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Have you read "Wheat Belly"?


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If so, what did you think?

Have you made any changes to your ways of cooking and eating?

Has anyone without any celiac or diabetes in their immediate family dropped wheat? With what results?

How can kids who are not diagnosed with celiac go wheat-free in our culture?

 

 

Does einkorn produce all the same negative effects on the brain, immune and digestive systems?

 

We already try to eat low sugar/low carb and buy very few processed foods.

Wondering if we should try a month wheat free and see what happens....

 

Just thinking as I go here...

Love to know what you think, Hive.

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I am also in TN! :)

 

I did read wheat belly and we have no celiac, no food allergies, nothing medical to encourage us to try this.

 

I have been *mostly* off wheat, most grains, sugar, processed foods, etc. for 2 months and 1 week now.

 

I am down exactly 20 pounds as of today!!! :D

 

I have more energy since before children. Seriously.

 

I also have had decreased depression symptoms, more motivation, etc.

 

I have tried going no sugar (by itself) and did not have these results!

 

I will say that I think everyone's bodies deal with things like wheat and sugar differently...some of us can be addicted to these things and some people seem to do ok with it.

 

I wrote a blog post on more about what I am doing personally if you want to read it. And here are our typical meals.

 

HTH! Oh, we aren't being as strict with our kids...they still have PB&J for lunch. But, getting MORE real foods, less processed, etc. Baby steps with them I guess.

 

It.

Edited by CandaceC
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I read halfway through it so far. It hasn't really changed anything for us as we already eat only organic, heritage grains that we grind ourselves and it is a side dish, not a main part of our diet. My nephew who can't handle gluten can handle the Emmer just fine. There is such a drastic difference between modern wheat and old wheat that I don't feel the need to take the old grains out of our diet. The modern stuff is nasty though.

Edited by Dory
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I finished reading it last week. I have been gluten free since Sunday. We don't have celiac or diabetes in our family.

 

I've noticed that it's really lessened my hunger and cravings. I've been working on losing baby weight for a year now (and I've lost 27 lbs so far) and I think this is helping me lose more and lose it pretty easily.

 

I haven't tried to make my kids wheat free, though I would really like to. And my DH. Thus far, if there is wheat in dinner foods, I have a substitute for all of us or just for me, depending on what it is.

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I have read it and although we don't have celiac there is definitely a sensitivity with wheat. I wrote a book review about it here. I can't be too strict with the kids because dh is not wheat free (nor does he want to be:)) but I do try to feed them grain free whenever I can. Even now they complain of stomach aches when they eat something with wheat. I think it definitely would be worth trying wheat free for a month- many people are pleasantly surprised with the results!

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If so, what did you think?

Have you made any changes to your ways of cooking and eating?

Has anyone without any celiac or diabetes in their immediate family dropped wheat? With what results?

How can kids who are not diagnosed with celiac go wheat-free in our culture?

We dropped wheat as a family. My DH has a family history of diabetes, and it was initially motivated out of his desire for weight loss to help avoid this. But I think it was good for all of us. My belly is definitely flatter when I stick with it well - it's always been a little poochy, and is flatter now (well, when I'm sticking with it better. Maybe not now this minute :p), after 3 kids, than be

fore I had kids at all. I'm at a normal weight, and maintain easily as long as I don't cheat. My moods are more stable. My skin is better. I don't get sick - I occasionally feel like maybe I'm coming down with something, but I always feel better by the next morning. And that's with working in healthcare, where I'm exposed to stuff all the time. Before, I didn't get all that sick, but I'd get a bad cold that stuck around for weeks a few times a season.

 

DD1 especially is much more in control emotionally when her sugar, wheat, and dairy are limited.

 

The kids aren't 100% wheat free. Since they don't have any known health issues, we don't restrict what they eat outside the house. At home, they eat what's available, and it just isn't an issue. I still make them wheat-free treats and stuff. DS is very aware of how food makes him feel, and self-regulates pretty well - he chooses not to eat food with wheat unless it's something he really really enjoys.

 

It would definitely be harder if we didn't homeschool.

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I haven't read the book, so I an not sure what the author's premise is. However, I am also in the wheat-free camp.

