Jump to content

Menu

What homeschooling nuances have you found?


bethben
 Share

Recommended Posts

So, because you homeschool, what have you noticed that your kids don't naturally pick up? For me, it's the whole reading an analog clock. They CAN do it, but not quickly because most of the clocks in the house are digital (microwave, radio, etc.). At public school, they would be looking at the clock all the time to know when recess, lunch, or the end of school was. This year, I am taping all the digital times out and buying an analog clock for my kitchen. If they want to know the time, they will have to figure it out!

 

 

Beth

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The national anthem! :blushing: I'm in Australia but we are American and moved here about three years ago. The national anthem is one of those things they would probably learn in school. We recently had an Olympic-themed week at our swim lessons (a swim school) and they all received medals and then sang the national anthem together. I was so proud of my son for attempting to sing along (by listening intently to what his swim instructor was singing), even though he'd probably never heard it before! It's one of those things I wasn't planning to cover until we do Australian history.

 

I guess it isn't that he isn't naturally picking it up, it's just something we haven't covered and would be very obvious if anyone asked. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yep, the patriotic stuff:

Pledge of Allegiance

National Anthem

 

Calendar skills to the degree that I had them - I think it evens out by middle school but my elementary school kids lack a bit of savvy with the calendar and the clock to a degree.

 

Packing up - I could pack up all my stuff in 2 seconds. My kids struggle with the concept of not strewing their books all over. There is no huge "stress" of leaving a book at school and not having it for homework.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It wasn't until we were at a library story-time that I realized my young girls had no concept of raising their hand to speak. They just kept blurting answers out. Granted- this took them all of 5 minutes to figure out and then they were fine. But it was one of those things that made me laugh.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with the patriotic stuff. My kids know the national anthem, but not the Pledge of Allegiance. I've tried to teach them, but they think the idea of pledging allegiance to a flag is hilariously funny. I have assured them that public school kids do it everyday, but they just look at me like this :001_huh:.

 

My kids have really struggled with the concept of grade level. They have a hard time remembering what grade they are in (by public school standards) and tend to announce that they are homeschooled when people ask for their grade level. I've starting making a big poster with their new grade level at the start of each school year and then posting it on their bedroom door for the first few weeks of school. This has helped a lot. They are doing better about answering with their correct grade level when people ask. I just don't need to have the homeschooling conversation with every.single.stranger at the grocery store. Come on, kids! The little old lady just wants to know how old you are! She doesn't need to know that we homeschool.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yep, the patriotic stuff:

Pledge of Allegiance

National Anthem

 

Calendar skills to the degree that I had them - I think it evens out by middle school but my elementary school kids lack a bit of savvy with the calendar and the clock to a degree.

 

Packing up - I could pack up all my stuff in 2 seconds. My kids struggle with the concept of not strewing their books all over. There is no huge "stress" of leaving a book at school and not having it for homework.

 

:iagree: Packing up and patriotic stuff are not our strengths. Plus, I have issues with the Pledge, so while I've told it to them, it hasn't been "learned".

 

 

I agree with the patriotic stuff. My kids know the national anthem, but not the Pledge of Allegiance. I've tried to teach them, but they think the idea of pledging allegiance to a flag is hilariously funny. I have assured them that public school kids do it everyday, but they just look at me like this :001_huh:.

 

My kids have really struggled with the concept of grade level. They have a hard time remembering what grade they are in (by public school standards) and tend to announce that they are homeschooled when people ask for their grade level. I've starting making a big poster with their new grade level at the start of each school year and then posting it on their bedroom door for the first few weeks of school. This has helped a lot. They are doing better about answering with their correct grade level when people ask. I just don't need to have the homeschooling conversation with every.single.stranger at the grocery store. Come on, kids! The little old lady just wants to know how old you are! She doesn't need to know that we homeschool.

