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Cat, Rabbit,Rat or Guinea Pig?


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We move next week. The next house will be at least 4 years, so my stb 10 has been promised a pet. While I know he would love a dog, we go out a lot. We run on overnighters or just leave the house for often 12 hours. So a dog doesn't really fit into our current life.

 

My husband is open to a cat. My son is sort of lukewarm on the cat right now. When he was 6 a 15yo cat had had enough of him and the cat family kids running around and swatted out at them as they ran past the couch where the cat was sitting on the back of the couch. He caught my son's shirt. He didn't hurt him, just scared him. That has pretty much been his only cat experience. No one we've known has had cats, or at least lap cats. Or even cats that don't hide the minute they hear people. I grew up with cats (the last brothers died at 15 and 19). Husband is also very cat friendly.

 

My son has expressed an interest in guinea pigs, but doesn't have a lot of exposure to them, but they have been owned by a few friends and we have heard positive thing about. I've heard often that rats make great pets. However I'm not sure I can do a rat. Mainly because, well it's a rat. He has zero interest in reptiles.

 

He had orginally wanted a rabbit, but friends who have rabbits, don't think this is a great idea as all their rabbits have not been into cuddling/holding unless the holder is very still. Not a strong point of a 10yo boy.

 

He wants something to cuddle, take care of, play with and will play with him.

 

So what are the thoughts? If it is a cat, it will be an indoor cat, however all my cats have always been leash "trained" in the sense they are on a leash and can enjoy the outdoors some with you. Anything we get will be a rescue as well.

 

Can you get rats and guineas fixed? Do you have to get them fixed? Does it make them better pets if they are fixed?

 

I'm thinking in the end a cat would be the easiest. Can you have a cat and a guinea? Or is that a horrible idea?

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I would vote cat and suggest the child pick out the cat. My son wanted a pet and we have had a few cats go through here that have not worked out well with the kids. I took him to the local SPCA and let him go from pen to pen checking out the different cats. He had two different ones (out of the dozens that he looked at) that actually came to him and crawled all over him asking for cuddles. They didn't mind his awkwardness in handling them. We picked one of them and it's been an awesome fit. It's been 1 1/2 years now and we all still love her, and I always thought I wasn't really a cat person.

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I had a cat when I was single and it was wonderful. I got it when it was so young that it had to be bottle fed (abandoned by mother), and it was very cuddly/friendly with me. Many cats aren't, though, so there's a bit of a risk there.

 

I too have heard rats are great pets, but I could absolutely never own one. I had a friend with two rats in a cage in their living room. I was grossed out by just seeing them when I was at her house.

 

When we were getting our first pets for our kids and were debating between rabbits and guinea pigs, we went with guinea pigs because we were told that sometimes rabbits can be very unfriendly. Our guinea pigs are very cute, but my boys are grossed out by the fact that the poo a lot when you have them out of the cage. They have to be on a towel on your lap, and even still my boys can't stand them, but dd loves them. I'm not sure if they're the right choice for you, though, because they don't really play a lot.

 

We finally broke down and got the kids rabbits about a year ago, and we've found them to be fantastic pets. They'll sit on the kids laps while their watching a movie or hop around on the sofa or the floor. We don't give them much freedom because I'm afraid of them getting into a corner where we can't reach them, but they will hop around and explore a bit and the kids love them. We got them when they were very young, so they got used to being held early. That may have made a difference.

 

The guinea pigs and rabbits are all normally kept outside in hutches, so we don't have a problem with smell. If you live in a very cold place, you'd probably need to keep them in a garage, but not one where you park your car. I don't know if guinea pigs can be neutered because we have two girls, but rabbits can be.

 

I know people who have had cats and guinea pigs, so it can be done, but it may depend on the temperment of the cat.

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I would say a cat would best. It you get a kitten, and spend a lot of time holding it, it will enjoy being held. We leave our two cats at home while we are away weekends, and they are fine.

 

Guinea pigs stink, but can be cute. They are easy to neglect in their cage, and then they get sick and die.

 

Also, a cat would gladly hunt a guinea pig. I don't think they mix well.

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Yes I was figuring it would lean towards cats. I know he would LOVE a rabbit. He's talked about wanting a rabbit for a few years now. I just don't know about that.

 

We'll have to look around when we get there. We'll check with on base vet as well as family readiness (maybe, but I may be thinking of the wrong place) to see if anyone has a cat that needs placement due to deployment or going overseas.

