Jump to content

Menu

Recommended Posts

Anyone had their kid totally fail the Iowa Test of Basic Skills?

 

Our oldest took it for the first time last month and I got the results back today. When dh and I were kids, our composite percentile was always 98 or 99. Alas! DS's composite percentile was 2. Seriously - there were many sections of the test where he could have done better had he just randomly filled in the blanks - he would get 1 out of 8 right or 0 out of 6 (and that's out of the questions he attempted, not just out of all of them including ones he didn't get to).

 

Granted, we do a Charlotte Mason approach with lots of reading aloud and very little seat work. For math, we were doing Math Mammoth but DS got overwhelmed with worksheets so we switched to Ray's which I do orally with him. Spelling is done orally. We don't do map drills (though we look at maps and talk about where things happened). We cover capitalization and punctuation in copywork and dictation, but ds is notorious for copying all the words and leaving out all of the punctuation (and I do point out to him what he missed and make him fix it).

 

But seriously, he totally bombed the test. When he took it I knew things weren't going well because he told me he finished early and got to read his book but then I got an email from the admin after the first day saying he didn't finish the tests and filled in a lot of "D" answers. The next day when I dropped him off, I looked at his test and showed him in the book how to know when he was finished with a test. I also explained that if he was putting the same answer for more than two questions in a row, he was probably answering some of them incorrectly. He did finish the tests better the second day. So I wasn't expecting stellar results.

 

We don't have to do the test for reporting purposes - it was just for our own use. But we would like our kids to do well on tests as that is a very easy way to qualify for college and scholarships and such. DS will be 9 in July - his birthday is 5 days before the current cutoff (it used to be 3 months later than it is now) so maturity could be a factor.

 

But still...do I need to embroider a scarlet F for FAIL to my bodice? Yikes!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My first thought is that he had no idea how to actually take such a test. For a kid who's basically had all narration/oral CM-y education, a standardized test is like a creature from another planet. What the heck do you do with it???

 

So, perhaps he needs to take tests every so often and have you explain the "hows" behind it.

 

The other issue may not be such an issue, but I would still plan to have him do some written work. There's probably something to be said for the kinesthetic process of writing spelling words and math problems that sort of solidifies it in a kid's head. That's what I've seen with my dc, at least. I'm not sure it's the best idea to do all his math orally, for example. You might not be able to go from your methodology to a first-time standardized test and expect success, IMO.

Edited by GinaPagnato
Link to comment
Share on other sites

How do his results compare to his day to day work? Did you do any sample tests with him before the test?

 

If you think his day to day work is fine for his age I might do some test preparation and then give him the test again next year. If you question his skills I might do some test preparation and then give him the Stanford.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Definitely no scarlet F's!!! At 8, there's plenty of time for him learn how to take tests for college, so I wouldn't worry about that too much!! :)

 

Do you think he's progressing well in his work at home? Is he comprehending the material? If the answer is yes, then honestly, the results you stated sound as if he really was answering randomly most of the time...

 

I think you will see huge improvement in his skills as his written workload increases. If the test scores are important to you, you could do some test prep work with him during the month preceding the next test.

 

Anne

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:grouphug:

If I were you I would get a book like, "Scoring High on the ITBS" and go through it with him just to see what the problem was. Maturity issues can often effect test scores before about fifth grade, imo. It may be he didn't understand the way the questions were asked. With the punctuation/cap/spelling, I have found my kids do better if we practice the specific way the questions are asked.

 

Math and Reading, however would concern me. If he reads he should have done a lot better than the second percentile on the reading test. That's why I would want to see how he did on the test prep book. I think you can get Texas state tests online and some NY state tests. If you don't want to invest in the ITBS book, it would probably be worth it to print a released test off and see how he does.

 

Another idea is a possible LD that made the act of taking the test difficult. My profoundly gifted brother is dyslexic (but so bright it wasn't "caught" for years.) His first standardized test experience was an unmitigated disaster. (As an encouragement he ended up acing the SATs and getting into Yale.:001_smile:)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Okay, well, I see two possibilities here: 1) He ignored your instructions and simply made *zero* effort to answer the questions and simply skipped answering or filled in columns of the same letter... or 2) This is a wake-up call.

 

It's not possible to know from your post which it is -- but I suspect you know because you know your child...

 

If you think he made an effort on *some* of the sections at least and was still scoring in the 2nd-8th percentile on all of those, then I really think you need to look into some additional testing *now*. At almost 9 years old, you need to get a handle on his learning challenges -- and identifying them will be your first step. ...

 

You mention doing a lot of reading aloud. Is he reading on his own? You mention doing most subjects orally and allowing him to self-limit his writing. Those things could well mask some serious problems.

 

I think there's a lot of great stuff about the Charlotte Mason approach, but aspects of it may not be working for your son.

