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Please help me choose the perfect small dog breed for a non dog loving family


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We are allergy people here and our doctor told us we could have a poodle, Bichon, shih tzu, maltese type dog. Because we have a very large Portuguese Water Dog (another dog on list) we couldn't go too small. We ended up with a Miniature Poodle. She is now 10 months old and wonderful. I love her and I really didn't think I liked poodles. Friends Bichon had so many health issues but she was sweet too. Shih tzu and maltese was just too small for us.

 

We found a breeder that specialized in therapy and service dogs and calm temperments.

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Might not be what you want to hear, but if you don't like dogs, and would rather remain pet-free, but you'd like to get your daughter an animal to love, I'd consider a cat instead. That might meet some of both of your desires/needs. Cats are SO much easier to care for than dogs. We have one of each, and the cat is no bother when it comes to leaving for the day (or on vacation), while the dog has to have arrangements made regularly. And a cat can be fun to cuddle and love, too. Our cat sits on my lap nearly every night when I'm on the computer after everyone is in bed.

 

:iagree:

You will be taking care of the pet as well. If you are starting off not being Dog happy it's not going to go too well. If you all gun ho about it I would stay away from Pomarraians. Ya, spelled that wrong but anywhoo they are the worse at the high pitch yapping. I been living next two these type of dogs all year and they are annoying.

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I am not flaming you - but I will say honestly that if you really do not enjoy the company of dogs, I think you should not try to have one in your family. Any dog will eventually try your patience. If you don't like them much in the first place, your chances of successfully working through that go down a lot. And I would absolutely not recommend any puppy if you are lukewarm toward dogs. Raising a puppy into a nice adult dog can take a lot of commitment and effort and they can put you through a lot of stress. Many well-intentioned people get in over their heads with a puppy and the dog eventually is surrendered to a rescue or shelter. Sorry to sound cynical but this happens all the time.

 

:iagree:with every word! And if I may add....OP, I know you *think* you want a little dog, but one of the laws of nature seems to be that the smaller the dog, the greater their tendency to bark, and the more shrill and irritating that bark tends to be. I adore shelties. Right now, I own 3. But our little 13-lb female has a bark that makes your ears ring and your eyes water. I am convinced that it could be used to disperse riot crowds if it could be bottled. And the sweet little shih-tzu next door can match her decibel for decibel.

 

Just my $.02.

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We've always had small dogs and none of them have every been yappy. Yes, they have high pitched barks, but they're not yappy.

If you're thinking of getting one, think about the length of the hair. A lot of the dogs mentioned here are long haired dogs and as the owner of long haired dogs, all I can say is ack!

 

We have a 12 year old Pekingese who is 14 pounds and has fine, silky hair that knots up like crazy. He is sweet, but honestly not all that bright. I know that's bad to say, but it's just true. He's very loyal and loving though, so I can overlook his dimness.

 

We also have a 9 year old Maltese who is 3 pound (yep, fully grown) and he has the long silky hair and it knots up worst that the Peke. He can be incredibly mean though. He has a serious Napoleon complex. Maltese also apparently have teeth issues. Ours only has 4 teeth left because all the others had to be pulled. The rotted or abscessed (which is gross). We've always taken good care of his teeth (regular cleanings, hard dog food), but the vet said sometimes it happens with them. I know 2 other people with Maltese who have similar issues and had to have teeth removed.

 

We get both dogs shaved down (about 1/2 of hair left) about every 6-8 weeks because I don't want to deal with all the knots. They look really good shaved and it makes things so much easier. They're both looking like cotton balls right now and I have to get them groomed. Neither of them shed too badly though. Of course there is going to be dog hair, but considering how much hair they both have, it's not nearly what you'd expect from long haired dogs.

 

We had a half pug, half shih tzu (my dad called her a putz), who was the smartest, sweetest dog you could ever imagine. Like most small dogs though she did have breathing issues (the other 2 do as well) and snored like a 300 pound man. James Bond and I used to lay in bed listening to her and giggle like girls because it was just so funny.

 

I personally like really small dogs. We call our 3 lb dog a "scoop and go" because you can just pick him up and go. The other one takes 2 hands to carry.

 

Our next dog (the 12 year old isn't doing well and we don't expect more than another year or two :() will be a small, short haired dog.

 

Like others have said, having a dog is a life long commitment. They have feelings and you can't just get rid of them (IMO) unless it's for a very serious reason.

