Jump to content

Menu

Does your child have a checklist each day?


skeeterbug
 Share

Recommended Posts

Of subjects/assignments they have to complete? Does it list everything they have to do? This is for my nearly 8yo. We are a "do the next thing" kind of homeschooling family, and aren't required to keep records. So I don't need a checklist of complete lesson x or page xx. I'd like to make a checklist of subjects- Monday you need to do math, spelling, writing, etc. Tuesday- math, grammar, latin. Etc. But what I find is that my checklist is becoming so long (it's full of short lessons) that it might be discouraging. He's always asking how much he has left, and I let him choose the order we do things in, so I thought a checklist would be helpful. I also want to begin encouraging independence.

 

I love the one here, she is using HOD (we are not). (And she posts on here but I don't remember her username, so Hi! if you read this!) The problem is we don't do the same thing every day, so I need a different one for each day. And sometimes if we don't feel like doing science we'll do history instead (alternating days). So we don't always follow the plan. Basically I want ds to know that there is a certain amount of work we need to get done each day.

 

Recommendations? I'm just overthinking this, right?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not yet, but I'm going to make one. I did think it would be easier on kids to just do what I say is next, but having read some comments here and thought about it more, I realize that my kids would rather know everything we're doing for the day or week. Just like I wouldn't want to go to work knowing that my boss will let me know when it's time to go home, depending on whether I have manufactured a specific number of widgets, which number only she knows.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been using homeschoolskedtrack online this year. I've really liked it so far. You can print off a daily schedule, schedule some activities on certain days, override all scheduled activities for a coop day, and it will slide assignments to the next day if you don't get to it.

 

Last year I wrote out a schedule by hand every day. Not sure why I wasted so much time!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My schedule keeps me sane (somewhat). I've been wrestling with this. I had a schedule for all of us, but wanted to find a way to also have my kids know what was expected each day, plus I wanted to be able to see at a glance what independent work they had finished. Plus, I didn't want it to be on the computer; I wanted a paper copy that I could leave open and see the entire week's plans at one time. After trying numerous things I finally made my own schedule on Open Office with color-coordinated columns for each day of the week, so for instance the Monday column is light blue and includes every assignment for every child with small check-off boxes for each so that we can all see what is supposed to happen on Monday AND then also see what actually DID happen on Monday. In this way I've combined my schedule with theirs. They know what's expected. I know what's done.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm a simple girl...I use an index card for each kid. I have a master plan in my binder for the week which I pull from the individual subject lesson plans (I plan out about a months worth of lessons per subject at a time and then weekly combine them on one sheet so I can adjust if we go faster or slower the week before.). Then each evening I write it all down on an index card for each of the kids to follow and check off. It helps if they can look at it and see what else they have to do for the day and also if it's one of the things they do independently (math and handwriting) they can go to the right lesson number without having to ask me which one to do. It's been working out so far and everytime I ask if they still want me to do them, they say yes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I created a checklist template that I print out daily. It lists every subject we cover in the school year (I think there are 11 subjects and a "miscellaneous". Each day I hand write what they need to do under each specific subject. If there's nothing written under a subject, they know they don't have it that day. The to-do list also includes a spot to write in their daily chore, a reminder to practice their instrument, and a place to list any extracurricular activity they have that day. They know they have to have everything checked off before they're free to do "play" stuff. It's working great so far :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My two younger kids have an assignment notebook. Each day they have a list that they need to complete by the end of the day. Anything not completed is "homework" that evening. The vast majority of the time, the lists are completed during the day. Some days, however, the kids are talking too much and they need to work after school.

 

By having a list, I don't have to constantly remind (aka nag) them to stop talking and to get back to work. They know that if they goof off too much during the day, they will be doing school that night.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use Homeschool Tracker so I make a checklist for each child through that, but here's an idea for you....

 

Write the subject on a 3x5 index card and laminate it. Then use a vis-a-vis pen to write the specific assignment for that day on the card. Only give your child the cards for assignments that day. You can put them on a metal ring or have a container. If your child likes to see his workload "go down" then you might keep the cards separate and let him turn them in as he completes them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Your DC is only 7 right? This might be a bit overwhelming for him right now, I don't know his maturity level, but the approach my family used worked wonderfully for us. I think it would work great for an older child.

