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Good luck New Orleans, the police will be no help again


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According to the policeman my father talked to in regards to the coming hurricane, the police have no plan of action. "When the s*** hits we will see then what to do." When will the NO police get it together? Just makes me mad. All the things the police did during and after Hurricane Katrina...yes, there were a few who stepped up to the plate and behaved with honor...the rest, no words can truly describe them, And now with Issac on it's way, if it hits the city will be the wild west all over again :cursing:

 

 

I am so glad we are no longer near there, but my family is. Much praying will be going on over the next few days.

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Why?!

 

I'd have thought that after cyclone Katrina there would be comprehensive plans in place :confused:

Typical New Orleans...lots of plans and talk and money but nothing happening.

 

Bet people think all the donated money and federal aid actually got to the people too. My dad is still waiting for his money after they lost all his paperwork 6 times.

He jogs the levee and said there are sections 5-8 feet lower then other areas...literal drops in the wall.:confused: They were suppose to have fixed that, but guess they figured those areas were less likely to get water then the others.

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Ok, you guys are getting second hand information here...lol There are no LAST MINUTE shelter's available. It's too dangerous and last time they did that, it didn't go well. They are giving people plenty of time to get out and ways to do that. They have secured thousands of buses and are moving people out (UNLIKE last time). They still don't know what this thing is doing...very unpredictable. Only supposed to make landfall at a category 1 storm. 90 MPH winds. The levee's can hold that. The last time everything went bad (Katrina...I was here for that too), it was the levee's that did the damage, NOT the storm. NOLA was fine after the storm..damage, yes...but it was when the levee's gave way that ppl died.

 

(coming from somebody that is doing her own packing and getting ready for the hurricane in the area and is getting first hand experience)

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Ok, you guys are getting second hand information here...lol There are no LAST MINUTE shelter's available. It's too dangerous and last time they did that, it didn't go well. They are giving people plenty of time to get out and ways to do that. They have secured thousands of buses and are moving people out (UNLIKE last time). They still don't know what this thing is doing...very unpredictable. Only supposed to make landfall at a category 1 storm. 90 MPH winds. The levee's can hold that. The last time everything went bad (Katrina...I was here for that too), it was the levee's that did the damage, NOT the storm. NOLA was fine after the storm..damage, yes...but it was when the levee's gave way that ppl died.

 

(coming from somebody that is doing her own packing and getting ready for the hurricane in the area and is getting first hand experience)

 

That is good to know. Where are they taking the people who are being bussed? There are so many people in NOLA who really never got back on their feet yet from Katrina. I'm sure they don't have funds for hotels.

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There are shelters everywhere just outside of new orleans..pointing that out too. They will not use the Dome and the convention center as shelters is all...and I wouldn't either after what happened last time.

 

We simulposted. :) Good to know!

 

No surprise the news isn't reporting all of this. :glare:

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There are LARGE shelter's set up in Alexandria that's set up for a large amount of people. That's about 3.5 hours away. They will bus there and in Shreveport too. There are numerous school shelters opening up by the minute in all communities surrounding New Orleans. There are thousands and thousands of national guard activated and mobilized. Red cross is ready to roll. I was in the heart of new orleans yesterday and everybody is fine and not panicked..just doing what they have to do. Yes, there are people that are not back on their feet, but we are strong down here...despite what the national news systems make us out to be.

 

I'm not evacuating. I'm not in a flood zone. If things should change, I will be ready to roll at a moment's notice.

 

The only MANDATORY evacuations that I have heard are south of the inter coastal area's...prone to flooding with a bad thunderstorm. People down here just don't evacuate for a Category 1 storm..no need unless you are in a mobile home, tent, camper or unsafe structure. If there is a mandatory evac, they don't want shelter's open in that mandatory evac area because it's not safe...they want all people out.

 

 

And yes, I'm sure there is lots of kitten killing going on in this post but I don't much care right now.

Edited by cajunrose
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Ok, you guys are getting second hand information here...lol There are no LAST MINUTE shelter's available. It's too dangerous and last time they did that, it didn't go well. They are giving people plenty of time to get out and ways to do that. They have secured thousands of buses and are moving people out (UNLIKE last time). They still don't know what this thing is doing...very unpredictable. Only supposed to make landfall at a category 1 storm. 90 MPH winds. The levee's can hold that. The last time everything went bad (Katrina...I was here for that too), it was the levee's that did the damage, NOT the storm. NOLA was fine after the storm..damage, yes...but it was when the levee's gave way that ppl died.

