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Book a Week in 2012 - Week 26


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Good Morning, Dolls! Today is the start of week 26 in our quest to read 52 books in 52 weeks. Welcome back to all our readers, welcome to all those just joining in and to all who are following our progress. Mr. Linky is all set up on the 52 books blog to link to your reviews.

 

52 Books - Halfway there Challenge: I'm always on the look out for unique or interesting book lists and forget who turned me on to Hawes Publications which lists every New York Times Bestseller listing from the year 1950 until now. You can look up which fiction and non fictions books were published and on the best seller list for the year, month and week you were born. Check out the list and read a book from the week you were born or choose another event such as a dear one's birthday or anniversary. Have fun perusing the list.

 

We are at the halfway mark. How is everyone doing? What are you reading this week?

 

 

 

 

Link to week 25

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I just finished Alafair Burke's suspense novel Angel's Tip which was pretty good. Enjoyed it more than Never Tell.

 

Currently working on nook book Judas Kiss by J.T. Ellison. Finally got into Jane-Emily by Patricia Clapp (reading during breakfast and lunch) and listening to audiobook Portrait in Death by J.D. Robb.

 

Books from my birth month (nov 59) that I have on the shelves are:

 

Exodus by Leon Uris

Dear and Glorious Physician by Taylor Caldwell

The Thirteenth Apostle by Eugene Vale

Doctor Zhivago By Boris Pasternak

 

Suppose I should move one of them up to the top of my current reading pile. :)

 

 

My book year so far has been filled with reading quite a few urban fantasy, paranormals and mysteries with a bit of classics thrown in here and there. Books completed so far

Edited by Mytwoblessings
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This week I finished

 

47.) The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson - I thought this book was excruciatingly slow for the first 300-350 pages (out of 465 total pages in the copy I read). The last 100 or so pages picked up, but it would have taken 100 pages of pure genius to begin to make up for my feelings about everything before that.

 

48.) Warhorses: Poems by Yusef Komunyakaa - This was a pretty good book of poetry with a war theme. There were many references to Greek mythology. Some of the poems had an interesting structure. Here's one poem:

 

The Catapult

 

At first,

warriors crawled into the ditch

with the demon

& wrestled the contraption

down to grapple & clutch,

as if cinching a stormy sail

on the high seas

or tussling a bull

on a cliff ledge. Loaded

with taut & release - timbers & braided hide, hemp

wound into a groan tied down on a rack,

a bowstring pulled by Zeus -

the stone nestled, ready to lift

& soar to its bull's-eye.

Exhausted by tug & sway, held there

by the great slingshot,

warriors bowed at the foot

of the cross.

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#60 I Am the Cheese (Robert Cormier). A YA fiction selection for Chapter 2 of Girl Detective's "The Shelf Discovery Project." Succeeds as a quality psychological thriller / mystery novel for adults, too.

 

Will finish Treasure Island (Robert Louis Stevenson) with the Misses tomorrow. How did we miss this when they were little? What a lot of fun. Next up is Othello for our yearly trip to the Illinois Shakespeare Festival. And my fingers are crossed re: FINALLY finishing The Shallows by month's end, too. Heh, heh, heh.

 

Complete list of books read in 2012 can be found here.

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Well, it's been a crazy busy week here, filled w/ family & friend birthdays, so we've spent most of the week celebrating & eating & going out, but doing no reading whatsoever.

 

The only reading I've managed this week is a little bit a few minutes ago, when I sat down to delve back into The Cat's Table by Michael Ondaatje. It's just so lovely, & lyrical, & enchanting, & amusing. Nostalgic too. Can you tell I'm loving it? (I'm happy because I loved Ondaatje's writing in The English Patient, but I didn't like that story at all. So, I'm pleased that I get to read his lovely writing & that I get to enjoy the story/plot too!)

 

Robin, it was fun to see your complete list of books read. Wow, you've read a lot already this year!!!! I think I've read 4 of the books on your list, lol.

 

Osmosis Mom, nice to see you here in the thread. :001_smile:

 

Crstarlette, thanks for posting the poem. I've never really been a big reader of poetry, but I'm always a little in awe of those who do (& those who share their finds). :001_smile: I didn't find the Girl w/ the Dragon Tattoo boring (maybe more creepy & overall not my style of story); I loved the main characters, but not the tale.

 

Mothersweets, can I come meet you for a meal once you're in Paris? Ahhhh. Sounds like a wonderful dream!

 

M-mv, I always enjoy reading your viewpoint on books you're reading. I found I liked Treasure Island less than I thought I would.

