Jump to content

Menu

Christian parents teaching mythology?


cherylterese
 Share

Recommended Posts

My NAB reads that verse from Peter as "His divine power has bestowed on us everything that makes for life and devotion, through the knowledge of him." This is a verse saying that we've been given that which we need for Salvation. It does not say found only in scripture. He has bestowed us with reason, intellect, science, history, language and the like. The author is really reaching with the interpretation that we need to only teach our children what's in the Bible. The exodus verse is clearly referring to the worship of other gods, not the teaching of history to our children 2000 years later. There will always be people that make up their minds first and then find a verse that they can twist to suit their needs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For an opposing view, here is what J.R.R. Tolkien had to say about myth-

http://catholiceducation.org/articles/arts/al0107.html

 

Personally, I side with Tolkien. It would be a shame to throw the entirety of Western Culture (well, correction- ALL culture) out the window. Definitely a "baby with the bath water" situation. Removing myth from history studies or culture studies would require one to also remove Christmas trees, Yule logs, Easter egg hunts... not to mention entire genres of literature, fairy tales...

 

To understand why Egyptians built pyramids and mummified their leaders (and cats), one must know something about Egyptian mythology. To understand why Hindus don't eat certain meats, we need to address their religion. To understand why Greeks and Romans did this that or the other thing... you get the idea.

 

I mean, if we were to obey the so-called laws stated in the Bible by this article, we would actually have to excise portions of the Bible! How to tell the story of Elijah without any mention of Baal? Or Moses without the golden calf?

 

I say if you don't want your kids to worship Thor, then let them know that Thor was a mythical god- Don't pretend his story had no influence on Norse culture by black lining every mention of Thor out of your texts.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have no problem teaching mythology in the context of this is what this culture believed at this time. It isn't that we are teaching it as truth but it is a historical fact that these cultures believed much differently than we as Christians do today. I think it does our children a disservice to eliminate portions of history. You can even take the time to explain that we know that the myths are not true because __________. Just saying there are ways to honor our religion while still insuring our kids do not miss out on learning about ancient cultures.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am completely befuddled by religious parents who would willfully choose ignorance on ANY subject. Completely befuddled.

 

Isn't it an insecure faith that feels threatened by knowledge? I can't imagine an intelligent child not feeling they were done a disservice if they reach adulthood and find that their parent/teacher had willfully kept them ignorant on various topics. (By the way, I have a Jewish mother who kept me willfully ignorant of Christianity, and I absolutely felt I was done a disservice. I have no desire to be Christian, but to keep me *completely ignorant* of Christianity was absolutely, without doubt, a huge disservice.)

 

Studying mythology deities is not the same as worshiping them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks - I loved reading through these replies. I read this post a few days ago and it's really stuck with me and caused me to question what I've been teaching (we did a lot of mythology this past year). I felt it seemed pretty restrictive, but then it did make me question. My children had no problem looking at the myths as stories and not as truth. I had also decided to start teaching Latin this year, thinking it was a good basis for language. This post had me questioning that too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like the way this issue was addressed in the Latin-Centered Curriculum.

 

I think the author of that article is misinterpreting some of those passages. "Do not learn the ways" means do not learn to practice those things and internalize them as habits. If it meant never be aware of or speak about those things, ever, then Joash was sinning in Judges 6; Elijah was sinning in I Kings 18; Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Amos were sinning when they mentioned gods by name in their prophecies; etc. Clearly they had knowledge of and had reasons to identify pagan gods. I would also point out a distinction that these were idols being actively worshiped by the surrounding cultures and the nation of Israel was in danger of being heavily-influenced by them. I don't know anybody who worships Zeus, and I've never heard of anyone running off to worship Zeus after learning about the significance of Zeus myths in a historical context.

 

My personal opinion is that, to the contrary, the the "cultural" things people do that are based in paganism stem more from ignorance and a failure to learn rather than being influenced by studying about the existence of those traditions. Most people who burn yule logs and put up greenery and eat ham at Christmas, throw salt over their shoulders, participate in the Olympics, or whatever number of things you might list here, do so having no clue where those things came from.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Knowledge of other religions helps us understand the Bible better. It would be very difficult to study without learning the background religious issues of the time period.