 

(coming from somebody that is doing her own packing and getting ready for the hurricane in the area and is getting first hand experience)

Might be second hand info, but after calling the a police department in New Orleans to find what kind of plan was in place (for my father and grandmother) I was put on hold and then passed around to finally be disconnected. Whether it hits or not, a plan SHOULD be in place. Right now no one has a clue what the actual plan of action if this thing hits.

 

Providing a shelter or not, the levees are not 100% yet and a repeat is inevitable should they get a fierce storm hitting NO. Knowing the city will not be totally evacuated...like last time, the police need to have an action plan. I lived 43 years in or around the city and not once has the evacuation of the city ever gone off without a problem, even when they provided shelters, that I can remember. If you are getting first hand experience you need to be forewarned, the city has no clue.

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Ok, you guys are getting second hand information here...lol There are no LAST MINUTE shelter's available. It's too dangerous and last time they did that, it didn't go well. They are giving people plenty of time to get out and ways to do that. They have secured thousands of buses and are moving people out (UNLIKE last time). They still don't know what this thing is doing...very unpredictable. Only supposed to make landfall at a category 1 storm. 90 MPH winds. The levee's can hold that. The last time everything went bad (Katrina...I was here for that too), it was the levee's that did the damage, NOT the storm. NOLA was fine after the storm..damage, yes...but it was when the levee's gave way that ppl died.

 

(coming from somebody that is doing her own packing and getting ready for the hurricane in the area and is getting first hand experience)

 

thank you for the information. I am glad to hear there will be buses for transportation. I have lived in the path of several evacuations, I am not in a flood area but the highway comes by us. The traffic jams are horrendous (spelling?). People around the country say things like 'just leave' but they don't really understand what that means in real life. :tongue_smilie:

 

Be careful and stay safe.

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Might be second hand info, but after calling the a police department in New Orleans to find what kind of plan was in place (for my father and grandmother) I was put on hold and then passed around to finally be disconnected. Whether it hits or not, a plan SHOULD be in place. Right now no one has a clue what the actual plan of action if this thing hits.

 

Providing a shelter or not, the levees are not 100% yet and a repeat is inevitable should they get a fierce storm hitting NO. Knowing the city will not be totally evacuated...like last time, the police need to have an action plan. I lived 43 years in or around the city and not once has the evacuation of the city ever gone off without a problem, even when they provided shelters, that I can remember. If you are getting first hand experience you need to be forewarned, the city has no clue.

 

I can't remember the number they are giving to get information...211 or 311 or something like that. Maybe try that? Look up the governor's press conference from yesterday too..he's pretty on the ball. I'm sure there'll be another one today. Yesterday, the cone was still on Mississippi so he was going by that information. Facts changed today and information changed today. Still no mandatory evacuation issued for NOLA or surrounding area's. If your father and grandmother need medical shelter, there is one open at the PMAC in Baton Rouge....

 

The levee's that busted last time have been shored up...there are hundreds of backup generators in the area just specifically for keeping pump stations running.

 

Here is a synopsis of yesterday's press conference...some of the information is dated though due to the new 'cone'.

http://www.katc.com/news/recap-governor-jindal-s-4-00-press-conference/

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Not to mention, the police are there for protection and order...it's the OEP that would be in charge of more specific storm things. I would never think to call the police to see what they are doing for my family. The OEP or maybe the Dept of homeland security has been telling everybody from June 1st to 'get a game plan'. If your family hasn't done that, it's not their fault.

 

http://www.getagameplan.org/

 

We have heard that on commercials on TV, radio, and billboards all season long.

Edited by cajunrose
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What cajunrose said. No one leaves for a Cat 1 or 2. Leaving is just too much of a hassle. My sister couldn't find gas in NO yesterday. Her boyfriend had to drive 2 hours to bring her enough gas to get out of NO if necessary. It's hard to find gas in Baton Rouge according to friends there. Still, everyone in south LA knows how to deal with this. Katrina was a freak disaster. My mom lived in NO during a few hurricanes that were much stronger than Katrina and was fine. I lived in an area that took a direct hit from hurricane Andrew. No biggie. I trust Mitch Landrieu. It's the Army Corps of Engineers that keeps me up at night.

 

Oh, for all the Tulane football fans out there (yes I laughed while typing that), the football team is being evacuated. Everyone else is staying.

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I'm sorry, I guess I'm just sick of the "What's the government doing for me?" attitude. Sometimes, you just have to be responsible for you and yours and not wait for the government to do for you.