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Shi Tzu.

 

Most friendly, non aggressive, kid tolerant small dogs I know. I worked in veterinary medicine in South Florida, land of the toy breeds, for 15 years. Maltese/toy poodle/chihuahua/Coton/havanese all were more likely to bite than a Shih Tzu.

 

:iagree: I have a Shih Tzu and they are the funnest little dogs. Great personalities, very friendly. Down side is they need grooming every so often (I get mine clipped very short and brush him often between times. He only goes in a few times a year but could probably stand to go in a little more often.) Also they can be hard to housebreak. An upside is that they'll do just about anything for food so you can train them to do tricks. :)

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I was just going to chime in again on the issue of grooming. Many have listed small breed that would require quite a bit more grooming. That's one thing I love about my Pug, we just brush him every other day, no need for hair cuts or trimmings, no worries about knotted hair. He also loves water, so it's easy to give him a bath, now my 50lb shar-pei mix hates water (that's typical of the breed) and it's a real wrestling match to bathe her, luckily she doesn't need it often.

 

I know many mentioned pugs shed, they can, but it really depends. My dad's black lab sheds more than my pug. He's also the sweetest guy, but yes like Mom in High Heels mentioned they sure can snore. Since getting my Sharpei mix a couple months ago, I warned my husband that he'll have to get used to things when he gets back from deployment. Our room is like sleeping in a den of hibernating bears. I actually find it hard to sleep with out my pug in the room, he's like my own personal white noise machine. He's actually sleeping on my feet right now, snoring away like an old man. LOL

 

Almost forgot to add that if a pug isn't for you, then I second the Boston Terrier.

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Hmmm Boston terrior. I had not thought of that. Wasn't that Martin's dog on Fraiser? A neighbor has one and it is the funniest little thing. I just can't decide between something like a pretty fluffy dog, or a pug/terrior look. I know I have to get on a wait list pretty soon for spring!

 

ETA: ok that's not the dog I was thinking I just looked it up.

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I didn't read all the responses, but we have a Cavachon (Cavalier King Charles Spaniel & Bichon Frise mix) and he is the sweetest, cuddliest dog ever. I recommend the breed all the time.

 

Those are sooo cute! I just looked it up. This is really tough! There are more breeds than I ever though that fit our criteria and I've talked to a few nice breeders so far.

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Hmmm Boston terrior. I had not thought of that. Wasn't that Martin's dog on Fraiser?

 

Nope; Martin had a wirehaired Jack Russell Terrier (known in today's AKC world as a Parson Russell Terrier-- long story!) Frasier's brother Niles had an Italian Greyhound.

 

astrid

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Those are sooo cute! I just looked it up. This is really tough! There are more breeds than I ever though that fit our criteria and I've talked to a few nice breeders so far.

 

The vet even commented one time on how he needed to recommend this breed more :)

 

He only barks when somebody is here. He is tolerant of anything and everything. He doesn't chew. We love him :)

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I didn't read all the responses, but we have a Cavachon (Cavalier King Charles Spaniel & Bichon Frise mix) and he is the sweetest, cuddliest dog ever. I recommend the breed all the time.

 

OMG, how did I forget this breed?????????

 

BEST BEST BEST temperment of any dog, ever, on the planet. And I say that being a big dog person who will never own one. But seriously, In all my years I've never known one that bit, growled, etc. They are just big sweeties. Gorgeous big sweeties. Even the vets I work with want one as their next dog.

 

They are less allergenic, as they have that "hair versus fur" nonsense going on. (not a real thing), don't NEED grooming but CAN be cut short if you want, LOVE LOVE LOVE kids, people, everyone. They are true lap dogs, not yappy, just the best.

 

Seriously get one. Just get one from a GOOD breeder that checks for heart problems....there was an issue with cardiomyopathy in the early years of the breed, but I havent' seem much of that in quite a while.

 

the most SMOOCHABLE dog in the world. And the don't act like a little yappy dog...go get one!

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OMG, how did I forget this breed?????????

 

BEST BEST BEST temperment of any dog, ever, on the planet. And I say that being a big dog person who will never own one. But seriously, In all my years I've never known one that bit, growled, etc. They are just big sweeties. Gorgeous big sweeties. Even the vets I work with want one as their next dog.

 

They are less allergenic, as they have that "hair versus fur" nonsense going on. (not a real thing), don't NEED grooming but CAN be cut short if you want, LOVE LOVE LOVE kids, people, everyone. They are true lap dogs, not yappy, just the best.

