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Dual enroll at home through College Plus????


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No direct experience, but I have a friend whose son has done this. They are having a great experience with it. He's finishing up his degree via a distance learning program at some university that "partners" (for lack of a better term) with College Plus. She has nothing but good things to say about it. I have seen a few comments on threads here that did express dissatisfaction.

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Yes, College Plus IS legit and can be a great option for the right type of student. We have friends whose daughter completed her BA concurrently with her last 2 years of homeschool high school, and another friend whose daughter is halfway through doing the same thing. Both have glowing reports about College Plus and the experience. Both started the program as high school juniors, and because the courses progress at an excellerated rate, had completed enough college classes before the end of the first year of College Plus to have enough credits to count towards dual enrollment and to be technically considered high school graduates. (Both waited/are waiting till College Plus and the BA is complete to walk through the high school graduation with their peers.)

 

As far as using College Plus *just* as dual enrollment... I don't know if you would want to do that... the program is based around earning a BA via distance courses and CLEP testing, and is scheduled such that you complete a full 4 years of college courses in just over 2 years of time.

 

Check out this recent thread for more input, and for links to more past threads.

 

Warmest regards, Lori D.

Edited by Lori D.
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Guest Annie Kate

I've heard a lot of good about it. People who are using it seem to love it. But many of the exams are not available in Canada...and besides, Canadian tuition is not nearly as expensive as US tuition, so we have much less incentive to do this.

 

From my experience, both teaching and studying at university, in Canada there is a larger academic gap between university and highschool than in the US. Dual enrollment is very difficult here, although some university offer head start programs.

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Based on this chart on their website: http://www.collegeplus.org/prep/what-collegeprep-costs I would not consider any information to be reliable and would do lots of checking. JMO

 

hoping to help clarify a bit... that chart is comparing the younger service of the College Plus program called College Prep.

College Prep is for 14 and 15 year olds (9th/10th grader) and that's why the comparison might seem odd or not quite right if you're thinking along the lines of "of course at community college you can earn 12 credits in a semester." I know around here the community colleges and 4 year universities don't make it easy or normal for 9th and 10th graders to enroll. so they wouldn't be able to enroll at community college full time at that age in most cases.

 

haven't used either program. I don't think my oldest child is quite the right kind of student for it during high school. Her best friend waited until after high school to enroll with College Plus for getting BA degree mostly online.

 

-crystal

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hoping to help clarify a bit... that chart is comparing the younger service of the College Plus program called College Prep.

College Prep is for 14 and 15 year olds (9th/10th grader) and that's why the comparison might seem odd or not quite right if you're thinking along the lines of "of course at community college you can earn 12 credits in a semester." I know around here the community colleges and 4 year universities don't make it easy or normal for 9th and 10th graders to enroll. so they wouldn't be able to enroll at community college full time at that age in most cases.

 

haven't used either program. I don't think my oldest child is quite the right kind of student for it during high school. Her best friend waited until after high school to enroll with College Plus for getting BA degree mostly online.

 

-crystal

 

From what others have written, it sounds like it could be a good program. All the more reason why they shouldn't have to resort to misleading advertising IMO. In re-reading that page, the College Prep - dual enrollment - is for 9th through 12th grades - and that's why they mention one of the categories as available to 9th and 10th graders. To be fair, AP and some community colleges are open to this, especially for homeschoolers. I have yet to hear of a high school which won't allow a homeschooler to take the AP test due to them being in 9th or 10th, and some community colleges routinely allow 10th graders and even 9th graders, and most others will make an exception if it's warranted. Certainly more info than they'd need to give, but a simple mark indicating "depends" might suffice and give more credibility to the rest of their site info.

 

Likewise, clearly collegiate consulting is available to those taking community college courses and the same could be said for outside monitoring and mentoring - generally for AP as well. Again, all of this is JMO, and I have no experience with this program. To be able to get a BA in two years sounds amazing, but I'm wondering how it's received in the workforce. Would love to hear of some experiences with that. I agree that it sounds like a good program for some students. :001_smile:

Edited by Teachin'Mine
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I agree the chart could have said "Generally no, but mileage could vary".

or something about easy to do vs jumping through hoops. instead of the yes/no thing. In general, I don't like those kinds of comparison charts. They are bias marketing..