 

We tended to prefer larger chunks of time on single subjects and the flexibility to run with something, so mum would write down our 'to do' list, but for the week instead of the days, with all the lessons to be covered over the 5 days. If we felt like doing an afternoon of science we might do all 3 science lessons in the one day, but skip history and art, or we might get really involved in reading some assigned reading, so do two days worth of assigned reading time at once, and skip the math supplement that day. Each 'assignment' had a similar amount of time required for it, and each day had a number of checkboxes, so Monday might be 8 checkboxes, but Tuesday has swimming lessons in the afternoon so it's only 6 checkboxes. We could also choose to do more than the required checkboxes, with the knowledge that the weekend starts at the end of the checklist, whether that's Thursday evening or Saturday morning.

 

To simplify it for a younger child, you could just require that at least one checkbox of English, math and whatever else be done each day as part of the checkboxes. Or have a daily assignment list and weekly assignment list, like below

 

Daily

LA lesson ____

20 minutes assigned reading

Math lesson ____

Latin lesson ____

 

Weekly

Science lesson 44

Science lesson 45

History lesson 22

History lesson 23

Art lesson 3

Art lesson 4

Art lesson 5

Geography lesson 87

 

Then require he finish the daily list, plus two items from the weekly list. It gives some direction, lets him know how much he needs to do, spells out the math and English requirements, but gives the flexibility in the weekly stuff.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We used workboxes for two years, then a modification similar to the one posted above.

 

This year, 3rd grade, I am using scholaric.com and I just print off the daily checklist each day. I print off a week at a time (5 pages) and 3 hole punch them, then slip them into the front of DS's weekly binder. He can see exactly what he needs to do each day, and since the entire week of work is in the binder, he can work ahead if he chooses. (That last bit is wishful thinking on my part, he has yet to work ahead! :tongue_smilie:)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, my 8 year old has always worked best with a checklist. It lets him know where we are and what is coming next.

 

I make a table in word for all 5 days of the week. I list subjects down the left side in the order that they usually work with mom. The first section is â€work with momâ€, and the second section is â€independent workâ€. With it separated like that, DS knows what he can work on while I do school with his younger brothers.

 

This year, all the kids are on the sheet, color coded. So if an assignment is green, I know it is DS1.

 

If we decide to switch days for something, we'll just mark it that way on the sheet. Also, while I put page numbers in there, I'm ok with going farther or not as far, then reassigning the lessons as needed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Of subjects/assignments they have to complete? Does it list everything they have to do? This is for my nearly 8yo. We are a "do the next thing" kind of homeschooling family, and aren't required to keep records. So I don't need a checklist of complete lesson x or page xx. I'd like to make a checklist of subjects- Monday you need to do math, spelling, writing, etc. Tuesday- math, grammar, latin. Etc. But what I find is that my checklist is becoming so long (it's full of short lessons) that it might be discouraging. He's always asking how much he has left, and I let him choose the order we do things in, so I thought a checklist would be helpful. I also want to begin encouraging independence. I love the one here, she is using HOD (we are not). (And she posts on here but I don't remember her username, so Hi! if you read this!) The problem is we don't do the same thing every day, so I need a different one for each day. And sometimes if we don't feel like doing science we'll do history instead (alternating days). So we don't always follow the plan. Basically I want ds to know that there is a certain amount of work we need to get done each day. Recommendations? I'm just overthinking this, right?

 

Yep. We use a checklist - or a planning sheet as I call it. Each sheet is for a week. I plan out dd10 and ds8's week and they cross things off as they have done them. The others do their own and record what they have done because they know what is required in each area.

 

My 8yo is becoming a lot more self-directed about his work now. He likes knowing exactly what he should do in each area, and having it all mapped out on paper for the week also lets him know where the finish line is which seems to work for him. He likes being able to see the goal and crossing it off.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use this workbox spin-off idea for my young children. For myself, I am using Homeschool Skedtrack.

 

Ditto. I use pretty much the exact same tweaked workbox system for our together subjects. Once they start doing independent work, then I input that into Homeschool Skedtrack to print a checklist of just their independent.

 

As for myself, I had a custom planner made for me this year! :hurray:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just started this at the beginning of this year for my 3rd grader and wish I'd started it earlier.. I just write what we need to do that day on the side of the white board and we check it off as we get things done. He really thrives on seeing what he's accomplished and how much we have left. I had a column for ds6 the first couple of weeks and he didn't like it. I think he was overwhelmed by all of the boxes even though a few subjects were just for fun or only 15 mins long. I stopped making his column at his request. However, he now puts a tiny dot next to the subject to remind himself that it is done for the day. :lol:

 

I like the pictures you linked. It would be fun to do something like that. We don't do the same subjects everyday, so I'd have to make one for each day of the week. That might be a fun project this weekend.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Each of my kids has a checklist for the week. It has 5 columns, and a colored box under the day we typically do that subject. (So math would have a colored box to check off on all 5 days, but science has boxes on Mon & Thur, and history has Wed & Fri.)