 

The good news is that he's young and you can remediate a lot at this age.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would not panic. The first time my son took the test in 4th grade his scores were less than stellar. My son moaned and complained about taking the test and tried to finish it in record speed. I was not even sure he read most of the questions before answering.

 

After several years now of taking the test his scores have grown up dramatically.

 

You can order it from BJU press and administer it at home.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would get another test to administer to him at home. The CAT survey is pretty cheap and much shorter than the IOWA. Then you can watch him as he takes it and look over his answers to see what he's getting wrong, if it seems like he just gives up and doesn't pay attention, etc. Then you know if he really needs work in skill areas or if he just needs to work on his test-taking ability.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No scarlet Fs.

 

At age eight, I would sit with him, read each question and be certain he filled in the correct circle for the answer he wanted to give on the answer sheet.

 

When I was a classroom teacher, that is how it would be done with any child up till 4th grade with whom we thought it was necessary, i.e., lack of focus, lack of experience taking standardized tests.....any reason at all, and that child would go to a quiet room with the principal and another teacher and any other kids who had difficulty with the test, and every single question would be read to the child to be certain they understood.

 

Huh? You just randomly offered accommodations without a 504 or IEP? Wouldn't that invalidate the scoring norms? On the MAP (NWEA test), typically developing kids only hear the questions verbally in K/1. After that, reading itself becomes part of the test-taking task. OP - I'd definitely look at getting a home test you could administer to see where he's weak. ITBS is a test of basic skills. If his skills are weak, you definitely need to see where the problems lie.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Huh? You just randomly offered accommodations without a 504 or IEP? Wouldn't that invalidate the scoring norms? On the MAP (NWEA test), typically developing kids only hear the questions verbally in K/1. After that, reading itself becomes part of the test-taking task. OP - I'd definitely look at getting a home test you could administer to see where he's weak. ITBS is a test of basic skills. If his skills are weak, you definitely need to see where the problems lie.

 

 

Ummmm, the scoring norms include tons of schools where principals and teachers do exactly what I described.

 

I'm not positive about the ITBS, but the schools where I have taught administered the Stanford Test, and the scenario I described went on in every school. I am sure I am not the only former classroom teacher who can honestly make that statement.

 

 

You specifically mentioned the MAP (NWEA) test -- different tests have different criteria regarding accomodating students. I do not know if the rules have changed, but when I taught, the Stanford allowed reading questions to the student -- I had 4th graders who had questions read to them.

Edited by MariannNOVA
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Okay, well, I see two possibilities here: 1) He ignored your instructions and simply made *zero* effort to answer the questions and simply skipped answering or filled in columns of the same letter... or 2) This is a wake-up call.

 

It's not possible to know from your post which it is -- but I suspect you know because you know your child...

 

If you think he made an effort on *some* of the sections at least and was still scoring in the 2nd-8th percentile on all of those, then I really think you need to look into some additional testing *now*. At almost 9 years old, you need to get a handle on his learning challenges -- and identifying them will be your first step. ...

 

You mention doing a lot of reading aloud. Is he reading on his own? You mention doing most subjects orally and allowing him to self-limit his writing. Those things could well mask some serious problems.

 

I think there's a lot of great stuff about the Charlotte Mason approach, but aspects of it may not be working for your son.

 

The good news is that he's young and you can remediate a lot at this age.

 

:iagree:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anyone had their kid totally fail the Iowa Test of Basic Skills?

 

Our oldest took it for the first time last month and I got the results back today. When dh and I were kids, our composite percentile was always 98 or 99. Alas! DS's composite percentile was 2. Seriously - there were many sections of the test where he could have done better had he just randomly filled in the blanks - he would get 1 out of 8 right or 0 out of 6 (and that's out of the questions he attempted, not just out of all of them including ones he didn't get to).

 

Granted, we do a Charlotte Mason approach with lots of reading aloud and very little seat work. For math, we were doing Math Mammoth but DS got overwhelmed with worksheets so we switched to Ray's which I do orally with him. Spelling is done orally. We don't do map drills (though we look at maps and talk about where things happened). We cover capitalization and punctuation in copywork and dictation, but ds is notorious for copying all the words and leaving out all of the punctuation (and I do point out to him what he missed and make him fix it).

 

But seriously, he totally bombed the test. When he took it I knew things weren't going well because he told me he finished early and got to read his book but then I got an email from the admin after the first day saying he didn't finish the tests and filled in a lot of "D" answers. The next day when I dropped him off, I looked at his test and showed him in the book how to know when he was finished with a test. I also explained that if he was putting the same answer for more than two questions in a row, he was probably answering some of them incorrectly. He did finish the tests better the second day. So I wasn't expecting stellar results.

 

We don't have to do the test for reporting purposes - it was just for our own use. But we would like our kids to do well on tests as that is a very easy way to qualify for college and scholarships and such. DS will be 9 in July - his birthday is 5 days before the current cutoff (it used to be 3 months later than it is now) so maturity could be a factor.