 

I guess around here it's not the same as other places where colleges are better about underclassman enrolling full time. Maybe for one class? maybe? but not around here. even the online stuff is for 11th and 12th graders. guess it's just different.

 

by the way.. I still didn't use the college plus or prep service though ;) My daughter has no clue what she wants to study.

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My dd18 is in College Plus! right now. She loves it! Before this she chose to complete one year of a Bible college. Now, she knows better what she wants to do with her life and asked about going through College Plus! We agreed. My girlfriend has two children and they are going through College Prep and will finish this summer and move onto College Plus.

 

We live in Canada, but we can cross over into the Detroit area to have the kids tested. Our two households are attempting to schedule the testing done at the same time to save us costs in driving and crossing the border.

 

My dd16 would have been doing College Prep, but our local school board elected to pay for her to use their online program "e-learning" and she'll finish her Ontario Diploma that way, then move to College Plus.

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Based on this chart on their website: http://www.collegeplus.org/prep/what-collegeprep-costs I would not consider any information to be reliable and would do lots of checking. JMO

 

Thanks for posting that. I agree that chart is very deceptive. Just to give a few examples....

 

1. Dual enrollment community college credits are 100% free in some states. For those students the cost may be much less than CLEP.

 

2. APs can certainly generate 12 credit hours of transferable credit. APs are much more likely to be awarded credit, and more credit, than CLEPs. That's not to say CLEP tests don't make sense for some students because they do, but it is deceptive to say AP won't result in credits.

 

3. I'm confused about where the numbers for the cost of APs is coming from. The test costs around $80 (just a bit less than CLEP depending on the fees of the test center). Students are not required to enroll in a specific course for APs. With self study and used textbooks, we've done some APs in our homeschool for very low cost - so maybe $20 investment in materials, $80 for the test resulting in close to $2,000 in college credit for a single test. So that's $100 out of pocket for $2,000 in credit.

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If a kid wants to go the CLEP route (and not every college accepts them - check with the program your child is interested in first), why pay college plus? You have to pay the testing fees anyway, why not find the books at the library and the resources that are online for free, study, take the exams, and do it on your own without a middle man? This material is not that hard. I don't see that they're good for anything other than a little bit of organization and hand holding.

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2. APs can certainly generate 12 credit hours of transferable credit. APs are much more likely to be awarded credit, and more credit, than CLEPs. That's not to say CLEP tests don't make sense for some students because they do, but it is deceptive to say AP won't result in credits.

 

agreeing that chart is not the best.... I read the chart differently. I see them saying with AP as a 9th or 10th grader you can't earn 12 credits in one semester. That's the comparison in the chart because that specific part of the website is their jr. division for younger crowd compared to the full program to earn associate degree, so I see the chart like that. doesn't mean I think it's a good chart...

 

again.. it's not that I'm in favor of their service... but I'm just seeing that section a little differently.... which suggests to me it is poorly written. :lol:

 

and yes... if they aren't familiar with the states that have free dual enrollment.. not like that everywhere.

 

Maybe it's from meeting these people at convention, but the mistake and style suggest to me that they are early in their growing service business vs being intentionally deceptive. I think they are just young in business skills.

 

*********

 

 

another option that was mentioned is the do it yourself with CLEP... one resource to help on that

 

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ClepForHomeschool/

 

-crystal

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I know one of the young gentlemen in their commercial, and it was an incredible blessing to him and his family, and he's been *extremely* successful with it. He went on to a law school after working in finance, and is now a practicing lawyer. I remember when he first started up, and his testimony in the commercial is not dramatized at all.

 

That said, that boy was *driven*. He got it all done in a year.

Edited by justamouse
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If you want to go the test it route, there are other, free options for advice.

 

Here's a site that maps out how to get a bachelor's in business or psychology in 4 weeks: http://www.bain4weeks.com/

 

Of course, you'd have to pay for the test fees, school fees, and possibly the books up front and without the benefit of financial aid, but if your goal is to get your child a degree as quickly and inexpensively as possible, the cost would probably range between $6K-$8K, depending on the test administration fees in your area and which books you chose. If you have that much already in a college fund for your kiddos, it would be an option.