 

If you have the funds and/or the ability. Not everyone can do it for themselves, that's when the government should take care of those who simply cannot.

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<snip> I lived 43 years in or around the city and not once has the evacuation of the city ever gone off without a problem, even when they provided shelters, that I can remember.<snip>

 

No mass evacuation of any major city has ever "gone off without a problem," EVER.

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We lived IN the direct hit area of Andrew..Patterson, LA (ended up being a Cat 5) and we were ok. It was ROUGH ROUGH don't get me wrong and I have PTSD from it, but we made it through it.

 

I waited 30 minutes for gas yesterday...ugh. NO spam, water, twinkies or beer left to be bought... priorities...lol :001_rolleyes:

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If you have the funds and/or the ability. Not everyone can do it for themselves, that's when the government should take care of those who simply cannot.

 

 

They are going to help the people that need to be helped...read the press conference....more will be done today. I, for one, will not sit around and wait...and yes, funds are tight for me too.

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What cajunrose said. No one leaves for a Cat 1 or 2. Leaving is just too much of a hassle. My sister couldn't find gas in NO yesterday. Her boyfriend had to drive 2 hours to bring her enough gas to get out of NO if necessary. It's hard to find gas in Baton Rouge according to friends there. Still, everyone in south LA knows how to deal with this. Katrina was a freak disaster. My mom lived in NO during a few hurricanes that were much stronger than Katrina and was fine. I lived in an area that took a direct hit from hurricane Andrew. No biggie. I trust Mitch Landrieu. It's the Army Corps of Engineers that keeps me up at night.

 

Oh, for all the Tulane football fans out there (yes I laughed while typing that), the football team is being evacuated. Everyone else is staying.

 

Ummm...Hurricane Andrew was a biggie. I don't know where *you* were, but I have relatives that lost it all. Not trying to be a smart-alec, but that was quite shocking to read.

 

I also have good friends that lost it all in Katrina and still haven't been able to return to NOLA. They had to start over elsewhere. On their way out, they gave rides to people who, to this DAY, still have not ever found their relatives.

 

If you have the means to take care of yourself that is AWESOME! It is something that I agree that we should all strive for and if we can do it, we should because there will ALWAYS be those who are NOT able to do so. Sometimes people are lazy bums. Sometimes, LIFE happens.

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Ummm...Hurricane Andrew was a biggie. I don't know where *you* were, but I have relatives that lost it all. Not trying to be a smart-alec, but that was quite shocking to read.

 

I also have good friends that lost it all in Katrina and still haven't been able to return to NOLA. They had to start over elsewhere. On their way out, they gave rides to people who, to this DAY, still have not ever found their relatives.

 

If you have the means to take care of yourself that is AWESOME! It is something that I agree that we should all strive for and if we can do it, we should because there will ALWAYS be those who are NOT able to do so. Sometimes people are lazy bums. Sometimes, LIFE happens.

 

 

I lost everything in Andrew. :( Like I said..it was rough and this stuff right here throws me into panic attacks. I was 13 and had to stand in line for food, water and soap. No power for 6 weeks, no water for 4. It was bad bad. We were in a mandatory evac area...but could not evacuate..long story that was absolutely nobody's fault, we just couldn't get out. I want to vomit when I think about that night and the next 6 month's after. I hope my daughter never has to experience anything like that in her life.

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Oh gosh! My post came across as harsh. Not my intention at all. Pardon my terrible case of foot-in-mouthitis. It was bad. No electricity for a week. Drinking water we stored in the bath tub. Housing family members who couldn't get to their homes due to flooding. My "no biggie" comment was meant to indicate that the people of south LA pulled together helped out one another. That's just what they do. My family housed Katrina victims for weeks. People they had never met. I meant that the character of the people in south LA is such that they will deal with whatever comes and move on. News people tend to sensationalize hurricanes. Fear sells. I'm also not belittling the real fear and trauma many experience when hurricanes head their way. I was just trying (without success) to point out that most of the people I know just go about preparing, waiting out the storm, and calmly pick up the pieces after. It's just a thing they do.

 

Seriously, I meant no offense and I'm sorry my poorly chosen words hurt someone. Mea culpa.

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I'm sorry, I guess I'm just sick of the "What's the government doing for me?" attitude. Sometimes, you just have to be responsible for you and yours and not wait for the government to do for you.

WHere did the "What's the Government doing for me" attitude take place?

Do you not think a city should protect it's citizens?

