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Following the Sandusky trial...new thoughts on McCleary?


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Anyone read the testimony from McCleary? Does it give you a new perspective on him, and his actions, compared to what you thought when the whole story hit the news?

 

It did for me. I actually feel kind of bad for him now. Not as bad as for the victims of course, but the fact that he was one of the first to blow the whistle and the "boys club" pushed it under the rug. Now he's unemployable in his field because he choose to blow the whistle.

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If he would have blown the whistle for real, i.e. gone immediately to the police, he would NOT now be unemployable.

 

Maybe, maybe not. It could just as easily been covered up and he could have been out of a job.

 

I won't defend the guy, but it is a tougher spot for him than many might think. Sandusky was a long time family friend, and processing that event and its implications would have been difficult.

 

What I will say for MM is that he at least reported what he saw. Others dropped the ball, even though they knew of past incidents with Sandusky. Not to mention the school counselor (and mandated reporter) who dismissed victim #1's claim when he came to her and did not report it as required.

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:iagree:

 

He sat on that stand and described in detail what he witnessed, down to the sound of "flesh slapping against flesh." He saw the victim was not of consensual age. His lack of immediate reaction tremendously disappoints me.

 

I know. I thought of him/that situation over and over again during the discussions on the recent "dad killed molester" and "what would you do if you witnessed or suspected abuse" threads. Everyone who responded said that they would intervene, with physical force if necessary. I just don't get how you could NOT, especially as a large, strong man who wouldn't have cause to worry about his own safety. I do get how shocking and confusing it must have been, but still. What if that poor boy was thinking, "Thank God someone will stop him now!", you know?

Edited by Kirch
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I don't feel bad for him. He caught an adult male raping a child and his response was to make noise so they would know someone was there, call a person who was not the police and in meetings where he claimed he was reporting the incident he left out details. How about grabbing the kid and driving to the nearest police station? How about calling 911? The family friend thing etc just doesn't hold up to me, this was a child and he saw exactly what was happening. Even if in the moment he didn't know what to do or was in shock he could have gone to the police after, tried to contact the child to bring him to the police etc. and all of this could be done without even talking to his superiors at the school. It would have been much harder to cover up if someone was able to medically examine the child immediately after the rape.

 

I understand that he may have been in shock but after he had time to process he needed to act. I think he would be employable if he had done something more extreme as a response. His half-action makes him unemployable.

 

I personally think he should be in jail for his inaction. I could care less about his job prospects. I also think the school counselor should have charges brought against her.

Edited by lula
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And let's not gloss over the fact that in his mind, he DID go to the police.

 

The people who sat in the room where he told all the nitty-gritty that he saw where: 1. The president of the school: 2. The Athletic Director, and 3. some dude who was the head of police on campus...not just some hokey-dokey campus security guy, but an commissioned police offer with full police authority, and in McCleary's mind, so he says, he thought was like the "legal authority" there. And in the law's mind, it WAS. That is why McCleary is not in legal trouble. He did report it to an office of the law.

 

He reported it to everyone he thought he was supposed to.

He expected something to happen. They covered it up.

 

I know that we could all expect him to do more when he witnessed the encounter. But in that situation, when a person's mind is so shocked and appalled that local hero is doing something so horrifying....well, hindsight is 20/20. It was noted that the "situation" he witness stopped at that moment. So in his freaked-out-at-that-moment mind, it was stopped and the next thing to do was to report it. I wonder had he went in, punched Sandusky, or whatever else we all expected from him, how it would have been handled then? Any differently?

 

In the end, he report it. It was covered up. When it finally came to light, he lost his dream job, and now is virtually unemployable, because he DID report it.

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I still think he went the wrong way with his reports. He should have talked to police, not his boss. I hate it for him. It sounds he thought he was doing the right thing and I'm sure hindsight is 20/20 and all that. I just cannot sympathize for him for not going to the police and getting something done. I would stood in the streets and yelled for days if that's what it took to protect these kids. I know it's easy for me to say on this side of the couch but my job would not be as important as what was happening to children.