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3. I'm confused about where the numbers for the cost of APs is coming from. The test costs around $80 (just a bit less than CLEP depending on the fees of the test center). Students are not required to enroll in a specific course for APs. With self study and used textbooks, we've done some APs in our homeschool for very low cost - so maybe $20 investment in materials, $80 for the test resulting in close to $2,000 in college credit for a single test. So that's $100 out of pocket for $2,000 in credit.

 

Following this thread with interest, and wanted to point out one quick thing. Most of the colleges we have asked will not give credit for the AP test alone, it must be accompanied by the year-long, College Board approved, AP class.

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Following this thread with interest, and wanted to point out one quick thing. Most of the colleges we have asked will not give credit for the AP test alone, it must be accompanied by the year-long, College Board approved, AP class.

Wow. I have not heard of this practice before. I have not researched many colleges yet, but all of the college websites I have looked at have only listed the AP score required in order to receive college credit - none has also specified that the student had to take a year-long, College Board approved class.

 

Would you be able to list the colleges that you have found that have this policy? Thanks for the information.

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Wow. I have not heard of this practice before. I have not researched many colleges yet, but all of the college websites I have looked at have only listed the AP score required in order to receive college credit - none has also specified that the student had to take a year-long, College Board approved class.

 

Would you be able to list the colleges that you have found that have this policy? Thanks for the information.

 

Yep, never heard of this either, and we have talked to many schools and many other parents with AP-laden kiddos. I'd be interested to know which schools, too!

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... go the CLEP route ... not every college accepts them - check with the program your child is interested in first

 

 

Good point Katy. It is very wise to check on what CLEPs are acceptable by the college of choice! CLEPs are not accepted everywhere...

 

 

 

... Why pay college plus? You have to pay the testing fees anyway, why not find the books at the library and the resources that are online for free, study, take the exams, and do it on your own without a middle man? This material is not that hard. I don't see that they're good for anything other than a little bit of organization and hand holding.

 

 

Just want to preface my reply with the statement that I am NOT working for College Plus, nor trying to promote them. BUT... based on the experiences of 2 families we are good friends with... you are getting a LOT more for your money than just "a little bit of organization and hand-holding" -- at least for the actual College Plus package (I do not know anything about the College Prep package).

 

- College Plus has done all the research and administrative work of lining up the specific college and the combinations of the specific CLEP tests and distance courses that will be accepted for a degree.

- College Plus walks you through some career testing/exploration FIRST.

- College Plus walks you through some special prep coursework FIRST so you will succeed in this style of learning -- speed reading course; study skills/memorization skills course; and CLEP. test practice

- The weekly emails/phone sessions with the College Plus mentor are crucial to helping young high school/college age students get through this intensively-paced, solo-study program -- remember, you have no face-to-face time with a teacher, or a classroom to have to go each week to to help you be disciplined and get the work done!

 

 

Both moms of the 2 teens we know who have completed/are in process of getting their BA with College Plus have said there is NO WAY they could have pulled this off on their own -- both the organizational aspect, AND the mentoring the student through the program to finish. And both these moms are extremely organized, smart women!

 

 

However, if you are talking about just taking a few CLEP tests (not an entire degree program) -- I agree; go for it! It would not be too hard to do the research of what is needed, what colleges will accept it, when/where the testing takes place, etc. BEST of luck in your CLEP testing! :) Warmest regards, Lori D.

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Following this thread with interest, and wanted to point out one quick thing. Most of the colleges we have asked will not give credit for the AP test alone, it must be accompanied by the year-long, College Board approved, AP class.

 

Hi, I think you may be mistaken. I've dealt with this at many colleges and have not run across this policy at all. Every college does have their own policy for what scores they accept and what credits they grant. But, all they ask for is the AP score. While scores may be noted on the transcript official scores are typically sent after the student decides to enroll.

 

It is the case that in order to list a course as an "AP course" on a transcript that the expectation is that you have gone through the College Board process to have an approved syllabus. Some homeschoolers go through this process or they register their children for courses that have gone through this process. Many homeschoolers instead list courses on the transcript something like this "Advanced Biology, A, AP score 5" and that works perfectly fine as well.