 

A city should provide protection for it's residents. A city like New Orleans who has gone through this numerous times over the last century and wiill go through it again and again SHOULD be able to evacuate a city without massive problems since they have done it over and over.(you have a problem one year then that problem should be fixed for the next year) People too poor to be able to "be responsible for themselves" in a situation like this should what...hunker down? Those are the people I met after Katrina who had the flood waters rip the child from their arms and swept them away. Those are the people who could not find a way to the busses or shelters and were in water up to their necks. These are the same people on food stamps or fixed income who are at the end of the month and have no money for the extra expense of buying food for the laughable 3 days the city tells you to have. Those are the people the city has forgotten in the past and will in the future. The city's plan (and I use this word lightly) cannot account for the high number of people listed above. Shame on those people to expect a city's government to help them out.

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Oh gosh! My post came across as harsh. Not my intention at all. Pardon my terrible case of foot-in-mouthitis. It was bad. No electricity for a week. Drinking water we stored in the bath tub. Housing family members who couldn't get to their homes due to flooding. My "no biggie" comment was meant to indicate that the people of south LA pulled together helped out one another. That's just what they do. My family housed Katrina victims for weeks. People they had never met. I meant that the character of the people in south LA is such that they will deal with whatever comes and move on. News people tend to sensationalize hurricanes. Fear sells. I'm also not belittling the real fear and trauma many experience when hurricanes head their way. I was just trying (without success) to point out that most of the people I know just go about preparing, waiting out the storm, and calmly pick up the pieces after. It's just a thing they do.

 

Seriously, I meant no offense and I'm sorry my poorly chosen words hurt someone. Mea culpa.

 

We are good Wendi. My family was hit hard by Andrew in FL. Different locale.

 

I agree that fear sells...it is completely irresponsible what TWC and the national news does.

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The major problem with media sensationalizing is that they make a big deal out out of a storm and it ends up being a minor inconvenience. Then a dangerous storm comes through and people blow it off as hype like last time. That's when lives are lost. Have we learned nothing from the boy who cried wolf?

 

We are prepared for the storm. We had a run of the mill thunderstorm pass through 2 weeks ago, and on my street alone, a house caught fire because of lightening and a huge tree came down on my neighbor's 3 cars and another on a truck and boat. It was crazy! You just never know and always need to be prepared.

Edited by Ruby Sue
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You have to remember that hurricane Katrina had a different governor and mayor...a VERY incompetent one at that. Her and the Mayor of NOLA didn't allow preemptive help...flat out turned down help from the president until they were forced to. There were THOUSANDS of buses ready but they didn't use them. The governor now is very very competent and is on the ball. He has been on this from day one. go to http://www.katc.com to see the press conference for LA that he's doing right now.

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Listening to the press conference now. The Jindal (governor) says "No mandatory evacuations in New Orleans at this time. If you feel unsafe and need help, call x number, we ARE prepared to help you and get you and your family evacuated to shelters. Please do it now and not wait until tomorrow."

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Anyone interested in first hand news and live press conferences with Mayor Mitch Landrieu and Governor Bobby Jindal can tune in to WWL radio (870am). I am listening now via an iphone app, but you can also use your computer internet connection if you are in an area beyond radio reception.

 

It helps to know the geography of the area but if you don't, grab a map and consider it a geography lesson. The National Hurricane Center website is a great resource for technical storm data.

 

If you saw my Lakeview home before Katrina, and again today, you just might not even realize you were in the same place. Katrina brought permanent change.

 

However, Katrina hit as a Category 4/5. Isaac should be much slower. But I am old enough to remember storms that just stopped and parked. Isaac could do that. The forward motion is slowing; how much it slows determines the amount of damage. Jindal is on the radio now saying the forecasters are saying this track is harder to predict than some others. The biggest problem for New Orleans/coastal Louisiana is rain. If the storm parks and dumps....Frances, anyone? That wasn't NOLA, but I went through that storm and it rained what seemed like forty days and forty nights.

 

One thing I will add to the "responsibility of the government" debate - the innate stubbornness of native New Orleanians is a variable that will throw off the equation every time. There are many shelters available and transportation available today that was not available during Katrina. You can build it, but that doesn't guarantee folks will come...

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Anyone interested in first hand news and live press conferences with Mayor Mitch Landrieu and Governor Bobby Jindal can tune in to WWL radio (870am). I am listening now via an iphone app, but you can also use your computer internet connection if you are in an area beyond radio reception.