 

Seriously get one. Just get one from a GOOD breeder that checks for heart problems....there was an issue with cardiomyopathy in the early years of the breed, but I havent' seem much of that in quite a while.

 

the most SMOOCHABLE dog in the world. And the don't act like a little yappy dog...go get one!

 

Yep, you just described my Colby. He's just a big baby.

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Oh, and the King Charles Spaniels have the SOFTEST fur...so yummy to pet and cuddle. But on the other hand they like to play ball and such like a bigger dog. So the best of both worlds.

 

Yes!! We've found this to be very true too! DH didn't really want a cuddly little lap dog, but our Cavachon has been the perfect mix of play and cuddle.

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The vet even commented one time on how he needed to recommend this breed more :)

 

He only barks when somebody is here. He is tolerant of anything and everything. He doesn't chew. We love him :)

 

When my parents got theirs he was a rescue. He was turned in to the vet office I worked at because the owner spent all her time traveling in Europe, and found out that her groundskeeper was just keeping him tied up outside all day. NOT that kind of dog!

 

So I had my mom just come look at him. She had firmly said NO more dogs, no pets, etc. She fell in love, and took him home "just for the weekend". Even my Dad, who said, "NO MORE DOGS" says now that he just kept waiting for the dog to do something, anything wrong, so he would have a reason to send him back. But the dog never did a single thing wrong. Ever. Still doesn't.

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I am not flaming you - but I will say honestly that if you really do not enjoy the company of dogs, I think you should not try to have one in your family. Any dog will eventually try your patience. If you don't like them much in the first place, your chances of successfully working through that go down a lot. And I would absolutely not recommend any puppy if you are lukewarm toward dogs. Raising a puppy into a nice adult dog can take a lot of commitment and effort and they can put you through a lot of stress. Many well-intentioned people get in over their heads with a puppy and the dog eventually is surrendered to a rescue or shelter. Sorry to sound cynical but this happens all the time.

 

:iagree:with every word! And if I may add....OP, I know you *think* you want a little dog, but one of the laws of nature seems to be that the smaller the dog, the greater their tendency to bark, and the more shrill and irritating that bark tends to be. I adore shelties. Right now, I own 3. But our little 13-lb female has a bark that makes your ears ring and your eyes water. I am convinced that it could be used to disperse riot crowds if it could be bottled. And the sweet little shih-tzu next door can match her decibel for decibel.

 

Just my $.02.

 

YES. Every word. (well, except the part about adoring Shelties. I kinda don't. :tongue_smilie: But that's just me!)

 

astrid

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When my parents got theirs he was a rescue. He was turned in to the vet office I worked at because the owner spent all her time traveling in Europe, and found out that her groundskeeper was just keeping him tied up outside all day. NOT that kind of dog!

 

So I had my mom just come look at him. She had firmly said NO more dogs, no pets, etc. She fell in love, and took him home "just for the weekend". Even my Dad, who said, "NO MORE DOGS" says now that he just kept waiting for the dog to do something, anything wrong, so he would have a reason to send him back. But the dog never did a single thing wrong. Ever. Still doesn't.

 

Oh thanks you two! I think I'm sold.

 

k- would you mind sharing what you paid? Or you can PM me. In speaking with a few breeders, the Shih tzu pups would be 1200-1500. I don't think I want to find a breeder more than 2 hours away because I would like to visit once before hand, and then after they allow you to see the new puppies, then to pick up. I really did not think I would have to go more than $700-$1000 range.

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I just tried looking for a Cavachon breeder. The first one I found range from $3k to 5k :scared:

 

Look for just a Cavelier King Charles...and check your local papers/etc too. Oh, and call the local vets and AKC club to ask around about local breeders.

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Miniature schnauzer. i do not love dogs, and DH has allergies. Dear freinds o ours have one- he is small enough to be a small dog, but big enough to not be tripped over and too big to carry in a purse and take into a restaurant. :D

 

This dog does not bother DH's allergies, and I adore him.

 

He is also very well trained- even responds to my commands "Doggie, SIT!" I do know they dedicated a summer to training him.

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Miniature schnauzer. i do not love dogs, and DH has allergies. Dear freinds o ours have one- he is small enough to be a small dog, but big enough to not be tripped over and too big to carry in a purse and take into a restaurant. :D

 

This dog does not bother DH's allergies, and I adore him.