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I know. I thought of him/that situation over and over again during the discussions on the recent "dad killed molester" and "what would you do if you witnessed or suspected abuse" threads. Everyone who responded said that they would intervene, with physical force if necessary. I just don't get how you could NOT, especially as a large, strong man who wouldn't have cause to worry about his own safety.

 

What people say they would do and what they actually do in a given situation can often be very different.

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I thought I read that he contacted campus police. Doesn't that count? I can understand being shocked in the moment.

 

Not in the least. Campus "police" work for people concerned about the University and its reputation. Police work for the public. His complaint taken to the appropriate police department would have likely resulted in the investigation of Sandusky starting earlier.

 

Because of how McQueary reacted, that child went un-helped and was abused again. Because of how he reacted, Sandusky was able to find (many) other victims. I don't care how shocked he was, he needed to call the police. Campus policy does not trump the law. Furthermore, if in the moment he called the campus police and not the actual police, it was certainly incumbent on him to go to the police when he realized his superiors were covering it up.

 

I feel as little sympathy for him as I do for Sandusky. He may not be legally responsible but he is morally responsible in my book.

Edited by kijipt
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I don't feel bad for him. He caught an adult male raping a child and his response was to make noise so they would know someone was there, call a person who was not the police and in meetings where he claimed he was reporting the incident he left out details. How about grabbing the kid and driving to the nearest police station? How about calling 911? The family friend thing etc just doesn't hold up to me, this was a child and he saw exactly what was happening, even if in the moment he didn't know what to do or was in shock he could have gone to the police, tried to contact the child to bring him to the police etc. and all of this could be done without even talking to his superiors at the school. It would have been much harder to cover up if someone was able to medically examine the child immediately after the rape.

 

I personally think he should be in jail for his inaction. I could care less about his job prospects. I also think the school counselor should have charges brought against her.

 

And see, this is where you have details wrong. You must not have read his testimony or other court details. You are only repeating what the news said months ago. He did give FULL details to those in the meeting. They denied knowing the extent of what he saw. Now that the attorneys have access to all the emails that went back and forth between those people, they show that they knew ALL the gory information, and still choose to do nothing. That is why they are being proscuted.

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And let's not gloss over the fact that in his mind, he DID go to the police.

 

The people who sat in the room where he told all the nitty-gritty that he saw where: 1. The president of the school: 2. The Athletic Director, and 3. some dude who was the head of police on campus...not just some hokey-dokey campus security guy, but an commissioned police offer with full police authority, and in McCleary's mind, so he says, he thought was like the "legal authority" there. And in the law's mind, it WAS. That is why McCleary is not in legal trouble. He did report it to an office of the law.

 

He reported it to everyone he thought he was supposed to.

He expected something to happen. They covered it up.

 

I know that we could all expect him to do more when he witnessed the encounter. But in that situation, when a person's mind is so shocked and appalled that local hero is doing something so horrifying....well, hindsight is 20/20. It was noted that the "situation" he witness stopped at that moment. So in his freaked-out-at-that-moment mind, it was stopped and the next thing to do was to report it. I wonder had he went in, punched Sandusky, or whatever else we all expected from him, how it would have been handled then? Any differently?

 

In the end, he report it. It was covered up. When it finally came to light, he lost his dream job, and now is virtually unemployable, because he DID report it.

 

Good and true points. I still just don't think he did enough. If the guy wasn't arrested his job wasn't over.

 

P.S. I wasn't typing my previous comment directly to you. We posted at the same time and both just happened to use "hindsight is 20/20". :)

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I don't feel bad for him. He caught an adult male raping a child and his response was to make noise so they would know someone was there, call a person who was not the police and in meetings where he claimed he was reporting the incident he left out details. How about grabbing the kid and driving to the nearest police station? How about calling 911? The family friend thing etc just doesn't hold up to me, this was a child and he saw exactly what was happening. Even if in the moment he didn't know what to do or was in shock he could have gone to the police after, tried to contact the child to bring him to the police etc. and all of this could be done without even talking to his superiors at the school. It would have been much harder to cover up if someone was able to medically examine the child immediately after the rape.

