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I also remember a teacher strike when I was in elementary school. I was only in 2nd grade so I don't think it negatively affected my overall education. But I have no idea how high schoolers got along. I remember we didn't go to school during the strike but some kids did. I think they had cafeteria staff "teaching" the kids. I don't know if my mom was in sympathy with the striking teachers. (We had no teachers among our family and friends.) I just remember her saying there was no point in us going to school if no one was teaching.

 

I hope they get this resolved soon.

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Never experienced a teacher strike and I don't think dh did either. I think it was because in dh's area, they automatically gave in to teacher's demands for salary and pension increases and healthcare increases and then NJ ended up with the highest property taxes and a huge financial debt. On the other hand, I lived in a RIght to Work state and no one ever struck anything- and that state is doing much better than NJ in finances. Over course, IL and specifically CHicago is in the true pits now along with CA and I don't see anyway they can give the teachers these increases.

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Wow...

 

http://www.cnn.com/2012/09/09/us/illinois-teachers-strike/index.html?hpt=hp_t1

 

Whatever your politics... where the heck does this leave the kids who are supposed to be receiving an education?!?

 

Well you know, they are doing this because they want the best for the kids. :glare:

 

I know teaching is a hard profession. But so is being an electrician (my dh) and any other job. My dh could die every time he puts his hands into an electrical panel. We are also union; my dh is the union rep. He came home after the talks to tell me the University wanted to offer a 2% raise each year for 5 years and leave the health/dental alone (we pay some of the premium, university picks up the rest and we have co-pays). We both felt, in this economy, this was a GREAT contract. He was happy and the shop accepted the contract.

 

What the teachers are asking for, when people are losing jobs and taking cuts, is insulting to everyone else out there in my opinion. And after the failed recall election in WI is not very smart. The climate towards unions is rapidly shifting.

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Well you know, they are doing this because they want the best for the kids. :glare:

 

I know teaching is a hard profession. But so is being an electrician (my dh) and any other job. My dh could die every time he puts his hands into an electrical panel. We are also union; my dh is the union rep. He came home after the talks to tell me the University wanted to offer a 2% raise each year for 5 years and leave the health/dental alone (we pay some of the premium, university picks up the rest and we have co-pays). We both felt, in this economy, this was a GREAT contract. He was happy and the shop accepted the contract.

 

What the teachers are asking for, when people are losing jobs and taking cuts, is insulting to everyone else out there in my opinion. And after the failed recall election in WI is not very smart. The climate towards unions is rapidly shifting.

 

:iagree: as the wife of a man in a dangerous profession in a right-to-work/fire-at-will state, I don't have much sympathy. Especially in this economy and given this quote:

 

"The average teacher will get a 16% raise over that (4-year) period" at a time when the city's fiscal situation is on edge, the school board president said of the offered deal.

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We had a teaching assistant strike when I was in college. All of my professors kept teaching, but my friends who had humanities type majors had classes cancelled by professors in solidarity. The striking TAs stood outside of all the doors and heckled any student who tried to go to the classes they were paying thousands of dollars for. :glare: It was pretty awful. It's not like the professors who were still teaching were going to not have exams or homework due just because you had to cross picket lines to get in. I had a couple TAs in my business classes that didn't strike, and if what was yelled at me is any indication, I can't imagine what got shouted at them as they were walking in the building.

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Teachers went on strike when I was in 8th grade. I went to stay with my grandma (out of town) and remember it rather fondly.

 

I can't blame the teachers for being a bit less than thrilled with the current educational policies, which seem so centered on tying pay with "performance" and the like. I am not always a fan of the teachers' unions, but I think it's nice to see one segment of the population not put up with anything, simply because they are supposed to feel lucky to get a job. I think the US is on a major downward spiral in terms of exploitation of workers and shockingly low pay. At least one group stands up for its members.

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The students in Chicago will suffer for this. Sad.

When I was in 6th grade the teachers went on strike. It was awful. You had a "teacher" who was put in place temporarily and taught with no real care because she knew it was a temp job. The teachers were all outside the school and you had to pass the line everyday. I was approached by one of my past teachers who yelled at me to stay home, even got in my face. Once the teachers came back , everything we did was thrown out and we had to start from the beginning but with extra speed to make sure everything got covered. It was one of the worst school years I can remember.