 

We always struggled with the grade thing too, until we heard a homeschooled friend answer someone with "I'm homeschooled, and we don't do grades, but if you are curious, I am eleven." I loved that response, and have taught it to me kids (adjusted for age, naturally).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The national anthem! :blushing: I'm in Australia but we are American and moved here about three years ago. The national anthem is one of those things they would probably learn in school. We recently had an Olympic-themed week at our swim lessons (a swim school) and they all received medals and then sang the national anthem together. I was so proud of my son for attempting to sing along (by listening intently to what his swim instructor was singing), even though he'd probably never heard it before! It's one of those things I wasn't planning to cover until we do Australian history.

 

I guess it isn't that he isn't naturally picking it up, it's just something we haven't covered and would be very obvious if anyone asked. :)

 

We have the reverse situation! I'm Australian and the kids have dual citizenship (we live in the USA). I decided they should know both sides of their heritage. Last year on Australia Day we did a fun unit study - we learned the Anthem (thanks to You Tube for the musical accompaniment!), played with money, did maps, mini-lapbooks including famous landmarks and indigenous animals. It wasn't a comprehensive study by any means, but it made me feel a little happier about incorporating some of my childhood history/educational experiences into their lives. Maybe a July 4th study could be a fun diversion for you, especially since it falls in the dead of winter, LOL! Might be fun for them to learn about July 4th summer celebrations! ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Working as a team on a task. I want ds to be able to do this (he's not even in team sports, but individual sports only), and I think when he gets into Boy Scouts this should be able to happen.

 

Speaking out of turn used to be a problem. Less so, but it still happens. Sitting at the table for a long time. He gets to sit at the table, but only for writing, math, penmanship, etc. He gets to read on the couch, bed, or whatever other times. He cries if he has to sit at the table too long :glare: Mind you, this child is almost 9 years old.

 

In addition, he wants to drink and eat all.the.time. A glass of water next to him all day. Snacks right after breakfast, lunch. Sigh.

 

When I tell him all the kids at school have to sit at a table for hours with no snacks, he bellows that they must all the worst life ever and that that's a nightmare, etc. Flare for drama, I guess :001_huh: :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think I ever was told to "pack up" when I was in school, so I'm sure I didn't teach my dc to do that. :D

 

However, I did notice that homeschooled kids in general were like this :blink: when they did a large group field trip and were told by the docent to line up by grade level. "Line up"??? By "grade level"??? The first time that happened with one of my support group field trips, we practiced lining up by grade level at our next park day. :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As silly as this sounds, learning our address and phone numbers. I realized when the oldest was about to start gr2 that we had never covered it. :blushing: We're not hover parents by any means, but we were always around so they never really *needed* to know it.

 

I've decided to wait until we get to Am. History to cover patriotic stuff. We do discuss it from time to time, but we haven't gone over the pledge or learned any patriotic songs.

 

As for raising one's hand to speak or lining up, the one year we participated in a co-op seemed to teach them that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not thinking to write his name on things. Address and phone number, and birth date, because he never has occasion to need to write them down. Dates in general - same thing. This year, I am training him to write his first and last name and the date on all of his work. Also, when he does worksheets with a test practice portion, he is not good at filling in bubbles. He also does not understand "show your work" on math problems. I have to explain to him that in school, if you just write the answer with no work, you are suspected of copying or getting the answer from someone else. He thinks if he can work out the answer in his head, why should he have to do extra writing ? (He is dysgraphic and fights every stroke of the pencil.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We had a hilarious experience at a co-op class when the teacher asked the kids to stand or sit in a circle. It was hilarious watching her try to mold 15 homeschool Pre-k to 1st graders into a acceptable circle formation.

 

Also lining up, the first several times that happened in sports or co-op situations they were so confused.

