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Science . . . could we pretend for a moment


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Secular or Christian?

Well, it doesn't really matter. I like the credit-where-credit-is-due approach of the so-called Christian programs but want good solid Science. We know where the credit goes so we don't need it spoonfed to us. If it were good solid science, I don't think it matters if it's "secular" or "Christian."

 

Self-teaching, parent taught, or outside teacher?

I'm open.

 

What level of math has she completed?

Pre-Algebra

 

What kind of career is she interested in?

Astronaut Nun who designs and makes clothing (while secretly sewing the green scapular in as the tag) who is also a teacher and is a famous singer on the side.

 

What branch of science would she like to study?

Astrophysics with a side of engineering. ETA: she wants to be the person to invent Voyager (as in Star Trek Voyager).

Seriously. I tell her we need to start a bit smaller and work up but she isn't interested. I'd like her to take a standard high school course so she can go on to college with all her science ducks in a row.

 

 

:bigear:

Edited by BibleBeltCatholicMom
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Honestly, without a few preferences with regard to worldview or teaching style, it would be tough to come up with any recommendations.

 

Are you planning to follow the "traditional" sequence of biology, chemistry, physics and one advanced class? Or are you sticking more closely to the WTM suggestions?

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What kind of career is she interested in?

Astronaut Nun who designs and makes clothing (while secretly sewing the green scapular in as the tag) who is also a teacher and is a famous singer on the side.

 

She sounds like my daughter! Just replace astronaut nun with archaeologist nun, and singer with actress. ;)

 

We are using Kolbe for High School, and I love the science programs they use. My daughter will be doing Physical Science in 9th, Biology 10th, Chemistry, 11th, then Physics in 12th. My oldest is doing Physics in 11th then Anatomy in 12th (he is planning on pre med for college).

 

I like the way Kolbe's science is secular but there are supplements to show how science can never be incompatible with our faith. We had tried Apologia with my oldest prior to him starting ps High School (he is returning to homeschool this year), and although he enjoyed it, I had some problems with it. He did both the general and physical science books. In my opinion the books were often "preachy" rather than instructive. We did find some of the arguments for a "young earth" interesting to read, but I think it would have been better as a supplement rather than being hammered into the student on every single page as the only possible explanation as to how God created the earth.

 

I do have the books and lesson plans for Kolbe's Physical Science if you have any questions about them, I have looked through them and am very excited to start using it (I will be using it for my 8th grader as well).

 

My oldest son's physics program is online and hands off for the teacher, which is great because I would have been out of my element trying to teach it.

 

The virtual labs for all of the science programs except physical science (the physical science labs are optional, but the ones presented are simple to do) are a huge plus for me!

 

If you have any questions about how the program is laid out, I will try my best to answer them!

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Math is going to be the limiting factor in course options until algebra is completed.

 

As far as recommendations for texts/resources, these are ones that we have used, plan on using, or have been recommended by the wonderful ladies that I respect on this site. (I won't be recommending any Apologia texts b/c I am personally biased against them. BJU, as a fellow Catholic, won't ever be recommended by me. ;) )

 

biology: Miller/Levine, Campbell/Reece, (these 1st 2 recommendations have intro and AP level texts) or Science Shepherd and Scanlon (for anatomy & physiology)

 

chemistry: Prentice Hall, Spectrum (we used in conjunction w/Plato chem and the 2 combined took little time and were a great combo), Chang (for AP)

 

physics: Kinetic books (available through Kolbe), Knight, TC physics lectures

 

astronomy: The Cosmos w/TC lectures "understanding the Universe", The Cosmic Perspective: The Solar System, all of the TC astronomy lectures (except for the skywatching ones unless that is the hobbyist level of interest for your child. )

Edited by 8FillTheHeart
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I think it would make sense for her to do a traditional science sequence. Her math will limit her choices right now. Since she hasn't had any formal science, I would suggest, Physical, Biology, Chemistry, Physics.

 

You could look at DIVE science which has video lessons that match up with a variety of textbooks. I've never used Kolbe, but I'm assuming since "nun" was in her list of ambitions you are Catholic. They use secular textbooks and offer a solid sequence.

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Math is going to be the limiting factor in course options until algebra is completed.

 

 

 

The great thing about Physical Science for the op is that it can be taken concurrently with Algebra 1. The other ones (except perhaps Astronomy?) will probably require the completion of Algebra 1.

 

My (entering) 9th grade daughter has finished Algebra 1, but although she has done various informal science programs, she has never worked through an actual science textbook. I felt Physical Science was a good place for her to start. My (entering) 8th grade son will be doing the same physical science program concurrently with Algebra 1.

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The great thing about Physical Science for the op is that it can be taken concurrently with Algebra 1. The other ones (except perhaps Astronomy?) will probably require the completion of Algebra 1.

 

My (entering) 9th grade daughter has finished Algebra 1, but although she has done various informal science programs, she has never worked through an actual science textbook. I felt Physical Science was a good place for her to start. My (entering) 8th grade son will be doing the same physical science program concurrently with Algebra 1.

 

Actually the astronomy courses are more meaningful if a student has had basic physics.

 

I think the physical science is going to be student/family dependent. My students don't take physical science nor do they use science textbooks prior to high school level courses. BUt, they do have solid science backgrounds from lots of science reading from elementary and middle school.

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Actually the astronomy courses are more meaningful if a student has had basic physics.

 

Good to know, none of my kids have shown any interest in advanced studies of astronomy, so I have never looked into it.

 

I think the physical science is going to be student/family dependent. My students don't take physical science nor do they use science textbooks prior to high school level courses. BUt, they do have solid science backgrounds from lots of science reading from elementary and middle school.

 

:iagree:

 

My oldest son could have easily skipped physical science, but he would read through science textbooks just for fun even when he was little. He seems to learn science and math via osmosis and the actual courses are fairly easy for him.

 

My daughter has an excellent memory, and can learn anything relatively quickly, but we really didn't cover much science at all last year so I am hoping Physical Science will boost her confidence going forward. It also allows for her and her younger brother to do science together this year like they always have (they are only 9 months apart).

 

The best thing about homeschooling is you can adjust for the needs of the child and the family as needed.

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I think it would make sense for her to do a traditional science sequence. Her math will limit her choices right now. Since she hasn't had any formal science, I would suggest, Physical, Biology, Chemistry, Physics.

 

You could look at DIVE science which has video lessons that match up with a variety of textbooks. I've never used Kolbe, but I'm assuming since "nun" was in her list of ambitions you are Catholic. They use secular textbooks and offer a solid sequence.

 

:iagree:

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Just a suggestion- Physical Science for 9th grade, Derek Owens (full course available on CD):

 

http://www.lucideducation.com/?p=PhysicalScience.php

 

Followed by an online class with Derek Owens for physics:

 

http://www.derekowens.com/course_info_physics.php

 

And then chemistry and biology from other sources - maybe there will be something fantastic available by then (we have not found it).

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