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It's REALLY hard on the juniors and seniors and especially those college bound taking A.C.T/SAT, AP's, and trying to get their recommendations for their college applications. It's difficult to pass an AP exam if you haven't had the whole year to cover the course material. A day or two won't matter, but given how broke Illinois is, this could go on for a long time. Two weeks would be awful; thirty days would be a disaster! There is ONE and ONE only exam date for each AP subject and those usually fall between May 4th and May 19th or in that range. So, the students do not have a full school year to cover the entire college textbook and study. With ds's computer science AB, we began the beginning of August and have kept a strict schedule. We will need to continue to do so if we want to make sure he has all of the java programming experience necessary to get at least a 4 on that exam. I have looked at the number of concepts and the amount of code that must be written in order to be well prepared for the exam. If Illinois takes a 30 day break, or God forbid, even longer, any kids in that course can kiss a decent test score goodbye.

 

We use the Campbell's Exploring Life text for AP biology. It has 36 chapters and it's serious material! At one chapter per week, the teachers need to have a full 36 weeks BEFORE the exam which is, if memory serves, May 8th or 9th this year. That's if labs and further exploration of the concept questions are delved into very mch at all. I would imagine that many classes don't do the labs and try to cover a chapter and a half per week. But, this is not a text in which one reads, answers a few questions per section, and then voila, it's all good! Biochemistry, interpretation of data, critical thinking about concepts, comparisons/contrasts, etc. -the study guide will have a few multiple choice questions, but most of it is more difficult than that. It's very similar to what I covered in college biology - minus genetics and biochemistry because those topics really weren't covered way back in the "dark ages" when I was in school :D - so I would imagine the tests are similar. I've never used the test-bank; I make my own exams - apparently my boys think I'm at bit too "Snape" :lol: - so I force a lot of writing and NO multiple choice.

 

The local school district didn't start back until after Labor Day and though they eliminated AP biology, I was able to pick the brain of the teacher that would have had that on her schedule. She would have spent three days going over the chapter assigning the study guide to be completed as homework to be ready for Thursday. They would have gone over their study guide in class and had time for questions, tips on studying, some vocabulary drill, etc. and had the test on Friday. They would get 20 -25 minutes to complete the chapter test and then she would have tried to have a lab experience (mostly demonstrative, but she did plan a few more in-depth, ongoing labs) for the rest of the afternoon Friday. The kids would be assigned to go through two chapters at Christmas break, one chapter at Thanksgiving break, and one chapter at Spring break, to be tested over on the first day back WITHOUT going over the material in class, in order to cover the entire book by exam day.

 

I can only imagine what would happen.

 

Then on top of that, there are September A.C.T's and if any of those schools are testing facilities and the teachers are proctors, my understanding is that it's entirely possible for the school to lock the teachers out until they agree to a contract which means the A.C.T. would be canceled. The A.C.T. board is very forgiving of this stuff and would likely allow the students to change dates to October in neighboring districts if those districts could accomodate the influx of kids. But, the collegeboard/SAT, NO WAY. I have found them to have zero mercy on students.

 

I feel for the high schoolers.

 

Faith

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a 2% raise each year for 5 years and leave the health/dental alone (we pay some of the premium, university picks up the rest and we have co-pays). We both felt, in this economy, this was a GREAT contract. He was happy and the shop accepted the contract.

 

What the teachers are asking for, when people are losing jobs and taking cuts, is insulting to everyone else out there in my opinion. And after the failed recall election in WI is not very smart. The climate towards unions is rapidly shifting.

 

:iagree: My dh has not had any sort of raise at all in 3 1/2 years, all while the price of everything has continually increased. But the teachers in our district still got their raise - on top of their annual step increase! That effectively makes a "lower" for our family.

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I just want to point out that the strike is not about the money...the main items they are objecting to is the evaluation of teaching based more than 50% on student achievement on a standardized test...when the majority of the students in their schools are on free or reduced lunch indicating that it is a very financially poor area. The other it appears is based on health insurance which as with everyone is going up and thus they are working longer hours and essentially getting paid less than when they were working shorter hours with better benefits.

 

http://news.yahoo.com/chicago-teachers-strike-talks-fail-030846765.html

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I just want to point out that the strike is not about the money...the main items they are objecting to is the evaluation of teaching based more than 50% on student achievement on a standardized test...when the majority of the students in their schools are on free or reduced lunch indicating that it is a very financially poor area. The other it appears is based on health insurance which as with everyone is going up and thus they are working longer hours and essentially getting paid less than when they were working shorter hours with better benefits.