 

A good example is the 10 plagues, which were used to show that the Egyptian gods were useless. If you don't know about those, you miss part of the story.

 

The context of those verses in Exodus appears to be warning them not to worship false gods. That was a recurring problem for the Israelites as they were around people that worshipped those gods.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I will be teaching mythology the same way I teach other religions. This group of people believed(s) this... We believe this... and this is why...

 

I agree with the pp's comment about families avoiding all "other religious" subjects b/c of insecurity in their own religion-or maybe being afraid that would be too big a temptation for their children? Kind of odd I think. :confused:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is something CS Lewis said about the subject:

 

The heart of Christianity is a myth which is also a fact. The old myth of the Dying God, without ceasing to be myth, comes down from the heaven of legend and imagination to the earth of history. It happens--at a particular date, in a particular place, followed by definable historical consequences. We pass from a Balder or an Osiris, dying nobody knows when or where, to a historical Person crucified (it is all in order) under Pontius Pilate. By becoming fact it does not cease to be myth: that is the miracle. I suspect that men have sometimes derived more spiritual sustenance from myths they did not believe than from the religion they professed. To be truly Christian we must both assent to the historical fact and also receive the myth (fact though it has become) with the same imaginative embrace which we accord to all myth. The one is hardly more necessary than the other.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've heard of parents not teaching anything about mythology. The first time I was gobsmacked. History wouldn't make a lick of sense without understanding the culture of the times, which is deeply rooted in the mythology. Pagan or not, it is our history. :confused:

 

If those verses really meant don't learn anything about those other religions and gods, that would mean there are parts of the Bible you couldn't read. :tongue_smilie: Those verses are about not adopting other religions as your own, not taking on their paradigms, and such. When you're among another people for a very long time it would be very easy to let their culture melt into your own. Intentionally not learning anything about those pagan practices would make you easy to deceive, and it would make you a pretty ineffective witness.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I never actually answered the question before hitting send. :tongue_smilie:

 

Yes, my kids learn mythology; we are protestant. I generally tie it into their history: Greek myths when we're learning about ancient Greece, and so on. As grammar stage kids they made friends with the pharaohs, Odysseus, Hercules, Gilgamesh, Thor and more by reading picture books about them and listening to simple retellings. As logic stage kids they read more advanced retellings. When I told them they get to read the real deal on the next pass (well, a translation of it), they let out cheers.

 

It's been awhile since we've done ancients, but the stories and characters are still so commonly mentioned that my little ones have picked up bits and pieces. The other day while driving down the road my 4yo loudly declared, "Oh yeah! Well *I* just stole your power of thunder. Take THAT!" to her teenage brother. You could say we're fluent on the myths here. :001_smile:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks - I loved reading through these replies. I read this post a few days ago and it's really stuck with me and caused me to question what I've been teaching (we did a lot of mythology this past year). I felt it seemed pretty restrictive, but then it did make me question. My children had no problem looking at the myths as stories and not as truth. I had also decided to start teaching Latin this year, thinking it was a good basis for language. This post had me questioning that too.

 

I wouldn't let Anne Elliott sway you. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We're Catholic and we've studies mythology as well. I just let them know this is what the Greeks believed in that time period and we enjoyed reading about it. Its important that we understand other religions. If we understand that we can understand the time period and what other people believed that came before us.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For an opposing view, here is what J.R.R. Tolkien had to say about myth-

http://catholiceducation.org/articles/arts/al0107.html

 

Personally, I side with Tolkien. It would be a shame to throw the entirety of Western Culture (well, correction- ALL culture) out the window. Definitely a "baby with the bath water" situation. Removing myth from history studies or culture studies would require one to also remove Christmas trees, Yule logs, Easter egg hunts... not to mention entire genres of literature, fairy tales...

 

To understand why Egyptians built pyramids and mummified their leaders (and cats), one must know something about Egyptian mythology. To understand why Hindus don't eat certain meats, we need to address their religion. To understand why Greeks and Romans did this that or the other thing... you get the idea.

 

I mean, if we were to obey the so-called laws stated in the Bible by this article, we would actually have to excise portions of the Bible! How to tell the story of Elijah without any mention of Baal? Or Moses without the golden calf?

