional (again, a nice holiday gift), and tutus are discouraged and often not allowed at all. Etsy.com might be a good source for cute skirts.

 

~ There is no need for legwarmers at that age. They can be given as a fun holiday gift later on, but honestly it's more a fashion thing than a functional thing, and many teachers won't allow them in class.

 

~ I do think a ballet-specific bag is useful, meaning a bag where all the ballet gear is stored. However I wouldn't buy anything special; something we already own or something thrifted or home-sewn is fine. Again, a cuter one could be made or purchased as a holiday gift, but I'd steer away from the ones marketed to younger kids for dance as they just don't hold enough for long.

 

~ Look at what the other girls are wearing to class. That will give you an idea of what is expected, and possibly save you from making less-than-ideal choices.

Edited by askPauline
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My dd is a professional ballerina, and I have bought more ballet shoes/tights/leos than I care to think about. :lol:

 

For starters:

 

Buying dance supplies anywhere other than a dance store is a recipe for disaster. Those are not ballet shoes and they are not properly fitted for your child's feet. That will make all the difference in the future in terms of form and injury potential. Or in other words....buy crappy shoes and you'll end up with all kinds of foot problems. Not to mention, most studios will not allow shoes that are purchased at discount stores. For a beginner "music and movement" type class, you can probably get away with them, but don't do it when your dd starts an actual ballet class.

 

The best thing to do is take your dd to a dance store and have her properly fitted for her first pair. After that, you can order her shoes from www.discountdance.com

 

Tights are not the same thing as pantyhose. Pantyhose will be ruined after one class. Again, ballet tights bought in a discount store are not real ballet tights. The real ones are quite strong and can take a fair amount of abuse.

 

"Outfits" are not acceptable in a ballet class. A simple black leotard (or if your school has color coded classes, they'll tell you what color leo to purchase). Skirts and tutus are only for older ballet students. When they're very little, the instructor needs to see the child's body line in order to make sure their form is correct. Also, underwear is not worn under a leo and tights. Ballet tights (real ones) take the place of panties.

 

The tights/leos/shoes may be a bit expensive in the beginning, but in a little girl, they will last quite awhile. They are worth the investment.

 

And the prices you quoted were dirt cheap. If your dd stays with ballet, you will eventually find tha pointe shoes will run you about $90 per pair, and my dd went through a pair a week. Thank goodness her company pays for those now!! :party:

 

I hope your dd enjoys her dance class. They are so much fun!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Buying dance supplies anywhere other than a dance store is a recipe for disaster.

 

Certainly true for professional or serious pre-pro dancers but a bit overstated for the typical young recreational dancer. We buy Walmart leotards (I think they are about $9) and tights and Payless shoes for ballet and jazz. We used to also get tap shoes there but her tap instructor asked for a different style now that DD is progressing higher in tap instruction.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I shopped discount dance for tights and shoes this year. $13 for bloch shoes and $7 for bloch tights. My daughter is still wearing a capezio black leotard from last year (around $12 new). The age ranges for leotards are usually a few years so unless the child is particularly hard on it, I'm sure it will last a young child at least 2 years (my daughter's still looks new). I like springing the extra $2-3 on good quality tights because my daughter usually only needs 2 pair a year while some kids tights already look trashed a few weeks into the semester.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I bought my dd's leotard this year for $5 at a consignment shop. It looks like new. I paid $9 for USED ballet shoes this year. Make sure that the shoes you are looking at in the store are not those house shoe slippers that sort of look like ballet shoes though. They won't work. I know at WalMart they hang those house shoe kinds by their leotards and tights, but they are not for use in class by any means.

 

TIghts. You want the real kind and they are not that cheap. My daughter went thru an inexpensive pair in one class. I have 3 pair from last year that are the good quality and they wash and wear wonderfully. The floors in her dance class are not smooth. They begin warm-ups on the ground and the cheap ones would snag every single time. oh, yeah, they also run small.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It all depends on the school. My daughter's school requires a specific brand and model number and color for the leotards. Skirts are not allowed. They do not allow slippers from the discount stores and Payless. In fact, the Bloch and Capezio slippers are cheaper than the Payless slippers. All tights must be ballet tights.

 

But I find you can buy used leotards from other parents. You only need to ask.

 

I pass on the slippers to the younger dancers. You can wash the slippers and line dry them and they are fine to pass on.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow I had no idea dance supplies were so costly! I see new and nearly new leotards at my local thrift shop for $5 or less nearly all the time, even fancy velvet ones. I see tap shoes for about $5 a pair too sometimes even adult sizes.