 

http://news.yahoo.com/chicago-teachers-strike-talks-fail-030846765.html

 

They're also irritated about the policy concerning recall of laid off teachers(which everyone admits is not a strikeable issue.)

 

The teacher's union was a part of team that has designed the evaluation system. They have never had a system and this is all new for Chicago. The team who wrote it agreed that it can be dynamic and changes can be made after the initial "transition" year. Essentially this year won't count.

 

The hours increase is a JOKE imo. Chicago has the shortest day and the shortest school year in the country. 5 1/2 hrs and 170 days. The CPS is requiring adding 50 minutes to the day. They want to give more instruction and less time on the street for these kids to get into trouble.

 

And that is the worst part...shootings and gang activity will be through the roof during this time. The Chicago Police will have a hard enough time keeping peace at the school pickets and at the "alternative" schools(144 locations) that have been set up by local organizations, churches etc to help these kids and their families.

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I just want to point out that the strike is not about the money...the main items they are objecting to is the evaluation of teaching based more than 50% on student achievement on a standardized test...when the majority of the students in their schools are on free or reduced lunch indicating that it is a very financially poor area. The other it appears is based on health insurance which as with everyone is going up and thus they are working longer hours and essentially getting paid less than when they were working shorter hours with better benefits.

 

http://news.yahoo.com/chicago-teachers-strike-talks-fail-030846765.html

 

The stike is all about $. Initially there was talk of a 30% pay raise over 2-3 years. Now they are willing to accept a 4% raise over the next several years along with other changes.

 

Reducing class size is going to cost $ because that will call for more teachers, classrooms, resources, etc. CPS teachers work the shortest school day in the nation. Again, I am not saying the job is easy, but looking at the rest of the country I have a hard time feeling this is justified. Wish my dh got a 4% raise and worked a 5 1/2 day. Oh, don't forget retirement at 55 like my cousin who taught public school!

 

IL has a high % of reduced/free meals throughout the state. This is not just in Chicago. And the state is broke. How much more can be squeezed out of the working taxpayers?

Edited by jelbe5
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I just want to point out that the strike is not about the money...the main items they are objecting to is the evaluation of teaching based more than 50% on student achievement on a standardized test...when the majority of the students in their schools are on free or reduced lunch indicating that it is a very financially poor area. The other it appears is based on health insurance which as with everyone is going up and thus they are working longer hours and essentially getting paid less than when they were working shorter hours with better benefits.

 

http://news.yahoo.com/chicago-teachers-strike-talks-fail-030846765.html

 

I love the sign in the picture: "On strike for better schools." :glare:

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...I think it's nice to see one segment of the population not put up with anything, simply because they are supposed to feel lucky to get a job. I think the US is on a major downward spiral in terms of exploitation of workers and shockingly low pay. At least one group stands up for its members.

 

Hmm. I think I might agree with this. I have been finding it quite frightening lately that people are more and more willing to put up with horrible conditions just to keep their jobs. Because if you lose a job, it could be years before you find a new one, and you can easily lose your home and everything you've worked your entire life for.

 

If does seem that if someone wants a nicer job, they're perceived as "greedy" and they should just be happy that they're not starving in the street.

 

That's a dangerous place for a population to be in. We're becoming content with less and less, but not in a good way--in a way that leads to companies exploiting people.

 

But at the same time, where will IL come up with anything to give the teachers? You can't get blood from a stone.

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Just saw a photo of the striking teachers on the Drudge Report. Nasty-looking bunch. I wouldn't want any of them teaching my child.

 

Oh stop! :tongue_smilie:

 

Don't judge a book by its cover. And you know they took a bunch of pictures and found the most unflattering one to post.

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Hmm. I think I might agree with this. I have been finding it quite frightening lately that people are more and more willing to put up with horrible conditions just to keep their jobs. Because if you lose a job, it could be years before you find a new one, and you can easily lose your home and everything you've worked your entire life for.

 

 

 

I could get behind this if they were being forced to work in horrid conditions, but they aren't and their demands and complaints are insulting to a lot of people who work a lot harder for a lot less. I think more it reeks of entitlement and our economy cannot afford it.

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I could get behind this if they were being forced to work in horrid conditions, but they aren't and their demands and complaints are insulting to a lot of people who work a lot harder for a lot less. I think more it reeks of entitlement and our economy cannot afford it.