 

I say if you don't want your kids to worship Thor, then let them know that Thor was a mythical god- Don't pretend his story had no influence on Norse culture by black lining every mention of Thor out of your texts.

:iagree:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am Christian and teach mythology. Not only is it part of history, it is essential to understanding parts of the New Testament. Paul fought against the religious culture when introducing Christ to the Greeks. I guess you could make the argument that you would introduce them when dc are older and I get that, but not to teach mythology at all would hamper them from understanding that part of the Bible.

 

We actually compare and contrast these types of creation stories with the Biblical accounts. My dc haven't had any trouble distinguishing between our beliefs and the stories. I don't see that it is much different from fairy tales.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

The article was way too serious. Especially the parts about statues [possibly] being idols and great works of art being an introduction to p*rnography. I'd like to see an indepth word study on the Hebrew / Greek of the quoted verses. We are reading myths along with fairytales, folk tales, tall tales, and legends.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Knowledge of other religions helps us understand the Bible better. It would be very difficult to study without learning the background religious issues of the time period.

 

A good example is the 10 plagues, which were used to show that the Egyptian gods were useless. If you don't know about those, you miss part of the story.

 

The context of those verses in Exodus appears to be warning them not to worship false gods. That was a recurring problem for the Israelites as they were around people that worshipped those gods.

 

 

I agree :iagree:. Great example.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I come from a background where I did not learn Greek and Roman Mythology (my parents were consistent in that we also did not have a Christmas Tree or do Easter Egg Hunts/Baskets). Is it possible to survive in this culture without it, yes, but as others have mentioned I did not understand some references, sayings etc. We were watching "O, Brother Where Art Thou" (He attended a public HS and did learn about the myths) I didn't have a clue that it was a retelling of the Odeyssey until my brother and SIL said something. It would have been cool to have understood some of the humor.

 

My husband on the other hand only remembers learning the myths as a student and thinking "What a stupid people". Not until he was older did he realize the physical contributions did these cultures give us. I believe by showing some of their, what I consider, silly beliefs, along with their contributions shows their humanity.

 

I think it is interesting that the Hebrew word for "learn" used in the verse is the same Hebrew word used in the same book (Deuteronomy) in instructing the Israelites how they should learn about the true God. This is how the Hebrews taught and learned according to Deot. 6:6-8 "Never forget these sayings that I am giving you today. teach them to your children. Repeat them whne you are at home and when you are away, when you are resting and when you are working. Tie them on your arms and wear them on your forheads as a reminder. Write them on the doorposts of your house and on your gates. It should be a way of life, if we are teaching mythology as a way of life, then yes we shouldn't read about it. That is something every family should decide for themselves.

 

FTR- I am allowing my 14yo dd to read Homer this year. She has a good foundation in our beliefs, I don't think it will cause her to go and worship Zeus/Jupiter. If it does, I will be back here with my apologies and warning.

 

Just my .02

Edited by kayinpa
typos
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can side with the hesitancy of the parents who choose not to. I feel like it may be more appropriate to really get into mythology in logic or rhetorical stages of learning. So, when learning about Egypt, we talk about that they believe in several gods, or that they think the pharoah is god, but I don't go out of my way to talk about all their names and their mythical stories on how they started the world or who makes the rain, according to them. Little kids believe everything they hear, so I'm not going out of my way to tell them how each culture thinks the world was started. In their immature faith, that can cause confusion. They can study mythology when they are able to draw on their own faith and understand the comparison between the two. Plus, when I studied mythology in high school, I thought it was boring and dry as toast. BUT, we didn't study the history along side it. That would be much more interesting and I think I would have enjoyed it more.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am a Christian and this is another of the list of things I didn't know "Christians don't do' until I started homeschooling. I certainly do and can't really understand why it's considered a problem.

 

Heather

 

Christians DO do it. Certain small little sub-sets with loud voices don't. :glare:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The article was way too serious. Especially the parts about statues [possibly] being idols and great works of art being an introduction to p*rnography. I'd like to see an indepth word study on the Hebrew / Greek of the quoted verses. We are reading myths along with fairytales, folk tales, tall tales, and legends.