 

The column that has the description says "do 2 worksheets per day" instead of having specific page numbers. Then when I check it, I write the exact page numbers on their sheet.

 

By the end of the week, they should have checks in every box.

 

My list is long, but I have carefully included things that I know they will have done by the time they get out their schoolwork (make bed, brush teeth, etc.) so they start off by checking off a lot of things! I also have several 5 second items like "show Mom your best handshake - be sure to use eye contact and a smile!", and "do 25 jumping jacks", so they don't think that lots of items is overwhelming. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, yes we do. Ds9 has a checklist of items to complete whenever I'm busy with the baby or dd5. This ensures he gets practice in his grammar, writing, dance stretching, and piano, and helps him develop the habit of Bible reading. I just created one in Pages and put his favorite characters in an image as a top border - this year he rotates between Ninjago, Inspector Gadget, and Ben 10 :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I make checklists for my oldest dd - we've been doing it for years, probably since she was around 5th grade. I began making lists for her, because she tends to wander aimlessly around the house waiting for someone to tell her what to do. :001_rolleyes:

 

I keep it fairly simple - she has a composition notebook where I make a daily list of assignments. I include everything she's expected to complete for that day, so it might look like this:

 

( ) Religion lesson 2 - read and write narration

( ) Math lesson

( ) Grammar workbook lesson 6

( ) Read Calico Captive, chapter 4 and complete any activities in your study guide

( ) Latin lesson 5

( ) A History of US Book 1 chapters 10 - 12 - write a summary for each chapter along with any notes you think might be important.

( ) Encyclopedia of Nature - pg. 100 - 101 - write an outline

( ) Complete the Plant and Animal cells sketch

( ) Read The Westing Game and work on your discussion notes for the book club

 

This is just an example that I made up off the top of my head, as she's got her checklist notebook with her upstairs while she does her schoolwork.

 

This year I'm working towards having her create her own checklists so she can take ownership.

 

I haven't done lists for my twins, as they are pretty eager to get their work done and don't really seem to need me to make them lists. But now that they're getting older I'm considering it just to get them working towards a bit more independence.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do! But I do it in a very easy, non blingy way ;) Haha!!! I bought TONS of cheap notebooks. They get a notebook for each 9 weeks with their 'assignments'. I schedule 1 week at a time. 1 page/day, date written on top, subjects written with all assignments under each subject (we use more than 1 curriculum for many of the subjects). I include EVERYTHING they are to do that day... everything they do "with me" is labeled with MOM next to it. I have my own notebook labeled with everything to work with on each child plus everything we do together. We start off with a morning meeting all together and then all 4 move on to handwriting. During this time I call them up one at a time to 'go over' all their independent work, I highlight everything they are to do in their notebook and hand it to them. As they finish they check it off. Because I have 4 kids we work on a rotating block schedule and this has helped us a LOT!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I give different types of checklists to my older and younger children. For my younger children (under 8), I use baseball card sheet protectors. I make cards out of halved index cards. One side has a clipart picture and the task written on it, the opposite side has a "good job" or other similar sticker. Each child has 2 sheets per day, one for school lesson tasks, one for chores. The sheets are kept in a daily folder for each child. When they complete a task, they turn the card over. When all the cards are turned, they know they are done for the day.

 

For my older children (over 8), I use Evernote, and I love it! Each older child has a "notebook " in Evernote, and the app is installed on our two laptops and two iPads, and stays synced over all devices. I also have a "checklist template notebook" where I have a note for each child with a daily list of the school subjects they should complete, along with instructions for subjects that have repeating tasks. They also have their chore lists on this checklist. Then daily or weekly (whenever I get to it), I copy and paste the list for each child for each day and add/modify any instructions and add it to their notebook. Then they can check the list on any device and when they are done for the day, I can double check the list on my device. I would prefer to give them a weekly list and have them scroll to the right day, but they prefer daily lists, so I oblige, since it is really only an extra 5 minutes of work a day for me.