 

It helps to know the geography of the area but if you don't, grab a map and consider it a geography lesson. The National Hurricane Center website is a great resource for technical storm data.

 

If you saw my Lakeview home before Katrina, and again today, you just might not even realize you were in the same place. Katrina brought permanent change.

 

However, Katrina hit as a Category 4/5. Isaac should be much slower. But I am old enough to remember storms that just stopped and parked. Isaac could do that. The forward motion is slowing; how much it slows determines the amount of damage. Jindal is on the radio now saying the forecasters are saying this track is harder to predict than some others. The biggest problem for New Orleans/coastal Louisiana is rain. If the storm parks and dumps....Frances, anyone? That wasn't NOLA, but I went through that storm and it rained what seemed like forty days and forty nights.

 

One thing I will add to the "responsibility of the government" debate - the innate stubbornness of native New Orleanians is a variable that will throw off the equation every time. There are many shelters available and transportation available today that was not available during Katrina. You can build it, but that doesn't guarantee folks will come...

 

I'm worried about it stalling out too. We are boarding up and going to be "15 minute ready" tonight. I have seen them stall out and build up to a STRONG storm right on top of us.

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Cajunrose, if you haven't already boarded up, I would probably recommend against it. I have never known wind to blow out windows in a hurricane. Yes, the wind can blow "stuff" through windows, which is why the yard should be picked up. But I have never known a window to blow out by wind itself.

We stopped boarding and taping a long time ago. Even with Katrina putting three feet of water in our home we had no broken windows in our house or in any of the houses on our street.

This is a very minimal storm. We will probably leave tomorrow because we are in a waterfront neighborhood on the Northshore which will likely experience street flooding.

I checked out your blog, and not sure where you are in the area, but seeing your pics of Global makes me think you are somewhat near. Would love for you to join the St. Tammany homeschool group if you are not already a member :001_smile:

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Can anyone tell me how the communities on the north shore of Lake Pontchartrain are generally affected during storms like this, specifically Covington?

 

My aunt and uncle and many other extended family members lost everything in Katrina, and have relocated to the north side of the lake. At the time they lived not far from downtown NOLA right off the intercoastal waterway.

 

I have been trying cell phones last night and today, but have been unable to reach them. I am assuming they evacuated, but I really don't know. I worry so much for them, not only because my uncle works on the Rigs out in the Gulf, and is often not able to get home to help, but also because they have put literally everything they had left to rebuild a beautiful safe home. It was years of staying with family, renting apartments, and otherwise bouncing around the region.

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Covington should be fine for this storm as it is north of the interstate. Covington is not under any evacuation orders that I am aware of at the moment, and I don't anticipate there will be any orders issued for Covington. The only problem I could see for Covington residents would be loss of power at some point and the possiblity of tornado activity. I know the media likes to blow up these storms and make them sound awful. And the timing for this one is painfully stressful for those of us that went through Katrina. But this one really isn't a bad storm.

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Might be second hand info, but after calling the a police department in New Orleans to find what kind of plan was in place (for my father and grandmother) I was put on hold and then passed around to finally be disconnected. Whether it hits or not, a plan SHOULD be in place. Right now no one has a clue what the actual plan of action if this thing hits.

 

Providing a shelter or not, the levees are not 100% yet and a repeat is inevitable should they get a fierce storm hitting NO. Knowing the city will not be totally evacuated...like last time, the police need to have an action plan. I lived 43 years in or around the city and not once has the evacuation of the city ever gone off without a problem, even when they provided shelters, that I can remember. If you are getting first hand experience you need to be forewarned, the city has no clue.

 

:confused:

 

They are called natural *disasters*. I don't mean to be or sound snarky; I really don't.

 

But I don't find your visceral reaction to half information to be accurate.

 

I feel this way about disasters (natural, like this) and man-made (like 9-11):

 

There is only so much any group of people, any organization, any institution can *do*. There is only so much individuals can *do*. You can't plan power and control into a situation that is inherently and by nature chaotic.

 

NOLA is a known risk for hurricanes, both for weather pattern reasons and for man-made reasons. People want to keep returning to their lives there, but that choice comes with consequences. Those consequences are that natural disasters exacerbated by human influence periodically threaten their safety and possessions.

 

There is no way to plan "enough" to make NOLA residents secure and safe from the synergistic effects that cascade after a STORM hits.

 

Finally, and gently, I don't think that responding to your phone call (and millions like it) should be one of the priorities of the officials who have some responsibility to mitigate the danger.