 

And being asked to sit "criss cross applesauce"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Since we're studying US history this year, DD has learned the Pledge of Allegiance, and has at least heard the national anthem, though she doesn't know the words. :o Of course, I didn't learn the words until I was in high school and I went to public school, so I'm not too worried about it. Other things: reading an analog clock, tying one's shoes (she's gotten better, but still asks me to do it on occasion), playing dodgeball and other organized playground games (even on park days with other kids, they don't play things like Red Rover anymore), and having class discussions with anyone other than an adult.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Clocks and Calendars :iagree: I have analog clocks in all the main rooms of the house now, and a large calendar visible from the kitchen table with all the kids' activities jotted down on it.

 

 

 

Assignments and lessons are non-negotiable.:001_huh::glare:

 

 

I blame the slacking in address/phone numbers on the fact that we've moved every year since we started HSing. If *I* have a hard time remembering those important facts, how much can I expect a young child to remember them!?!:tongue_smilie: It's funny to look back at FLL1 pages from the past b/c each of my dc have practiced different addresses for those same assignments. (The 3 of them are within a 3.5years age difference!) sigh! I think we'll stay put here, so no more excuses, eh....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just had the same idea about our clocks earlier this week. I'm so tired of them running to the kitchen every time I ask for the time. :lol: Granted, our living room clock has Roman numerals, so we need to work on those too. ;)

 

We've been practicing phone numbers an addresses on the way to lessons, practices, coops, etc for the past year. That way if it does come up, it's fresh in their minds.

 

I've also been told my DS doesn't sit down for Sunday school. He stands at the table. I don't get that because he usually sits down at home...maybe he likes a more comfy chair? :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The first time someone tried to get my kids to stand in a line, we had 2 problems - one, they didn't even know what a line WAS (the standing kind), and two, she was asking them to "Queue up!" :lol:

 

They were looking around confused . . . knowing they were supposed to be doing SOMETHING, but unable to pinpoint exactly WHAT she wanted them to do.

 

Several years later, it still makes me chuckle.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They are not in the practice of putting their names on paper nor do they know the date as well as a public schooled child might (I don't always know the date, either :confused:)

 

I sort of like looking over a "What Your Child Should Know By Age..." list because there is often something I've neglected that I do want them to know (like our national anthem).

 

Despite my negligence, they are all doing well. :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Answering to a bell :)

 

My DH is a school principal of a small school and I sometimes take the kids to play with everyone at recess on the playground.

 

The first time the bell went for everyone to come back inside every child dropped what they were doing and ran for the classrooms - my kids didn't even look up :lol: Eventually DD looked up all suprised and asked"Where did everyone go?" and I said - "Didn't you hear the bell -that means it was time to finish playing and go back inside. "Oh" she replied and went back to playing :D

 

My kids also have trouble with the line up, hand up, wait your turn to speak -but they are getting better.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I realized a couple years ago that my youngest won't eat much for lunch unless it's a hot lunch. It's hard to come up with things he likes that I can pack if we're eating somewhere else, because he got so used to me cooking lunch at home.

 

Oh my this is us too!!! My Odd is going to 1 day a week enrichment classes that go from 9-2 (and therefore needs to bring a lunch) and we have settled on yogurt and fruit as her lunch. She has definitely been spoiled by hot lunches at home.

Edited by flamommy2mygirls
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was just talking about this with a friend the other day. My dd went to a private school through 4th grade so she learned all these things. My ds has not. We will be working on it this year.

 

Yep, the patriotic stuff:

Pledge of Allegiance

National Anthem

 

:iagree:

 

In addition, he wants to drink and eat all.the.time. A glass of water next to him all day. Snacks right after breakfast, lunch. Sigh.

 

When I tell him all the kids at school have to sit at a table for hours with no snacks, he bellows that they must all the worst life ever and that that's a nightmare, etc. Flare for drama, I guess :001_huh: :D

 

Yes, this is ds too. Right down to the drama. :lol:

 

As silly as this sounds, learning our address and phone numbers.

 

He has the phone number down, but not address. In fact there is still some confusion about what a city/town is.

 

Not thinking to write his name on things.