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Well, I'd say NOT a rat, simply b/c everyone I've known that has had one say they bite. A lot. :tongue_smilie: Of course the people that had the rats really liked them anyway...

 

We've had cats, guinea pigs and a rabbit. Our rabbit was a little Netherland Dwarf. He was very 'cuddly' and was also litter trained (had a tiny bowl in his cage, so it was easy to clean daily if you're worried about smell. He was completely indoors.) Our guinea pigs were also affectionate, but smellier. ;) And I love cats, so I think you'll probably like any of the above.

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I've had them all except for rats. I've only ever heard good things about rats from people that have owned them.

 

As far as all 3 go, it really depends on their personalities as to whether or not they'll be a "cuddly" pet. I've found that most rabbits don't want to be held, but will tolerate you petting them on their terms. My rabbits were free range and litter trained. But, they chew..... and chew..... and chew. :glare: When they both passed my DH had to do a lot of repair work to the woodwork in the house. :D

 

My guinea pigs had 2 different personalities. The one loved to be held and even gave me a sign that he had to go potty by squirming. I'd put him in his cage, he'd do his business, and then I'd take him back out. My other guinea pig wanted nothing to do with being held, but he'd let me pet him. I thought between the guinea pigs and the rabbits, the guinea pigs smelled worse. Especially after the one developed anal impaction (look that up if you dare). :lol:

 

My cats have always been totally different from one another.

 

If I had to pick out of the 4 I'd go with a cat. They aren't as much work as guinea pigs and rabbits, you don't need a cage, and they can be left alone for long periods of time.

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I would say a cat would best. It you get a kitten, and spend a lot of time holding it, it will enjoy being held. We leave our two cats at home while we are away weekends, and they are fine.

 

Guinea pigs stink, but can be cute. They are easy to neglect in their cage, and then they get sick and die.

 

Also, a cat would gladly hunt a guinea pig. I don't think they mix well.[/QUOTE]

 

 

We have four cats, a guinea pig and a parrot. Not your typical combination and not one people would think to mix but ours are fine. I think it depends on the order you get them and the temperaments of all involved. We have a very peaceful household.

 

The biggest issue with the cats (we have 4 indoor) is the hair and the litter box. The guinea pig is cute and makes great noises and responds to us but she is messy. She is in my dd's room but there is always hay and food thrown all over the carpet. We have cared for two rabbits in the past when we lived in a house and they poop so much. We had one that was very loving and sweet and one not so much. Again, really just depends on the personality of that particular animal. Unfortunately, you can't always predict what they will be like. All of our cats came home as kittens. 1 from a family member and he was born inside a house and well taken care of. The 2nd cat came from a friend who found a Mom with babies outside in her backyard. He (out cat) lived outside for 6 weeks until we picked him up and took him home. That was his first contact with people, from what we can tell. The other two were rescues from a home and were brothers. Both tiny and not well taken care of. All of the cats are different. The one that was well pampered, is a bit stand off-ish and doesn't like kids too much. The one from outside is a big love. Crawls up on your chest and whines if you don't pay him attention. He is the one laying in the middle of the table during all our lessons. The other two, love their contact but their quite time as well. Well balanced, not needy but not a baby either.

 

Just take your time and try to get know the animal and see what type of personality they have and what you want.

 

I would vote cat though, I think they can offer the best companionship. One of the top 10 reasons my kids said they loved homeschooling at the end of the this year was that the cats were always around and involved in their day. :001_smile:

Edited by fourcatmom
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Cats are relatively easy, interactive, and can be left for hours at a time. (sometimes a day or two) Kids can lose interest in rodents pretty quickly, unless they're busy letting them loose and chasing them around the house.

 

My kids are still very entranced by our two cats (obtained as kittens three years ago.)

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Well, I'd say NOT a rat, simply b/c everyone I've known that has had one say they bite. A lot. :tongue_smilie: Of course the people that had the rats really liked them anyway...

 

 

Mine didn't. My sister told me not to feed it meat and I'd be fine. I didn't and it was. She was even a rescue rat, full grown from a lab, and was going to be gassed with a bunch of unused rats. Man she was smart.

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Probably a cat. If you go to a good shelter, they should be able to help match your son up with the right kind of personality. A younger cat will be more playful in general.

