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Recent discussions with friends have raised some questions. I would love to hear from a variety of denomination members on policies.

 

Does your pastor/minister/priest/rabbi know how much you donate to your religious institution or is that information only known to a financial officer or financial team?

 

Is it common place for ministers within your denomination to know how much members of the church give? Why is the information important for a minister/pastor/priest/rabbi to have?

 

Does this policy raise ethical concerns within your religious institution?

 

Does your church or denomination have a history of sharing financial information with officials outside of the financial officer?

 

I remember that the church I attended in childhood published a booklet listing family contributions. :001_huh: Since then though I have been under the impression that financial information was known only to a financial team--not to church officials. Am I naive?

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Recent discussions with friends have raised some questions. I would love to hear from a variety of denomination members on policies.

 

Does your pastor/minister/priest/rabbi know how much you donate to your religious institution or is that information only known to a financial officer or financial team?

 

Is it common place for ministers within your denomination to know how much members of the church give? Why is the information important for a minister/pastor/priest/rabbi to have?

 

Does this policy raise ethical concerns within your religious institution?

 

Does your church or denomination have a history of sharing financial information with officials outside of the financial officer?

 

I remember that the church I attended in childhood published a booklet listing family contributions. :001_huh: Since then though I have been under the impression that financial information was known only to a financial team--not to church officials. Am I naive?

Dh is on the parish council, president this year. They started a big fundraising campaign last year to fix the church, so giving was a relevant topic. Only the accountant and maybe the priest actually knew the amounts, and I'm not even for sure the priest did. When information was out for them to do solicitations every thing was kept confidential. The accountant went through and worked through it but none of the council or anyone else that I'm aware of knew those details.

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At our church the only people that know what you give are the people that count the money after the service and the accountant that prints out the receipts at the end of the year.

The Pastors know how much comes in each week and where it goes but they don't know who gave or how much.

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The only person who knows how much someone gives is the treasurer. And they keep track for income tax purposes only. Finance committee only knows total taken in from everyone. United Methodist Church-- everyone UMC we've gone to was the same way.

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I attend a small, evangelical church. Our pastor does not look at what families give in general. He will look if it affects his job like when nominating people to our council or as elders. Then it isn't the amount so much, but more about consistency. Our council would be considered the financial committe, but they definitely do not see what each family tithes...just what comes in each month. Our church administrator would see the big picture of giving as she records and deposits the money as well as sends out yearly statements.

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Christian here. We usually write a check each week to give, so whoever oversees the money will know. At some churches we have been, they don't keep track of who gave what. We have been at 1 or 2 where the person who oversees the finances will keep track and give you a form at the end of the year showing what you have given for tax purposes. That info is never published or shared in any way with anyone else.

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Short answer: Episcopalian and under our old rector, the only person who knew was the treasurer. Our new rector is looking at individual giving. We have decided to no longer pledge and give in cash only.

 

Long answer: http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/showthread.php?t=410464

 

Thanks for the link.

 

The only person who knows how much someone gives is the treasurer. And they keep track for income tax purposes only. Finance committee only knows total taken in from everyone. United Methodist Church-- everyone UMC we've gone to was the same way.

 

Yes, this was my experience when I attended a Methodist church.

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Honestly, I don't know the answer to all of your questions. I just remember once a few years ago our pastor standing up in the pulpit and saying something to the affect that he knew for a fact that there were many families who didn't tithe and others who were giving well below what they were able. There was another time that he implied that he (or the church leadership, I don't remember which specifically) knew what the congregation was doing online, as if they were somehow spying and keeping tabs on people. Both instances creeped me out. Personally, I don't think the pastor needs to know who is tithing and how much. There are other people to do that job and it should be completely confidential. Needless to say, I have chosen not to return to that church (or any other, at this point) even though DH and DS continue to attend (and tithe) there.

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No one knows what we give other than the bookkeeper, and we could go envelopeless, but we give with a check, and I want that check hidden from other eyes...soooo envelope it is (as opposed to cash which would be completely anon).