 

He is also very well trained- even responds to my commands "Doggie, SIT!" I do know they dedicated a summer to training him.

 

IME miniature schnauzers can be very temperamental. My mom has one and she is a biter. After talking with my uncle (who is a long time schnauzer owner) this isn't uncommon.

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IME miniature schnauzers can be very temperamental. My mom has one and she is a biter. After talking with my uncle (who is a long time schnauzer owner) this isn't uncommon.

 

My mom's across the street neighbor has one. All I know is the mail lady no longer gets our of her truck:lol:

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Wet blanket here. Just remember that dogs live 15+ years. Most likely your daughter will be off to college and you will be caring for her dog. It is something that the humane society tried to drill into us that we really didn't understand. I love my pets but I'll be honest that I won't miss the hair, smell, poo pick up, trying to find a kennel every time we go on vacation, and muzzling my dog so she won't nip the vet. Pups are cute, but they are a long-term (IMHO) commitment.

 

We have a 9-month-old pup (rescued at 10 weeks), and I can say that after our Chocolate Lab, at least the poops are small! ;)

 

We also take her with us everywhere, including vacations. So far she's been on one, getting ready to go with us for the month of July, and next year is joining us on a plane to France.

 

Loved my Lab, but I love even more the advantages of a small dog!

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Don't get a dog. Seriously. Especially if you're not a dog person (trust me, I'm not, either and we have a lab/bc mix!). They will be loud, annoying, poop everywhere, bark continuously, and the smaller the dog the BIGGER the problems. I speak as someone who has had over a dozen dogs in my life of about every breed. They are not disposable and a lot of people realize too late that they are a major responsibility. You will not be able to vacation or leave the house all day without making complicated arrangements, and it's not fair to the dog to come into a home where people will not want it. I don't mean flames, I'm just being honest as one non-dog person to another.

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If you are drawn to the Cavashon, you might just look at the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. My DH had 2 growing up and they loved them. They were great dogs! Always happy, well behaved, and easy to train. Good luck with your search! Your dd will be so happy!

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If you are drawn to the Cavashon, you might just look at the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. My DH had 2 growing up and they loved them. They were great dogs! Always happy, well behaved, and easy to train. Good luck with your search! Your dd will be so happy!

 

Thanks I think I am looking at both the Cavashon, and just the cavalier Spaniel like you and another have mentioned. I have a few breeders to contact. I really don't think I need to go over $1000 especially since I don't care about perfect colorings and such.

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I just tried looking for a Cavachon breeder. The first one I found range from $3k to 5k :scared:

 

:blink:

 

FOR A MIXED BREED DOG???? SERIOUSLY?!

 

Holy cow---- as an infrequent, scrupulously careful breeder who researches pedigrees back to 1922 on both sides, combs through genetics, health issues and causes of death in both lines going back generations, spends thousands of dollars on health testing, prenatal care and nutrition, early socializing and puppy nutrition, litter evaluation, and who only breeds dogs with exceptional structure and temperament AND proven working ability, etc. etc. etc. I just can't wrap my head around that price tag. My puppy prices are at the high end of the going rate for our pure breed, and I am incredibly choosy about puppy families, yet I charge half that.

 

astrid

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:blink:

 

FOR A MIXED BREED DOG???? SERIOUSLY?!

 

Holy cow---- as an infrequent, scrupulously careful breeder who researches pedigrees back to 1922 on both sides, combs through genetics, health issues and causes of death in both lines going back generations, spends thousands of dollars on health testing, prenatal care and nutrition, early socializing and puppy nutrition, litter evaluation, and who only breeds dogs with exceptional structure and temperament AND proven working ability, etc. etc. etc. I just can't wrap my head around that price tag. My puppy prices are at the high end of the going rate for our pure breed, and I am incredibly choosy about puppy families, yet I charge half that.

 

astrid

 

Agreed. A working lines, herding dog with a chance at a herding title goes for about 1,000 here. I wouldn't pay 3k for a mix/designer dog with no papers.

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Another caution re: Cavaliers and Cav mixes:

http://www.cavalierhealth.org/syringomyelia.htm

 

I love Cavs, but this disorder is so pervasive in the breed it's downright scary, and excrutiatingly painful for the poor dog.

 

From the article:

"

Syringomyelia (SM) is an extremely serious condition in which fluid-filled cavities develop within the spinal cord near the brain. It is also known as "neck scratcher's disease", because one of its common signs is scratching in the air near the neck.