 

Yep. Ds will be writing his name and date on every paper this year. I had to get dd back in the habit of doing this. I had let it slide for a couple of years. It wasn't until the end of 8th when I was putting her portfolio together for our annual review that I discovered how much of an issue it could be with no dates on the paper. I was carrying a box of her paper (in folder even) to another room to work on the portfolio when I dropped the box. Paper everywhere!!! We spent hours getting all back together. Needless to say, now she writes her name, date and subject on everything! :lol:

 

standing in line. :tongue_smilie: my kids have a really hard time anytime we go someplace (such as the Kennedy Center) and they require the kids to stand in line to be admitted. They just don't understand why they need to do that.

 

:iagree:

 

Having no concept of popularity or having a girlfriend by the age of 9!

I am thankful that he has no clue about this one. :001_smile:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It wasn't until we were at a library story-time that I realized my young girls had no concept of raising their hand to speak. They just kept blurting answers out. Granted- this took them all of 5 minutes to figure out and then they were fine. But it was one of those things that made me laugh.

:lol: My daughter picked this up at Brownie's. The kids were all in a circle and offering suggestions for a game to play and my DD looks around and sees all the hands up and slowly raises her own with this look on her face that was so comical! It made me giggle because I soooo often hear "won't she be "weird" because you homeschool" and here she is looking at the other kids like they are "weird" for needing to raise a hand in order to speak. :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh my! This thread is making me think of so many little things my kids haven't learned...I'm not sure how I thought they'd learn it if I'm not teaching it to them! Ha! Osmosis maybe? My 8-year old never knows the date, never writes her whole name, and we have no analog clocks in our house. Thanks everyone!!! :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My almost 8 year old son was asked how to spell his last name at VBS a couple of weeks ago. He looked at the lady like she had 2 heads and he just repeated our name, she looked at him crazy and asked him to spell it. He turned around and looked at me like he had no idea what she was talking about. I realized that I taught it to him 2 years ago but since he never has to spell it or write it, he was totally confused. I was pretty embarrassed. Needless to say, that was at the top of our to learn this year along with how to spell our horribly long address. Most adults can't even pronounce our street or city name, but the kids are trying to learn how to spell it.

 

My kids also don't know anything patriotic either, the pledge or National Anthem. I'm not concerned about the pledge but do think we should learn the anthem. We also need to continue working with analog clocks also.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My Brother's kids go to school, and are very close in age.

 

The topic came up about a younger student surpassing an older one in some areas.

 

My boys could not grasp that a person should care what level someone was working at compared to them.

 

For my kids perspective it can only be good when someone is good at something. If someone is good at reading, writing, math... then that is something to take advantage of when playing a game. "Well X is good at writing so he can do all the writing we need on this new board game we are making..." or "Y is good at reading, you read the rules"

 

Doesn't matter to them one little bit who is older or younger. They can't grasp that some kids care about this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Assignments and lessons are non-negotiable.:001_huh::glare:

 

 

 

I like that... DD and DS always tell me how much they like to do school today. We have been very liberal and follow their cues. So... they never like B&M school (private) when I sent them in for try-out. They hate the homework and assignments so much!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love this thread! Now I don't feel so bad that my 8yr DS doesn't know how to tie laced shoes. He is usually barefoot, in flip-flips, or velcro sneakers when it gets too cold for bare feet. :)

 

Oh, thank you for saying this! My 7.5yo can't tie his either, I feel so bad about it. Every time I try to teach him he gets sooo frustrated!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is your answer to teaching your kids all the patriotic 'stuff' we learned in school as kids: Wee Sing America. The Pledge, national anthem, preamble to the constitution, part of the Gettysburg Address, and all sorts of patriotic songs and much more is included. My girls loved listening to it in the car and can sing them all!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is your answer to teaching your kids all the patriotic 'stuff' we learned in school as kids: Wee Sing America. The Pledge, national anthem, preamble to the constitution, part of the Gettysburg Address, and all sorts of patriotic songs and much more is included. My girls loved listening to it in the car and can sing them all!

 

I have this somewhere, we've never listened to it. I was saving it for when we do American History, but maybe I should get it out sooner.