 

2012 Books Read:

01. Mozart's Last Aria by Matt Rees (3 stars)

02. Oh No She Didn't by Clinton Kelly (2 stars, if you're in the right mood, lol)

03. The Sisters Brothers by Patrick deWitt (4 stars)

04. In a Strange Room by Damon Galgut (4 stars)

05. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by J.K. Rowling (5 stars)

06. The Infernals by John Connolly (3 stars)

07. Kitchen by Banana Yoshimoto (2 stars)

08. The Coral Thief by Rebecca Stott (3 stars)

09. Zeroville by Steve Erickson (4.5 stars)

10. Broken Glass Park by Alina Bronsky (4 stars)

 

11. Hygiene and the Assassin by Amélie Nothomb (2 stars)

12. The Geography of Bliss by Eric Weiner (3 stars)

13. The Raw Shark Texts by Steven Hall (4 stars)

14. The Nun by Simonetta Agnello Hornby (4 stars)

15. The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern (5 stars)

16. The Enchanted April by Elizabeth von Arnim (3 stars)

17. The Devotion of Suspect X by Keigo Higashino (3 stars)

18. The Scrapbook of Frankie Pratt by Caroline Preston (3 stars)

19. Cooking with Fernet Branca by James Hamilton-Paterson (4 stars)

20. Stone Junction by Jim Dodge (3 stars)

 

21. Clash of Civilizations Over an Elevator in Piazza Vittorio by Amara Lakhous (3 stars)

22. Colony by Hugo Wilcken (5 stars)

23. Swimming to Antarctica by Lynne Cox (3 stars)

24. The Master & Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov (4.5 stars)

25. Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs (3 stars)

26. The Dream Life of Sukhanov by Olga Grushin (4 stars)

27. Vanishing Point by David Markson (3 stars)

28. I Am Half-Sick of Shadows by Alan Bradley (4 stars)

29. The Curious Case of the Clockwork Man by Mark Hodder (4 stars)

30. Unclutter Your Life in One Week by Erin Rooney Doland (2 stars)

 

31. Hounded by Kevin Hearne (4 stars)

32. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald (5 stars)

33. The Bookman by Lavie Tidhar (2 stars)

34. Anthem by Ayn Rand (3 stars)

35. Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte (2 stars; perhaps only 1 star...)

36. Pink Boots and a Machete by Mireya Mayor (3.5-4 stars)

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I finished a couple of books last week:

#23 Rilla of Ingleside by L. M. Montgomery - a reread of a favorite :)

#24 Greenmantle by John Buchan

 

52 Books - Halfway there Challenge: I'm always on the look out for unique or interesting book lists and forget who turned me on to Hawes Publications which lists every New York Times Bestseller listing from the year 1950 until now. You can look up which fiction and non fictions books were published and on the best seller list for the year, month and week you were born. Check out the list and read a book from the week you were born or choose another event such as a dear one's birthday or anniversary. Have fun perusing the list.

 

Fun! I had to chuckle at some of the best sellers during the week I was born (Sept. '79) For example:

The Third World War: August 1985 (not surprisingly out of print!)

Tinsel (description: "under the tinsel of Hollywood lies tinsel":lol:)

 

This one does look good: War and Remembrance by Herman Wouk - anyone here read it? :)

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I just finished the audio book The Hoarder in You by Dr. Robin Zasio. It was pretty interesting and gave me some ideas of things to work on. I've looked at clutter management books before, but this one actually made an impact. It may have been that I listened to it while exercising, rather than just half-heartedly flipping through it.

 

I'm also reading Crazy by Pete Earley--about his son's journey through the mental health and prison systems. It is gripping.

 

My book club is reading Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet, and I have it as an audio book to listen to.

 

I love the halfway challenge! I looked at my birth month (Aug 1975) and got a kick out of the fact that Richard Chamberlain starred in mini series adaptations of two books on the lists that month (The Thorn Birds and Shogun). I chose Ragtime by E.L. Doctorow, though. It is supposed to have changed the American novel.

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Books from my birth month (nov 59) that I have on the shelves are:

 

Exodus by Leon Uris

Dear and Glorious Physician by Taylor Caldwell

The Thirteenth Apostle by Eugene Vale

Doctor Zhivago By Boris Pasternak

 

Suppose I should move one of them up to the top of my current reading pile. :)

 

 

I really like this idea of checking out what was published during your birth month and year! Thanks, Robin, for the idea! After I'm done posting here and checking out the other threads :) I'm going to check the link you so thoughtfully included.

 

ETA: I checked the site. While I was familiar with some of the authors and some of the titles, there was only ONE book I had actually read. I have bookmarked the page and may, in the future, try to increase that number - some of the titles sound intriguing.

Edited by eaglei
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This week I finished:

 

#31 - Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking, by Susan Cain. Wow! Just wow! I found myself. This was fascinating reading. The author meshed facts and studies with real life examples from real people including herself and the result is a can't-put-down, eye-opening, educational, and entertaining read. Shortly into the book, I reached for a pencil and piece of scrap paper to jot down page references. When I finished the book, I typed up a number of those references in my journal. Quiet is quite a validating book for introverts. To all who recommended this book - a huge Thank You!

 

Currently I am reading:

 

#32 - The Truth About Hillary, by Edward Klein. Quick reading and 'nufff said.

 

Next up will be Chaim Potok's The Gift of Asher Lev, sequel to My Name is Asher Lev. Has anyone read both of these books? Did you find the sequel as absorbing as its predecessor?

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Robin,

 

Thanks for the NY Times listing; it was interesting to see what was popular when I was born.