 

The lists save my brain power for teaching and helping where help is needed instead of for repeating daily tasks to 5 school aged children. They still do occasionally ask "what do I do now" to which my only answer is "check your list".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My kids have checklists. Every Sunday I print a schedule for the upcoming week. Each day of the week has a column. The top of the page lists any scheduled outings so I know to assign fewer things those days. Then I list the specific subjects to do on each day. Each kid gets her own list. A kid might have between 7-14 items per day depending on age, type of items, and outings for the day. The first item is always "ready on time"!!!! Every "item" gets one slot; some items take two minutes, others an hour.

 

I don't list specific pages or assignments on the chart because every subject is pretty much do the next thing. I just list "piano", "memory work", "math", "history", "copywork", "writing", etc. My kids already know which things they can do on their own and which need to be done with me. They know that they should do their independent work when I am not available. (Just because they know it doesn't mean they always do it ;-). I have a set routine for the subjects that I do with the kids, but they are free to choose the order of everything else.

 

I post the chart and a pencil in a decorative picture frame on the wall next to the kitchen where it is easy for everyone to see. As each subject gets done, the kids mark them off. When everything is checked off, we're done for the day.

 

The kids like knowing what they have to do for they day and knowing when they will be done. I like it too.

 

I do leave extra blanks and pencil in changes throughout the week. At the end of the week, the checklist goes in the trash because we are not required to keep any records.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, we have a weekly "grid" with all the info. It's a Word table with days of the week along the tops of the columns, and each school subject along the front of the row. I put in the assignment for each day at the beginning of the week. So I list the math pages, the chapter we'll do in health, what we're reading for history, etc. Now, that doesn't mean it doesn't get "tweaked" as we go through the week, but it really helps us have a blueprint for where we're going.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This year my mom gave us an old white board - the first wall board we've ever used in hs! I started writing dd9's daily work on it (instead of carrying a list only in the binder that I use for both her and dd6) and circling all the things she can do on her own.

 

It's amazing! She's done so well on her own - I actually can work with dd6 with very few interruptions. (Of course, dd9's math is still in the easy stage of the year, though . . .)

 

At this point I can't quite believe I've never done this before - I bet it would bless dd6 to try something like it, too, even though she still needs me for just about everything. It's so wonderful to have even one child go from one thing to another without interrupting me in the process!!!

 

As for my checklist, I plan things out in a weekly format over the summer. Then, each Friday night, I spend about 2-3 hours plotting the next week and boning up on whatever I'll need to be able to teach dd9. (I just use Excel for my computer work.) I use the paper schedule/checklist through the week for tracking our hours as required by the state, too. It seems slightly OCD, but works for me!

 

Mama Anna

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Like many people we also use a daily checklist. I use a planner for each kids (ages 6 and 8) and fill it in each Sunday night. It has their daily school listed (independent and Mom), outings, classes and chores.

 

They loves that they get to pick the order of their independent work and enjoy highlighting or crossing off as they complete work.

 

Keeps up all on track b/c all know school in done for the day when chart is done

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My 10yo has a list for the first time this year in 5th grade. It's working really, really well.

 

We are very simple and do-the-next thing, so her list is generic enough to use every day. The top left of her sheet looks like this:

 

Morning Independent Work

[ ] Math Homework

[ ] Writing Assignment

[ ] Typing

[ ] Read Literature

[ ] Read Religion

[ ] Cursive

[ ] History/Science/Drawing

 

Afternoon With Mom

[ ] Discuss Independent Work

[ ] Logic of Enlish

[ ] Math Lesson

[ ] Word Problems

[ ] Discuss Writing Assignment

 

The bottom left of the sheet has boxes where we discuss her independent assignments and SHE writes in what she is to complete for each subject. I assign the independent work in the afternoon, and she completes it the following morning.

 

The top right of the sheet has a blank daily schedule so SHE can write in her activities and such for the day.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes!

 

I use HST+

 

I print out a copy for each of us for the whole week. She checks her copy off as she finishes, I use my copy to keep track and write her scores down as I have time to look over her work. Each weekend I enter everything into HST+ and print out the next weeks work checklist.

 

My DD likes to be independent, so she likes having a whole week in front of her. She knows she needs to finish todays work by the end of the day, but if she is done and wants to work ahead, she can. She likes being able to choose for herself.

 

She is also nearly 8yo.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love the one here, she is using HOD (we are not). (And she posts on here but I don't remember her username, so Hi! if you read this!) The problem is we don't do the same thing every day, so I need a different one for each day. And sometimes if we don't feel like doing science we'll do history instead (alternating days). So we don't always follow the plan. Basically I want ds to know that there is a certain amount of work we need to get done each day.

