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Need advice on planning ahead for college with my student athlete


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My son is a sophomore and plays baseball for the public high school in our district, which is a large school with a great baseball program. He has always played competitively and I expect that he will eventually be offered baseball scholarships. I would expect community colleges to want him and possibly more major universities. Right now, I want to plan ahead for college, but feel limited because I don't know for sure if he'll get baseball scholarship offers and if he does, what schools will be offering them to him. I've heard that we should pick a handful of schools that he's interested in and then find out about their admission policies. We could do that, but I feel like the chances that those will be the schools to offer a baseball scholarship would be slim. I'm also wondering about dual enrollment. If he takes community college classes now, will that disqualify him for a baseball scholarship in the future? Have any of you have to plan around a possibility of a sports scholarship? I feel like we're not going to be able to plan much for college options until the last minute when we'll know if and who offers a scholarship. Has anyone else had to plan for college while keeping a possible sports scholarship in mind? If so, I'm all ears!

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I'm also wondering about dual enrollment. If he takes community college classes now, will that disqualify him for a baseball scholarship in the future?

I'm a year ahead of you. My 16yo ds hopes to play basketball in college. I know this much: As long as he only takes classes at CC and does not play baseball for CC, he is fine. In fact, it is to his advantage to take CC classes because it demonstrates to college admissions officers and college coaches and the NCAA that he is capable of college level academics. It may even help him obtain an academic scholarship, which may be more attractive than a baseball scholarship because it cannot be taken away if he is injured, is cut from the team, or loses interest in baseball.

 

Have any of you have to plan around a possibility of a sports scholarship? I feel like we're not going to be able to plan much for college options until the last minute when we'll know if and who offers a scholarship. Has anyone else had to plan for college while keeping a possible sports scholarship in mind?

Is there a way to plan around the possibility of a sports scholarship? May depend on the athlete. I have borrowed a few "athletic scholarship" books from the library. There is a great theory: Have your athlete identify x number of colleges they are interested in. Have your athlete determine what level the colleges are and what level of play they are capable of. Have your athlete market himself to the colleges that are at the right level for him. Have your athlete update these colleges over the years. Etc.

 

Ds is a bright, but unmotivated student. He would like to think about college tomorrow. Our HS coach has told us that with his height and his ACT score, ds can play at any D3 school he wants. Ds wants to play D1 or D2. We are not convinced that he is capable of D1 play, but are not ready to abandon the thought yet. Here is how I started with ds: I did a college search. I searched on all D1 schools in FL. I figure that if I am going to send ds off to college and ds doesn't really care where he goes, then I would rather not have the added expense of sending him on an airplane. I sorted the D1 schools in FL by SAT scores (something that I can no longer do on collegeboard, :banghead: but I digress). I did the same for D2/D3 and GA. I taped them up to ds' wall. That way, if he gets college material in the mail or some college coach shows interest in him, he can look at this list and have some idea about just how bright (or not so bright) the students at the college are.

 

Take a look at this thread.

 

Take a look at the ncaa tag.

 

There are others on these boards who have student athletes in college. I hope they share their wisdom.

Edited by Sue in St Pete
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My son is a sophomore and plays baseball for the public high school in our district, which is a large school with a great baseball program. .. Has anyone else had to plan for college while keeping a possible sports scholarship in mind? If so, I'm all ears!

 

I am in the same boat. Here is a list of some of what I have learned that you may find useful:

 

1. If your son wants to play baseball for a Div I or Div II school, you must register with the NCAA Eligibility Center at the beginning of his junior year. If you go to the NCAA website, you will find a section devoted to explaining the process for homeschoolers, along with the required "Core Courses" and required GPA and ACT/SAT scores needed to receive approval.

 

2. In your situation, I would talk to your son's baseball coaches and ask how many former players the coaches helped to get college scholarships. My youngest brother played baseball, but his high school coach was not involved at all when my brother received a full-ride to a top Div I school. My brother's summer travel coach was the person who was involved in the process.

 

3. Athletes should have their standardized testing completed by the end of their junior year. Some colleges also require althletes to submit SAT II's in addition to the SAT and ACT.

 

4. It is not uncommon for athletes to commit to a college the summer between their junior and senior year of school. Two of my boys' friends who are rising seniors have both committed to their top choice colleges this week. You should have your son's transcript and other required documentation complete by the beginning of the summer between junior and senior year.

 

5. The website College Confidential has a sub-forum devoted to athletic recruits. You will be able to glean a ton of great information specific to baseball recruiting from the parents on that site.

 

6. Your son should start contacting college coaches and get on their radars. The NCAA has rules about time-frames for when coaches can contact students, but many players will initiate contact before the coach would be permitted to contact the student per the NCAA rules.

 

Good luck to you and your son.

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Thank you so much for the advice! This gives me more to consider in preparing my ds for college. I'm a homeschooler of 3 and my student athlete is my oldest, so this is all new to me and I'm a bit intimidated. I'm trying to make it possible for my son to have as many college credits done ahead of time without taking away his elligibility for scholarships, and I don't want to put him through a rigorous workload if some of those classes won't even transfer to whatever college he attends. There are so many factors. Any other input is appreciated!

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I was a little late navigating the NCAA requirements. I had no idea that my awkward 15yo would grow to 6'7" and blossom on the basketball court during his Jr. year! My ds is about to start his freshman year in college and made the JV basketball team at a small Christian school, so I had to do a lot of backtracking. I didn't know about these requirements until he tried out for the team this spring.

 

Here are a few tid-bits I learned:

 

1)Record ISBN #'s for all textbooks. I had to track down old books to do this.

 

2) Record ISBN #'s for any Jr. high class that many typically take in high school. I had to track down Algebra I & II texts from Jr. High despite the fact that my ds took 2 years of Calculus in high school and CLEP'ed out of college level Calc I.

 

3) Keep ALL of your paperwork that proves that you homeschooled under your states homeschool laws.

 

4) Have a formal diploma made for him. They'll need a copy of this.

 

We're still waiting to hear if everything got approved. I let you know if I learn anything else through this process.

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  • 2 weeks later...
www.diycollegerankings.com

 

A lot of it is general college search, but it is by a homeschool mom with a baseball son, so there is a lot of baseball specific info, too.

 

Good luck!

 

Thanks for this website! It is was I have been looking for. The timeline is great information. We have a 14 yo ds who plays baseball with a promising future. I'm overwhelmed by the maze of the whole process. My 14 yo is only an 8th grader this year so we have a little time to plan--which looks like a good thing! Of course, he would rather be drafted right out of high school and avoid the whole college thing. :lol::glare:

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Check the NCAA website or the local college in your area for advice.

 

 

Talking to the local schools is important. I would also continue with the assumption of no athletic scholarship. The number of athletic scholarships is small. Not all players recruited are going to get one and there are no guarantees with them. It is not unheard of for an athlete to get their scholarship taken away to recruit another player. Those academic scholarships are much harder to lose. NCAA rules and the rules of the conferences are numerous so keep up-to-date with the coaches of your son and those at the schools he wants to attend.

 

Also remember to talk to the admissions people. If you take too many college credits before enrolling full-time, you can lose out on a lot of scholarships because you are seen as a transfer student not a freshman.

Edited by tarahillmom
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I think another important question is the decision about which is more important academics or getting a scholarship? We have decided on the side of academics and since my son is fairly bright what this means is that he will likely not get a scholarship offer because his academics far out pace his athletic skill. As we get closer he'll need to go further and decide does he want to go to a large university or a LAC? At a LAC he could possibly walk onto a team but a large university that will probably not be possible.

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