 

You might find the Barnes and Noble site to be of interest. It has some interesting articles and reviews in many genres. See here.

 

Regards,

Kareni

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61. The Poisoner's Handbook by Deborah Blum~non-fiction, forensic science, chemistry, New York, Prohibition. I really enjoyed this historical look at the growth of forensic chemistry, particularly on poisons, during the Prohibition era in NYC. Nicely broken down into lurid tales of murder and chemistry. *

 

60. Cold Comfort Farm by Stella Gibbons~parody, farm family/life, '30s. I hated and was amused by this in turns. I can see why it was popular, like Vanity Fair it manages to skewer everyone. It parodies farm dramas of the period and when it hits its target it is funny. Unfortunately I kept feeling smarmy ex-rich girl was supposed to be better than everyone. Eh. I found her obnoxious. On a positive note, "I saw something *nasty* in the woodshed" now totally cuts me up.

 

59. The Green Mile by Stephen King~supernatural, prison, 1930s. *

58. The Sacred Journey by Frederick Buechner~religious, memoir, childhood.

57. Wisconsin Gardens & Landscapes by Mary Lou Santovec~public gardens, Wisconsin.

56. Sarabeth's Bakery by Sarabeth Levine~cookbook, baking, pastries.

55. Essential Pleasures edited by Robert Pinsky~poetry, compilation, audio CD included.

54. Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home by Jeni Britton Bauer~cookbook, ice cream

53. The Sea Gull by Anton Chekhov~Russian, play.

52. A few hundred pages of Hyperion and all of Farewell to Hyperion by Dan Simmons~science fiction, future worlds, pilgrim tales.

51. North by Northanger by Carrie Bebis~Jane Austen, mystery

50. The Essential Garden Design Workbook by Rosemary Alexander~non-fiction, gardening, landscape design.

49. The Scrapbook of Frankie Pratt: a Novel in Pictures by Caroline Preston~fiction, '20s, NY, Paris, coming of age.

48. Q: a Novel by Evan Mandery~fiction, quirky, time travel.

47. The Monster of Florence by Douglas Preston and Mario Spezi~memoir, Italy, criminal case, serial killer.

46. Food Chaining by Fracker~non-fiction, food issues, picky eaters.

45. The Long Retreat by Andrew Krivak~memoir, Jesuit.

44. Exploring Garden Style by Tauton Press~non-fiction, gardening, design.

43. Homeschooling Children with ADD (and Other Special Needs) by Lenore Hayles~non-fiction, education, medical issues.

42. Reading Lolita in Tehran by Azar Nafrisi~non-fiction, memoir, Iran, literature.

41. Five Quarters of the Orange by Joanne Harris~fiction, France, WWII, food. *

40. Blue Like Jazz by Donald Miller~memoir, stories, Christianity.

39. Just Take a Bite! by Lori Ernsberger~non-fiction, food issues, special needs.

38. Suspense and Sensibility by Carrie Bebris~Jane Austen, Mystery.

37. Pride and Prescience by Carrie Bebris~Jane Austen, Darcys, Mystery, supernatural.

36. Superfudge by Judy Blume~fiction, classic children's book.

35. The Explosive Child by Ross Greene~non-fiction, behavior, children

34. Cyteen 2: The Rebirth by CJ Cherryh~science fiction, cloning.

33. The Peace War by Vernor Vinge~science fiction, future, technology.

32. Whiskey Breakfast by Richard Lindberg~memoir, Swedish Immigration, Chicago.

31. Corvus: a Life with Birds by Esther Woolfson~non-fiction, birds.

30. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen~classic literature.

29. Cyteen: The Betrayal by CJ Cherryh~science fiction, future, space, cloning.

28. Divergent by Veronica Roth~youth fiction, dystopian.

27. The Help by Kathryn Stockett~fiction, '60s, race relations.

26. Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs~youth, fiction.

25. Below Stairs: the Classic Kitchen Maid Memoir by Margaret Powell~non-fiction, memoir.

24. Ender in Exile by Orson Scott Card~fiction.

23. Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical Boyhood by Oliver Sacks~non-fiction, memoir.

22. The Garden Book of Wisconsin by Melinda Myers~non-fiction, gardening, flowers and landscaping.

21. Putting Down Roots: Gardening Insights from Wisconsin's Early Settlers by Marcia Carmichael~non-fiction, history, gardening.

20. Gudrun's Kitchen: Recipes from a Norwegian Family by Irene and Edward Sandvold~cookbook, biography.

19. Twelve Owls by Laura Erickson~non-fiction, birds.

18. A Thread of Grace by Mary Doria Russell~fiction, WWII **

17. A Fire Upon the Deep by Vernor Vinge~science fiction, space

16. Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card~classic science fiction, read aloud.