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agreeing that chart is not the best.... I read the chart differently. I see them saying with AP as a 9th or 10th grader you can't earn 12 credits in one semester. That's the comparison in the chart because that specific part of the website is their jr. division for younger crowd compared to the full program to earn associate degree, so I see the chart like that. doesn't mean I think it's a good chart...

l

 

Technically students aren't earning credits because that is determined by the colleges. But, leaving that aside for a minute, there isn't a reason why 9th or 10th grade would be able to take CLEPs but not APs. 9th and 10th graders can and do take APs. So, I don't understand how that would make more because it was on the junior division. Am I missing something?

 

Also, the costs listed for APs make no sense at all. I understand why their business model has an investment in pushing CLEPs rather than APs, but I do not find this to be accurate information. I'd always like to give anyone the benefit of the doubt that something is a mistake rather than an intentional deception. But, if they really don't understand the process, that's a concern too.

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Good point Katy. It is very wise to check on what CLEPs are acceptable by the college of choice! CLEPs are not accepted everywhere...

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just want to preface my reply with the statement that I am NOT working for College Plus, nor trying to promote them. BUT... based on the experiences of 2 families we are good friends with... you are getting a LOT more for your money than just "a little bit of organization and hand-holding" -- at least for the actual College Plus package (I do not know anything about the College Prep package).

 

- College Plus has done all the research and administrative work of lining up the specific college and the combinations of the specific CLEP tests and distance courses that will be accepted for a degree.

- College Plus walks you through some career testing/exploration FIRST.

- College Plus walks you through some special prep coursework FIRST so you will succeed in this style of learning -- speed reading course; study skills/memorization skills course; and CLEP. test practice

- The weekly emails/phone sessions with the College Plus mentor are crucial to helping young high school/college age students get through this intensively-paced, solo-study program -- remember, you have no face-to-face time with a teacher, or a classroom to have to go each week to to help you be disciplined and get the work done!

 

 

Both moms of the 2 teens we know who have completed/are in process of getting their BA with College Plus have said there is NO WAY they could have pulled this off on their own -- both the organizational aspect, AND the mentoring the student through the program to finish. And both these moms are extremely organized, smart women!

 

 

However, if you are talking about just taking a few CLEP tests (not an entire degree program) -- I agree; go for it! It would not be too hard to do the research of what is needed, what colleges will accept it, when/where the testing takes place, etc. BEST of luck in your CLEP testing! :) Warmest regards, Lori D.

 

:iagree: Our dd used CollegePlus at first, until their life purpose planning was a little too good and it showed that what she was really interested In studying was not a major they offered. College Plus was VERY good about refunding our money at this point. Dd REALLY liked her coach and was sorry to not be able to use the program. It certainly IS much more than just tips---the coaches really work with the kids. I am even more thrilled with CP Now that they are partnered with Liberty University, because ds wants to use CP for a business degree. He does not want to graduate in debt and is fine living with us rent free until he graduates. It may not be a program that suits every student, but for kids who are concerned about college debt and who aren't interested I spending 4 years on undergrad, it's a viable option that should pose no hindrance to future employment ;)

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Technically students aren't earning credits because that is determined by the colleges. But, leaving that aside for a minute, there isn't a reason why 9th or 10th grade would be able to take CLEPs but not APs. 9th and 10th graders can and do take APs. So, I don't understand how that would make more because it was on the junior division. Am I missing something?

 

 

hmm... maybe this is what you are missing that I keep seeing.

The chart is comparing AMOUNTS in a SEMESTER. While it might be technically possible somewhere out there that some 9th grader is taking 3 or 4 AP courses and then the test (as you say it is to be done).... AP courses are over a whole year, aren't they? the College Prep program is a semester only to get their feet in the water.

Without clicking around again, I can't remember (and don't really care at this point) which CLEP exams they take during the semester.

I think with most charts, it's helpful to keep in mind that you can't assume the rare data point to have the general conversation starter. and a 9th grader taking full college load in community college is rare. 9th grader taking 3-4 AP courses is rare and that's over a year.

 

Doesn't mean their program fits everyone's needs. I appreciate what they are offering in service. I'm not in the market for that service. and yes.. I think the yes/no approach on the chart is a bad approach in general. Yes/no/maybe would be better. doesn't mean I think they are not giving a good service though. just think they don't see the chart from the zoom out point of view. (it's like the commercial for Dawn dish detergent which is concentrated comparing itself to non concentrated other brand.. makes you scream at the TV)

 

on your side note... this is agreeing with you....