 

Rabbits are great, but they're not generally a great pet for a young child. Many of them will be skittish about rapid movements and being carried around, especially until they get to know you and trust you. They do like some toys, but they don't play the same kinds of games a cat would, like chasing and pouncing.

 

Guinea pigs are similar to rabbits in some ways, but I have heard that they do get very excited to see their owners and make cute little noises.

 

Wendi

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Cat. Least trouble of all the choices with the best payoff. I've always had female cats over the past 25 years or so, but now I have two males and I prefer them. Maybe offer to foster a litter. We've done that a couple of times and it has worked out great. The rescue does the health care and helps you place the kittens while you get to keep the cat or pair of cats you've helped hand raise and suits your family best.

 

Barb

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I'm a HUGE animal person, volunteer at a zoo, am taking Vet. Asst. classes and actually have all of these animals right now with the exception of the guinea pig, which we did have a couple of years ago.

 

Cats - We have 3 and they make good kid pets, however, some kids really want something they can cuddle and most cats just don't fit the bill. Litter boxes are easy to clean though, which is a plus.

 

Rabbits - We currently have 1. If you choose a rabbit, my suggestion would be to stay away from the mini and small breeds. They are usually pretty flighty, nippy and are relatively fragile. The medium - large breeds are very hearty but need a LOT of time out of the cage to be happy. Our rabbit free ranges on our enclosed deck 24/7 and comes inside to roam occasionally. Unlimited hay (timothy, NOT alfalfa) and water are all you NEED food-wise but pellets and fresh lettuces are great treats. They poop A LOT. Seriously, whatever you're imagining right now - double it. :)

 

Guinea Pigs - I acquired one after I agreed to pet-sit and the owner never took it back. They are MESSY to the nth degree and stink. They actually don't make good pets for kids as they are skittish and very fragile. I have known several that have fallen from very short distances or been handled improperly only to end up with a broken back. They require a lot of horizontal space in a well-ventilated cage.

 

Rats - Currently I have 2 rats (one of which is sitting on my shoulder right now) and I personally think they make the absolute BEST pet of the 4 options you gave. If your child wants something to cuddle, a rat is PERFECT. Some other pluses - they have a very short life-span (3 - 5 yrs.), which is perfect for a child, they are inexpensive, they are downright loveable, they are active and really respond to people. Before I had rats I imagined that they would leap out and attack my face everytime I opened the cage (too many movies, I guess). They are very docile though and I've never been bitten even though I'm on my third rat. Even my husband, who is not an animal lover, now has quite the soft spot for my rat girls. Mine climb all over me and ride on my shoulder all the time. Most rat owners will tell you that you need 2 rats for them to be happy and I would 100% agree with that. They are very social animals. Their dietary needs are pretty simple - plain rat blocks (not seeds) and fresh water are all they NEED but some fresh foods are always appreciated. They do need a large open-air cage (no tanks) and lots of things to do to keep them from getting bored. Toilet paper tubes, PVC pipes, cardboard boxes, fleece scraps etc. are all great toys. Contrary to popular belief, rat cages do not smell that bad as long as you clean them regularly. I clean mine with a Chlorhexadine (Nolvasan) solution once a week and line all of the shelves with newspaper. My husband has a VERY sensitive nose so he would not put up with it if it smelled. Just a note though, un-neutered males smell A LOT more than females.

 

Edited to add:

Yes, you can get rats and guinea pigs fixed. It will help with spraying in the males just like in a male cat. In females it reduces the risk of mammary and reproductive cancers. I've only had female rats though and have never spayed any of them. Their lifespan is so short regardless that I've never seen the point. Rabbits are the same, however, my female will be spayed soon because reproductive cancers plague almost 100% of unfixed females and shorten their life by about 50%.

Edited by contessa20
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I would definitely go for the cat. The only reason we don't have one is that my dh is severely allergic to cats.

 

I had a cat, a dog, and a guinea pig all at the same time when I was a kid. They actually all got along great together. My cat slept in the guinea pigs cage and on top of my dog. Guinea pigs don't stink if you keep them in a large cage and use bath towels instead of litter, but you need to change out the towels frequently. We change them out every day and have no stink at all.

 

We have a dog and a guinea pig and our dog would gladly mouth all over the guinea pig if we let her be in the same room. The dog I had when I was growing up was a mother to every animal he found, including the kills that the cats brought back home if they were still living.

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We have a dog and a guinea pig and our dog would gladly mouth all over the guinea pig if we let her be in the same room. The dog I had when I was growing up was a mother to every animal he found, including the kills that the cats brought back home if they were still living.