15. Flour by Joanne Chung~cookbook, baking

14. Home to Woefield by Susan Juby~light fiction, humorous

13. Making the Most of Shade by Larry Hodgson~non-fiction/gardening

12. Growing Perennials in Cold Climates by Mike Heger~non-fiction/gardening

11. Case Histories by Kate Atkinson~mystery

10. Letters from Yellowstone by Diane Smith~historical fiction

9. The Circus in Winter by Cathy Day~fiction

8. The Alphabet in the Park by Adelia Prado~poetry

7. The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down by Anne Fadiman~non-fiction/medical

6. One Thousand White Women by Jim Fergus~speculative fiction

5. The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place: The Hidden Gallery by Maryrose Woods~juvenile

4. The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Jester~(read aloud) juvenile

3. The Alienist by Caleb Carr~Mystery

2. The Forgotten Garden by Kate Morton~Fiction

1. The Children's Book by A.S. Byatt~Fiction *

Working on:

Blood Meridian (McCarthy)

Temple of the Golden Pavilion (Mishima)

Moby Dick (Melville)

Summer People

 

 

*~top 5 books of the year (so far)

**~best book of the year (so far)

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I'm not sure how many weeks ago I last posted or what I posted about, but I've really slowed down on my reading.

 

#34 - Why We Get Fat and What to Do About It, by Gary Taubes

#35 - Confederacy of Dunces, by John Kennedy Toole. I've been reading this for about 2 weeks. It is taking longer than it should.

 

Nothing has been "grabbing" me lately. Has anyone read "Tell The Wolves I'm Home" by Carla Rifka Brunt? I've only seen very positive reviews and it looks like an interesting story. I'm off to go through the past few weeks of threads to look for some good book titles.

 

ETA: thank you for the link to the NYT bestsellers for your birth week - very interesting. Going through the past few weeks of threads, I've put these on hold at my library: the Dick Van Dyke autobiography, Pink Boots and a Machete, and the one about the book thief.

Edited by Pink and Green Mom
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I finished four books this week.

In the Heart of the Sea by Nathaniel Philbrick (#19), A Year of Wonders by Geraldine Brooks (#20), People of the Book also by Geraldine Brooks (#21), and Divergent by Veronica Roth (#22). Hopefully I can catch up by the end of this week.

 

My favorite was Heart of the Sea which was a find from my own bookshelves. I'm getting ready to start Pink Boots and a Machete which was waiting for me at the library. After that I may do the NYT birthday list. I have some great choices including To Kill A Mockingbird, The Incredible Journey, and The Winter of Our Discontent by Steinbeck. These are all from October of 1961.

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I finished two books this week... "The Witness" by Nora Roberts (one of her better ones in a while), and "Bringing up Bebe" by Pamela Druckerman (comparison of American and French parenting styles). Both were pretty good. Brings me to a total of 36 titles for the year.

 

Not sure what's up next... I've been thinking about re-reading the Mitford series by Jan Karon... it's been a few years and I think it's a great, gentle series that would be worth revisiting. :)

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We are at the halfway mark. How is everyone doing? What are you reading this week?

 

 

Egads -- the halfway point? I'm at book 19!

 

It's been a steady trickle of books this year -- no time for any marathon reads, not as much time in the car for marathon listens. But I do have a recommendation for any of you Star Trek or television sci fi nerds out there. Red Shirts, by John Scalzi is a very funny geek fest of Meta sci fi tropes that is simply delightful. It had me laughing out loud for most of it, then saying "awww" at the very sweet ending. Best of all is the audio version as it is read by Wil Wheaton, you know, Ensign Crusher on Next Generation. Total happy Meta geek fest. And looky here, NPR has a review of it!!

 

The rest of my reading isn't that deep, either.

 

 

  • The Osiris Ritual by George Mann -- a steam punk mystery, 2nd in the series

  • Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie -- the narrator is a prat

  • Into the Wilderness -- a historical fiction romance, fun mindless read

  • Sacre Bleu by Christorpher Moore -- a comedic alternative history of the lives of great painters in France. The premise didn't quite carry the book for me.

  • Terry Pratchett: The Spirit of Fantasy by Craig Cabell -- not a biography, more an appreciation of Pratchett interrupted by the author's hang up on the difference between sci-fi and fantasy. Disappointing

  • Interesting Times by Terry Pratchett -- very funny Discworld nonsense, yet Pratchett does an excellent parody of Chinese history

 

 

Next up??? I have a stack of titles to choose from and jury duty this week. I guess it depends on my mood!

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Finished this week:

73. Bringing Up Bebe: One American Mother Discovers the Wisdom of French Parenting. This book was much more engaging than I expected, and I thoroughly enjoyed it. An American living in Paris contrasts her pregnancy/parenting experience with that of her upper crust friends back in the States. It made me want to eat good cheese and be a less neurotic parent -- both good things!

 

74. The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Vol. 1. This was so much fun! Volume 2 is next on my to-read list.

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A little bit of reading for me this week, I finished

#44 A New Earth by Eckhart Tolle

 

A lot of reading for DD10

#48 Rumor Has It

#49 Ice Dreams

#50 The Problem with Here is That It's Where I'm From

#51 The Good Dog

#52 The Boy Who Lost His Face

#53 Sophie the Chatterbox

#54 Sophie the Hero

#55 Sophie the Awesome

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Fun! I had to chuckle at some of the best sellers during the week I was born (Sept. '79) For example:

The Third World War: August 1985 (not surprisingly out of print!)