Yes technically, no credits are earned until a college gives the credits.. And how that is done will vary widely. the college prep/plus people work with a few universities out there to get it done.

Anyone who does AP, CLEP or IB program will not earn credit unless a college gives it on the transcript. In fact, here is my story on that with AP credit. and then one with dual enrollment.. (more than 25 years ago.. and things change.. but)

 

I have my college transcript over here.... my AP credit was given at the end of my first semester of freshman year, not the beginning. There were conditions of the credit. I had a 4 on the Calc AP. It only gave me advanced placement into 2nd semester of Calc as first semester freshman. Upon successful completion of that 2nd semester taken in first semester, then I was eligible to ask the registrar's office to give me the AP credit.

 

My dual enrollment. Took a summer class at Carneige Mellon U. They gave me credit.. but it wasn't applied to my degree at Washington U (st. louis) until I took some other advanced course and then I got credit toward my degree.

 

of course, that was decades ago...

 

ooh.. my coffee is ready.. my dh picked up some local micro roaster coffee at farmer's market this week. good stuff.. yum...

 

-crystal

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I think with most charts, it's helpful to keep in mind that you can't assume the rare data point to have the general conversation starter. and a 9th grader taking full college load in community college is rare. 9th grader taking 3-4 AP courses is rare and that's over a year.

 

But is it that much rarer than a 9th grader taking 12 credits of CLEP in one semester? If they can take 3-4 CLEPs, can't they take 3-4 APs instead? Or maybe this conversation is linked to the recent thread about the level and reputation of CLEP vs. AP. ;)

 

They are advertising, so of course they represent the other options as impossible and don't discuss the possible drawbacks of their own program. That's just business. But as consumers, we have to take the advertising and examine it critically.

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This is an option we are considering for our dd. :) I don't know it she will do the College Prep or just start a little later with College Plus.

 

She is in grade 9, but is only 13, so this will wait for a couple of years.

 

It is pricey, but I think dd will do better with the accountability to someone other than mom.;)

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If you want to go the test it route, there are other, free options for advice. Here's a site that maps out how to get a bachelor's in business or psychology in 4 weeks: http://www.bain4weeks.com/

 

 

Please be careful of scams from "diploma mills", which are worthless degrees. An incredible short time (i.e., a month) to earn a full degree is one of the warnings that you may be looking at a diploma mill. Check out this article on what diploma mills are, and how to spot them.

 

Warmest regards, Lori D.

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Please be careful of scams from "diploma mills", which are worthless degrees. An incredible short time (i.e., a month) to earn a full degree is one of the warnings that you may be looking at a diploma mill. Check out this article on what diploma mills are, and how to spot them.

 

Warmest regards, Lori D.

 

Actually, the site linked lists the same type of colleges CollegePlus recommends using, and one of the exact same colleges is listed on their website: Thomas Edison State.

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Yep, never heard of this either, and we have talked to many schools and many other parents with AP-laden kiddos. I'd be interested to know which schools, too!

 

Wow, I'm excited that I might be wrong on this one. That could be a game changer for our high school years with the youngers.

 

Patrick Henry College and Furman are the two I recall, but admittedly this was several years ago and I was only dealing with the entry level admissions people, not directors of admission or anything.

 

Looking into this now, thanks!

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Please be careful of scams from "diploma mills", which are worthless degrees. An incredible short time (i.e., a month) to earn a full degree is one of the warnings that you may be looking at a diploma mill. Check out this article on what diploma mills are, and how to spot them.

 

Warmest regards, Lori D.

 

Yes, these are the same online degrees College Plus uses- regionally accredited colleges. Not degree mills.

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But is it that much rarer than a 9th grader taking 12 credits of CLEP in one semester? If they can take 3-4 CLEPs, can't they take 3-4 APs instead? Or maybe this conversation is linked to the recent thread about the level and reputation of CLEP vs. AP. ;)

 

They are advertising, so of course they represent the other options as impossible and don't discuss the possible drawbacks of their own program. That's just business. But as consumers, we have to take the advertising and examine it critically.

 

I agree on the advertising thing. that's why I mentioned that commercial that drives me nuts about the dish detergent comparison. :lol: I just sat there shaking my head at the TV screen thinking... yeah right. :lol:

 

 

But on the first paragraph.. I guess one could defend their argument (and I have nothing to do with their program or marketing, so honestly I'm just typing to hear the keys click...) on it as "in their program it is commonly done."