 

Wheat causes me digestive issues, and seems to "ramp up" my appetite. I feel so much better without it. I am also dairy-free, but that is an actual allergy. I am on again, off again with the no wheat thing, but I think I am committed now.

 

As far as I know, we have no biological family members who are diabetic (or any in the past.) My mom has the same issues I do with wheat. My 11yo has been tested twice for celiac (both negative), but he also has some level of intolerance, too.

 

ETA: I don't use any substitutes here for wheat. It really isn't necessary. If I have cereal, I make sure it is wheat and dairy-free. I do use soy milk (though my mother swears by almond milk.) I am better off without baked goods, bread, tortillas, etc. I can still eat corn chips and tortillas, but the rest would just be extra calories.:D

Edited by Renee in FL
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I've read parts of "Wheat Belly".

 

My dd and I went gluten free for about 6 months in 2010/11 while we were trying to straighten out some of her allergy issues. I lost 30lbs and felt SO much better. More energy, better moods, etc. Then, I let it creep back in. Dh was very ill for a while, and it just wasn't worth it to maintain (or so I thought) We went back to eating bread and pasta, etc. I gained ALL the weight back. My energy level dropped. My moods were all over the place.

 

I have decided to cut it all back out again. I've been off of it for almost 2 weeks. I already feel better. My mind is clearer. Crampy/bloatedness is decreasing. I've lost about 2lbs.

 

I wish I could get the rest of the family to go along with it, but I cannot.

Edited by Apryl H
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I haven't read the book, and probably don't intend to. I just have to wonder about all those countries/cultures that have breads and pastas as a mainstay of their diets and don't have the health concerns we have. We eat only organic grains and most of them whole grains. I try to eat lower carb because of my hypoglycemia issues. I am sure we could eat cleaner, but I don't want to become a food nihilist again. I found that it harmed my relationships with others who didn't feel that way.

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Went wheat/gluten/dairy/soy free for about 8 months a few years ago after some major medical issues. (Yeah. I ate A LOT of vegetables.) I was not what people would have called "overweight" by any means, but within 6 weeks I had lost 17 pounds and felt better than I had in YEARS. I didn't realize how bloated I was, until...well, I wasn't.

 

I have not read this book, and since this time even when I have personally experienced dramatic results from changing my eating, I struggle daily. (DAILY) with eating choices.

 

Our youngest DS is wheat sensitive. He lost 7 pounds and wasn't puffy after 4 weeks wheat free.

 

But I agree with what a previous poster wrote - it may not work for everyone. Healthy choices don't look the same for every person or every family.

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I haven't read the book, and probably don't intend to. I just have to wonder about all those countries/cultures that have breads and pastas as a mainstay of their diets and don't have the health concerns we have. We eat only organic grains and most of them whole grains. I try to eat lower carb because of my hypoglycemia issues. I am sure we could eat cleaner, but I don't want to become a food nihilist again. I found that it harmed my relationships with others who didn't feel that way.

 

I read somewhere one time that Italy has very high rates of celiac. In stuck in my head because I wondered what they would eat!:tongue_smilie:

 

Other than that, what cultures are wheat heavy in their traditional diet?

 

As I said before, I think wheat is bad for me, but I don't think it is bad for everyone.

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I read somewhere one time that Italy has very high rates of celiac. In stuck in my head because I wondered what they would eat!:tongue_smilie:

 

Other than that, what cultures are wheat heavy in their traditional diet?

 

Germany. We eat LOTS of bread; two bread based meals each day, breakfast and dinner. Traditionally, most was made from rye (which, btw, contains gluten as well) because wheat was harder to grow. Wheat was the luxury grain for Sundays and rich people - but that is no longer the case, now wheat is everywhere, too.

Czech cuisine is heavy on wheat, too; lots of bread, and the traditional starch accompanying meals are (wheat flour) dumplings.

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I read somewhere one time that Italy has very high rates of celiac. In stuck in my head because I wondered what they would eat!:tongue_smilie:

 

Other than that, what cultures are wheat heavy in their traditional diet?

 

As I said before, I think wheat is bad for me, but I don't think it is bad for everyone.

 

Only 1% of Italian children have celiac, according to celiac.com.