Tinsel (description: "under the tinsel of Hollywood lies tinsel":lol:)

 

:lol: (P.S. You're young!!!)

 

I just finished the audio book The Hoarder in You by Dr. Robin Zasio. It was pretty interesting and gave me some ideas of things to work on. I've looked at clutter management books before, but this one actually made an impact. It may have been that I listened to it while exercising, rather than just half-heartedly flipping through it.

 

I will have to check this one out. I know the author from seeing her on the show Hoarders. I enjoy reading 'clutter busting' type books to try & remind myself to get rid of stuff. (I have some relatives who are close to hoarder level & I want to make sure I never end up there....)

 

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking, by Susan Cain. Wow! Just wow!

 

With all the great reviews of this one here, I want to read it!

 

Hungary, with a little about England and Australia.

 

Thanks for clarifying. I was wondering about that too.

 

60. Cold Comfort Farm by Stella Gibbons~parody, farm family/life, '30s. I hated and was amused by this in turns. I can see why it was popular, like Vanity Fair it manages to skewer everyone. It parodies farm dramas of the period and when it hits its target it is funny. Unfortunately I kept feeling smarmy ex-rich girl was supposed to be better than everyone. Eh. I found her obnoxious. On a positive note, "I saw something *nasty* in the woodshed" now totally cuts me up.

 

I recently checked this out of the library, then returned it unread. (I've had so many stacks of books lately, yet so little time &/or motivation to read much that lots of my recent library picks have been returned unread.) Glad to see your review. I think it's not quite as high on my want to read list now, lol.

 

Nothing has been "grabbing" me lately.

 

I totally know what you mean. I'm in the same boat a lot of the time lately. (Hope you enjoy Pink Boots & a Machete!)

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A Year of Wonders by Geraldine Brooks (#20), People of the Book also by Geraldine Brooks

 

How did you like these? I really enjoyed People of the Book when I read it (at least, the story of the book itself; didn't enjoy the modern day story part as much). I wonder if I would like A Year of Wonders or if I would find it too depressing?

 

"Bringing up Bebe" by Pamela Druckerman (comparison of American and French parenting styles).

 

Another one I keep seeing recommended & want to read. (And, one that I had recently from the library & returned unread. :tongue_smilie: I will get to it....)

 

Next up??? I have a stack of titles to choose from and jury duty this week. I guess it depends on my mood!

 

Hey, Jenn! :001_smile: I've found there's lots of down time during jury duty, so it's a good time to get some reading in. Enjoy!

 

74. The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Vol. 1. This was so much fun! Volume 2 is next on my to-read list.

 

I really want to read this one too!

 

I finished Hiroshima Diary. I found it fascinating to read a first person account of the bombing of Hiroshima from someone who was in Hiroshima when it happened.

 

Have you read Hiroshima in the Morning? (I have it sitting on my shelf to read, but haven't read it yet.)

 

A little bit of reading for me this week, I finished

#44 A New Earth by Eckhart Tolle

 

Did you like it?

 

I finished Farenheit 451 this morning. It was my first time reading it. Wow! What a good read!

 

I'm getting ready to re-read this soon. (Last read it when I was in high school -- a.k.a. a LONG time ago.)

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....

 

This one does look good: War and Remembrance by Herman Wouk - anyone here read it? :)

 

W&R is the sequel to Wouk's The Winds of War. It's been a long time since I read them, but in my memory, they were excellent. You could read W&R alone, but it is in the first book that you fall for the characters.

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I started at your "Books completed so far" list and ended up at your DYI MFA list. I love it; I am inspired! I'm now working on convincing myself to work through a similar list (minus a couple of books my library doesn't have, plus a couple of alternates) after I've completed a few education/parenting books on my short list. Did you compile your DYI MFA list yourself or find it somewhere? Any reason you (or the list creator) picked those particular books?

 

 

Crstarlette, thanks for posting the poem. I've never really been a big reader of poetry, but I'm always a little in awe of those who do (& those who share their finds). :001_smile: I didn't find the Girl w/ the Dragon Tattoo boring (maybe more creepy & overall not my style of story); I loved the main characters, but not the tale.

 

 

You're welcome! I just figure posting one poem will give you all a much better idea of the work than any review I whip up.

 

I finished two books this week... "The Witness" by Nora Roberts (one of her better ones in a while), and "Bringing up Bebe" by Pamela Druckerman (comparison of American and French parenting styles). Both were pretty good. Brings me to a total of 36 titles for the year.

 

 

 

Finished this week:

73. Bringing Up Bebe: One American Mother Discovers the Wisdom of French Parenting. This book was much more engaging than I expected, and I thoroughly enjoyed it. An American living in Paris contrasts her pregnancy/parenting experience with that of her upper crust friends back in the States. It made me want to eat good cheese and be a less neurotic parent -- both good things!

 

Twice in one thread - attention grabbed!

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I'm still in the middle of readalongs and giant Victorian novels, so I haven't got much to report.

 

I finished the Decameron (finally! don't bother) and The Prince (good reading).