 

3 general clep exams in one semester with a coach to help student... that's 6 weeks per test of intensive study. and that is NOT how AP tests are done. different process. different way to study. and for the 3 tests in Prep... it's a different route with some level and reputation issues to consider.

 

I know I looked into it. hung out in their booth for a little while. in the end realized, I wasn't interested in the product or service. My daughter has no idea what she wants to study or "be when she grows up" ;) and I have no need to have her graduate with associates prior to age 18. We've done one CLEP (more for practice of timed test and maybe it will have credit benefit later. maybe not... it was just college algebra after finishing Saxon Alg. 2). and we plan for 1 or 2 dual enrollment in 12th grade. The dual enrollment will be through a 4 year college in our state.

 

Of course, I liked how my dh said it this morning... if they are able successfully to take 3-4 AP in 9th grade then they don't need CLEP with College Prep.

(He had a lot of ap credit (well.. high scores on the tests if we get picky picky on it that wasn't credit until undergrad gave it) but his school didn't permit 9th graders to do AP..... but that was decades ago...

 

different paths for everyone... that's why we individualize with homeschooling. Not all students who have big plans and dreams for what they want a degree in want to do it AP route, or IB, or PSEO options....

 

College Plus is trying to serve a couple of niche markets out there.

 

-crystal

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Actually, the site linked lists the same type of colleges CollegePlus recommends using, and one of the exact same colleges is listed on their website: Thomas Edison State.

 

Isn't Thomas Edison State for adults who never went to college and get "credit" for life experiences?

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Wow, I'm excited that I might be wrong on this one. That could be a game changer for our high school years with the youngers.

 

Patrick Henry College and Furman are the two I recall, but admittedly this was several years ago and I was only dealing with the entry level admissions people, not directors of admission or anything.

 

Looking into this now, thanks!

 

Patrick Henry College's AP Policy

 

Furman's exam equivalencies (includes link to AP policy)

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Isn't Thomas Edison State for adults who never went to college and get "credit" for life experiences?

 

I have no idea. I was just pointing out that if the linked page is a diploma mill, then CollegePlus would be, too. And if CollegePlus isn't, then neither is the other link. The big difference I see is in the time period, but I think the link is aimed at adults and CollegePlus at teens.

Edited by angela in ohio
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3 general clep exams in one semester with a coach to help student... that's 6 weeks per test of intensive study. and that is NOT how AP tests are done. different process. different way to study. and for the 3 tests in Prep... it's a different route with some level and reputation issues to consider.

 

Yeah, I have no dog in this fight. I just thought it was funny that CollegePlus seems to be making a statement about the difference in difficulty level between AP and CLEP.

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Okay, I was a music major in college. How can a student possibly do this online? :confused:

 

 

Not all majors they offer can be done totally online. For music majors, I do believe they help you find a close enough school where you can fulfill the required credits in person.

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I have no idea. I was just pointing out that if the linked page is a diploma mill, then CollegePlus would be, too. And if CollegePlus isn't, then neither is the other link. The big difference I see is in the time period, but I think the link is aimed at adults and CollegePlus at teens.

 

NEITHER Thomas Edison State College NOR College Plus are diploma mills!! :glare:

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  • 3 weeks later...

We are in the process of enrolling my oldest daughter in CollegePlus and I realized that CollegePREP is not what I thought it was. I never paid it much attention because what I thought it was did not appeal to me for my next daughter still in high school. It is not CollegePlus for younger students. Here's the big difference and what appeals to me (if I had the money):

 

CollegePrep is not about dual-enrollment but dual credit: "two types of credit for one type of work". I was never interested before because I wasn't interested in using CLEP books for my high school curriculum for any particular course. What I discovered is that CollegePrep is about using and doing what you are ALREADY using and doing and supplementing only if necessary in order to pass the exam.

 

So, it is maximizing what you are already doing in high school in order to get college credit too.

 

I hope this helps the conversation.

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  • 1 year later...

My answers are solely based on what I understand from past discussions with my friend when her DD was earning her degree thru College Plus. I am NOT an expert on College Plus, and I'm not a sales person or advocate for them. ;) I think it *can* be a great option for the right type of student who is pursuing a particular type of degree and career. You might want to check out the College Plus website for more info.