 

However, the amt offered the previous week is published in the weekly bulletin, so everyone knows the overall finances of the church.

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Honestly, I don't know the answer to all of your questions. I just remember once a few years ago our pastor standing up in the pulpit and saying something to the affect that he knew for a fact that there were many families who didn't tithe and others who were giving well below what they were able. There was another time that he implied that he (or the church leadership, I don't remember which specifically) knew what the congregation was doing online, as if they were somehow spying and keeping tabs on people. Both instances creeped me out. Personally, I don't think the pastor needs to know who is tithing and how much. There are other people to do that job and it should be completely confidential. Needless to say, I have chosen not to return to that church (or any other, at this point) even though DH and DS continue to attend (and tithe) there.

 

It is one thing for a minister to know the amount of the donation. How anyone would know whether or not a family is tithing is beyond me!

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Our current parish is huge (too big if you ask me :glare:). Our priest is presumably aware of the large-scale donors but we aren't in a financial position to be one of those at this time.

 

My mom is Episcopalian and was on the fundraising team for her church's recently built community center renovation. Their priest again knew who the major donors were because there was a special appreciation dinner. But beyond that, I don't think the information was shared.

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i assume the person over finances knows who tithes, but that isn't a staff person, but rather, someone in leadership that oversees that aspect. my husband is on staff and has no idea who gives what. he has no idea if other pastors or staff members... or leadership... or congregation members tithe at all. it is none of his business either. the lead pastor does not know who gives what. our church is large and that would be ridiculous for him to attempt and track that. we have a statement each week in the bulletin for what is budgeted and what was received. we are always above budget, so i don't think anyone is worrying about who gives what. we tithe online through our bank, so i'm not sure who receives that or where it goes when it arrives in the mail.

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It is one thing for a minister to know the amount of the donation. How anyone would know whether or not a family is tithing is beyond me!

 

If a family is only giving a 3 figure or less annual donation, it's a safe bet that they aren't tithing. Now it is between them and God whether they are in a financial position to give more generously to the congregation than they currently are. But I can see where a pastor might feel frustration if the majority of families are only donating very small amounts. Particularly if it's like my church where the parking lot is full of late model luxury vehicles.

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I don't know how it was done in our last church, but I think the treasurer and potentially the secretary and a financial group knew.

 

Everyone who gave by check got a paper at the end of the year for their tax deduction, saying how much they gave.

 

I never liked this, so we gave in cash. I didn't like anyone knowing what I gave, and I didn't like taking it off of my taxes (not that we ever had enough to give to make it significant) because. . . to me (and others will surely disagree and look at it differently), that was part of the sacrifice of giving. I didn't need to get a "give back" by giving.

 

ETA: Baptist, but it was similar in the Evangelical Free church we attended too.

Edited by Ipsey
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Bapist, and we are the only ones that know how much we give. Sometimes we will put a cheque in the offering and in those cases obviously the treasurer knows how much we gave. Normally though, that information is between God and us. There is no reason for anyone else to know about it.

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The only person who knows how much someone gives is the treasurer. And they keep track for income tax purposes only. Finance committee only knows total taken in from everyone. United Methodist Church-- everyone UMC we've gone to was the same way.

 

:iagree:

 

I was financial secretary for many years at my old church before we moved away. The treasurer and I counted donations; he made deposits and payed bills and I kept 'record of giving' for each person or family. That was it, no one else not even our spouses knew who gave what.

 

Finance committee knows total giving and total pledges, they base the budget out of that.

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Episcopal here, husband the Rector. He doesn't know who gives what. I think only the financial person does. No one shares that information.

 

We do know exactly where the money goes, tho. Even dh itemizes his discretionary fund (that info is not made public, beyond "X amt given for rent" kinda stuff, not to whom it was given). We did have one Rector at another church who would not disclose how he spent his discretionary fund--I didn't like that.