 

I'm close to done with my 3 readalongs, and I'm halfway through Little Women, which is for a project. I had to put Bleak House down in favor of LW for a while. :( (I like LW but I already know what happens!)

 

Absolutely NOTHING on the bestseller list for the end of October 1973 looks remotely interesting. Bleh, I'm sticking to Madame Bovary. :D

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I started at your "Books completed so far" list and ended up at your DYI MFA list. I love it; I am inspired! I'm now working on convincing myself to work through a similar list (minus a couple of books my library doesn't have, plus a couple of alternates) after I've completed a few education/parenting books on my short list. Did you compile your DYI MFA list yourself or find it somewhere? Any reason you (or the list creator) picked those particular books?

 

Gabriella from DIY MFA gave me the idea and I created the list myself. The books on my lists are ones I picked up over a period of time and hadn't read yet. Decided to make a concerted effort to read, learn and apply to my writing. Several of the books are from Write Great Fiction series including a couple by James Scott Bell. He always has lots of wisdom - follow his blog. And I knew was on the right track when heard from a professional editor the best books to read on editing as the G.F. series. Also picked books that would give advice for writing romantic suspense stories.

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I read The Sweet Life in Paris: Delicious Adventures in the World's Most Glorious-and Perplexing-City. Yes, I am feeding (ha!) my secret fantasy of living in Paris and eating wonderfully prepared food every day. A girl can dream, can't she?

 

Almost done with At Home.

 

 

I think we all dream of living in or having a long visit in Paris one of the years. It's the dream city. :)

 

Fun! I had to chuckle at some of the best sellers during the week I was born (Sept. '79) For example: The Third World War: August 1985 (not surprisingly out of print!) Tinsel (description: "under the tinsel of Hollywood lies tinsel":lol:) This one does look good: War and Remembrance by Herman Wouk - anyone here read it? :)

 

Oh, I feel old. Graduated high school in 78. Just kidding. The Last Enchantment by Mary Stewart or The Dead Zone by Steven King caught my eye.

 

I love the halfway challenge! I looked at my birth month (Aug 1975) and got a kick out of the fact that Richard Chamberlain starred in mini series adaptations of two books on the lists that month (The Thorn Birds and Shogun). I chose Ragtime by E.L. Doctorow, though. It is supposed to have changed the American novel.

 

Ragtime! Cool beans!

 

Robin, Thanks for the NY Times listing; it was interesting to see what was popular when I was born. You might find the Barnes and Noble site to be of interest. It has some interesting articles and reviews in many genres. See here.

 

Hey, neat list. Bookmarking it. Don't know how I missed it when on b&n's website practically daily.

 

After that I may do the NYT birthday list. I have some great choices including To Kill A Mockingbird, The Incredible Journey, and The Winter of Our Discontent by Steinbeck. These are all from October of 1961.

 

Great choices. Neato!

 

It's been a steady trickle of books this year -- no time for any marathon reads, not as much time in the car for marathon listens. But I do have a recommendation for any of you Star Trek or television sci fi nerds out there. Red Shirts, by John Scalzi is a very funny geek fest of Meta sci fi tropes that is simply delightful. It had me laughing out loud for most of it, then saying "awww" at the very sweet ending. Best of all is the audio version as it is read by Wil Wheaton, you know, Ensign Crusher on Next Generation. Total happy Meta geek fest. And looky here, NPR has a review of it!!

 

Love John Scalzi. Follow his Blog. Adding it to my list to read after get to Old Man's War.

 

I finished Farenheit 451 this morning. It was my first time reading it. Wow! What a good read!

 

Wasn't it though. Lots of food for thought.

 

I checked the NYT bestseller list for my birthday and I came up with Jonathan Livingstone Seagull. :glare:

 

I did read The Odessa File in high school though. That was on the list too.

 

Hey ... me too! February 1973?

 

Ya'll also have I'm O.K. Your O.K. and The Joy of Sex on your lists. :lol: I was 14 at the time and remember all the press about both of them.

 

Absolutely NOTHING on the bestseller list for the end of October 1973 looks remotely interesting. Bleh, I'm sticking to Madame Bovary. :D

 

Well that's a bummer! I liked Mary Stewart and Victoria Holt back then.

 

 

So much fun seeing what everyone is finding on their lists.

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I did it - I finished a book this week. I'm definitely back!

 

Admittedly I let ds watch TV for a few hours so I could finish the book, and I am really struggling to get back into the habit of regular reading, but I am making progress.

 

I read Montessori in the Classroom by Paula Polk Lillard. It's not what I'd call a page-turner, but it does give a very clear and detailed, diary-style overview of how a Montessori preschool class works. She covers class life, language, mathematics and special children in different sections, and includes several appendices with more details on materials and how they are used. As I am now a confirmd Montessori Parent (ds5 joins his big sister at school in July) I will probably look for a few of her other books on Montessori.

 

I will try to finish Frankenstein and A Monster's Notes this coming week - the latter retells the Frankenstein story from the Monster's perspective. I also need to get another audio book going if I am ever going to get close to 52 this year.