 

I understand that he may have been in shock but after he had time to process he needed to act. I think he would be employable if he had done something more extreme as a response. His half-action makes him unemployable.

 

I personally think he should be in jail for his inaction. I could care less about his job prospects. I also think the school counselor should have charges brought against her.

 

:iagree::iagree::iagree:

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And let's not gloss over the fact that in his mind, he DID go to the police.

 

The people who sat in the room where he told all the nitty-gritty that he saw where: 1. The president of the school: 2. The Athletic Director, and 3. some dude who was the head of police on campus...not just some hokey-dokey campus security guy, but an commissioned police offer with full police authority, and in McCleary's mind, so he says, he thought was like the "legal authority" there. And in the law's mind, it WAS. That is why McCleary is not in legal trouble. He did report it to an office of the law.

 

He reported it to everyone he thought he was supposed to.

He expected something to happen. They covered it up.

 

I know that we could all expect him to do more when he witnessed the encounter. But in that situation, when a person's mind is so shocked and appalled that local hero is doing something so horrifying....well, hindsight is 20/20. It was noted that the "situation" he witness stopped at that moment. So in his freaked-out-at-that-moment mind, it was stopped and the next thing to do was to report it. I wonder had he went in, punched Sandusky, or whatever else we all expected from him, how it would have been handled then? Any differently?

 

In the end, he report it. It was covered up. When it finally came to light, he lost his dream job, and now is virtually unemployable, because he DID report it.

 

I think the bolded is the part that not everyone is comprehending. Campus police IS a real, functional police station. The head of the Campus Police is an officer of the law.

 

Do I think he should have done more at the moment? Yes of course. But he didn't. I'm sure he wished he did. He did report it, and that's what is legally required of him. I can't honestly say what I would do in that situation. Knowing myself and my reactions to things I might have done something similar... it's a very hard position to be in.

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Good and true points. I still just don't think he did enough. If the guy wasn't arrested his job wasn't over.

 

P.S. I wasn't typing my previous comment directly to you. We posted at the same time and both just happened to use "hindsight is 20/20". :)

 

;) That's fine. I didn't take it as you were talking to me :). This is not heated for me at all. Just an interesting conversation, between educated parents...food for thought, is all :).

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Not in the least. Campus "police" work for people concerned about the University and its reputation. Police work for the public. His complaint taken to the appropriate police department would have likely resulted in the investigation of Sandusky starting earlier.

 

Because of how McQueary reacted, that child went un-helped and was abused again. Because of how he reacted, Sandusky was able to find (many) other victims. I don't care how shocked he was, he needed to call the police. Campus policy does not trump the law. Furthermore, if in the moment he called the campus police and not the actual police, it was certainly incumbent on him to go to the police when he realized his superiors were covering it up.

 

I feel as little sympathy for him as I do for Sandusky. He may not be legally responsible but he is morally responsible in my book.

 

The local police had a report on Sandusky, and his admission that he engaged in inappropriate contact, in 1998 and brushed it away.

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I don't really find his testimony about the locker slam all that credible. I think it's kind of a CYA addition meant to burnish his public persona. Based on the reports I saw, he showed more emotion over his lack of employment prospects than the victim's lost innocence. I mean really, who sees that and walks away without saying a word to police? No, he called his dad and relied on the university rather than the rightful authorities. I think he made it pretty clear based on his actions initially and on the stand where his interests/loyalty lay...self, job and university preservation and, for a time, the university rewarded him for it.

Edited by Sneezyone
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And let's not gloss over the fact that in his mind, he DID go to the police.

 

The people who sat in the room where he told all the nitty-gritty that he saw where: 1. The president of the school: 2. The Athletic Director, and 3. some dude who was the head of police on campus...not just some hokey-dokey campus security guy, but an commissioned police offer with full police authority, and in McCleary's mind, so he says, he thought was like the "legal authority" there. And in the law's mind, it WAS. That is why McCleary is not in legal trouble. He did report it to an office of the law.