 

:lol: Okay, this is funny, even if you didn't mean it to be. Funny, and very sweet.

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Most of my cats came from a feral cat who had kittens in our yard. He wouldn't let her near them because he thought she was going to hurt them. He was standing guard over the kittens when I got home from school. He did finally let her have her kittens back, but he was their 2nd mommy. She ended up very attached to him and it was awfully cute to see him curled up with a whole litter of kittens and their mommy all on top of him and around him.

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I vote cat too. My 2 cats are very tolerant of my kids. One of them sleeps with my son almost every night. The thing is we got both of them when my son was 2, and I took him to the humane society to pick them. It was really easy to tell which ones could live with kids. So definitely take your son with and maybe even bring a spare when you go look at kittens. We leave our cats up to 3 nights. My kids are in charge of the kitty litter (we have 2 rolling litter boxes like this ...).

 

http://www.petco.com/product/2611/Omega-Paw-Roll-n-Clean-Litter-Box.aspx?CoreCat=certona-_-ProductDetail_1-_-Omega%20Paw%20Roll%20%27n%20Clean%20Litter%20Box-2611

 

So fun! :D

 

ETA - we have male cats too. I've had 4 male cats in total after looking at a bunch of kittens. The males just seemed more laid back in general and definitely better with kids when I took my son.

Edited by kck
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A cat will live at least 15 or more years. When ds grows up and leaves home he probably won't be able to take the cat with him. Do YOU want a cat ;-) ?

 

If you get a cat, pick one from a shelter where your son can sit and see which cat is a lap cat cuddle bum.. Some cats are, some aren't. I have both kinds.

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My dd and I would love to have rats - you really need two. They are great pets from all I've read about them, but they require a lot of interaction and care. I don't think they're low maintenance.

 

I've heard good things about guinea pigs too, but they also need a lot of interaction and handling to be nice.

 

I've never owned either of those options though, just cats and dogs.

 

Both of those options I think are more work than cats, though any pet is going to be work. Cats are low maintenance though, IME, as long as they don't have health problems. (One of my cats has skin issues that require meds and many vet bills.)

 

You never know what you're gonna get with cats. My childhood cat slept w me, curled up w me whenever I was reading, and was pretty cuddly. But he was also tempermental. I have three cats right now and two are very cuddly, one is male and one is female. They are both from the same litter and from a pregnant stray that came to my door, so I've had them since they were born. The male follows me everywhere and literally hugs me when I sit down and my lap is toddler free. As a matter of fact, I'm having trouble seeing my iPad screen right now because he's on my lap. He's the sweetest cat I've ever met, he is so patient with my rowdy toddler. The third cat we have dh found as 6 wk old kitten on the side of the road and he's a huge grump, bites the kids and prefers to be left alone.

 

I love cats but a kitten can turn out to be a cuddly cat or an aloof one. I don't know how to predict what you'll get. Maybe it's safer to get a cat from a rescue group that's already a year or more in age so you can find out what it's personality is like.

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I love cats but a kitten can turn out to be a cuddly cat or an aloof one. I don't know how to predict what you'll get. Maybe it's safer to get a cat from a rescue group that's already a year or more in age so you can find out what it's personality is like.

 

:iagree:

 

I'd vote cat for sure, of the options you gave, but I would recommend picking out an adult one at a shelter, and letting it's reaction to your son's attentions be the guide.

 

I picked up a sweet kitty off the side of a road last year, and we cuddled & loved on & adored that kitty his entire kitten-hood - but he is still NOT a cuddly cat. He is a likeable cat, friendly & affable, and generally willing to put up with the kids no matter what they do, but he is not cuddly at all (or super playful anymore, now that he's "all growed up"!). If my 6yo picks him up & takes him to the bedroom to play, he lets it happen all mellow & then takes the first available opportunity to wander away. :)

 

- Rats I don't know much about, but I've heard they are pretty good pets (friendly, clean, sociable, playful). I've never heard that they are particularly cuddly, though, and it sounds like from pp that you would need to get 2 to keep each other company while you are gone. I have no idea about the smells.

 

- Rabbits are timid and don't deal well with stress, from what I've seen. My neighbor's kids got rabbits as pets & I felt SO bad for those poor tormented things every time we went over... they were obviously miserable and scared. I don't think I've ever really seen a rabbit play, either. Pp make them sound awfully smelly, too - lol.