 

The fancy velvet ones aren't dance leotards; they're for gymnastics.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Be sure you have the right type/brand of shoes, too, and the right size. It has been my experience that for both Jazz and ballet soft shoes when I think they're the correct size, they're too big, and that the correct size as sized by the dance store seems like it barely fits on my DD's foot for the first couple of weeks until the leather stretches and adjusts-at which time they're usually good until she wears them out, at which point she needs to go up a size anyway. The only shoes that seem to fit as I'd expect are her tap shoes.

 

And there can be a BIG difference between "pink" from one manufacturer and another-and my DD's studio director, at least, wants the colors to match for recital, and keeps the color of the shoes in mind when ordering tights and planning costumes. So when, this year, they switched from leather to canvas ballet shoes and the canvas shoes are a different shade than the leather, it was made clear that while the girls could continue to wear their leather shoes for practice for now, by spring recital they needed to have the "Real" shoes. Same with the split-sole jazz shoes-the color they had last year was discontinued, so therefore by recital, anyone who still has "suntan" will need to have "caramel".

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ill look for the real tights then.

 

One other question.... Hair. Theres no requirement, but I would say Up would be best. Is there a style that would work on a thin haired child that will actually stay up for a 1hr practice?

 

Ponytail, then twist it and use hairpins (not bobby pins) to put it into a bun. To put in a hairpin, poke it in perpendicular to the head, then it over and insert them into the bun. Add a hairnet to keep it all together. Ask an experienced ballet mom at your studio to show you how. There is a nice tutorial here - scroll down to find it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ill look for the real tights then.

 

One other question.... Hair. Theres no requirement, but I would say Up would be best. Is there a style that would work on a thin haired child that will actually stay up for a 1hr practice?

 

This is what I do with my hair, which never wants to stay up. I pull it into a pony tail about mid-height, then braid the ponytail. Then I wrap the braid around itself into a bun, and secure with cris-crossed hair elastics or a tight scrunchie.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We got pink canvas ballet shoes at one of the online stores (might have been Discount Dance Supply or Dancewear Solutions) for $5. I ordered 5 boxes and they were perfect for her P.A. school. I can't find that again though :glare:

 

The ballet outfit is just black leo and tights around here. I spend anywhere from $15 to $40 on leos and dd only likes Body Wrappers tights (Capezios feel "weird") and they cost anywhere from $12 to $18 a pair.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Prepare yourself--these are the cheap and easy days. :lol:

 

:iagree: If you have sticker shock now, you may want to reconsider the whole ballet thing. It gets drastically more expensive as they age and a single weekly class no longer cuts it. It would be a LOT easier to redirect them now. If you try in adolescence you will be accused of 'ruining her life.'

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:iagree: If you have sticker shock now, you may want to reconsider the whole ballet thing. It gets drastically more expensive as they age and a single weekly class no longer cuts it. It would be a LOT easier to redirect them now. If you try in adolescence you will be accused of 'ruining her life.'

But what would you switch to? Gymnastics is expensive. All the sports that kids do year-round cost thousands of dollars/year.

 

There would be a possibility of recreational dance. Not at a true ballet school but dance schools that offer a variety of classes will often have tap/jazz/ballet combo classes even for older girls.

 

Kids just get more expensive as they get older.:001_smile:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow I had no idea dance supplies were so costly! I see new and nearly new leotards at my local thrift shop for $5 or less nearly all the time, even fancy velvet ones. I see tap shoes for about $5 a pair too sometimes even adult sizes.

 

I see far more gymnastics style leotards at thrift shops than dance leos.

 

My daughter has wide feet and a long, narrow torso so no thrift shop dance finds for her. She did get a few handmedown leos, but that's been it. The worse dance expense was when I had to buy two pair of pointe shoes those first few rounds because her feet were different sizes. Thankfully her feet evened out.

 

If I were starting a very young (ie preschool) age girl in dance I might go the inexpensive route that first year on everything but tights.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:iagree: If you have sticker shock now, you may want to reconsider the whole ballet thing. It gets drastically more expensive as they age and a single weekly class no longer cuts it. It would be a LOT easier to redirect them now. If you try in adolescence you will be accused of 'ruining her life.'

 

:iagree: I agree. My daughter dances at a reasonably priced studio and I have three kids in music. By the time my oldest child hit high school dance and music costs together per month exceeded our monthly mortgage payment. Sticker shock to me these days looks like paying $600 for two teens to go on an overnight band trip....as in a ONE night trip.

 

I don't regret it, but it hasn't been easy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, those $10 a week lessons and $12 shoes all seemed so innocent back then.