 

He reported it to everyone he thought he was supposed to.

He expected something to happen. They covered it up.

 

I know that we could all expect him to do more when he witnessed the encounter. But in that situation, when a person's mind is so shocked and appalled that local hero is doing something so horrifying....well, hindsight is 20/20. It was noted that the "situation" he witness stopped at that moment. So in his freaked-out-at-that-moment mind, it was stopped and the next thing to do was to report it. I wonder had he went in, punched Sandusky, or whatever else we all expected from him, how it would have been handled then? Any differently?

 

In the end, he report it. It was covered up. When it finally came to light, he lost his dream job, and now is virtually unemployable, because he DID report it.

 

Yes, let's gloss over it. This is a CRYSTAL CLEAR case of right and wrong. It wouldn't/couldn't have been covered up if he had gone to the police. If he had reported it to the authorities who would have actually done something to stop it at the time, sure, he might have lost his job at Penn State. But his courage to do the right thing would have been recognized and he would be able to coach football somewhere. There is NO excuse for what he did, and more importantly than him losing his job, Sandusky's victims have to live with the loss of their innocence.

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He reported it to everyone he thought he was supposed to.

He expected something to happen. They covered it up.

 

In the end, he report it. It was covered up. When it finally came to light, he lost his dream job, and now is virtually unemployable, because he DID report it.

 

No, now he is unemployable because he didn't do enough. He is unemployable because no employer would want someone with judgment that bad on their staff.

 

No rational, moral person should think that calling the campus was enough to do in that circumstance AND that when they saw no action or a cover-up, think that they had done their duty. I think he was at the very best complicit in the cover-up. Dude is not innocent by any stretch of the imagination. 9-1-1 is not a hard thing to remember.

 

If it was your kid he had failed to help, I am sure you would feel no sympathy.

Edited by kijipt
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I don't really find his testimony about the locker slam all that credible. I think it's kind of a CYA addition meant to burnish his public persona. Based on the reports I saw, he showed more emotion over his lack of emplyment prospects than the victim. I mean really, who sees that and walks away without saying a word to police? No, he called his dad and relied on the university rather than the rightful authorities. I think he made it pretty clear based on his actions initially and on the stand where his interests/loyalty lay...self, job and university preservation.

 

This. He knew that Sandusky was not arrested, charged, tried or jail. He *knew* Sandusky continued to have access to children.

 

He's guilty similarly to Rusty Yates being guilty.

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The local police had a report on Sandusky, and his admission that he engaged in inappropriate contact, in 1998 and brushed it away.

 

Then press on till you find someone who cares. Try to help the child in whatever way you can in the moment and after.

 

Multiple reports of the same thing would be helpful in triggering an investigation and arrest.

Edited by kijipt
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I can't believe the defense attorney. Is he really incompetent as he seems or is he that confident that his client is going to walk?

 

What's going to convict Sandusky is that interview he gave Costas. He will be convicted by what he said and how he said it. Parts of that interview were admitted into evidence today.

 

The whole Penn State thing was covered up apparently. It seems they unearthed emails from the higher ups that reveal they knew about Sandusky and were active in trying to sweep it under the rug.

 

These kids were failed by so many people. :(

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That doesn't make his inaction acceptable.

 

It does show the "local police would have resolved this" line of thinking is possibly flawed as well.

 

I am being very cynical here, but I think Sandusky had enough of a strong reputation and enough powerful people backing him that he was likely going to get away with what happened no matter what MM did.

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Not in the least. Campus "police" work for people concerned about the University and its reputation. Police work for the public. His complaint taken to the appropriate police department would have likely resulted in the investigation of Sandusky starting earlier.