 

Every European country we've ever been to is wheat heavy. Bread is a staple in Germany, France, Switzerland, Austria, Poland, and loads of others. They frequently eat just bread and cheese for dinner. We do this a lot too. If we're going out for the day and plan a picnic, we just stop by the store and pick up a loaf of bread (OMG, what bread!), cheese, crackers, grapes and maybe a bit of meat. This is a common thing here.

I know I'm a carb addict, but except for the occasional bowl of Apple Jacks (my secret shame!), it's almost always whole wheat when we're at home. I applaud those who can give it up, but I don't think I could.

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Wheat is different in Europe than it is in North America. Over here wheat has been hybridized to contain far more gluten (I've heeard 20 times more gluten but you would have to confirm that number).

 

I went off gluten when I was nursing because my baby was having some digestive problems and I became suspicious of the gluten in my milk. I would have NEVER done it otherwise. Long story short, my afternoon fatige went away, my moods became more sunny, the fog in my head went away. These were all things that I never knew that I had but once they were gone I was amazed. I did try gluten again from time to time but the crappy feeling and extreme fatigue that it produced in me (which would last about 5 days) made it not worth it.

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I also gave up gluten a few months ago, in an attempt to get rid of my eczema, which for the first time in my life WORKED and all but one area completely cleared up, flaring up with my two test moments: pizza, and donuts.

 

But then we did some more food testing and it turns out that I'm having an allergic response to yeast, but likely not to gluten. Some more testing and yes, I feel terrible after eating yeasty/moldy things (including baker's yeast but also wine, hard cider, coffee, mushrooms...). I'm still mostly gluten free because I feel SO much better eating fewer carbs, but have found that I can cheat a little 1-2/week and feel ok.

 

Like others, having I get bloated when I have gluten and get tired, I started losing weight (much needed) and most surprising to me, is that I feel fully satisfied with my meals. Sadly, whenever I "cheat" I end up not being satisfied with that morsel of goodness and crave more more more for days afterward. I feel more anxious, too.

 

Good luck if you do try it! Just think of it as a one month thing, not something potentially forever. You can make decisions about that as you get more information about how you and your family respond to it.

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Wheat is different in Europe than it is in North America. Over here wheat has been hybridized to contain far more gluten (I've heeard 20 times more gluten but you would have to confirm that number).

 

I'm confused, if people know that the problem has more to do with the north american modern, hybridized wheat, and less to do with wheat in general, why aren't people simply going back to the original grains instead of pulling wheat completely out of their diet?

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Only 1% of Italian children have celiac, according to celiac.com.

 

Every European country we've ever been to is wheat heavy. Bread is a staple in Germany, France, Switzerland, Austria, Poland, and loads of others. They frequently eat just bread and cheese for dinner. We do this a lot too. If we're going out for the day and plan a picnic, we just stop by the store and pick up a loaf of bread (OMG, what bread!), cheese, crackers, grapes and maybe a bit of meat. This is a common thing here.

I know I'm a carb addict, but except for the occasional bowl of Apple Jacks (my secret shame!), it's almost always whole wheat when we're at home. I applaud those who can give it up, but I don't think I could.

 

That's very interesting! Do they get their wheat from here, or is it grown in Europe? Just curious. Like I said further upthread, I haven't read the book, but the topic is now interesting to me.

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I read the book. I was way more alarmed by the genetic modification issues that just the gluten. Modern wheat isn't really wheat... it doesn't even have the same number of chromosomes.

 

I know that wheat was greatly stimulating my appetite. I would crave more and more wheat, I couldn't stop eating. I know wheat doesn't affect everyone like this. but I really don't care about others... I am a science project of 1.

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Wheat is different in Europe than it is in North America. Over here wheat has been hybridized to contain far more gluten (I've heeard 20 times more gluten but you would have to confirm that number).

 

I took a class on gluten free living taught by a nutritionist a few years ago. She said that she has non-celiac patients with gluten intolerance who can eat wheat in Europe. She said US farmers are paid by the protein content of their wheat. That leads to wheat with higher gluten. She said wheat in Europe is more similar to how wheat has always been.

 

I know that wheat was greatly stimulating my appetite. I would crave more and more wheat, I couldn't stop eating. I know wheat doesn't affect everyone like this. but I really don't care about others... I am a science project of 1.