 

 

1) How do they help the kid study for the CLEP test? Is it an online course designed to help? Are there specific classes the student has to take before they are ready to sit for the CLEP test?

 

The program is self-study, self-paced. College Plus does NOT provide tutoring or help a student study. BUT, College Plus DOES do the following:

 

- Before the student starts actual on-line distance classes or CLEP testing, College Plus runs the student through a few short study skills courses, which include speed-reading, how to read for content and testing purposes, memorization techniques, etc.

 

- Weekly, the student's personal College Plus mentor calls/emails with a pep-talk, advice, encouragement, etc., and helps address any problems that crop up before they grow into major problems. This College Plus coach remains as the student's personal mentor/advisor throughout the program. (Side note: the students I know who are doing the program have said how vital their personal coach has been in helping them persevere through the program and finish.)

 


Are there specific classes the student has to take before they are ready to sit for the CLEP test?

 

No. Again, the CLEP test credits are completely self-paced and self-study. The student studies from the specific CLEP test book purchased for that test, and when the student has completed it, the student schedules a time to take the CLEP exam at the nearest CLEP testing center (usually a community college or university).

 


 

2) How do they know which test to take?

 

Along with paying for the weekly mentoring, that is what the student's fee to College Plus is paying for. College Plus has already gone in to several universities (such as Thomas Edison) and done all the research and paperwork in order to put together a specific list of courses for each degree awarded by the participating universities. If the student has taken college classes previously, College Plus will, as much as is possible, work those courses into the student's specific degree program to have those count as credit toward the degree.

 

3) Is the price all inclusive of the Degree program and the coaching program?

 

My understanding is that the student pays separately for each CLEP study book and then pays for each CLEP test directly themselves. A little bit can be saved if the student can find used books.

 

The cost of the coaching portion of College Plus will depend on how long it takes a student to finish the degree. If the family finds partway through that they need to slow the pace and take an extra 6 or 12 months to finish, then they will need to pay for the extra coaching time. (For example, the one student I know who will be earning her degree in December has had to take an extra 6 months to finish from her original plan, due to multiple interruptions to her studies and testing a year ago when the family was making a number of trips out of state to help an ailing grandparent, who then passed away.)

 


what is the 2 year breakdown?

 

Depends on the student's specific choice of degree program and what list of classes the individual student needs to take -- and this DOES vary a bit even among students completing the same degree, as some have coursework from other sources that can count as credit. However, in talking with my friend, the CLEP study/testing process averaged (for her DD) about 4-8 weeks per course, depending on the course -- rather than the typical 16 weeks a course takes on-site at a university. Also, the student is schooling year-round for those two years -- straight through the summers, rather than taking 12 weeks off for summer, and 4 weeks off for winter break between the fall and spring semesters. That's why the 120 credits of a typical 4-year Bachelor's degree can be completed in about half the time (2 to 2.5 years).

 


can kids use other community college classes taken to transfer into program also?

 

This will very much depend on the quality of the Community College (CC), and whether or not the university used by College Plus will transfer and accept the CC classes. You'd have to discuss that with College Plus.

 

 


Sounds great for us since we were going to pay for a Community College degree for my kid's Junior/Senior year.

 

I'd look very carefully at the program, but also especially at each student. This type of program is NOT for every student. It requires a very determined, persevering attitude, a lot of self-discipline, and the student absolutely must be able to self-learn, be a good test-taker, and do well learning completely alone, with no teacher or class support. The student really has to be emotionally and intellectually mature, and to WANT this for themselves and be DETERMINED to see it through.

 

The two young ladies I know who have finished / almost finished are incredibly bright, driven, responsible, over-achievers. The third young lady who is in process and taking 3 years to do it, will, I think, make it, but she is less focused and less driven, which may be one reason why her family decided to move through the program at a slower rate, that is more in line with their DD's personality and abilities.

 

Also, if Community College (CC) and transfer of those credits is a goal for your family, I'd also suggest checking around to see how transferable those CC credits will be to other universities, just in case that ends up being a better fit for one of your students than College Plus.

 

Just my 2 cents worth! BEST of luck as you research your options! Warmest regards, Lori D.

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