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can someone explain the term "providential history" in detail


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Christopher and Lincoln Collier.

This series suplimented with thier historical fiction is our spine.

 

~christine in al

 

I like that too. But I didn't think it was right for my 2nd graders. Ditto the Joy Hakim series.

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I like that too. But I didn't think it was right for my 2nd graders. Ditto the Joy Hakim series.

 

I tracked down a copy of Builders of the Old World, but my question is - why does / did Calvert use it in middle school? Do you think it's too old? I agree with you that it's interesting.

 

The golden history of the world by Watson isn't bad, although it has a bit of anti-communist/proUN sentiment that comes across as somewhat dated towards the end. This is world history, though, not US.

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For elementary, we used the following:

K: basic American cultural literacy types of things---major holidays, major symbols, couple of big figures, etc. The kinds of things you can find in basic workbooks, library books, fun websites associated with historical sites, etc. For world at that point: used DK's "A Child Like Me" as a jumping off point and looked at library books, websites, etc. I actually did have an Abeka 2nd grade social studies text we used as a bit of a spine in K for the American history portion, but I left out the section at the end of each chapter that was providential. Easy to do since it was a read-aloud for us.:) At the time I found it for $1 at the used bookstore, I had no idea it was providential.

 

1st: SOTW vol. 1 world, ancients

2nd: SOTW vol. 2 world, medieval

3rd: SOTW vol. 3 for world along with Story of the USA workbooks 1 and 2 (by EPS, an alternate spine in Sonlight--not the Hakim which we are using in middle school). You might consider looking at the Landmark History of the American People by Daniel Boorstin as a spine for American history. We also liked American Adventures: True Stories from America's Past, 1770-1870.

4th: SOTW vol. 4 for world along with Story of the USA workbooks 3 and 4, second vol of American Adventures (1870-present). The second part of the Boorstin Landmark book could also be useful.

 

I got a lot of these suggestions from the Sonlight lists, along with suggestions for historical fiction. These particular books are not providential (we are not Christian), but I wouldn't say they ignore the role of religion.

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Providential history doesn't stop with the idea that the USA is specially blessed. It goes further and says that it is God's Will that the USA become/remain THE Christian Nation...that the USA is a new Israel, so to speak.

 

 

Hubby's dear-departed sister once hung up on him when he wouldn't agree that the writers of the Constitution had their pens actually guided by the Christian deity, that they were God's words, not men's words.

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I find it funny that Christians like calling on the name of the Egyptian sun god. There's so much paganism in the things they do. :tongue_smilie:

 

Oh boy, I see a spin-off thread there, LOL! And people think homeschoolers are so dry and boring, ha ha!!

 

They should do a "big house" reality-show for homeschool parents to win 12-years' worth of curriculum of their choice. Imagine the drama and arguments, ha ha!

 

Tracey in Oregon

who, btw, totally agrees that there is a ton of paganism in modern Christianity! :tongue_smilie:

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I tracked down a copy of Builders of the Old World, but my question is - why does / did Calvert use it in middle school? Do you think it's too old? I agree with you that it's interesting.

 

The golden history of the world by Watson isn't bad, although it has a bit of anti-communist/proUN sentiment that comes across as somewhat dated towards the end. This is world history, though, not US.

 

I think it could be either grammar or logic stage - we used it as a read aloud, but we didn't read it all and I was happy for it to be exposure. I could see returning to it when we comeback around to the ancients and doing it more in depth.

 

I'll have to look at the Golden history... I want to find something else for early modern next year...

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Oh boy, I see a spin-off thread there, LOL! And people think homeschoolers are so dry and boring, ha ha!!

 

They should do a "big house" reality-show for homeschool parents to win 12-years' worth of curriculum of their choice. Imagine the drama and arguments, ha ha!

 

Tracey in Oregon

who, btw, totally agrees that there is a ton of paganism in modern Christianity! :tongue_smilie:

 

I'm not sure I'm ready for the bloodshed over phonics only vs. sight words only. :D

 

Indeed there is a ton of paganism in modern Christianity, rivaled only by the ton of Christianity in modern Paganism.(says the Neopagan ;))

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I like that Builders includes information on common people, too, not just nobility and famous people.

 

I'll have to look at the Golden history... I want to find something else for early modern next year...

 

It's a large format book with lots of pretty illustrations! I love De Witt. :)

 

Eta - I tried to find some photos and turned up a photo of the Golden Girls. Er, not helpful, thanks Google.

These listings have some pics

http://yorebooks.ecrater.com/p/10098953/the-golden-history-of-world-cornelius

http://www.etsy.com/listing/75261637/the-golden-history-of-the-world-giant

Edited by stripe
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