The back half of the cavalier King Charles spaniel’s skull typically may be too small to accommodate all of the brain’s cerebellum, which may also be too large, and so it squeezes through the foramen magnum – the hole at the back of the skull – partially blocking the flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) down the spinal cord. The variable pressure created by the abnormal flow of CSF is believed to create the SM cavities – called syrinx – in the spinal cord.

SM is rare in most breeds but has become very widespread in cavalier King Charles spaniels. The number of diagnosed cases in cavaliers has increased dramatically since 2000. Researchers estimate that up to 95% of CKCSs have Chiari-like malformation (CM or CLM) – also known as caudal occipital malformation syndrome (COMS) or occipital hypoplasia (OH), the skull bone malformation present in all cases and believed to be at least part of the cause of syringomyelia – and that more than 50% of cavaliers have SM. The severity and extent of syringomyelia also appear to get worse in each succeeding generation of cavaliers. It is worldwide in scope and not limited to any country, breeding line, or kennel, and experts report that it is believed to be inherited in the cavalier.

...........

SM seldom can be detected in young puppies, as symptoms of it usually are not evident before the age of six months or years later.

Pain is the most important clinical sign of the disorder. Symptoms may vary widely among different dogs, but the earliest sign often is that the dog feels a hypersensitivity in its neck area, causing in some an uncontrollable urge to scratch at its neck and shoulders. Then usually follows severe pain around its head, neck, and shoulders, causing it yelp or scream. Click here or the YouTube logo to see videos of cavaliers with SM symptoms. As the disease progresses, it destroys portions of the cavalier's spinal cord, and is so painful that the affected dog may contort its neck and even sleep and eat only with its head held high. The dog's legs may become progressively weaker, so that walking becomes increasingly difficult. Some dogs deteriorate to the point of paralysis.

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:blink:

 

FOR A MIXED BREED DOG???? SERIOUSLY?!

 

Holy cow---- as an infrequent, scrupulously careful breeder who researches pedigrees back to 1922 on both sides, combs through genetics, health issues and causes of death in both lines going back generations, spends thousands of dollars on health testing, prenatal care and nutrition, early socializing and puppy nutrition, litter evaluation, and who only breeds dogs with exceptional structure and temperament AND proven working ability, etc. etc. etc. I just can't wrap my head around that price tag. My puppy prices are at the high end of the going rate for our pure breed, and I am incredibly choosy about puppy families, yet I charge half that.

 

astrid

 

:iagree: I have never had one of my cockers go for more than $800.

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Thanks I think I am looking at both the Cavashon, and just the cavalier Spaniel like you and another have mentioned. I have a few breeders to contact. I really don't think I need to go over $1000 especially since I don't care about perfect colorings and such.

 

I urge you to read my post here and arm yourself with information as you talk to Cav breeders and Cav mix breeders. This is SO pervasive in the breed-- estimates are that approximately 95% have it. It's an expensive heartbreak. Forewarned is forearmed.

 

astrid

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OP, this is a plea for you to think this through very carefully.

 

No matter what breed you convince yourself is "perfect" for you, as a non-dog-loving person, I guarantee that any breed on the planet will somehow disappoint you. And when that happens, you will have to decide whether or not you will be responsible and honor your commitment to the dog, or the dog will pay the price for your disappointment. (And if you don't see that there is any commitment owed to the dog in this equation, you really should not even consider a dog, at all, ever.)

 

I love dogs....and still, I can't even count how many times over the years a dog of ours has done something that has me swearing and yelling, "hooooo boy, it's a good thing I love dogs !!!" at the top of my lungs. That is what gets us through it - the fact that it is a commitment, and that we love dogs. If either of those are missing, the chances of an eventual owner-surrender are extremely high. Being around rescue work, I have seen this over and over and over again. :(

Any dog will eventually push your buttons, and if you don't like dogs to begin with, your buttons are going to be very sensitive. It is not fair to any dog to carry your expectations of it being "perfect", just because you spent some time researching breeds and dropped a load of cash for the dog. It's a dog. They all eat, poop, fart, bark, and each have the potential to do many other things that people can find annoying at best to intolerable at worst. If you aren't ready to love a very imperfect dog, with several habits that drive you to distraction (because they all have them), with your heart and arms wide open to it, you are not a good home for a dog.