 

:iagree:

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:iagree: My dh has not had any sort of raise at all in 3 1/2 years, all while the price of everything has continually increased. But the teachers in our district still got their raise - on top of their annual step increase! That effectively makes a "lower" for our family.

 

I hear that. My dh is an airline pilot. Last year he made about $2,000 more than he made the year we were married (1995), and part of that year he flew as a first officer and not a captain. Meanwhile, everything around us has gone up, up, and up. Now, the company is wanting the crews to fly more days for no extra pay and pay more towards their health insurance. My husband's retirement is also at stake. Our own circumstances just make it hard to feel sympathy for these teachers.

 

I don't know the details of their contract. I do know that almost everyone who goes on strike will say that "it is not about the money," so I feel certain there are other issues involved. That said.... I do not envy them their jobs, so I do hope the receive a fair wage and working conditions. It is hard, though, to ask for raises, etc, when the very people footing the bill are taking pay cuts and seeing stagnation in their own pay.

 

:) Beachy

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They're also irritated about the policy concerning recall of laid off teachers(which everyone admits is not a strikeable issue.)

 

The teacher's union was a part of team that has designed the evaluation system. They have never had a system and this is all new for Chicago. The team who wrote it agreed that it can be dynamic and changes can be made after the initial "transition" year. Essentially this year won't count.

 

The hours increase is a JOKE imo. Chicago has the shortest day and the shortest school year in the country. 5 1/2 hrs and 170 days. The CPS is requiring adding 50 minutes to the day. They want to give more instruction and less time on the street for these kids to get into trouble.

 

And that is the worst part...shootings and gang activity will be through the roof during this time. The Chicago Police will have a hard enough time keeping peace at the school pickets and at the "alternative" schools(144 locations) that have been set up by local organizations, churches etc to help these kids and their families.

 

Wow, I thought Michigan was bad for only requiring 6 hrs. per day of instructional time and 180 days per year.

 

I think it's getting really hard on the people working 60-80 hrs. per week, years on end for no pay raises or bonuses to see any "meat" to the teachers' demands. Even if they grade work or do lesson prep at home, the reality is with a 5.5 hr. school day and only 170 days of school, and even if they have to take one or two three-day seminars in the summer to keep their licenses current, they still won't approach the work hours that many people are keeping. It's a bad job, I'll give them that, when you consider the cr*p they put up with! But a HUGE portion of our population is dealing with long hours and a lot of cr*p too. So, while I don't know enough to make any judgment calls for or against the teachers' in this fight, I don't think they are likely to find much support even if they turn out to have very serious, legitimate grievances.

 

It is the unfortunate reality of this economy. :tongue_smilie:

That said, I'm usually in the corner for teachers in our school district. It's a HORRIBLE, HORRIBLE, HORRIBLE place to work!!!!

 

Faith

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I don't have a huge opinion about this. But I do know many teachers, including teachers in CPS, and none of them work a 5.5 hour workday. That might be their "contact hours" but every single teacher I know works far far more than an 8 hour workday once prep, grading, mentoring, volunteering, and self-education are factored in. I have a close friend who is a teacher and she puts in 12 hours a day and spends most of her summer prepping and self-educating.

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DH and I have been discussing this as well. We actually have 4 very close friends who are teachers at different districts in our area. While we believe they do care about their students and do the best of their ability, we have noticed that the longer they teach, the more 'entitled' their attitude has become. I don't know anyone who doesn't have stress from work. All of my working friends vent about it at some point or another. I realize the education of our children is important. I don't think teachers have a cushy job. However, I have a hard time believing it's SO much harder than anyone else's. Each profession obviously has its unique challenges. One of our teacher friends has actually started comparing his pay recently to that of a doctor or lawyer. :001_huh: I'm sorry, but if that's the level of pay you wanted then that's the profession you should have entered.

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I don't have a huge opinion about this. But I do know many teachers, including teachers in CPS, and none of them work a 5.5 hour workday. That might be their "contact hours" but every single teacher I know works far far more than an 8 hour workday once prep, grading, mentoring, volunteering, and self-education are factored in. I have a close friend who is a teacher and she puts in 12 hours a day and spends most of her summer prepping and self-educating.

 

I understand that, however, the kids are only getting 5 1/2 hrs of instruction. These schools represent some of the poorest educated children in the country. They are worth 50 extra minutes of class time a day.