 

I'm guessing those who go to a church where the financial folks know if you tithe also know how much you make--to me, that's no one's business.

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Recent discussions with friends have raised some questions. I would love to hear from a variety of denomination members on policies.

 

Does your pastor/minister/priest/rabbi know how much you donate to your religious institution or is that information only known to a financial officer or financial team?

 

Is it common place for ministers within your denomination to know how much members of the church give? Why is the information important for a minister/pastor/priest/rabbi to have?

 

Does this policy raise ethical concerns within your religious institution?

 

Does your church or denomination have a history of sharing financial information with officials outside of the financial officer?

 

I remember that the church I attended in childhood published a booklet listing family contributions. :001_huh: Since then though I have been under the impression that financial information was known only to a financial team--not to church officials. Am I naive?

 

An individual/family's giving is only known to one person, the recording secretary. She keeps track so that they can give out contribution statements at the end of the year for tax purposes, and she can share with the board of deacons whether someone is a regular tither or not, but nothing to do with the amounts. (to be on the deacon board, the nominee must be a regular tither as one of the qualifications.).

 

There is a financial committee that oversees the budgetary stuff of the church, and all of the church budget is shared with the membership. But that is the general church budget as a whole. There is a listing for the total giving, but nothing individualized whatsoever.

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Recent discussions with friends have raised some questions. I would love to hear from a variety of denomination members on policies.

 

Does your pastor/minister/priest/rabbi know how much you donate to your religious institution or is that information only known to a financial officer or financial team?

No, my priest does not know how much I donate.

 

Is it common place for ministers within your denomination to know how much members of the church give? Why is the information important for a minister/pastor/priest/rabbi to have?

 

No, I don't think it's the norm within my denomination but I cannot speak to all of them. I'm Eastern Orthodox and every jurisdiction (Greek, Serbian, Russian, American, Antiochian) runs things differently.

 

Does this policy raise ethical concerns within your religious institution?

 

it would if the priest knew.

 

Does your church or denomination have a history of sharing financial information with officials outside of the financial officer?

Not that I am aware of.

 

I remember that the church I attended in childhood published a booklet listing family contributions. :001_huh: Since then though I have been under the impression that financial information was known only to a financial team--not to church officials. Am I naive?

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Recent discussions with friends have raised some questions. I would love to hear from a variety of denomination members on policies.

 

Does your pastor/minister/priest/rabbi know how much you donate to your religious institution or is that information only known to a financial officer or financial team?

 

Is it common place for ministers within your denomination to know how much members of the church give? Why is the information important for a minister/pastor/priest/rabbi to have?

 

Does this policy raise ethical concerns within your religious institution?

 

Does your church or denomination have a history of sharing financial information with officials outside of the financial officer?

 

I remember that the church I attended in childhood published a booklet listing family contributions. :001_huh: Since then though I have been under the impression that financial information was known only to a financial team--not to church officials. Am I naive?

 

That is the ethical way to handle it. The other people involved have no business knowing. Only the financial officer needs to know, in order to prepare statements required by the IRS.

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In my experience as a Presbyterian (OPC and PCA), the pastor has no access to information on any individual's giving. There are only a small number of people who handle that.

 

Just my opinion, but the pastor has no business knowing that. What a temptation to offer preferential treatment, even if just subconsciously.

Edited by marbel
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Recent discussions with friends have raised some questions. I would love to hear from a variety of denomination members on policies.

 

Does your pastor/minister/priest/rabbi know how much you donate to your religious institution or is that information only known to a financial officer or financial team?

 

Is it common place for ministers within your denomination to know how much members of the church give? Why is the information important for a minister/pastor/priest/rabbi to have?

 

Does this policy raise ethical concerns within your religious institution?

 

Does your church or denomination have a history of sharing financial information with officials outside of the financial officer?

 

I remember that the church I attended in childhood published a booklet listing family contributions. :001_huh: Since then though I have been under the impression that financial information was known only to a financial team--not to church officials. Am I naive?