 

It really wasn't serious enough. It cherry-picked some quotes, removing them from historical and Biblical context to make a very superficial case without once managing to use an ounce of God-given reason. We are not that stupid. The Bible is not that simple a text.

 

Can you tell that that kind of lazy scripture-quoting drives me up the wall? :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Knowledge of other religions helps us understand the Bible better. It would be very difficult to study without learning the background religious issues of the time period.

 

A good example is the 10 plagues, which were used to show that the Egyptian gods were useless. If you don't know about those, you miss part of the story.

 

The context of those verses in Exodus appears to be warning them not to worship false gods. That was a recurring problem for the Israelites as they were around people that worshipped those gods.

 

Well said. Knowledge of other religions has strengthened my own belief and also that of my children. There is a sense in which we don't want to glorify other religions or take part in worship of them. But studying the basics of what they believe and why is an integral part to bring able to share or defend one's own beliefs.

 

We did wait until our children had a very solid overview of the bible and an understanding of the Gospel and God's attributes before allowing a lot if mythology. Because my children are very verbal, and avid readers and had read through 5 different bible story books, they were each about 8 when we began allowing them to read mythology.

 

There is a sense in which we can protect the innocence of our children and not take part in the culture of idolatry, materialism and violence. (We do not allow cable TV, and we throw out most catalogs and such) but they can't be in a bubble either. It's important to Introduce the world's beliefs and practices and talk through them while we have the chance.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have a lot of talks around here as to what is real and what isn't. Why something is good or not. That said, we've jumped into mythology, fairy tales, and the such with both feet, eagerly. Comparing and contrasting myth with God's truth seems to bear more fruit that pretending that nothing else exists or if it does it is pure evil and will pollute you if you dare think about it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The fact that she has taken so much scripture and bent it around her beliefs should truly worry readers. Anyone can take scripture out of context and make it fit what they want it to say.

 

The fact is that mythology is part of history, as are other religions. Not teaching about them leaves our children unprepared to face future challenges. I feel the same way about mythology as I do about evolution. I believe both to be untrue, but I will still teach them both to my children so that they can see why we do not believe them.

 

Besides that, as someone else posted, there are a lot of aspects of various cultures, including our own, that would be very hard to understand without at least a basic knowledge of mythology.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well said. Knowledge of other religions has strengthened my own belief and also that of my children. There is a sense in which we don't want to glorify other religions or take part in worship of them. But studying the basics of what they believe and why is an integral part to bring able to share or defend one's own beliefs.

 

We did wait until our children had a very solid overview of the bible and an understanding of the Gospel and God's attributes before allowing a lot if mythology. Because my children are very verbal, and avid readers and had read through 5 different bible story books, they were each about 8 when we began allowing them to read mythology.

 

There is a sense in which we can protect the innocence of our children and not take part in the culture of idolatry, materialism and violence. (We do not allow cable TV, and we throw out most catalogs and such) but they can't be in a bubble either. It's important to Introduce the world's beliefs and practices and talk through them while we have the chance.

 

agreed. We are reading the Black Ships Before Troy (Illiad) and ds keeps asking who the good guy is? "Umm noone son! - even the gods have poor character/behavior"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am a member of a very "Christian" (well, except for their behavior toward each other - which is decidedly unChristian) homeschool group in a nearby town. This was a question a couple of years ago by a family who couldn't see the point in studying mythology from any source (Greek/Roman/Egyptian) with some very loud answers on the anti-mythology side. The pro-mythology (well-rounded education-type stand) side was small and expressed understanding that not everyone would find such stories/studies interesting.

 

I have friends who don't delve deeply - simply skimming the surface as required by their curriculum choices - and they have explained that they don't feel it is important. That's fine with me. To each their own.

 

My older kids love these stories -- and have recently read Rick Riordan out of house & home -- but will emphasize to the younger kids, "little g - god," when retelling. They are clear who The One God is & none of these gods in mythology are similar.

