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http://incompetech.com/graphpaper/cornelllined/

 

I have been trying these out at meetings at work, and I love them. They really do help me make sense of my notes later on.

 

I couldn't find a spiral notebook of them at the big U bookstore, so I printed them from the above site.

 

(Pardon if I'm the last living boardie to learn about these.)

 

It's so funny, I only discovered this method a few days ago and introduced it to my kids. Since then, I've been seeing it EVERYWHERE! I even heard about it on TV.

 

I wish I had used this method when I was in school. I was horrible at taking notes.

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Thank you!!! I've used them before and had that site marked to make my own. Well that computer died and I found one of those pages in a stack of papers yesterday. I just didn't know where it came from. It's from the site you linked. :hurray:

 

I like that you can play with the line spacing.

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We learned about Cornell notes when ds was in a model school during middle school. The students had to keep organized notebooks with Cornell notes for every subject. We've tried other notetaking methods, but nothing has worked as well as Cornell when it comes to organized notes that are easy to study.

 

You don't need to print anything special. Just fold a piece of notebook paper in half. If your children know how to outline, you can link Cornell with outlining by explaining that the left side is for the main ideas; i.e. the Roman numerals of the outline, and the right side is for the support; i.e. the A., B., 1., 2., etc. Cornell notetaking has worked for all of our children, who all have different learning styles, and they use Cornell for oral lectures and taking notes from a text. I use it as well. Occasionally, I will outline a text, but Cornel is faster.

Edited by 1Togo
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As the second to the last living boardie to learn about these, how do you use them?

 

Well, I'm just a beginner, but I take notes down the lined side. During long yaps from boring committee members, I write a few words to summarize each four or so lines (a single sub-topic) down the left. I can also just write single words in bigger letters so I can find the topic again when running my eye through many notes. One could draw a little diagram there as well. One could write outline topics.

 

Later, when I'm reading my notes, I write a one or two sentence summation at the bottom, gathering up the important ideas from the page. I try to make this a rather decent sentence, one that rings a bit and that I'll remember. Next meeting, when a topic comes up, I have this "pre-thought" sentence and can then say it, making me "sound good" and getting the point across. I have no where to go up the ladder at work (except into management, gag) so I don't do it for greater glory, but to make the meetings go smoothly and efficiently.

 

You could also note any questions you need to look up or ask the teacher, etc in the bottom.

 

However, if you google Cornell notetaking, etc you'll find much less hurried and much more practiced people who are willing to share their ideas.

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I attended a workshop that taught the new revised Cornell Note Taking System. Very intensive, a lot of work, but well worth the effort if used consistently. My school site is adopting this as one of its standards.

 

If you go to an AVID website, there should be samples of pages, etc.

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There really isn't any need to spend money on special paper or notebooks. We've been taking Cornell notes for 15 years using notebook paper. Dd uses the format for her science notes or any other class with a textbook. We've used it to take sermon notes, etc. Our oldest son used it with his college classes. Cornell doesn't work well with math lectures, but it's a good method for most subjects. It also provides a ready-made study format; i.e. the student folds the paper so he sees only the left side with the main ideas and then attempts to recall the information on the right side of the paper. When he can lecture through notes using only the main ideas, he is prepared for exams.

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There really isn't any need to spend money on special paper or notebooks.

 

I watched many of the youtube vids. While "stiff" this was the most useful:

 

 

I like printing my page because I can make the sides and bottom blank, rather than lined, and I can make very narrow lines, if I want, or much bigger if I want to use it for, e.g., diagramming sentences. I also admit to being in love with the pale blue lines, with very light lines in the note-taking area, and the demarcation lines rather heavier. :)

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  • 2 weeks later...

I was listening to a productivity talk when one of the speakers talked about using law ruled paper which is another name for Cornell paper. Using that name I found two somewhat cheaper sources for the paper:

 

http://bookstore.landmark.edu/merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=LCBS&Product_Code=104&Category_Code=D10

 

http://www.staples.com/Staples-3-Hole-Double-Pad-Canary-Law-Ruled-3-Margin-Each/product_369746

 

Besides the note taking under the Cornell method, these can be useful in taking meeting notes, call outs of items for the note taker to take action on or to be waiting for others to take action on, can be put on the left side so they stand out and make for a quick review of what everyone has agreed to at the meeting.

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Besides the note taking under the Cornell method, these can be useful in taking meeting notes, call outs of items for the note taker to take action on or to be waiting for others to take action on, can be put on the left side so they stand out and make for a quick review of what everyone has agreed to at the meeting.