 

 

N.O. spells no.

 

Dh is the church treasurer and there is a financial recording secretary that helps prepare end of year giving receipts for those that wrote checks or gave cash in envelopes with their names on them. Lots and lots of people give unrecorded cash. We give half our donation by check and half by undesignated cash so that even the financial secretary doesn't know exactly who much we give.

 

We've seen this information abused in the past and let me tell you, it can lead to trouble, big trouble.

 

It also takes two out of three signatures in order for check to even be written against the church accounts...dh plus either the financial recording secretary or one of two other authorized church board members.

 

Our pastor does not sign on the church accounts. In order to help him assist the deacons with budgeting for the next year, he and the deacons always have reports. These reports show the total for each offering, and the budgetary break down for that money...mission's gets X, children's ministries receives X, payroll and insurance is X, etc. When the church board and deacons vote on a financial matter, pastor excuses himself from the room after giving his heartfelt opinion and especially when that may be a decision that concerns him such as someone makes a motion that he receive a pay raise, or that insurance companies change, or that X enhancements to the parsonage be made (we maintain a lovely four bedroom, two bath parsonage with a fenced yard and two car garage that every new pastor and wife get to pick paint, new carpet, etc. before they move in, and the trustees take care of all maintenance in a timely manner or they hear it from the deacons!), etc. Pastor does not vote on financial decisions and neither does any other paid member of the staff. Dh is not paid by the way.

 

So, the ministry staff knows who much money comes in and what budget categories we have, but they don't know who gave what and when. Dh and the financial secretary are the only ones that do, and as dh puts it, "We run silent as the grave!"

 

Oh, I forgot to add. There are no personal financial disclosures made. NO ONE provides tax returns, pay stubs, or anything else to the leadership so there is no way of knowing who tithes and who does not because that is totally between each person and God. All budgets are based on the previous five years giving averages. If more comes in, it's put into savings and allowed to grow with the eye to increasing ministries later or maybe taking on another staff member, or whatever. If less comes in, then every budget category BUT payroll and insurance, is cut. So there is a maximum amount of the annual budget that any department can have access to in a quarter minus 10% which is held in reserve in case offerings are lower than expected. If those departments get to the end of the third quarter and have a surplus, they can choose to do something extra special for their ministry area or buy a needed expensive item, etc.

 

This also prevents the church from incurring something huge - like burst pipes, or roof problems, or whatever that might be a slow recovery getting an insurance claim made...they'll always have the money to make that big repair and just wait on the insurance check.

 

Faith

Edited by FaithManor
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At our church the only people that know what you give are the people that count the money after the service and the accountant that prints out the receipts at the end of the year.

The Pastors know how much comes in each week and where it goes but they don't know who gave or how much.

 

This is like our current church and any other Catholic church we've regularly attended. People may give the priest personal gifts for certain occassions (Christmas, weddings, baptisms, funerals, anniversary masses, gas money for retired priests) or events, but otherwise donations are private.

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You know, it occurs to me that I always see people talk about end of year statements. Our church sends out quarterly statements of what we've given, and when we were pledging, they included our pledge amount and how much we had left on our pledge to go. Do others do this?

 

We do not use a pledge program. Therefore, only annual statements are mailed.

 

Faith

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You know, it occurs to me that I always see people talk about end of year statements. Our church sends out quarterly statements of what we've given, and when we were pledging, they included our pledge amount and how much we had left on our pledge to go. Do others do this?

 

The last 3 or 4 churches we've been regular attenders or members of have not done pledges. It's been so long since I belonged to a church that does do pledges, I've forgotten if we got more than an annual statement.

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You know, it occurs to me that I always see people talk about end of year statements. Our church sends out quarterly statements of what we've given, and when we were pledging, they included our pledge amount and how much we had left on our pledge to go. Do others do this?

 

When we were pledging for a building fund, we received semi annual statements.