 

But, I let my kids read/listen to/watch Harry Potter, so I guess we don't fall into the "Good Christian" camp. :tongue_smilie:

 

We're Catholics and some of the locals 'round here would tell you that means we aren't Christians anyway. :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am a member of a very "Christian" (well, except for their behavior toward each other - which is decidedly unChristian) homeschool group in a nearby town. This was a question a couple of years ago by a family who couldn't see the point in studying mythology from any source (Greek/Roman/Egyptian) with some very loud answers on the anti-mythology side. The pro-mythology (well-rounded education-type stand) side was small and expressed understanding that not everyone would find such stories/studies interesting.

 

I have friends who don't delve deeply - simply skimming the surface as required by their curriculum choices - and they have explained that they don't feel it is important. That's fine with me. To each their own.

 

My older kids love these stories -- and have recently read Rick Riordan out of house & home -- but will emphasize to the younger kids, "little g - god," when retelling. They are clear who The One God is & none of these gods in mythology are similar.

 

But, I let my kids read/listen to/watch Harry Potter, so I guess we don't fall into the "Good Christian" camp. :tongue_smilie:

 

We're Catholics and some of the locals 'round here would tell you that means we aren't Christians anyway. :lol:

 

((Hugs))) I've seen that many times, sorry to say.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is something CS Lewis said about the subject:

 

The heart of Christianity is a myth which is also a fact. The old myth of the Dying God, without ceasing to be myth, comes down from the heaven of legend and imagination to the earth of history. It happens--at a particular date, in a particular place, followed by definable historical consequences. We pass from a Balder or an Osiris, dying nobody knows when or where, to a historical Person crucified (it is all in order) under Pontius Pilate. By becoming fact it does not cease to be myth: that is the miracle. I suspect that men have sometimes derived more spiritual sustenance from myths they did not believe than from the religion they professed. To be truly Christian we must both assent to the historical fact and also receive the myth (fact though it has become) with the same imaginative embrace which we accord to all myth. The one is hardly more necessary than the other.

 

:iagree:I'm with Lewis and Tolkien...

That article freaked me out a bit. Was she serious? We have to stop saying good luck and tear down our statues of heroes? And Shakespeare is evil?

 

How do you teach your children about the Bible WITHOUT teaching mythology? Paul's brilliant preaching in Athens is totally lost. THere is no context for the Ten Plagues, it just looks like God is picking random things to hit them with, rather than trying to show them their gods were false so they would repent (which the Bible says many did and followed Israel into the desert and were counted as Israelites). Hundreds of other examples, where things seem random until you learn the context.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For an opposing view, here is what J.R.R. Tolkien had to say about myth-

http://catholiceducation.org/articles/arts/al0107.html

 

Personally, I side with Tolkien. It would be a shame to throw the entirety of Western Culture (well, correction- ALL culture) out the window. Definitely a "baby with the bath water" situation. Removing myth from history studies or culture studies would require one to also remove Christmas trees, Yule logs, Easter egg hunts... not to mention entire genres of literature, fairy tales...

 

To understand why Egyptians built pyramids and mummified their leaders (and cats), one must know something about Egyptian mythology. To understand why Hindus don't eat certain meats, we need to address their religion. To understand why Greeks and Romans did this that or the other thing... you get the idea.

 

I mean, if we were to obey the so-called laws stated in the Bible by this article, we would actually have to excise portions of the Bible! How to tell the story of Elijah without any mention of Baal? Or Moses without the golden calf?

 

I say if you don't want your kids to worship Thor, then let them know that Thor was a mythical god- Don't pretend his story had no influence on Norse culture by black lining every mention of Thor out of your texts.

 

:iagree::iagree::iagree::iagree:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We read all sorts of mythology in our conservative, fundamentalist Christian homeschool. It's theologically important that we do.

 

1. We clarify that in pagan mythology these are just made up stories and not real.

2. We clarify that the stories in the Bible are true.

3. We contrast that the mythological view of pagan gods is a sharp contrast to the real God.

 

We focus on just how shockingly different the children of gods and women are in mythology to the one time God really did have a child (Jesus) with a woman (Mary.) The ones in mythology were out to satisfy their lust and serve their own sinful desires. There was no lust (or sex) involved with the real God when He conceived Jesus and He was serving humanity-not Himself in doing so. We point out just how sinful those gods in mythology are in contrast to the sinlessness of the real God. The false ones have all sorts of vices while the real one humbled Himself to the point of death on cross for humanity. I side with Chesterton when he points out that Christianity was in no way a product of the culture at the time-it was a complete departure for the reasons mentioned above.