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I don't have a huge opinion about this. But I do know many teachers, including teachers in CPS, and none of them work a 5.5 hour workday. That might be their "contact hours" but every single teacher I know works far far more than an 8 hour workday once prep, grading, mentoring, volunteering, and self-education are factored in. I have a close friend who is a teacher and she puts in 12 hours a day and spends most of her summer prepping and self-educating.

 

:iagree: that there are many dedicated teachers who go above and beyond the call of duty. But I have seen plenty who put forth very little effort. Unfortunately the really good teachers often burn out and leave the profession.

 

Just editing to add I worked in Chicago schools and have many teacher friends. I have seen both good and bad.

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The military has been getting less than 2% raises these last four years (I am counting the one starting this October too). That is everyone, including those being shot at in Afghanistan and had been shot at in Iraq. Oh, and that wasn't for 5.5 hours for 170 days, either. Yes, I know they should plan and correct in the evenings. I know the good ones do and I also know the bad ones don't. So, compared to most workers anywhere, they have it really, really good. I know Chicago has dangerous areas but then so does Afghanistan.

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I understand that, however, the kids are only getting 5 1/2 hrs of instruction. These schools represent some of the poorest educated children in the country. They are worth 50 extra minutes of class time a day.

 

I totally get that and agree. I was just pointing it out because it had been implied earlier in the thread that they only work 5.5 hours a day. Which is not true.....in most cases.....there are slackers in every profession.

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I don't have a huge opinion about this. But I do know many teachers, including teachers in CPS, and none of them work a 5.5 hour workday. That might be their "contact hours" but every single teacher I know works far far more than an 8 hour workday once prep, grading, mentoring, volunteering, and self-education are factored in. I have a close friend who is a teacher and she puts in 12 hours a day and spends most of her summer prepping and self-educating.

 

 

True, but every professional does a certain amount of work for which s/he is not compensated. I know my dh revises the flight manuals the FAA and the company require him to carry. He does all his flight planning and pre-flight checks while not on the clock. He also does training -- both at home and away from home for which he does not get paid. He also has expenses that go along with the job. That is just part of being a professional. Teachers want us to see them as professionals (and I do), but they don't seem to want to have those less than plesant things that come with being a professional.

 

:) Beachy

 

ETA: I am not bashing teachers. I have great respect for them. I wish we could pay all of them (and police officers and firefighters, too, for that matter) top, top dollar for the work they do. However, if the money just isn't there, I don't see how we can. I also know that I have a hard time giving up even more money to give them a raise when we haven't had one in a really long time.

Edited by Just Beachy
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Does anyone actually object to the teachers' demands about performance based pay and such? I'm not familiar with the situation, so I'm truly just asking - it just seems everyone so far has objected to them striking because of the effect on the kids (which I completely understand) or because everyone else has it rough too, so teachers should just deal with what they get (which sentiment I disagree with) and not because of what they are asking for.

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True, but every professional does a certain amount of work for which s/he is not compensated. I know my dh revises the flight manuals the FAA and the company require him to carry. He does all his flight planning and pre-flight checks while not on the clock. He also does training -- both at home and away from home for which he does not get paid. He also has expenses that go along with the job. That is just part of being a professional. Teachers want us to see them as professionals (and I do), but they don't seem to want to have those less than plesant things that come with being a professional.

 

:) Beachy

 

:iagree: My husband is a "blue collar" hourly worker and he puts in many, many unpaid hours. He has to pay for his (very expensive) tools. He has to deal with dangerous conditions and irate customers. I understand that teaching is a thankless job in many instances, but it is NOT unique in that regard.

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True, but every professional does a certain amount of work for which s/he is not compensated. I know my dh revises the flight manuals the FAA and the company require him to carry. He does all his flight planning and pre-flight checks while not on the clock. He also does training -- both at home and away from home for which he does not get paid. He also has expenses that go along with the job. That is just part of being a professional. Teachers want us to see them as professionals (and I do), but they don't seem to want to have those less than plesant things that come with being a professional.

 

:) Beachy

 

I agree that most professionals work outside of the traditional 9-5. I was only refuting the implication that teachers are somehow less than "full-time" because they might only have 5.5 hours of "contact time." I believe they are on par with any other professional in the area of total hours worked. Now, if they are disputing that they should have to do this, then I agree completely that they should be treated like any other professional. I am only pointing out that 5.5 hours of contact time does not mean only 5.5 hours of "working."