 

Because of how McQueary reacted, that child went un-helped and was abused again. Because of how he reacted, Sandusky was able to find (many) other victims. I don't care how shocked he was, he needed to call the police. Campus policy does not trump the law. Furthermore, if in the moment he called the campus police and not the actual police, it was certainly incumbent on him to go to the police when he realized his superiors were covering it up.

 

I feel as little sympathy for him as I do for Sandusky. He may not be legally responsible but he is morally responsible in my book.

 

I don't know about other states; but, in TX (or at least at my alma mater), campus police ARE commissioned peace officers and carry the same authority and obligations as a city officer or sheriff's deputy. So, on a university campus calling the campus police is calling the police.

 

I don't know how jurisdiction might (or might not) play into this. Do the city/county police have the jurisdiction in PA to investigate crimes on university property? I would assume so, but don't know for sure.

 

I agree that campus policy or reputation does not trump the law and it sounds like the campus P.C. in this case made some appallingly horrid decisions. I couldn't say whether or not those decisions were made at the behest/direction of the university president.

 

I don't know how I feel about McQueary. On the one hand he did report what he saw and may have felt he did the right thing at the time. On the other hand, once he saw that there was no investigation, he should have gone to whichever police agency in whose jurisdiction the university lies and made another report. And brought whatever e-mails, etc he might have had.

 

And ChocolateReign is right - what people say they will do or say/how they will respond in a situation is more times than not vastly different (almost diametrically opposed to) what they actually say/how they truly react.

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I can't believe the defense attorney. Is he really incompetent as he seems or is he that confident that his client is going to walk?

 

He doesn't have a lot to work with. Other than some inconsistencies in dates, the prosecution witnesses have been very strong. When the prosecution has so many victims telling similar stories, there isn't much he can do other than poke random holes in stories, claim they are doing it for the money (which is hurt by not every victim having any attorney), and hoping he can make the minor inconsistencies blend into a reasonable doubt/maybe they are all lying closing.

 

Unlike in some high profile cases, the prosecution has done a solid job of keeping the story simple and easy for a jury to follow.

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I sincerely hope that he actually did do more than is being reported and he just can't talk about it because of the trial. I have no comprehension of how the shock etc must have actually affected him however, years went by before anything was actually done concerning this situation. Did he not in those years ever question why nothing was happening and why the police didn't want to interview him? Did he ever wonder why he didn't have to make a signed statement? Didn't he wonder why the officials met with him at the arena instead of the police station? Did he ever do anything about this other than "feel uncomfortable" or wonder?

 

He claims that he thought he had reported it to the Penn State police or Central PA police but there is no record of that from any police department. (obviously they could be lying/covering it up however, it does seem odd that he doesn't recall ever making a statement or being interviewed) If he was worried about a cover-up or his reputation wouldn't it have been better to go to the off campus police? Get an attorney of his own and file a report?

 

Honestly, I think he continued with his life, continued showing up to Sandusky charity events, recruited for the team, etc simply because he couldn't handle rocking the boat or contemplating that by making a greater effort to report Sanusky he may lose his job, his social life would be wrecked, people wouldn't believe him etc etc I know those are things that all whistleblowers must deal with but in cases involving children I think there should be a higher duty placed on people who had knowledge of situations like this. Yes, he froze, yes, he tried but you know what I think it is just fine for society to say "you should have tried harder and done more." So many kids were harmed by this man that I have no tolerance for the adults involved who failed to stop the situation. Seriously we can't come up with a higher standard of acceptable behavior for these adults and instead worry about the poor guy who will have lost job prospects and his social life?

 

A major reason he won't being charged is that in most states it is not actually a crime to not report child abuse. (unless you are a mandated reporter, which it seems to me a coach should be)

Edited by lula
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I am being very cynical here, but I think Sandusky had enough of a strong reputation and enough powerful people backing him that he was likely going to get away with what happened no matter what MM did.