 

 

I learned a similar method way back when in a Teaching Secondary Science course. We didn't do the Cornell method, but for writing out lesson plans on notebook paper we learned to write directions to self in the left margin and short notes on the right. For example:

 

SAY: Cell basic unit of life (write what you want to say in key words)

 

SHOW: Slide #1

 

ASK: Who knows the difference between a plant cell and an animal cell?

 

SHOW: Slide #2

 

OUTLINE: (write on board the outline you want students to copy)

 

 

...and so on

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Oh, thank you for this info and for the site for generating the paper. This is exactly what I needed for the outlining our science program for next year. I was using a notebook with my notes on the left page and the outline on the right but I found using an opened notebook cumbersome at the table (not enough room!) but now I will have a single page with everything right on it and it can be double sided. I had seen this notebook paper in our college supply store and I liked it but it was so expensive I didn't want to buy it to try it. Now I have paper and instructions. And a great way to teach my children how to take notes!

 

The best part--I have only done 4 sections of notes so far (usually I find these things when I am on the very last section).

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Thanks for the links.....:001_smile:

 

I got some extra heavy paper to print mine one, double sided, for outlines.

 

For meetings, I take minutes in the main section and add my thoughts in the right hand column, and then summarize for the next meeting at the bottom. For studying a book I really want to learn, I'm outlining on the right, and making statements like: Name the 10 XXXs. Or Define Z. Or What is the tricky exception you must never forget.

 

Then, I cover the right as I'm reviewing and try to recite from the teaser words on the left. When I have it down pat, I "rewrite" what I outlined above, in my own words. Really, REALLY seats it in the mind.

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I have purchased Ampad project organizer notebooks from Walmart. They are college ruled. There is a blank margin running down the left. We have drawn a line across the bottom for the summation section. I have also seen these at Staples.

 

As they are, without the summation at the bottom, they make great chapbooks. I keep several going with quotations, etc.

 

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Ampad-Writing-Pad/20369714

 

Ruth in NC

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Thank you for sharing. I had heard of Cornell notes before, but one big advantages wasn't clear to me. Writing questions on the left and covering the right and this becoming your own study guide. As I was reading about it I realized that this might help my graduated senior. It is very hard for him to listen and take notes. I think he could listen and write the left margin questions and then fill in the notes and summary after class from memory and then go to the books and friends to fill in the rest.

 

I didn't share this with him, but explained the Cornell notes and the advantages of creating a study guide. He said, "I think I should do it backwards and write the questions in the left during class."

 

So, have any of you tried this?

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Yes,

 

We have the 2nd edition (It was pretty much a free upgrade with our last order btw.) I'm hoping to compare the two soon, and choose the best one for ds to watch.

 

Tammyla,

 

Are you referring to the colored pens in the first edition of Superstar Student or is there something different in the new edition?

 

Thanks.

Edited by Tammyla
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Kendall,

 

When we use Cornell to take notes in a lecture class, we don't try to write questions, and we definitely don't wait until after the lecture is finished to fill in the right side. We use the left side for the big picture ideas, and the right side for the explanations of the big picture ideas. The summaries can be done after class, but it wouldn't be good to wait until after class to remember explanations; i.e. the material on the right side.

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I was listening to a productivity talk when one of the speakers talked about using law ruled paper which is another name for Cornell paper. Using that name I found two somewhat cheaper sources for the paper:

 

http://bookstore.landmark.edu/merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=LCBS&Product_Code=104&Category_Code=D10

 

http://www.staples.com/Staples-3-Hole-Double-Pad-Canary-Law-Ruled-3-Margin-Each/product_369746

 

Besides the note taking under the Cornell method, these can be useful in taking meeting notes, call outs of items for the note taker to take action on or to be waiting for others to take action on, can be put on the left side so they stand out and make for a quick review of what everyone has agreed to at the meeting.

 

The law-ruled notebook I have is lined all the way across and the left hand column is rather fatter than in the Cornell paper. That makes the area for the prompting questions rather big and the area for notetaking rather small. I prefer to use it when I'm making comments on what I've written, not just write a squib or a prompting question. FYI.

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You might even check you local library, but Kalanamak is right with the link.

 

If you need to order, post and many of us have e-mail or catalog codes that will save you money.

 

And wait until there is a sale. Only chumps pay full price. It is part of the quirky marketing, somehow, like people who listen to lectures on Herodotus are going to pay full price. :D

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