 

Nikki

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I wonder if I would like A Year of Wonders or if I would find it too depressing?

 

I read A Year of Wonders, too. I really didn't think it was depressing. However, the ending was DUMB. If you read it, stop before you get to the epilogue. You can completely skip that part and still get the story. That said, I loved the book. The book was at a good stopping point before that epilogue/last chapter (can't remember if it was an epilogue or a final chapter).

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I am reading Mr. Wentworth's Diary (of Persuasion fame- like it a lot). Finished King of the Wind with the youngers- love M. Henry. She can really write beautiful prose. Still slogging through 5 Red Herrings by Sayers and Technopoly.

I have the Dick Van Dyke book waiting to read and can't wait to dive in!

 

I am bogged down with trying to write more diligently (and doing it!) play in the pool with the kids, garden, horse study with a group of 3rd graders, work out, work on getting doors/door frames finished to put in on the 2nd floor, keep track of my adult-ish kids, WHO ever says stay at home Mom's have free time is delusional. And why, why do I always think I'll have all this free time in the summer?!

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Gabriella from DIY MFA gave me the idea and I created the list myself. The books on my lists are ones I picked up over a period of time and hadn't read yet. Decided to make a concerted effort to read, learn and apply to my writing. Several of the books are from Write Great Fiction series including a couple by James Scott Bell. He always has lots of wisdom - follow his blog. And I knew was on the right track when heard from a professional editor the best books to read on editing as the G.F. series. Also picked books that would give advice for writing romantic suspense stories.

 

Great, thanks! Love the DIY MFA site and I'm checking it out now - trying to find the first post and start from the beginning, but I've read the About, Welcome, FAQs, How Does it Work pages.

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I started Diary of a Provincial Lady and I'm kind of bored. So far it's all about what so and so said and trying to keep up with The Joneses.

 

I don't relate because I don't care what most people think of me, my house, or my kids. I don't try to "fit in" and "keep up" with what society says I should or should not be doing or wearing.

 

Not sure if I'll continue.

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I'm keeping up so far. I just finished #26 Darcy's Voyage by Kara Louise. This was a free Kindle book a while back. It was not what I expected but I ended up thoroughly enjoying it. It is basically a retelling of Pride and Prejudice, not a continuation of the story. A Jane Austen purist would not like it ;)

 

I looked up the week I was born on the NYT list. The only book I even recognize is The Exorcist and I can guarantee I will never read it.

 

Robin mentioned what she had been reading most this year so I took a look at my list. Most of my reading has been Regency, mystery, or Shakespeare. The Mr. & Mrs. Darcy mysteries combined both the Regency and the mystery. :D I can't remember the last time that my most read was not fantasy.

 

I haven't decided what to read next. I'm slowly reading through an H.G. Wells book I picked up at the library book sale, but that's not my main book.

 

26. "Darcy's Voyage" by Kara Louise

25. "A Red Herring Without Mustard" by Alan Bradley

24. "Below Stairs" by Margaret Powell

23. "The Deception at Lyme" by Carrie Bebris

22. "The Intrigue at Highbury" by Carrie Bebris

21. "Faro's Daughter" by Georgette Heyer

20. "The Merchant of Venice" by William Shakespeare

19. "The Sword of Shanara" by Terry Brooks

18. "The Matters at Mansfield" by Carrie Bebris

17. "A Midsummer Night's Dream" by William Shakespeare

16. "Juliet" by Anne Fortier

15. "Romeo and Juliet" by William Shakespeare

14. "North by Northanger" by Carrie Bebris

13. "Yarn Harlot" by Stephanie Pearl-McPhee

12. "Suspense and Sensibility" by Carrie Bebris

11. "The Tempest" by William Shakespeare

10. "Cotillion" by Georgette Heyer

9. "Pride and Prescience" by Carrie Bebris

8. "Ophelia" by Lisa Klein

7. "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead" by Tom Stoppard

6. "Hamlet" by William Shakespeare

5. "The Sisters Grimm" by Michael Buckley

4. "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows" by J. K. Rowling

3. "The Lost Hero" by Rick Riordan

2. "Henry V" by William Shakespeare

1. "The Eyre Affair" by Jasper Fforde

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I finished the Decameron (finally! don't bother)

 

I remember reading (& liking!) it in college. :lol:

 

I read A Year of Wonders, too. I really didn't think it was depressing. However, the ending was DUMB. If you read it, stop before you get to the epilogue. You can completely skip that part and still get the story. That said, I loved the book. The book was at a good stopping point before that epilogue/last chapter (can't remember if it was an epilogue or a final chapter).
Was Year of Wonders the one about the Black Death?

 

Oh man, that book annoyed me. It was like everyone's personality suddenly changed in the last few chapters, and the epilogue moved into some kind of dream world.

 

Ok, so it's still on my maybe list. But, I have so many books on my to-read list, I'll never make it to my maybe list. ;):lol:

 

WHO ever says stay at home Mom's have free time is delusional. And why, why do I always think I'll have all this free time in the summer?!