 

To be clear, I am not defending the actions of these teachers, nor do I feel I even understand both sides well enough to even have a valid opinion. I was only addressing the single point of contact hours versus working hours.

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The military has been getting less than 2% raises these last four years (I am counting the one starting this October too). That is everyone, including those being shot at in Afghanistan and had been shot at in Iraq.

 

Wow. I had absolutely no idea. Here are the people who really deserve raises.

 

Thank you for your service and sacrifice.

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Just saw a photo of the striking teachers on the Drudge Report. Nasty-looking bunch. I wouldn't want any of them teaching my child.
I'm happy for you that you are perpetually pretty and pleasing, always calm no matter the circumstances, and never take a bad picture. Perhaps I should pack my kids off your school as I am not so lucky?
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What exactly happens with the kids? Do they get picked up regardless, or do the parents have to make other arrangements? Do the school buses take the kids to these alternatives, or do parents have to drive them themselves? I would imagine a lot of parents in Chicago wouldn't have a lot of flexibility in their schedules to work around this issue; I could see a lot of younger kids staying home.

 

I personally think that teacher's pay should be tied to performance, but not necessarily by standardized test scores.

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What exactly happens with the kids? Do they get picked up regardless, or do the parents have to make other arrangements? Do the school buses take the kids to these alternatives, or do parents have to drive them themselves? I would imagine a lot of parents in Chicago wouldn't have a lot of flexibility in their schedules to work around this issue; I could see a lot of younger kids staying home.

 

I personally think that teacher's pay should be tied to performance, but not necessarily by standardized test scores.

 

 

No transportation is provided. Parents have to work that out and it is only until 12:30.

 

The current plan is 60% standardized tests, 40% teacher designed work.

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What exactly happens with the kids? Do they get picked up regardless, or do the parents have to make other arrangements? Do the school buses take the kids to these alternatives, or do parents have to drive them themselves? I would imagine a lot of parents in Chicago wouldn't have a lot of flexibility in their schedules to work around this issue; I could see a lot of younger kids staying home.

 

I wonder about this too. What happens to the kids? I live in a right to work state without unions, so I always wonder how things work when a group strikes, but this even more so when kids are affected which in turn affects parents and their jobs.

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I personally think that teacher's pay should be tied to performance, but not necessarily by standardized test scores.
I prefer evaluation systems in which student progress is measured individually rather than in aggregate. Johnny might increase three grade levels in reading while in Ms. Smith's class but still be below grade level. Ms. Smith should not be penalized for this.
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Just saw a photo of the striking teachers on the Drudge Report. Nasty-looking bunch. I wouldn't want any of them teaching my child.

 

 

You are ok with teaching your own kids to judge people by their looks? How incredibly shallow of you.

Edited by Carrie75
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I prefer evaluation systems in which student progress is measured individually rather than in aggregate. Johnny might increase three grade levels in reading while in Ms. Smith's class but still be below grade level. Ms. Smith should not be penalized for this.

 

 

Exactly this! I know it takes time to look at portfolio reviews, but I've always felt that using standardized tests punishes those teachers who really help a child overcome some obstacles, but still isn't up to grade level for a variety of reasons. Then there are also kids who refuse to take the tests seriously, which is again, not the faculty's fault, and there are children who are excellent students but who never get over testing nerves, and score lower than they are capable of and all of that is not taken into account with the heavy emphasis on standardized tests and especially during the younger grades.

 

You'd think they could come up with a way to do portfolio reviews. Plus, that is where one can really see how a child shines. Johnny may struggle in math, but look at what an amazing artist he is....can we manage some extra time with the art teacher next year? or Susie is truly gifted on her clarinet even if her writing is very poor....let's find a way to remediate her writing, but get her some extra time with the band instructor...etc. Portfolio review allows a child to be a person and not some random number on paper.

 

Faith

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I hate these threads because there are always nasty comments about teachers in them.

 

My sister is on strike today. She is a CPS teacher, who teaches science and math, on the south side to be precise.

 

She didn't want to go on strike, it's not a vacation. She still has to go to school, plus she doesn't want this interruption to her classes. It sucks for the teachers, too. Both students and teachers will have to make up these missed days.

 

However, what they've been doing to CPS teachers is not right. They have already put up with a lot and didn't strike, but there comes a time when enough is enough.

 

We do not want to go back to a time where the working class "should just be thankful to have a job". We don't rebuild a strong economy by sticking it to public school teachers.

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