 

This is what I noticed. I also share your feeling about being most concerned about my own personal experience.

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I read the book. I was way more alarmed by the genetic modification issues that just the gluten. Modern wheat isn't really wheat... it doesn't even have the same number of chromosomes.

 

I know that wheat was greatly stimulating my appetite. I would crave more and more wheat, I couldn't stop eating. I know wheat doesn't affect everyone like this. but I really don't care about others... I am a science project of 1.

 

:iagree:

 

I don't know how long it's going to take my body to heal..if ever.

 

If I eat any gluten my stomach blows up. I didn't realize how bloated I was until I went LCHF. I was really, really, bloated. And it's ANY gluten. A *bite* of bread, one small gnocchi, and I can feel my abdomen start to blow up.

Edited by justamouse
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:iagree:

 

I don't know how long it's going to take my body to heal..if ever.

 

If I eat any gluten my stomach blows up. I didn't realize how bloated I was until I went LCHF. I was really, really, bloated. And it's ANY gluten. A *bite* of bread, one small gnocchi, and I can feel my abdomen start to blow up.

 

Isn't that weird? I just smell bread and bloat.

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If I eat any gluten my stomach blows up. I didn't realize how bloated I was until I went LCHF. I was really, really, bloated. And it's ANY gluten. A *bite* of bread, one small gnocchi, and I can feel my abdomen start to blow up.

 

Do you find that any other grains do that to you? I find that oats do that to me.

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I watched an interview with the Wheat Belly author just today and decided to try going gluten free for a month because I am ALWAYS tired. In this video, he discusses why wheat farmers don't make the switch back to the old-fashioned wheat.

 

Here's the link.

 

It doesn't have to yield less per acre. Done properly, the guy I get my Emmer and Red Fife from gets as much per acre as any of the farmers around me do with their wheat. I think that it's simply easier to farm with the GM wheat. So the easy out is just to tell people that you can't yield as much with the non GM crops. My FIL is at least honest about it. He says it's just not worth the extra effort to him.

Edited by Dory
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I watched an interview with the Wheat Belly author just today and decided to try going gluten free for a month because I am ALWAYS tired. In this video, he discusses why wheat farmers don't make the switch back to the old-fashioned wheat.

 

Here's the link.

 

That is amazing. And he totally explains carb addiction. It's an opiate in this new 'wheat'.

 

I was talking to a friend (a IRL friend) on fb about his paleo experience, and he said he was able to go off ALL his asthma meds, and he's a cop that runs every day. He said he's now able to run and not once have tightness in his chest. HE started paleo to lose weight, his added benefit was healing his asthma. Which makes sense because asthma is chronic inflammation. The Dr in the vid said that arthritis sufferers were able to drop their meds--another chronic inflammation--and an immune response.

Edited by justamouse
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I haven't read Wheat Belly, but I've read a few other anti-gluten/anti-grain books and websites. We decided at the beginning of the year to give up gluten to see if it helped with the myriad health issues my family has. We gave up wheat for 6-7 weeks. I saw no difference in anyone, and I was really looking! I'm glad I can eat wheat, but I was really hoping that I had found *something* that would help my kids. I didn't even lose weight. :glare: Wait, I thought of one thing that probably was a coincidence looking at my perimenopausal history: shortly after going GF I had a 5 week long period from h#ll that I'm still anemic from. :glare:

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I haven't read Wheat Belly, but I've read a few other anti-gluten/anti-grain books and websites. We decided at the beginning of the year to give up gluten to see if it helped with the myriad health issues my family has. We gave up wheat for 6-7 weeks. I saw no difference in anyone, and I was really looking! I'm glad I can eat wheat, but I was really hoping that I had found *something* that would help my kids. I didn't even lose weight. :glare: Wait, I thought of one thing that probably was a coincidence looking at my perimenopausal history:

 

:blink: yikes!

 

When you first went back on wheat did anyone experience "digestive issues"? IYKWIM ;)

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This explains why it isn't as prevalent in other places in the world.