 

:iagree: So THAT'S why I'm not able to get much summer reading done! :tongue_smilie:

 

I started Diary of a Provincial Lady and I'm kind of bored. So far it's all about what so and so said and trying to keep up with The Joneses.

 

That type of stuff does get irritating to read after awhile, imo.

 

I looked up the week I was born on the NYT list. The only book I even recognize is The Exorcist and I can guarantee I will never read it.

 

Yeah, Rosemary's Baby is on the list for my week & I can guarantee I won't be reading that one either. (Gore Vidal's Washington D.C. also is on the NYT list for my week, so perhaps I'll try that one at some point. It has been ages since I've read anything by Vidal, but I remember always enjoying his writing.)

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I managed to finish two in the last few days. Both of them were fun light reads. An Unsuitable Job for a Woman was exactly what I wanted and expected - a quick British mystery. I didn't like it as much as I like her Dalgliesh stories but still interesting. Behind the Bedroom Wall was a YA book I saw recommended somewhere. Good story and interesting POV for a WWII - Jews hiding in Germany story. I'm going to put it on DD reading list in a few years.

 

 

In progress:

The Unknown Ajax by Georgette Heyer (ladies book club)

Stein on Writing by Sol Stein

Calico Bush by Rachel Field (read aloud)

Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K. Jerome (audiobook)

 

2012 finished books:

 

74. An Unsuitable Job for a Woman by PD James (***)

73. Behind the Bedroom Wall by Laura Williams (***)

72. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald (****)

71. The Fellowship of the Ring by JRR Tolkien (****)

70. The Third Policeman by Flann O'Brien (**)

69. The Princess and the Goblin by George MacDonald (****)

68. The School Story by Andrew Clement - read aloud (****)

67. The Great Brain by John D. Fitzgerald (*)

66. Free-Range Kids by Lenore Skenazy (***)

65. Red Sails to Capri by Ann Weil -read aloud (***)

64. The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy by Douglass Adams (*****)

63. Death of a Cad by MC Beaton (**)

62. Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood (***)

61. The Year of Living Biblically by AJ Jacobs (***)

60. A Pocket Full of Rye by Agatha Christie (***)

59. The Secret Adversary (Tommy and Tuppence) by Agatha Christie (****)

58. Tales of Robin Hood by Tony Allan - read aloud (****)

57. Betsy-Tacy by Maud Hart Lovelace (*****)

56. The Beekeepers Apprentice by Laurie R. King (****)

55. Death of a Gossip by MC Beaton (***)

54. The Thin Man by Dashiell Hammett (**)

53. On Writing by Stephen King (*****)

52. Maus by Art Spiegelman (****)

51. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie (***)

50. The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins (****)

49. The Night Bookmobile by Audrey Niffinegger (*)

48. Notes from a Small Island by Bill Bryson (***)

47. Casino Royale - James Bond by Ian Fleming (**)

46. A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson - Audiobook (***)

45. The Lucky Shopping Manual by Kim Lenitt (*****)

44. And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie (****)

43. Half Moon Investigations by Eoin Colfer - Audiobook (****)

42. Half Magic by Edward Eager (***)

41. Dealing with Dragons by Patricia Wrede - Read Aloud (****)

 

Books 1 - 40

 

Amy's Rating System:

 

***** - Fantastic, couldn't put it down

**** - Very good

*** - Enjoyable but nothing special

** - Not recommended

* - Horrible

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I started Diary of a Provincial Lady and I'm kind of bored. So far it's all about what so and so said and trying to keep up with The Joneses.

 

I don't relate because I don't care what most people think of me, my house, or my kids. I don't try to "fit in" and "keep up" with what society says I should or should not be doing or wearing.

 

Not sure if I'll continue.

 

But this is a comedic take on those who do care! I adore all five of the Provincial Lady books!

 

#30 on my list for the year is a book that can only be described as poignant and lovely: The Hare with Amber Eyes. Edmund De Waal tells the tale of a set of netsuke that have been in his family since their purchase by a 19th century Parisian banker who rubs elbows with Proust and Renoir. The netsuke are later given to a nephew in Vienna as a wedding gift. And then comes WWI, followed by the atrocities of WWII when this Jewish banking family has its possessions stripped from them. Miraculously the collection of delicate carved sculptures is reunited with the family that no longer resides in Vienna. They make their way back to Japan and then London.

 

This is a story of art and diaspora, beautifully told. Wonderful book.

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#30 on my list for the year is a book that can only be described as poignant and lovely: The Hare with Amber Eyes. Edmund De Waal tells the tale of a set of netsuke that have been in his family since their purchase by a 19th century Parisian banker who rubs elbows with Proust and Renoir. The netsuke are later given to a nephew in Vienna as a wedding gift. And then comes WWI, followed by the atrocities of WWII when this Jewish banking family has its possessions stripped from them. Miraculously the collection of delicate carved sculptures is reunited with the family that no longer resides in Vienna. They make their way back to Japan and then London.

 

This is a story of art and diaspora, beautifully told. Wonderful book.

 

Ohhh. I've been wanting to read this for over a year now. Sounds like I need to make it more of a priority to get around to it!

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