 

Hi back :) I'm the one who made those check-boxes. I may tweek them because we do some additional work in addition to our HOD work. My kids do like seeing what is left, so they have been helpful.

 

I have a list I follow for each day. It's more of an order of the day. I don't have anything written out specifically. I know how many days each subject takes to be completed in one year. We live in a pretty lax state for reporting. I have it all in Homeschool Skedtrack just in case someone ever wants to see something in print.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Honestly, I just bought her a regular school planner. Got her a cool, funky looking one. I have a rough plan in my head after planning/organizing every few months, but on a daily basis we are a "do-the-next-thing" family. The planning/organizing is just for me because I love to do it to see the big picture.

 

When we are done with our 1:1 work each day, I write down her assignments in her assignment book. It varies so much. She loves this method and it works better than any other system I've tried.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use an file for each child.they know how to open it up and see what is planned for the day.some subjects are just do the next thing, or"do as much as you can handle in the allied time frame", like Latin. Others have more specific assignments like history, science and spelling. But i like the index card idea for my younger! I might just try that next well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, we do a daily checklist because I don't want to answer the " how much more do I have to do?" question all the time. Ours is a third piece of paper which is divided into three color-outlined blocks (yellow, red, green). The kids know they need mom for things in yellow, green they can do independently (or only need me for the first minute or two) and red is the fun stuff wwe are going to get to once the rest is done. I just list subject names usually. If necessary to make a subject completely independent I will include page or lesson numbers. This system has worked well for us.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Didn't read all the replies, so hopefully I'm not repeating... I've seen some cute ones for younger kids that look like this:

 

To Do Subject Name Done

History

Reading

Writing

Math

 

Anyway, you just clip a clothespin on the To Do side, then move it to the Done side after completion. This is what I'm going to do for my 5yo.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you all for your responses, I am now pondering. I do have a checklist for *myself* for each day. It has a list of subjects for M-F on one page. I'm going to break it into one page for each day so as not to overwhelm ds, and be more specific with some of the subjects so he knows exactly what he has to do. Mainly this is so he has a light at the end of the tunnel and knows when he is done for the day, instead of having to ask me over and over again!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What if you made one page in Word for each day. You could use the fun shapes in Word and put one subject in each of them. Let ds do school with the sheet and a marker, and he can cross off or color each shape. It will still be the same number of items, but because it's not a long list, it won't be as intimidating. If you laminate and use a wet erase marker, you could reuse them each week.

 

I don't do anything like that at 8, but starting in 4th grade now, I am making ds a planner. I fill in independent subjects and then after we work on the non-independent ones, he writes his assignment for each. Then he can check off the work as he goes. I also use it to record grades and notes, so it will be a great record.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was using a word document to plan a week at a time (since there is no consistency I can't plan farther ahead). It had 4 columns for 4 "loops" we do each week. They theoretically correspond to 4 days but sometimes they don't. If I know we have something that we will be gone a day, I can just leave one blank. At the end of the week, I stick these in the kids work binders as a record (even though I don't need one).

 

A sample of what I've been using is here. My younger child has a much more detailed description because it was just ideas for when she wanted to do school.

 

Now here is a grid I did for my son to check off as he finishes each thing. I did have his work in a binder that he could just work though, that allowed him to see how much he had left. But I thought it might be good for him to be able to chose the order he did things in. I thought it might encourage some independence and anything he needed my help, he has to put aside until I'm done working with his sister. I modified an idea I saw on the Teaching Stars blog. She used velcro, we just cross things off with a dry erase crayon (it's in a sheet protector). I will cross off anything he doesn't need to do ahead of time. I made one for myself too, that had anything we did all together like history, spanish, etc, but decided I like my original grid better for my schedule. For mine, I would write on each square with a sharpie to indicate what day I wanted to do something.