 

I have attended two churches in the last 15 years that preach the same message and share the identical doctrinal beliefs. At one only about 1/4 of the kids do Halloween and read Harry Potter, watch some R rated movies, listen to contemporary Christian music, etc. The music is very conservative. Most of the kids are homeschooled or go to a private Christian school. I was the only one who read mythology to my kids.

 

The other, which I now attend, has Youth Group activities that involve watching Harry Potter, Batman , Twilight, etc. movies. Most of the kids have read HP. The music is contemporary most of the time. Most of them celebrate Halloween. Most people homeschool and have no problem reading mythology as long as it's pointed out that they're just stories.

 

I don't expect all Christians to do what I do or share my convictions on the subject though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was raised in a strong Christian family, with a strict mother, but I read tons of mythology. I was fascinated by it.

 

I was aged 10-12, so that is probably when we'll delve more deeply into it, really no point in it at such a young age as my boy is now, it would totally confuse him. He believes the stories about how possums got nekkid tales...

 

 

oh, I had no idea O Brother Where Are thou? was based on Odysseus! Now some parts make more sense to me.

 

love that movie...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For an opposing view, here is what J.R.R. Tolkien had to say about myth-

http://catholiceducation.org/articles/arts/al0107.html

 

Personally, I side with Tolkien. It would be a shame to throw the entirety of Western Culture (well, correction- ALL culture) out the window. Definitely a "baby with the bath water" situation. Removing myth from history studies or culture studies would require one to also remove Christmas trees, Yule logs, Easter egg hunts... not to mention entire genres of literature, fairy tales...

 

To understand why Egyptians built pyramids and mummified their leaders (and cats), one must know something about Egyptian mythology. To understand why Hindus don't eat certain meats, we need to address their religion. To understand why Greeks and Romans did this that or the other thing... you get the idea.

 

I mean, if we were to obey the so-called laws stated in the Bible by this article, we would actually have to excise portions of the Bible! How to tell the story of Elijah without any mention of Baal? Or Moses without the golden calf?

 

I say if you don't want your kids to worship Thor, then let them know that Thor was a mythical god- Don't pretend his story had no influence on Norse culture by black lining every mention of Thor out of your texts.

 

:iagree:

 

I would not chose ignorance out of fear.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had no idea O Brother Where Are thou? was based on Odysseus! Now some parts make more sense to me.

 

 

 

You might enjoy revisiting this old thread with more tidbits on Odyssey connections with O Brother Where Art Thou, as well as some spiritual themes in the film: http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/showthread.php?p=2648407#poststop

 

:) Enjoy!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I didn't read the article either but my husband and I talked over this issue and read on the differing viewpoints when entering into homeschooling because several families at our church hold to the view that pagan mythology has no place in Christian education and I had read another Christian homeschooling author who felt likewise. In the end, we concluded that we do not agree for various reasons already described by a few others in this thread.

 

One personal point, however, is that I was brought up without education in such things. Additionally, the church I grew up in was more inclined to share those silly, made-up stories in Sunday School about the origin of certain current "Christmas" and "Easter" traditions as if they grew out of the Scriptures themselves. Such things may seem harmless but when I grew and became exposed to different beliefs along with a fuller picture of history with it's connections between past and present, the lack of real knowledge became a huge stumbling block.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The veracity of Truth always substantiates itself. Iow, truth is truth and is not compromised by things that are not true or partially true.

Life is story.

Mythology is part of the great conversation.

We are reading FMOG, memorized Horatius at the Bridge, reading Greek Myths, along with Xian Studies IV right now. It's an interesting combo and the kids are making fantastic connections, drawing conclusions and asking questions like crazy. Good stuff.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You might enjoy revisiting this old thread with more tidbits on Odyssey connections with O Brother Where Art Thou, as well as some spiritual themes in the film: http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/showthread.php?p=2648407#poststop

 

:) Enjoy!

 

 

Thanks!

 

I'll read and then watch the movie again. One of George Clooneys best films.

 

My favorite part is when they are on stage singing. I laugh so hard...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...