 

I'll confess that it was this three year pledge (above and beyond regular giving) that has led me to avoid pledge forms in general. I understand thst churches want to budget. I just feel uncomfortable with the pledge without full knowledge of how those funds may be dispensed.

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No, in general our priest doesn't have this info, though I imagine he has a good idea who the larger donors are just by being a reasonably intelligent guy. In some cases of special donations or gifts he knows (for example a parishoner recently made a large donation in kind to building maintenance and there is no way to have done that without the priest being involved), and in some cases like capital campaigns where donations are public unless made anonymously.

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When we were pledging for a building fund, we received semi annual statements.

 

I'll confess that it was this three year pledge (above and beyond regular giving) that has led me to avoid pledge forms in general. I understand thst churches want to budget. I just feel uncomfortable with the pledge without full knowledge of how those funds may be dispensed.

 

 

Jane, I'm uncomfortable with any church that isn't accountable.

 

Dh makes the quarterly spending statements available to any member. No one gets to see what anyone else gave. But, they do get to see what came in the offerings, how it was dispensed - except for benevolence gifts and those are just labeled "benevolence" and then a total for the quarter so that no one need feel like their financial troubles were blabbed around the church - and how much is in savings, utilities' reserve for the winter months, etc. Then we have an annual business meeting at which anyone who attends the church, will receive a copy of the annual audit - done by an indepedent auditing/CPA firm - the annual budget reports, the proposed new budget, etc. and voice praises or concerns about how last year's finances were handled.

 

I wouldn't make a pledge to much of anything if I didn't feel confident about the financial accountability.

 

Faith

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We are PCA - a conservative, evangelical Presbyterian denomination.

 

The pastors have zero access to giving/financial information. The financial secretary (who is not a church member) handles all that - making deposits, maintaining records etc. We get quarterly and annual statements. Two deacons count the cash on Sunday, but they do not count the amount of the checks, only the number of them.

 

The pastors are involved with annual budgeting of course and do know about the details of the church's income and expenses. The senior pastor likely knows how much everyone else on staff makes. A small committee handles personnel issues.

 

When there is a capital campaign to raise funds for a new building, the pastors are likely in planning meetings with the team leading the fund raising effort and likely do know who the big givers are, but not how much they give.

 

The only time we have pledge cards is for a capital campaign. And there the pastor would only know how much total, how many pledges and perhaps the dollar amount of any unusually large gift.

 

In our church, the pastor is NOT supposed to be a manager. The Session, a group of elders elected by the congregation is the highest authority. The Deacons serve the church and the elders by handling primary responsibilty for "practical" matters such as budgeting, stewardship education, building and grounds, mercy ministry (including financial assistance to church members or others who ask for help) ministry to widows and orphans and many other hand-on things. The Elders, ruling elders elected from the congregation and teaching elders who are pastors are thus freed for the primary responsibilities of spiritual nurture, preaching and teaching the Word, leading worship and prayer. They oversee all areas, but (in theory!) don't micro-manage or get into details of things that the deacons, the womens' ministry or another group is handling.

 

Other than for a capital campaign or for mission teams, our church does not permit designated giving. No one can specify where money he gives is to be spent. We elect qualified leaders of good character and trust them.

Edited by ScoutTN
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We are PCA - a conservative, evangelical Presbyterian denomination.

 

The pastors have zero access to giving/financial information. The financial secretary (who is not a church member) handles all that - making deposits, maintaining records etc. We get quarterly and annual statements. Two deacons count the cash on Sunday, but they do not count the amount of the checks, only the number of them.

 

I would not assume that this is how all PCA's are run. The church that I went to (and DH/DS continue to attend) is PCA and is not run this way, or at least wasn't at the time my previous story took place.

Edited by contessa20
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We have been members of three types of Presbyterian Churches, and United Methodist. Currently we are members of a PC(USA) church but have been members of a PCA and Cumberland Presbyterian too. None of any of these churches (10 in all) have ever had the minister knowing who was giving what. It was always separately handled. Some did pledges, some did not. We gave the same amount whether we were pledged or not. (Not the same amount per year since we have increased as income went up but whether there was a pledge card or not didn't determine our giving).