 

:lol: So true!!! We are up to $200/month for one child at a recreational (not pre-pro by any means) ballet school. Our other daughter is up to $116/month for three classes/week. And last year we paid around $450 just for their recital costumes. :blink:

 

We use their charter school money to help pay for lessons, otherwise no way could we afford it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It gets drastically more expensive as they age and a single weekly class no longer cuts it.

 

Yeah, those $10 a week lessons and $12 shoes all seemed so innocent back then.

 

By the time my oldest child hit high school dance and music costs together per month exceeded our monthly mortgage payment. Sticker shock to me these days looks like paying $600 for two teens to go on an overnight band trip....as in a ONE night trip.

 

I don't regret it, but it hasn't been easy.

 

We are up to $200/month for one child at a recreational (not pre-pro by any means) ballet school. Our other daughter is up to $116/month for three classes/week. And last year we paid around $450 just for their recital costumes.

 

Okay, all of this is true, to some extent, but I don't want to scare off a family from dance.

 

My son is semi-serious about dance. He started with ballet when he was almost seven and, over the years, he's taken ballet, tap, jazz, character and ballroom dancing. He started at the pre-professional school affiliated with the local ballet company, but eventually moved to first one smaller studio and then a second even smaller one.

 

For the last couple of years, he's taken just tap, usually one or two classes a week. Each class was about $40 per month. Recital fees were right around $100, including the costume. I didn't have to buy him any special dance clothing, in part because he had dance pants left over from previous costumes. His tap shoes are under $30 per pair.

 

He's not aiming at being a professional ballet dancer. He dances recreationally and to keep alive the idea of doing musical theatre (as either a hobby or a career, depending on the day you ask him).

 

At the end of last year, out of the blue, he was awarded a scholarship for a second class at the current studio. He also auditioned and earned a place on the competition tap team. He now dances at least three hours per week, sometimes more if they are preparing for a performance, with two hours of ballet and an hour of tap. I had to buy him a pair of dance pants, because the ballet teacher wanted something specific. He needed new tap shoes and new ballet shoes.

 

We now pay $100 per month in dance tuition. The pants were under $20. The tap shoes were under $30. The ballet shoes, which had to be special ordered, will be right around $30. The recital fee will remain about the same, although I'm sure the costume fee will double since he will be in two pieces. There will be occasional additional fees for competition choreography and rehearsals, but our basic monthly committment, including shoes and such, is about $120.

 

We are in discussions about adding a second tap class at a different studio, which he would attend part-time. That would be another $35 or so per month.

 

So, is it expensive? It depends on your defininition of the word, but, yes, it does cost a nice chunk of money. There are ways to mitigate this, though.

 

My daughter, for example, is currently working part-time at her dance studio in exchange for classes. She works 10 - 12 hours per week at the front desk and generally helping around the studio. In exchange, she takes as many classes as she wants. Currently, she's taking three (ballet, jazz and zumba), but she is about to add hip hop. And she is making arrangements with the studio owner to schedule a private lesson each week, also. She had virtually no dance experience prior to starting this job/internship/whatever, although she did have jazz and ballet shoes left over from a couple of college courses, and her training is currently costing us literally nothing except a leotard and tights and some gas money.

 

At my son's studio, a couple of the teen girls also volunteer to pay for portions of their training. I've also known moms who work the front desks at dance schools to defray or cover the costs of their kids' classes.

 

So, if dance is important, and we believe it is, there are ways to make it possible, financially, if you are willing to think creatively.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There would be a possibility of recreational dance. Not at a true ballet school but dance schools that offer a variety of classes will often have tap/jazz/ballet combo classes even for older girls.

 

Combo schools aren't generally any cheaper, especially if they're decent, and doing more styles of dance means more shoes, more outfits, etc. A cheap school isn't worth the time or money if the instruction isn't up to snuff. As in everything, you get what you pay for.

 

Okay, all of this is true, to some extent, but I don't want to scare off a family from dance.

...

So, if dance is important, and we believe it is, there are ways to make it possible, financially, if you are willing to think creatively.

 

I agree. I barter for our classes, as do many dancers/parents at our studio. Parents and dancers do everything from assisting in classes, to cleaning the studio, to working at the front desk, to using specialized skills in photography or web design.

 

Dance is a lifetime sport - one you can continue to do for many, many years. I've danced with several women in their seventies. It's a great form of exercise and the health benefits alone are well worth the price. Add in the mental challenge of remembering the steps, the friendships made, and all the other typical advantages of extracurriculars.

 

Plus it's FUN!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...