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Cajunrose, if you haven't already boarded up, I would probably recommend against it. I have never known wind to blow out windows in a hurricane. Yes, the wind can blow "stuff" through windows, which is why the yard should be picked up. But I have never known a window to blow out by wind itself.

We stopped boarding and taping a long time ago. Even with Katrina putting three feet of water in our home we had no broken windows in our house or in any of the houses on our street.

This is a very minimal storm. We will probably leave tomorrow because we are in a waterfront neighborhood on the Northshore which will likely experience street flooding.

I checked out your blog, and not sure where you are in the area, but seeing your pics of Global makes me think you are somewhat near. Would love for you to join the St. Tammany homeschool group if you are not already a member :001_smile:

 

We actually *have* lost windows from random things flying through the air...not the wind itself. The only reason we did it this time is that we are selling our home and have old window panes. If one breaks, we will have to replace them all and don't want that expense. LOL If it weren't for that, we wouldn't have boarded up. We have helped all of our neighbors clean up around the homes (their *stuff* could hit my home just as easily as theirs) and get ready. My husband went to buy extra wine for us...we are good to go! LOL I still look for it to go more west...giving my hometown a direct hit (I'll pm you where we are way2blessed).

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:confused:

 

They are called natural *disasters*. I don't mean to be or sound snarky; I really don't.

 

But I don't find your visceral reaction to half information to be accurate.

 

I feel this way about disasters (natural, like this) and man-made (like 9-11):

 

There is only so much any group of people, any organization, any institution can *do*. There is only so much individuals can *do*. You can't plan power and control into a situation that is inherently and by nature chaotic.

 

NOLA is a known risk for hurricanes, both for weather pattern reasons and for man-made reasons. People want to keep returning to their lives there, but that choice comes with consequences. Those consequences are that natural disasters exacerbated by human influence periodically threaten their safety and possessions.

 

There is no way to plan "enough" to make NOLA residents secure and safe from the synergistic effects that cascade after a STORM hits.

 

Finally, and gently, I don't think that responding to your phone call (and millions like it) should be one of the priorities of the officials who have some responsibility to mitigate the danger.

 

Thank you thank you THANK YOU!!!! Everybody is doing everything they can. The government IS helping those that can't help themselves, but they need to pick up the phone and ask for help, or ask a neighbor to call. They can't wait until after the fact and expect immediate help. As far as gas, they have been telling us for 2 days to fill up. It's pretty well known down here that if there is a storm pointed anywhere near you, the first thing you do is fill up. There are numbers to call so that the gas stations can get emergency deliveries too. I haven't heard of shortages yet..just lines.

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Can anyone tell me how the communities on the north shore of Lake Pontchartrain are generally affected during storms like this, specifically Covington?

 

My aunt and uncle and many other extended family members lost everything in Katrina, and have relocated to the north side of the lake. At the time they lived not far from downtown NOLA right off the intercoastal waterway.

 

I have been trying cell phones last night and today, but have been unable to reach them. I am assuming they evacuated, but I really don't know. I worry so much for them, not only because my uncle works on the Rigs out in the Gulf, and is often not able to get home to help, but also because they have put literally everything they had left to rebuild a beautiful safe home. It was years of staying with family, renting apartments, and otherwise bouncing around the region.

 

My aunts and cousin live in Ponchatoula, they aren't evacuating.... my Nanny was working on her sewer pipes today, LOL!

 

They aren't worried...

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Ok, you guys are getting second hand information here...lol There are no LAST MINUTE shelter's available. It's too dangerous and last time they did that, it didn't go well. They are giving people plenty of time to get out and ways to do that. They have secured thousands of buses and are moving people out (UNLIKE last time). They still don't know what this thing is doing...very unpredictable. Only supposed to make landfall at a category 1 storm. 90 MPH winds. The levee's can hold that. The last time everything went bad (Katrina...I was here for that too), it was the levee's that did the damage, NOT the storm. NOLA was fine after the storm..damage, yes...but it was when the levee's gave way that ppl died.

 

(coming from somebody that is doing her own packing and getting ready for the hurricane in the area and is getting first hand experience)

 

It frustrates me when people outside our area are getting second hand info from news sources. It's a fairly weak storm. We've been dealing with them long enough...you pack up and go when they say. They are helping people out. I think last minute shelters are a bad idea. They did learn from last time. Pack 'em out early and no last minute shelters. Those who choose to stay behind are pretty much on their own as they should be. It's their choice.

 

I hope you have a safe trip out!

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