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I really like the Core Knowledge "What Your Preschooler Needs to Know" Activity books.

http://books.coreknowledge.org/product.php?productid=16296

There are two activity books (ages 3-4/4-5) that go along with the Needs to Know Book. I bought BFIAR but I was so disappointed that it required the parent to go and get all the materials to do the projects. I love that all the stickers and cut-outs are in the back of the book. I am not crafty so this works out well for me. It is really open and go. For example, yesterday the lesson was on the Old Woman Who Swallowed a Fly. I read the song in the main book to my 3.5 year old. The activity book says talk about real and pretend and note that you can't really swallow all those things. Then in the back of the activity book there are punch out colored pieces of all the animals. You punch them out and on the activity page there is a picture of the woman. We sang the song as he placed the pieces in her stomach.

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At that age I always liked buying the big Preschool workbooks at like Sams Club or Costco. Also the Dollar Tree stores have a lot of preschool workbooks and fun activities for $1 each. I've also heard good things for the Five In A Row curriculum.

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We will be using Rod & Staff Preschool, Before Five in a Row and MFW Preschool. I don't think I will schedule all of this each day, but just kind of alternate them so DS doesn't get bored with them. We also do other things like calendar, day of the week, weather, shapes, numbers on a daily basis - I bought posters at the teacher supply and work with him for about 10 minutes each morning.

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We have used a lot of hands on (easy to set up and free) activities. My DS was 3 this past year while I worked with my oldest in K. Pinterest is a GREAT resource! I set up whole board called toddler-tainment for me to refer to for just these kinds of activities (pinterest.com/sbeaty/toddler-tainment/). He was much more hands-on and not a fan of workbook-style activities (at least for more than a few minutes). A few things that he enjoyed doing while I worked with my oldest:

 

-sensory boxes

-pipe cleaners activities (esp ones with cheerios threading and counting)

-bingo dauber art pages

-magnets and shapes

-playing trains

-montessori style trays

-pegboards

-geoboards with rubber bands

-scrabble jr letters - he loved to play with and sort them

-counting bears

-online stories/read alouds

-ipad alphabet and shape games

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I really like the Core Knowledge "What Your Preschooler Needs to Know" Activity books.

http://books.coreknowledge.org/product.php?productid=16296

There are two activity books (ages 3-4/4-5) that go along with the Needs to Know Book. I bought BFIAR but I was so disappointed that it required the parent to go and get all the materials to do the projects. I love that all the stickers and cut-outs are in the back of the book. I am not crafty so this works out well for me. It is really open and go. For example, yesterday the lesson was on the Old Woman Who Swallowed a Fly. I read the song in the main book to my 3.5 year old. The activity book says talk about real and pretend and note that you can't really swallow all those things. Then in the back of the activity book there are punch out colored pieces of all the animals. You punch them out and on the activity page there is a picture of the woman. We sang the song as he placed the pieces in her stomach.

:iagree: this and letter enrichment and fun crafts every so often. That's all we do.

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--Preschool Activities in a Bag ...or search Pinterest for free ideas. Popular ones are button snakes, stuffing pom-poms in container with hole in lid, Popsicle stick puzzles, I-spy bags, marble mazes

--I'm keeping some toys in the school room that will keep her busy: Little People, blocks, puzzles, puppets, board books, Lauri toys, etc.

--dry erase boards

--maze books

--cheap dollar store workbooks...My kids wanted to be like their big sibling and weren't happy with just a coloring book. At that age, they often just scribbled in them, but since it was $1, I didn't care.

--We love Kumon books or Rod and Staff preschool if she's ready for real workbooks.

--Oriental Trading Co. crafts are a bit hit...the older DC get theirs when they are finished with their school. If only I could afford these everyday. :lol:

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Thank you a million times over for this. I knew what I was doing for the three Rs with DD but didn't have any clue what I was going to do for some fun on her level. I mean of course she will color during read alouds but I wanted something that was more for her age especially since her little life is changing big time with the arrival of her new little sister in October.

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We have a very curious 18 month old and we are developing a "pre-school" program for her. In reality it is all things that we would do with her anyway but helps us to have some goals and ensure that we work with her on skills she will need later. We also are using our state homeschool requirements as the framework for what we do with her.

 

I would recommend even at the 3/4/5 year old level looking at what your goals are for her in the coming year. Those goals will then lead you to the curriculum and program that is right for your child and family.

 

Here is what DH and I have developed for our daughter. Remember this is using the framework of the state. Not everything is done every day and these are our goals for exposure to by the end of the year. We decided our family homeschool "pre-school" will be from after Labor Day to the Friday before Memorial day. We live in a very pre-school snobby area and have already encountered the oh you aren't sending her to preschool. Having the more formal plan allows us answer with ease in conversations that turn to pre-school and what the kids are doing/learning.

 

English: Pre-letter skills, Pre-reading skills, Pre-writing skills

Listen to stories read aloud, sit with book and "read", treat books gently

Color with crayons on paper, stay on the paper while coloring

 

Math: Number concept development, Shape Awareness

1 to 1 correspondance

Pre-counting skills

Shape recognition, Matching

 

Science: Explore the world

 

Social Studies: Social Skills, Imagination/Creativity

 

Art: Color awareness, recognition and matching

 

Music: Music Appreciation, signing songs, dancing

 

Health: Self Care, Nutrition

 

Physical Education: Large Motor Development

 

Life Skills: Toddler appropriate routine tasks (i.e. dressing self)

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