 

This is flawed because ultimately Sandusky has not gotten away with it and is standing trial. His power failed him because people who came after McQueary were persistent. He was finally brought down because of the courage of some of his victims and by police who cared enough not to give up on a case against a well liked figure. Victim 1 was raped as a young teen and yet he, even as a child and a survivor, had the courage to keep going to investigators and working with investigators. McQueary was an adult not burdened with the toll of rape. He could have done more. Period. I doubt the parents of any 18-22 yo college student would want McQueary working with their kids. It's only natural the dude has no employment prospects.

 

Also, I am willing to bet that Sandusky's early retirement was triggered to some degree by the earlier reports. He was supposed to inherit the program from Paterno until an abrupt retirement?

Edited by kijipt
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I believe that is true for a lot of large state universities and university systems. I know it was for my alma mater and where DH attended.

 

It wasn't always so. Changed sometime after I was out of college, so after the late 80's. So folks who know PSU at different times may have different facts...just trying to clarify as I'm falling asleep...

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A major reason he won't being charged is that in most states it is not actually a crime to not report child abuse. (unless you are a mandated reporter)

 

This is incorrect- he is not being charged because investigators have concluded what he did was legally sufficient since he met with a campus police officer in the room. Other people, who did not see what he saw, are facing charges.

 

And let's be clear about something. It is rape of a child. Not child abuse. If a full grown woman is forced to have sex, we always call it rape. Same thing happens to a minor and we often call it molestation and abuse. Sandusky is a rapist.

Edited by kijipt
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This is flawed because ultimately Sandusky has not gotten away with it and is standing trial. His power failed him because people who came after McQueary were persistent. He was finally brought down because of the courage of some of his victims and by police who cared enough not to give up on a case against a well liked figure. Victim 1 was raped as a young teen and yet he, even as a child and a survivor, had the courage to keep going to investigators and working with investigators. McQueary was an adult not burdened with the toll of rape. He could have done more. Period. I doubt the parents of any 18-22 yo college student would want McQueary working with their kids. It's only natural the dude has no employment prospects.

 

And? Nothing you posted goes against what I said. At the time, there was a power structure in place that protected him. Had he not pursued a victim at the local high school leaving a trail of evidence away from PSU, he still may not have been caught. (And even then a school guidance counselor didn't report because "he was such a nice guy.")

And FTR, the man's name is McCreary.

 

Also, I am willing to bet that Sandusky's early retirement was triggered to some degree by the earlier reports. He was supposed to inherit the program from Paterno until an abrupt retirement?

 

Possibly. Paterno also never retired, so there is that. Also, even if his retirement was forced, he was still allowed campus and program access after his retirement.

Questions were raised as to why Sandusky did not get a couple of head coaching jobs around that time (1998-ish), and it would not surprise me if some rumors may have been swirling around him. If so, that again just indicates that there was protection in place for the man.

 

I don't weep for McCreary, but in the list of people to blame, he is farther down for me that the local police, certain PSU administrators, members of the Second Mile Foundation, all of which fall way, way below Sandusky.

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:iagree:

 

He sat on that stand and described in detail what he witnessed, down to the sound of "flesh slapping against flesh." He saw the victim was not of consensual age. His lack of immediate reaction tremendously disappoints me.

 

That's an understatement. He saw a child getting raped, so he banged a locker, went home and "tried to wrap his brain around it" and then called his Dad and then went to bed, slept, and went the next day to tell someone at the college, NOT the police.

 

THIS is why he is unemployable. He didn't react appropriately on the spot.

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Why didn't he sneak around the corner, call 911, and then walk in on Sandusky and everyone could wait for the cops to show up? Surely he had a camera phone. I'm sure he would have gotten Sandusky's attention if he walked in and started taking pictures.

 

If he had done that and the police didn't do anything then I could understand him not taking it further.

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Why didn't he sneak around the corner, call 911, and then walk in on Sandusky and everyone could wait for the cops to show up? Surely he had a camera phone. I'm sure he would have gotten Sandusky's attention if he walked in and started taking pictures.

 

If he had done that and the police didn't do anything then I could understand him not taking it further.

 

In 2001, having a camera phone would not have been a given.