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I urge you to read my post here and arm yourself with information as you talk to Cav breeders and Cav mix breeders. This is SO pervasive in the breed-- estimates are that approximately 95% have it. It's an expensive heartbreak. Forewarned is forearmed.

 

astrid

 

wow...is the pervasiveness new? I've never seen a single one with this issue, or any health issue actually.

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OP, this is a plea for you to think this through very carefully.

 

No matter what breed you convince yourself is "perfect" for you, as a non-dog-loving person, I guarantee that any breed on the planet will somehow disappoint you. And when that happens, you will have to decide whether or not you will be responsible and honor your commitment to the dog, or the dog will pay the price for your disappointment. (And if you don't see that there is any commitment owed to the dog in this equation, you really should not even consider a dog, at all, ever.)

 

I love dogs....and still, I can't even count how many times over the years a dog of ours has done something that has me swearing and yelling, "hooooo boy, it's a good thing I love dogs !!!" at the top of my lungs. That is what gets us through it - the fact that it is a commitment, and that we love dogs. If either of those are missing, the chances of an eventual owner-surrender are extremely high. Being around rescue work, I have seen this over and over and over again. :(

Any dog will eventually push your buttons, and if you don't like dogs to begin with, your buttons are going to be very sensitive. It is not fair to any dog to carry your expectations of it being "perfect", just because you spent some time researching breeds and dropped a load of cash for the dog. It's a dog. They all eat, poop, fart, bark, and each have the potential to do many other things that people can find annoying at best to intolerable at worst. If you aren't ready to love a very imperfect dog, with several habits that drive you to distraction (because they all have them), with your heart and arms wide open to it, you are not a good home for a dog.

:iagree:

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I am not flaming you - but I will say honestly that if you really do not enjoy the company of dogs, I think you should not try to have one in your family. Any dog will eventually try your patience. If you don't like them much in the first place, your chances of successfully working through that go down a lot. And I would absolutely not recommend any puppy if you are lukewarm toward dogs. Raising a puppy into a nice adult dog can take a lot of commitment and effort and they can put you through a lot of stress. Many well-intentioned people get in over their heads with a puppy and the dog eventually is surrendered to a rescue or shelter. Sorry to sound cynical but this happens all the time.

 

:iagree:

 

My best friend's kids wanted a dog. She has never been a "dog person" -- but wanted to make her boys happy and darn, those puppies are so cute!

 

Now, three purebreds later (think Goldilocks), she has three dogs that live outside in a fenced in yard or in her laundry room because they all shed to some extent and aren't housebroken. They are bathed weekly to get the "stink out" and never played with. They've all been to obedience school, but w/o follow-up at home....well, you know.

 

They've had people offer to buy the dogs from her, but she says, "They're FAMILY -- and we never get rid of FAMILY!" :001_huh:

 

So, buying a dog does not make one a "dog person" and if there are things you don't like about dogs, remember the 15+ years is a long time (and lots of vet bills and food).

 

Just my .02

K

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Our neighbor just got a coton de tulear. Look it up! It's a hypoallergenic dog and it is SOOOO adorable. Hers is cuddly and sweet and not at ALL barky.

 

We are considering one as well!

 

This is one of the breeds I was thinking about. Here's the thing. Are you ok with training the pup? I mean, spending time socializing it, taking it to training somewhere? I suggest going to a really good training place. Ours was under $100. But, you have to figure in time and such and working on recall and house training.... :)

Also, if you're gonna purchase a pup, remember to do your research and pick a reputable place. :)

Edited by NayfiesMama
Oh yes, and grooming and such, too :)
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wow...is the pervasiveness new? I've never seen a single one with this issue, or any health issue actually.

 

It actually is a fairly common problem with Cavaliers. It is more pervasive in some areas than others, and a lot of breeders are doing more testing before breeding, but it is still a problem. My letter through the CKC have talked about it a few times.

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Much sympathy and support on your venture. I am not a pet person or a dog person either. I am in the boat of considering getting a dog for the family as our younger children get older and when we're sure we're done having babies too, the idea of a puppy or young dog and a baby isn't something I'd voluntarily sign up for.

 

Our timeline is like 2 years or 3 from now but I'm already thinking and mentally prepping for this because I'm not a pet person and because to take this step means that I'm committing 110% to raising an animal and caring for it for a very long time. Training and such would be a big part of it and we're not even going to pretend the dog would belong to the kids, it would be our dog.