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You know, it occurs to me that I always see people talk about end of year statements. Our church sends out quarterly statements of what we've given, and when we were pledging, they included our pledge amount and how much we had left on our pledge to go. Do others do this?

 

Only 1 church out of the 6 churches I've attended as an adult did pledges and that one was only for a new building. Our current church sends out the yearly statements only for tax purposes.

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Recent discussions with friends have raised some questions. I would love to hear from a variety of denomination members on policies.

 

Does your pastor/minister/priest/rabbi know how much you donate to your religious institution or is that information only known to a financial officer or financial team?

 

Is it common place for ministers within your denomination to know how much members of the church give? Why is the information important for a minister/pastor/priest/rabbi to have?

 

Does this policy raise ethical concerns within your religious institution?

 

Does your church or denomination have a history of sharing financial information with officials outside of the financial officer?

 

I remember that the church I attended in childhood published a booklet listing family contributions. :001_huh: Since then though I have been under the impression that financial information was known only to a financial team--not to church officials. Am I naive?

 

I give an offering each week and no one else knows how much I give but the pastor and the committee. The church budget is printed in the weekly bulletin but its an overall number not a broken down by member type.

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Without reading any other posts...

 

If my church ever gave out my information, I would throw the biggest hissy fit ever. We give monetary gifts to our church. Those may not amount to exactly 10%. However, dh and I both give much more of our time to our church. Dh is the head trustee. That means, despite his full time job, he gets called anytime anything in the church building is malfunctioning. He has to organize help for and/or fix anything that is broken in the church/preschool. Not only that, but he has to make sure any regularly scheduled maintanace gets done-carpet cleaning, painting, regular cleaning, etc.. I teach Sunday School, confirmation class, and I am on the Board of Education. In November I will be teaching an extra class to the high schoolers about technological sexual temptations, because no one else wants to teach that. If anyone ever complained about the money we donate, I would happily invite them to donate the time we do. Stewardship/discipleship is not only about monetary gifts. It is also about donating your time/talents.

 

ETA: We are LCMS Lutherans.

 

ETA2: No one but our church treasurer know the monetary amount we give. Unfortunatly, everyone knows the time we donate because we (dh and I) are constantly in front of the congregation asking for volunteers. If monetary information was ever released for anyone, I would leave on principle.

Edited by wendilouwho
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Honestly, I don't know the answer to all of your questions. I just remember once a few years ago our pastor standing up in the pulpit and saying something to the affect that he knew for a fact that there were many families who didn't tithe and others who were giving well below what they were able. There was another time that he implied that he (or the church leadership, I don't remember which specifically) knew what the congregation was doing online, as if they were somehow spying and keeping tabs on people. Both instances creeped me out. Personally, I don't think the pastor needs to know who is tithing and how much. There are other people to do that job and it should be completely confidential. Needless to say, I have chosen not to return to that church (or any other, at this point) even though DH and DS continue to attend (and tithe) there.

 

I think you could very likely know for a fact that there are many families not tithing by the overall amount collected and the number of givers. You can get an impression of income levels in the church from cars driven, sizes of houses, etc. IOW, I don't think you need specific individual numbers to "know for a fact" that many people aren't tithing.

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Does your pastor/minister/priest/rabbi know how much you donate to your religious institution or is that information only known to a financial officer or financial team? No, at our parish, our priest does not know how much each person/family gives. The treasurer is the only person who knows the amount.