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It bears noting that when McQueary saw what he described as likely the rape of a boy about age 10 or so, he:

 

*May have slammed a locker (which sounds to me like what you might do if you stumble onto an adult couple getting it on rather than a sane reaction to child rape.)

*Let the rape continue and Sandusky presumably leave with his victim

*Waited several hours

*Called his Dad.

*Waited a day

*THEN told Paterno

*Waited TEN DAYS

*THEN reported it to campus police

 

So even if we accept that only reporting it to the campus police was morally sufficient and that he was shocked into cowardice and failed to intervene and help the boy, the dude still waited a heck of a long time to do anything at all. His actions definitely seem more in line with protecting his job than with helping bring to light/stop the rape of a child.

Edited by kijipt
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It bears noting that when McQueary saw what he described as likely the rape of a boy about age 10 or so, he:

 

*May have slammed a locker (which sounds to me like what you might do if you stumble onto an adult couple getting it on rather than a sane reaction to child rape.)

*Let the rape continue and Sandusky presumably leave with his victim

*Waited several hours

*Called his Dad.

*Waited a day

*THEN told Paterno

*Waited TEN DAYS

*THEN reported it to campus police

 

So even if we accept that only reporting it to the campus police was morally sufficient and that he was shocked into cowardice and failed to intervene and help the boy, the dude still waited a heck of a long time to do anything at all. His actions definitely seem more in line with protecting his job than with helping bring to light/stop the rape of a child.

 

Not exactly. Paterno was officially his supervisor and head of the football program (obviously), and McQueary reported it to him on Saturday after witnessing the incident on Friday night. Paterno took over the reporting of the incident, and contacted the AD. The AD and the VP over the campus police then contacted MM 10 days later.

 

MM could have handled this differently, but based on how the PSU administration went about covering it up, coupled with the local police acting in a similar manner in 1998, makes him much less of a target in my eyes.

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And see, this is where you have details wrong. You must not have read his testimony or other court details. You are only repeating what the news said months ago. He did give FULL details to those in the meeting. They denied knowing the extent of what he saw. Now that the attorneys have access to all the emails that went back and forth between those people, they show that they knew ALL the gory information, and still choose to do nothing. That is why they are being proscuted.

Ok, so he did tell the full details to the police officer and other officials and it was covered up.

But he still didn't do anything to protect the kid on the spot against this older man. He could have easily have stopped it.

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Not exactly. Paterno was officially his supervisor and head of the football program (obviously), and McQueary reported it to him on Saturday after witnessing the incident on Friday night. Paterno took over the reporting of the incident, and contacted the AD. The AD and the VP over the campus police then contacted MM 10 days later.

 

MM could have handled this differently, but based on how the PSU administration went about covering it up, coupled with the local police acting in a similar manner in 1998, makes him much less of a target in my eyes.

 

A person was being raped. A *little*, *minor* person was being raped by a pedophile. The ONLY acceptable responses are:

 

1) Stop the rape

 

and/or

 

2) Call 911

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A person was being raped. A *little*, *minor* person was being raped by a pedophile. The ONLY acceptable responses are:

 

1) Stop the rape

 

and/or

 

2) Call 911

 

Yes. Exactly what she said.

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MM could have handled this differently, but based on how the PSU administration went about covering it up, coupled with the local police acting in a similar manner in 1998, makes him much less of a target in my eyes.

 

I agree with you that he is less of a target/less responsible for the coverup. I am glad the higher ups are facing charges and have lost their jobs. However in my eyes as a child rape survivor, a parent of young boys and just a gal who tries to be a decent human being, McQueary is pretty dang responsible for just walking away that night. No one else saw what he saw and failed to lift a finger to help. Local PD or campus police, no matter how you dice the onion it's an emergency and immediate call, even if you are too scared or unable to personally intervene yourself. I have been in some dicey and dangerous situations and I have either called the police or become involved. I know that what people say they would do and what they do in reality are often different. But I just don't grasp the mindset that would not attempt to do ANYTHING of value that night.

Edited by kijipt
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