 

I need a Wee Sing Australia!!! :tongue_smilie:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My DD7 only just learned to pump a swing on her own. Apparently, at park days there have always been older kids or other kids willing to push, so she didn't have a NEED to do so until mean mommy refused to help because it was too darned hot out there and I was trying to get laundry done!

 

Tying shoes-she's still not doing that regularly.

 

Writing a header on a paper-I suppose we should work on that.

 

She recognizes the national anthem, pledge, and so on, but I doubt she actually knows them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree on the patriotic stuff.

 

And taking instructions in group situations. The first time my kids did soccer the coach started right off having them line up, each kid with their soccer ball, doing drills and throwing out instructions like crazy. My kids were like :001_huh: and were always 10 steps behind the other kids until they realized you can't ask the coach to repeat, nobody stops for you, and you just have to pay close attention so you don't get left behind. Turning on "sheep mode" (do what everyone else is doing if you didn't hear the directions) was a very foreign concept to them.

 

Also, names of subjects. I have had people ask my kids if they liked science and they were like "What's science?":eek: until I said, "You know! Our botany book where we learn about plants is science" and they say "ohhh." :tongue_smilie: I also said this year we are starting a new English program and my 7 yr old said, "Why? We already know English" :lol: I guess I have always called it "Language Arts" or "Grammar." I really notice sometimes how something as simple as not having a habit of using certain words will mean your kids have no clue what it means.

 

I had a photographer to ask one of my kids to sit "criss cross applesauce" (that's the first I'd ever heard it, too) and my kids stood there like :confused:. lol

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have enjoyed reading through this thread. I am glad to hear I am not the only one who suddenly realizes that my kids haven't just naturally picked up some of these "common knowledge" things.

 

Raising hands was a pretty foriegn concept until my kids were old enough to be in the children's class at church. They seemed to pick it up pretty quickly. Another concept that was difficult for my kids was the fact that because they were in a larger group, they wouldn't always get a turn. At home everyone usually gets a turn because there are only 4 kids.

 

I don't think my kids would know what criss cross applesauce means. My Dh and I both grew up calling it "indian style." At about age 2 we were trying to teach my daughter how to sit like that (we were trying to discourage her W sitting, thats when you sit with both legs to either side of you). We had no idea what to call it because we knew that what we had both grown up calling it was politically incorrect. So we just made up our own name, Spider Sit. Silly but it was something my Dd could relate to. I guess we should probably teach our kids the current proper name.:tongue_smilie:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The national anthem! :blushing: I'm in Australia but we are American and moved here about three years ago. The national anthem is one of those things they would probably learn in school. We recently had an Olympic-themed week at our swim lessons (a swim school) and they all received medals and then sang the national anthem together. I was so proud of my son for attempting to sing along (by listening intently to what his swim instructor was singing), even though he'd probably never heard it before! It's one of those things I wasn't planning to cover until we do Australian history.

 

I guess it isn't that he isn't naturally picking it up, it's just something we haven't covered and would be very obvious if anyone asked. :)

 

Ha! Yep this! We're in australia too. DD watched some olypics with my mum, who quickly came and told me that 'I must teach her the national anthem!' - it's an atrocity for a 7y/o not to know it yet apparently :001_huh:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We also need "We sing South Africa"My kids have heard We sing America over and over again. The fact that we spent two years studing American history also does not help for our local knowledge content.I have thought on investing in a date stamp. I really need to do that because my kids do not like writtng date and names on any papers.We know the tune of the national South African hymn but are lacking in South African history...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just realized that my 9yo doesn't know how to spell our last name! Granted, it isn't the easiest name because it has both a silent 'h' and a silent 'e' but still! LOL! I guess not having to put her name on papers in school has created that gap. I can't say that she's terrific with our phone # and address too.