 

- G pigs are apparently not very good pets (although my 8yo REALLY wants one). They stress & get sick easily, don't deal well with people picking them up or moving them around, and smell. Their cages need to be kept clean constantly, and would probably be vile if you left them alone for a day or so (unless it was quite big).

 

- Cats are the main ones I think of when I think cuddly, playful, low-maintenance, able to deal well with being on their own for long periods, and all-around good pets. They can certainly have their problems - some don't like kids, some mark things or pee (we have 1 cat to this day that is a mandatory outdoor cat because she caused so many problems with peeing everywhere), some are playful but feisty while some are not playful but cuddly, etc. Most importantly, of course, they ALL rule the world & allow you to live in it... :D

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We've had rats and cats. We work on a farm with guinea pigs and rabbits.

 

Rats-GREAT little pets. They are smart, almost like miniature dogs lol. Ours came to their name, we free roaming in the guest bathroom (when we didn't have guests. If we had people over, I put them in their cage) and were totally litter trained. They were sweet and cuddly. You will need two at least. And they chew-provide them with ample toys and space and they should be fine tho. They do love interaction and a good challenge-my girls loved setting up obstacle courses for them. We fed them a rat food, but they got daily fresh fruit and veggies, grains, and things like yogurt, nuts, and seeds. They lived a little over two years.

 

Cats-depends on the cat. Lol. Ours right now is super low maintenance. But she isn't really a cuddly cat, and only tolerates the kids. She will lay at the foot of our or dd7 bed, but she mostly hides in my closet. She's old tho, and I got her before I was married, so maybe that's why...

 

Rabbits-very cute. Get a bigger breed, they tend to be calmer and nicer. The floppy eared ones especially. However, IMO, they can be a little unpredictable. And they poop a lot, but can be litter trained.

 

Guinea pigs-again, they poop a lot. Not sure if they can be litter trained? The ones at the farm where we work are sweet once we hold them, but are skittish to get out of the hutch.

 

I don't know, it seems like rabbits and guinea pigs can get boring after a while, tho we have never owned one. Unless they are litter trained, they are confined to a hutch or cage, and thats kind of sad.

Cats are great, but can live a long time, like another poster said.

Rats are sweet, we've known quite a few friends who have had them, and NEVER have we heard of them biting. Hamsters and gerbils, yes. But rats. No. They are very very docile and sweet. Plus, they are so cool! I used to keep ours on my shoulder and do my chores. People who came to the door were always surprised to see one peeking out from under my hair lol. We have mice right now, which are very fun and teeny and cute. They are very calm in our hands and one has learned to come onto our hand for a treat. The rats were much easier to train tho. Almost as soon as we brought them home they were willing to come to us for some yogurt. And we adopted them as adults, so I'm sure looking for a breeder and getting a baby would be even better. We have left for a weekend and they have been fine-just leave a lot of food and water. We eventually got a huge three story ferret sized cage-which I would suggest getting from the beginning. Rats really do need space and mental stimulation or they get depressed. We had two females and they never smelled. I used the pine cat

Litter, and they only pooped in there, not anywhere in the bathroom. They did poo on us in the beginning as they were getting used to us tho. we would switch their cage toys out weekly. I gave them hanging wooden beads, cardboard boxes, oatmeal tubes, material to shred, rope, cardboard egg cartons, sticks, stuffed animals, ect. We never had to buy them things, we just utilized what we could find and they loved it. We'd hide their food and make them find it, or hide treats. They were really fun.

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- Rabbits are timid and don't deal well with stress, from what I've seen. My neighbor's kids got rabbits as pets & I felt SO bad for those poor tormented things every time we went over... they were obviously miserable and scared. I don't think I've ever really seen a rabbit play, either. Pp make them sound awfully smelly, too - lol.

 

I would probably say cat, but we got our first rabbit last year and she's really fun too. My 9 year old adores her, carries her around, and kisses her. We keep ours indoors and during the day she is allowed to run around part of the house. She really does play! She pushes toy cars around with her nose, picks up and throws small toys and toilet paper tubes, and enjoys moving shoes around the room. She also loves to race from the dining room into the living room and behind the couch at top speed and then hop back to do it over and over again. She comes when she's called and lies down to be petted too.

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For the love of all that you hold dear, don't get a guinea pig. Don't be fooled by their cuteness. Much cage-cleaning will ensue;).