"Davis said that the wheat we eat these days isn't the wheat your grandma had: "It's an 18-inch tall plant created by genetic research in the '60s and '70s," he said on "CBS This Morning." "This thing has many new features nobody told you about, such as there's a new protein in this thing called gliadin. It's not gluten. I'm not addressing people with gluten sensitivities and celiac disease. I'm talking about everybody else because everybody else is susceptible to the gliadin protein that is an opiate. This thing binds into the opiate receptors in your brain and in most people stimulates appetite, such that we consume 440 more calories per day, 365 days per year."

 

Asked if the farming industry could change back to the grain it formerly produced, Davis said it could, but it would not be economically feasible because it yields less per acre. However, Davis said a movement has begun with people turning away from wheat - and dropping substantial weight.

 

"If three people lost eight pounds, big deal," he said. "But we're seeing hundreds of thousands of people losing 30, 80, 150 pounds. Diabetics become no longer diabetic; people with arthritis having dramatic relief. People losing leg swelling, acid reflux, irritable bowel syndrome, depression, and on and on every day."

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I'm confused, if people know that the problem has more to do with the north american modern, hybridized wheat, and less to do with wheat in general, why aren't people simply going back to the original grains instead of pulling wheat completely out of their diet?

 

I don't know if my issue is with the current wheat supply or wheat in general, but it's a lot easier for me to just stop using bread than to find an alternate grain source (and then have to bake all my own products). I don't think wheat has very much nutritional value, and I've mostly replaced it with vegetables (which have undoubted nutritional value) and healthy fats.

 

Once I got used to not using bread it actually is pretty easy. The only places I really miss it are pizza, donuts, and convenience if I forget to bring a snack (it's hard to find wheat-free snacks at a lot of places). The first two I'm clearly better off without, and convenience store snacks aren't likely to be made of heritage wheat anytime soon.

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I don't know if my issue is with the current wheat supply or wheat in general, but it's a lot easier for me to just stop using bread than to find an alternate grain source (and then have to bake all my own products). I don't think wheat has very much nutritional value, and I've mostly replaced it with vegetables (which have undoubted nutritional value) and healthy fats.

 

Once I got used to not using bread it actually is pretty easy. The only places I really miss it are pizza, donuts, and convenience if I forget to bring a snack (it's hard to find wheat-free snacks at a lot of places). The first two I'm clearly better off without, and convenience store snacks aren't likely to be made of heritage wheat anytime soon.

 

I can see where you're coming from. If finding alternative wheat was a problem for me, or if my life was just too full to be trying to do my own baking, I would take wheat out of my diet as well. I guess I'm lucky in many ways. If you're interested here's a short article that mentions some of the nutrition in the ancient grains. I wish I could find the article I was thinking of, but this works I suppose.

 

https://apps.facebook.com/wpsocialreader/me/channels/read/content/xw5m4?utm_source=redirect&utm_medium=headline&utm_campaign=gen_redirect&denyRedirect=http%3A%2F%2Fwpsocialreader.washingtonpost.com%2Ffbwapolabs%2Fme%2Fredirect%2Fwww.washingtonpost.com%2Fnational%2Fhealth-science%2Fancient-grains-can-help-prevent-cancer-heart-disease-and-high-blood-pressure%2F2012%2F08%2F10%2F5a1d9438-b631-11e1-9e4c-5a6a137d65e1_story.html%3Fsocialreader_check%3D0%26denied%3D1

 

btw, I seriously need to learn how to link things better. :tongue_smilie:

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I think the problems is multifaceted.

  • Many of us have too much wheat altogether (wheat based breakfast cereal or baked goods for breakfast, sandwiches for lunch and pasta for dinner isn't uncommon); and
  • The wheat isn't often wholemeal, so most of the nutrition has been removed in processing; and
  • The wheat is a sub-optimum hybrid designed for convenience and profit rather than nutrition; and
  • Wheat products are often too highly processed, with lots of added sugar, salt, transfats, etc; and
  • Too much wheat crowds out better food choices such as fresh vegetables.

 

I have no intention of removing wheat from our diet. I tend to work on the principle that a moderate improvement that we can sustain is preferable to a radical improvement that we'll never keep up. But what we do try to do is

  • Only eat one, or occasionally two, wheat based meals in a day;
  • Use wholemeal flour or pasta most of the time;
  • Enjoy other grains regularly;
  • Avoid store bought cookies or other over processed stuff most of the time (eg there are only two commercial breakfast cereals that we eat).