Edited by dottieanna29
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8A8AF090.jpg

 

Here's DD's weekly tracking board-we decide at the start what is reasonable for the week, and those frogs go to the side, and then she moves them as she completes activities all week. She likes being independent, and she likes being able to just keep reading in history if that's what she wants to do, instead of switching gears. The board was a discard from Dh's company.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a very simple checklist in a simple 10 cent spiral notebook: each morning I write the date on a fresh page and quickly write out everything I'd like ds to accomplish that day. He can do them in whatever order he'd like and uses a highlighter to draw a line across each item as he finishes it. There's plenty of room to make notes if needed on the bottom of the page, to list activities, field trips, etc. It then also serves as a record of what he's done (not required by our state, but still nice for my own reference.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have a pocket chart on the wall, one side for DS, one for DD. I put cards with their school subjects in it each day. I put a check-mark on the back of each card. It's flexible. I was having the same problem with a checklist that you are having -- we don't do the same things every day, and sometimes we'll be in the middle of the day and I'll think, "Why the heck did I schedule THAT for today?" or "We're not going to have time for this subject. Let me substitute this other thing we're doing tomorrow instead." I've used it since January and it's been working well.

post-8623-13535087507625_thumb.jpg

post-8623-13535087507625_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Of subjects/assignments they have to complete? Does it list everything they have to do? This is for my nearly 8yo. We are a "do the next thing" kind of homeschooling family, and aren't required to keep records. So I don't need a checklist of complete lesson x or page xx. I'd like to make a checklist of subjects- Monday you need to do math, spelling, writing, etc. Tuesday- math, grammar, latin. Etc. But what I find is that my checklist is becoming so long (it's full of short lessons) that it might be discouraging. He's always asking how much he has left, and I let him choose the order we do things in, so I thought a checklist would be helpful. I also want to begin encouraging independence.

 

I love the one here, she is using HOD (we are not). (And she posts on here but I don't remember her username, so Hi! if you read this!) The problem is we don't do the same thing every day, so I need a different one for each day. And sometimes if we don't feel like doing science we'll do history instead (alternating days). So we don't always follow the plan. Basically I want ds to know that there is a certain amount of work we need to get done each day.

 

Recommendations? I'm just overthinking this, right?

I did something similar to her stars, a vine with leaves, when my little guy was in first grade.

 

Now, ds (4th grade) has a list that he uses and a guide book that has a weekly overview page similar to the one that she has for her 4th grader. I titled our guide book The Well-Nourished Mind.

 

His checklist is exactly what you are saying. We have a different schedule each day, because we have different outside activities that dictate what needs to be done. In the spirit of Charlotte Mason, we have numerous shorter lessons and I try not to place similar topics in a row. I have his list broken down into Early Morning, Late Morning, and Mid-Day. After early morning we take a break and after late morning we eat lunch. I just typed it up in Excel.

 

HTH-

Mandy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Of subjects/assignments they have to complete? Does it list everything they have to do? This is for my nearly 8yo. We are a "do the next thing" kind of homeschooling family, and aren't required to keep records. So I don't need a checklist of complete lesson x or page xx. I'd like to make a checklist of subjects- Monday you need to do math, spelling, writing, etc. Tuesday- math, grammar, latin. Etc. But what I find is that my checklist is becoming so long (it's full of short lessons) that it might be discouraging. He's always asking how much he has left, and I let him choose the order we do things in, so I thought a checklist would be helpful. I also want to begin encouraging independence.

 

I love the one here, she is using HOD (we are not). (And she posts on here but I don't remember her username, so Hi! if you read this!) The problem is we don't do the same thing every day, so I need a different one for each day. And sometimes if we don't feel like doing science we'll do history instead (alternating days). So we don't always follow the plan. Basically I want ds to know that there is a certain amount of work we need to get done each day.

 

Recommendations? I'm just overthinking this, right?

 

Yes, last year. Haven't yet this year, but what was from last year is still pretty much it. And it did start to get to be a habit as to what the items are each day.

 

It has the everyday subjects like math listed, and then it has the choice subjects (which sounds like your situation) as "history or science". (This year it might say "history or geography or science".) Another choice area is "art or music". This seems to work well enough here, and in the course of the year enough history and science both get done. It allows interests to be followed instead of arbitrarily started and stopped, and it allows ds to ask if _____ can count as history/science that day. I try to be pretty flexible about that.

 

This system also allows for "deferring" something, usually to the weekend, or getting ahead in something. This week, for example, ds first deferred some math to the weekend, but then Wednesday decided to get ahead in math for the week so as not to have any yesterday, or on the weekend.

 

It does have each day of week separately, but most days were largely cut and paste of the rest. I put the paper orientation in landscape direction, and got the whole thing onto two sides and put that into a plastic cover so it could be written on with a wet-erase marker. Possibly one day only to not be overwhelming would help--but seeing the whole week seems to allow more independence as in what I describe above about "deferring" or "getting ahead".

Edited by Pen
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...