 

I do know that it all works out over time, though. My oldest is in high school and he knows all the things my youngest seems to be failing to pick up...the patriotic stuff, telling time, etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

DS has trouble remembering address and phone number and I don't stress it. He has trouble working with others, but I expect that's more the autism than the homeschooling. Everything else I've seen mentioned here, we've worked on. Well, he can't pump to swing, but that's another autism issue.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How to receive hot lunch and how to open a milk carton!

 

Our public school does a summer meal program, and serves breakfast and lunch on weekdays, free for any children in the school district. While it's not a confusing concept for my kids (who did attend school for a few years before we started homeschooling), I was babysitting some friends of ours who have always homeschooled, and I brought them to school for lunch, and they were hilarious. They had no idea what to do with the lunch tray, how to interact with the ladies serving, and were completely baffled by the milk cartons.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with the patriotic stuff. My kids know the national anthem, but not the Pledge of Allegiance. I've tried to teach them, but they think the idea of pledging allegiance to a flag is hilariously funny. I have assured them that public school kids do it everyday, but they just look at me like this :001_huh:.

 

My kids have really struggled with the concept of grade level. They have a hard time remembering what grade they are in (by public school standards) and tend to announce that they are homeschooled when people ask for their grade level. I've starting making a big poster with their new grade level at the start of each school year and then posting it on their bedroom door for the first few weeks of school. This has helped a lot. They are doing better about answering with their correct grade level when people ask. I just don't need to have the homeschooling conversation with every.single.stranger at the grocery store. Come on, kids! The little old lady just wants to know how old you are! She doesn't need to know that we homeschool.

 

That is a riot. I am struggling to get my kids UNfixated on what "grade" they are in. I keep telling them that now that we homeschool, grade levels make absolutely no sense. :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Criss Cross Applesauce drives me nuts! There's NEVER any eating of anything, let alone applesauce involved. Why couldn't it simply be "sit with legs crossed" or "sit cross-legged"????

 

My kids don't like cutesy stuff and look like they are about to vomit when one of these common-isms is spouted by an adult. Yeah, I guess the apple doesn't fall far from the tree....:tongue_smilie:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Criss Cross Applesauce drives me nuts! There's NEVER any eating of anything, let alone applesauce involved. Why couldn't it simply be "sit with legs crossed" or "sit cross-legged"????

 

My kids don't like cutesy stuff and look like they are about to vomit when one of these common-isms is spouted by an adult. Yeah, I guess the apple doesn't fall far from the tree....:tongue_smilie:

 

:iagree: I've posted about this before. If you want to be PC, just call it cross-legged!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The first time someone tried to get my kids to stand in a line, we had 2 problems - one, they didn't even know what a line WAS (the standing kind), and two, she was asking them to "Queue up!" :lol:

 

They were looking around confused . . . knowing they were supposed to be doing SOMETHING, but unable to pinpoint exactly WHAT she wanted them to do.

 

Several years later, it still makes me chuckle.

 

That reminds me of a time when I was about 8 years old. My parents were stationed in England, and we were at a Fall Festival. One of our British neighbors was being helpful in showing me where to get some food. She said, "Go stand in the queue, love." I recall circling around for some time looking for the letter "Q". :lol: Incidentally, I was a product of public/DoD schools. ;)

 

For my boys:

 

Tying shoes is the bane of my youngest DS's existence. I try to tackle it "once and for all" every few months, but it always ends in frustration for both of us. We live in Florida. We RARELY wear anything other than sandals/crocs.

 

We're still working on how to unlock my cell phone in case of an emergency.

 

I am proud to say that both of my boys know the National Anthem. We go to a lot of hockey games. :tongue_smilie: They hear it quite a few times throughout the year.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mine know the National Anthem from the years playing baseball. It was played at every game. The pledge was learned as Cub Scout requirements and that gets said at least weekly.

They can even open milk cartons thanks to summer camp which also took care of the raising hands and standing in line business.

 

However, I just discovered that my 9 year old can not spell either of his middle names and he struggles with our last name.

 

How in the heck did this happen. At least he can spell his full first name.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...