 

Is it common place for ministers within your denomination to know how much members of the church give? Why is the information important for a minister/pastor/priest/rabbi to have? As part of the parish council, we do know as a total how much the donations are each week, month, etc. It is important for us to know so that we can plan our budget and make sure we have enough to cover our costs and can plan for future expenses. Now, we will usually have at least 2 people count the money for obvious reasons, but if cash is given, we don't know who gave it, and if it's a check I only look at the amount to list on the deposit slip, and not who wrote it. The treasurer also needs the info for tax purposes, so she can send out donation receipts at the end of the year. The priest is part of the parish council and is involved with the financial planning, etc., but again he doesn't know specifics of the donations (and he has said many times he doesn't want to know).

 

Does this policy raise ethical concerns within your religious institution? We try to be transparent about our finances in general so that there won't be any question of misappropriation, etc., but nothing is revealed about who gives what.

 

Does your church or denomination have a history of sharing financial information with officials outside of the financial officer? We share the information about total giving with our archdiocese, but again no specifics are revealed as to how much each person gives.

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I remember that the church I attended in childhood published a booklet listing family contributions. :001_huh: Since then though I have been under the impression that financial information was known only to a financial team--not to church officials. Am I naive?

 

My general church history is much like everyone else's, but I wanted to pull this out because I've served in various capacities in the nonprofit world, including some fundraising experience.

 

Here's my overall take: secular nonprofits often publish giving amounts pretty widely. Our local United Way has a special deluxe book that gets printed up of the big givers. If you give more you get in a special groups. Similarly our jumbo poverty relief agency also lists donors in various categories of amounts. They hold banquet fundraisers where you have to pay up front to get a spot at your table and if you want your table to be your business's table then you pay for all the spots at it plus extra to get your business listed.

 

Christian nonprofits are much less like this. Sometimes a big donor might get mentioned but usually it will be in terms of a challenge gift or the naming of something for a long term donor. Most recently, the nonprofit I served on the board of has decided to experiment with charging for their banquet. Before that people could come and get a free meal (and the nonprofit couldn't do a cheap meal because the only venue large enough had high costs and you had to get their food).

 

Does this mean the money given to the Christian nonprofits is reduced? I don't know. Since many businesses won't give to a nonprofit that has a religious component this is hard to gauge.

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Does your pastor/minister/priest/rabbi know how much you donate to your religious institution or is that information only known to a financial officer or financial team? No one knows how much we donate. We often give cash and the amount varies. Only infrequently do we give via check.

 

Is it common place for ministers within your denomination to know how much members of the church give? No.

 

Why is the information important for a minister/pastor/priest/rabbi to have? I have no idea why on earth a minister/pastor/priest/rabbi/ect. would need to know how much each member gives. I can't imagine why it is anyone associated with the church to know what each member gives.

 

Does this policy raise ethical concerns within your religious institution? Which policy?

 

Does your church or denomination have a history of sharing financial information with officials outside of the financial officer? I have no idea.

 

I remember that the church I attended in childhood published a booklet listing family contributions.

Personally I would find this practice very unsettling and quite rude to boot. Money is not a topic for polite conversation. Church is a place of worship not a one-upping sporting event.

 

Since then though I have been under the impression that financial information was known only to a financial team--not to church officials. Am I naive? Maybe. I wouldn't let anyone with any kind of official title within my parish know anything about my financial standing. AT ALL. It is none of their business.

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Does your pastor/minister/priest/rabbi know how much you donate to your religious institution or is that information only known to a financial officer or financial team? Only to the treasurer and I suppose the secretary who deposits the checks. Both are very trustworthy and discrete. My husband was an elder (we’re Presbyterian) and now is a deacon and I’m pretty sure he has no idea what people give. Or if he does, he hasn’t told me which would also be good.

 

Is it common place for ministers within your denomination to know how much members of the church give? Why is the information important for a minister/pastor/priest/rabbi to have? No

 

Does this policy raise ethical concerns within your religious institution?

 

Does your church or denomination have a history of sharing financial information with officials outside of the financial officer? No

 

I remember that the church I attended in childhood published a booklet listing family contributions. :001_huh: Since then though I have been under the impression that financial information was known only to a financial team--not to church officials. Am I naive?

No you are not naive. I would not attend a church that published givings.
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