 

I'm not a cat person, but with those choices (and if dh weren't allergic, haha), I'd get a cat.

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We have a dog, a cat, two guinea pigs, two hamsters, and two ducks. The dog and cat are lowest maintenance, and the cat is the cuddliest (when she wants to be). One guinea is fine with cuddling, but the other is too skittish even after a couple of years with us. Guineas are social and do best with a friend. Guinea cages must be cleaned often. The hammies are adorable, ultra tame, and very sweet, but like to run around a lot instead of being held. It took a lot of time, attention, and patience to tame them, too. Hamsters can seem cranky at first and get a bad rap because people give up on them too soon. Hammie cages can go a little longer between cleanings than guineas. One hamster per cage is best.

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Your statement about being in the next place for four years concerns me in regards to a cat. Cats can live a very long time, my last two died at 18 and 20 respectively. If you foresee that you may have to move to a new place without the ability to keep the cat, don't get it now.

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I'd tend to say a cat too.

 

I used to keep rats, and I would be hesitant to give one to a ten year old. They are nice animals, very social and fun, but they are delicate, and it is pretty easy to neglect them - they really need regular social interaction. They also tend to have respiratory issues and the vet bills can be high with that.

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Well, I'd say NOT a rat, simply b/c everyone I've known that has had one say they bite. A lot.

 

Not all rats bite! They are naturally chewers and if you give them things to chew in the cage such as hard food, wood blocks, cardboard, and if you handle them daily then they don't bite.

 

We have had nine different rats (said good bye to five of them...) and only one nipped and never really bit. This one would nip at your toes to indicate "Get me back to the cage and my litter box or I will pee on your carpet." It didn't hurt, it was more like someone tapping you on the shoulder to get your attention.

 

So, I will say that not all rats bite.

 

Rats are smart, clean, and can be trained to use a litter box and come when called. Some people teach them tricks too.

 

If you decide on rats, don't get just one. You need to get a same-sex pair (or alter one so they can't make babies) to keep each other company. They get really lonely otherwise and will get sick and die.

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Can you get rats and guineas fixed? Do you have to get them fixed? Does it make them better pets if they are fixed?

 

I would assume that you can get guinea pigs fixed. I'm allergic to guinea pigs so we've never considered them as pets and I don't know that much about them.

 

You can get rats fixed. Simple operation and they recover nicely. And, you don't have to withhold food first to prevent vomiting due to anaesthesia because rats can't vomit.

 

Some people spay their female rats to lower the incidence of mammary tumors. But not all female rats get tumors and they can be removed. You can also get your rats fixed if you want to mix males and females and not end up with a million rats. My friend, who had several female rats at home, volunteers at the humane society and a really cute male rat showed up there. Someone had purchased him as food for their pet snake and for whatever reason, the snake refused to eat that rat (my friend says that she thinks its because the rat is white and snakes might think something is wrong with a white rat???). So, the snake owner, not knowing what else to do, brought the uneaten rat to the Humane Society where the staff named it Mister Squeaks (unoriginal to say the least). Well, my friend adopted Mister Squeaks and had him neutered before bringing him home so that he could live with the girl rats. I told her, "So, your new rat had a 'mister-ectomy.' He is no longer Mr. Squeaks, just Squeaks."

 

Anyway, I don't know how small of an animal a vet can safely and easily spay or neuter. For rats, it's really no big deal.

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Your statement about being in the next place for four years concerns me in regards to a cat. Cats can live a very long time, my last two died at 18 and 20 respectively. If you foresee that you may have to move to a new place without the ability to keep the cat, don't get it now.

 

 

As I said, my cats (brothers) lived to 15 and 19, so I am well aware how long they live. But why would I ever NOT be able to take the cat? Even if we were traveling overseas, which is highly unlikely in the husband's current field, we would obviosly take the cat. I can see more issues getting a rabbit or rat overseas, but like I said, that is highly unlikely to ever happen again. I guess I just don't get what you mean.

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I think she was just worried because your statement about "the next four years" could have been implying that if you were moving sooner than that you wouldn't get anything because you might just get rid of it anyway. Not a big deal with critters that only live 2-4 years, but sad for a cat - far too many get abandoned because of owners moving away & deciding to not take them! :(

 

Our family cat lived 19 years or so & traveled all over the states in the car with us! Lol. We were military and moved a lot, and I was so glad to take my beloved cat everywhere! :)

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