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I have no intention of removing wheat from our diet. I tend to work on the principle that a moderate improvement that we can sustain is preferable to a radical improvement that we'll never keep up. But what we do try to do is

  • Only eat one, or occasionally two, wheat based meals in a day;
  • Use wholemeal flour or pasta most of the time;
  • Enjoy other grains regularly;
  • Avoid store bought cookies or other over processed stuff most of the time (eg there are only two commercial breakfast cereals that we eat).

 

See, I had done that already. And I still had to cut it out completely. An immune response is an immune response, and everyone has a different threshold, And I made everything from scratch, all of my bread, deserts, everything.

Edited by justamouse
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I have no intention of removing wheat from our diet. I tend to work on the principle that a moderate improvement that we can sustain is preferable to a radical improvement that we'll never keep up. But what we do try to do is

  • Only eat one, or occasionally two, wheat based meals in a day;
  • Use wholemeal flour or pasta most of the time;
  • Enjoy other grains regularly;
  • Avoid store bought cookies or other over processed stuff most of the time (eg there are only two commercial breakfast cereals that we eat).

 

If it works for your family, that is great. I spent years grinding my own wheat and making whole wheat bread. I found that a slice of whole wheat bread, slathered with nut butter and a side of fruit left me needing to eat more food almost immediately. Calorie-wise, it should have been satisfying. For some reason, it seemed like any time I ate wheat, it left me even hungrier. :confused: The same for whole wheat muffins and cookies. Now I make almond meal pumpkin bars, and they leave me full until lunch time when eaten with a side of fruit. I really think wheat gives me the munchies.

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:blink: yikes!

 

When you first went back on wheat did anyone experience "digestive issues"? IYKWIM ;)

 

None. We truly seemed no different on than off, digestively, immune system wise, weight wise, everything -- even at the beginning of each transition (going off and then back on to gluten).

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See, I had done that already. And I still had to cut it out completely. An immune response is an immune response, and everyone has a different threshold

 

Yes, absolutely. I wasn't implying that drastic dietary changes are bad or unnecessary, just that smaller tweaks work for us. It has been a while since I read the book, but I had the impression that the author advocated ditching wheat for everybody.

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We just read the first part of Wheat Belly (thank you Kindle for the sample), but my hubby has not had more than 5 bites of anything wheat/gluten in the last 6 weeks and except for not drinking pop, hasn't changed anything else in his diet and has dropped 35 pounds. It has literally just melted away.

 

I haven't been nearly as good because of multiple trips out of town/visiting family etc., but the first two weeks I dropped 10lbs. and have managed to keep it off for the last 6 weeks as well. Now that we have made the rounds of family trips I am back on the no-wheat wagon!

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None. We truly seemed no different on than off, digestively, immune system wise, weight wise, everything -- even at the beginning of each transition (going off and then back on to gluten).

 

I guess that is a good sign that gluten is not an issue for your family. Someone was telling me yesterday that when her kids went off and then back on it, one was fine and the other developed explosive issues. :ohmy:

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We just read the first part of Wheat Belly (thank you Kindle for the sample), but my hubby has not had more than 5 bites of anything wheat/gluten in the last 6 weeks and except for not drinking pop, hasn't changed anything else in his diet and has dropped 35 pounds. It has literally just melted away.

 

I haven't been nearly as good because of multiple trips out of town/visiting family etc., but the first two weeks I dropped 10lbs. and have managed to keep it off for the last 6 weeks as well. Now that we have made the rounds of family trips I am back on the no-wheat wagon!

 

Wow! That is amazing! I would love to just see 35 pounds melt off. :tongue_smilie:

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We just read the first part of Wheat Belly (thank you Kindle for the sample), but my hubby has not had more than 5 bites of anything wheat/gluten in the last 6 weeks and except for not drinking pop, hasn't changed anything else in his diet and has dropped 35 pounds. It has literally just melted away.

 

I haven't been nearly as good because of multiple trips out of town/visiting family etc., but the first two weeks I dropped 10lbs. and have managed to keep it off for the last 6 weeks as well. Now that we have made the rounds of family trips I am back on the no-wheat wagon!

 

Whenever I cut pop I drop weight fairly quick too though.

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