 

I prefer really big dogs, in my non-dog-person preference, but that probably won't happen. DH really loves Shelties because that is what he had growing up, that just seems like a little high strung to me. I'm a bit partial to the Bernese Mountain Dog. I know I could not stand a small dog personally, they just seem a little too.... something. But figuring out a good breed and size and also matching up energy needs seems like a good step - that and being ridiculously committed to good training too.

 

Good luck! And I too realize that while I'm not a pet person, that I would still manage to fall in love with whichever pet we decide to get. Kinda like I'm also not a kid person, but I managed to fall in love with my three girls too. ;)

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It actually is a fairly common problem with Cavaliers. It is more pervasive in some areas than others, and a lot of breeders are doing more testing before breeding, but it is still a problem. My letter through the CKC have talked about it a few times.

 

I knew of it, just not the high prevalence, if that makes sense. Maybe most of the ones I know are from a few breeders....but i've never seen it in the vet clinics I've worked at. lucky i guess.

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:blink:

 

FOR A MIXED BREED DOG???? SERIOUSLY?!

 

Holy cow---- as an infrequent, scrupulously careful breeder who researches pedigrees back to 1922 on both sides, combs through genetics, health issues and causes of death in both lines going back generations, spends thousands of dollars on health testing, prenatal care and nutrition, early socializing and puppy nutrition, litter evaluation, and who only breeds dogs with exceptional structure and temperament AND proven working ability, etc. etc. etc. I just can't wrap my head around that price tag. My puppy prices are at the high end of the going rate for our pure breed, and I am incredibly choosy about puppy families, yet I charge half that.

 

astrid

http://www.foxglovecavachonpuppies.com/Available-Puppies-.html

 

scroll down. I almost spit my coffee out at the computer. Ok so there is some good info here. I am not an expert on any dog breed, but health risks are a concern I have.

 

And a thank you for all of the criticism, but I am not interested in responding to it individually. I was never a "kid person" though after having mine I am truly a mama at heart. And I have mentioned several times that though I have not been a dog person, it's not like I don't like them, we are just not an animal family...yet. I have a local vet with a good reputation calling me back for a phone interview and to ask some questions about the three breeds I am looking in to. I plan to visit each breeder prior, and make appropriate changes around my home in the next year. I'm not sure how that translates in to someone who will never like a dog LOL. And yes, I get what a puppy takes. I have had a couple kids ya know;). One of them fussy, and we co-slept and breast fed and all of that, so I'm not a stranger to giving a part of my life for a family member.

 

Thank you to all of the dog experts. I am JUST beginning the journey and appreciate all of the information.

 

Oh yeah, and in my OP I mentioned a close family who just got a pug pup. We are the designated sitters for said puppy and she would do the same. Our intention is to let each puppy visit our homes frequently, to limit the separation anxiety should one of us vacation or something.

Edited by 425lisamarie
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http://www.foxglovecavachonpuppies.com/Available-Puppies-.html

 

scroll down. I almost spit my coffee out at the computer. Ok so there is some good info here. I am not an expert on any dog breed, but health risks are a concern I have.

 

And a thank you for all of the criticism, but I am not interested in responding to it individually. I was never a "kid person" though after having mine I am truly a mama at heart. And I have mentioned several times that though I have not been a dog person, it's not like I don't like them, we are just not an animal family...yet. I have a local vet with a good reputation calling me back for a phone interview and to ask some questions about the three breeds I am looking in to. I plan to visit each breeder prior, and make appropriate changes around my home in the next year. I'm not sure how that translates in to someone who will never like a dog LOL. And yes, I get what a puppy takes. I have had a couple kids ya know;). One of them fussy, and we co-slept and breast fed and all of that, so I'm not a stranger to giving a part of my life for a family member.

 

Thank you to all of the dog experts. I am JUST beginning the journey and appreciate all of the information.

 

Oh yeah, and in my OP I mentioned a close family who just got a pug pup. We are the designated sitters for said puppy and she would do the same. Our intention is to let each puppy visit our homes frequently, to limit the separation anxiety should one of us vacation or something.

 

That's a puppy mill. I see no info health testing, training, diet. Responsible breeders do not sell puppies over the internet.

 

And gently, you did state that you're not a dog person. To dog people, that's not a statement we take lightly. Yes, kids are messy, tiring and inconvenient. They also sprung from your womb.

 

Good luck in your search.

 

astrid

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