 

But still...do I need to embroider a scarlet F for FAIL to my bodice? Yikes!

 

For a child who does nearly all his work orally, to test him with a fill-in-the bubble test is not going to give you an accurate measure of how he's doing. Look around for someone who administers the Woodcock Johnson Achievement test. It is oral almost everywhere it can be. It is not oral in reading (duh) though the child answers the questions orally. Math computation problems are written down, but math word problems are read aloud to the child and the earliest ones have pictures. (The problems also have words). The child answers orally. Spelling is dictated. The child is given oral prompts and must write sentences in response. All content area material (humanities, social studies, science) is orally presented and answered.

 

I would either practice those kinds of tests next time (there are plenty of books available at barnes and Noble, etc.) or just don't give that kind of test until he is doing independent reading and writing and math.

 

Another advantage is that if there are learning disabilities, that is the test most commonly used as part of the testing battery given. Unlike the ITBS, CAT, etc. it is designed to give statistically significant information about an individual child. I would want the additional information if I were you--to either affirm that he's on track or to get a realistic assessment of where he is and decide on next steps.

Edited by Laurie4b
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ummmm, the scoring norms include tons of schools where principals and teachers do exactly what I described.

 

I'm not positive about the ITBS, but the schools where I have taught administered the Stanford Test, and the scenario I described went on in every school. I am sure I am not the only former classroom teacher who can honestly make that statement.

 

I administered the 3rd grade Stanford last year and very little of it is supposed to be completed orally. I also administered the 1st grade Stanford and most of that one is supposed to be completed orally with the administrator reading the question and answers and the child filling in the answer.

 

The norms (to my understanding) are based on standardized test administration to a preselected group. Those tests would all be administered the same way. If schools are giving the tests incorrectly then the scores are invalid.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Agreeing with others who said to give him another test at home.

 

My son has taken the CAT at home twice now. This past year he was in a very foul mood on the day I planned to administer the math computation test. Needless to say, he did not feel like working out the problems on scratch paper and bombed that section. I know he knows how to do those problems because he does that and more every day here with me. It was just a bad testing day. Next year, I'll know to be sure he's ready to do the work before giving him the test.

 

If you administer a test at home, you can see where he's making mistakes. Is he just filling in random bubbles, guessing, or is he really struggling with a basic concept? Then you can make notes of what you should work on in the coming year. A standardized test administered by someone else that tests content that you may or may not have covered yet in your homeschool isn't a good indicator of how well your child is really doing. However, it is a good practice for taking future tests.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is a child who can stand on deck at a little league game and swing perfectly, but then he steps up to the plate and swings half-heartedly with terribly form after the pitch has already hit the ground and rolled toward the catcher.

 

I did give him practice test questions at home and made him fill in the ovals on a separate piece of paper. I made up questions based on what I remember of the test from having taken in as a kid. I gave answer choices that would be possible choices if you were doing the answer wrong (such as a math question where someone has five baskets of six items - possible answers for total items was 1, 11, 30 and something else). He thought it was really fun and got all of the questions right. So I thought there was a chance that he might do well on the test even though he was a fish out of water in that he is not accustomed to seat work.

 

He was very late to talk, though he won't be quiet now. We never took him for speech therapy and he caught up in due time. His narration lagged but all of a sudden really blossomed this winter. He would make comments about the readings and connect them to previous readings (done even in previous school years) and so I wasn't concerned really that he wasn't understanding the material - his verbal skills just hadn't caught up yet. He loves Latin and has memorized dozens of poems as part of our curriculum. We do Ambleside which we started with year 0 and are now in year 3. He catches on to math very quickly - we gave up worksheets because there was too much explanation and practice when he already understood the concept. He likes to draw and does it a lot in his free time - if hand-eye coordination were an issue I would assume he wouldn't enjoy that type of thing. We do copywork and dictation, but keep it short and sweet.

 

So really I'm not concerned about his progress academically. His taking the ITBS was a total shot in the dark, but I wanted him to be familiar with that type of test because at some point he will encounter it when it does matter (we may move to a state where it is required or he may need to do well on college entrance exams). I try to avoid all things workbooky or textbooky and stick with living books and real-life math problems. I know in schools they tend to streamline things in a way that is easy to teach and show results - thus the emphasis on capitalization and punctuation on the ITBS among other things (easy to show you have taught the children something).

 

When family and friends hear a description of our typical school day, they are generally very impressed. DS is an out-of-the-box sort of child, and I've had more than one person say it is probably especially good that we homeschool him as he might not necessarily do well in a school environment. It think that was probably a factor in his taking of the test.

 

He is quiet and thoughtful, but has a lot to say if you are with him one-on-one. He doesn't read stories and such for pleasure, but he studies his presidents and states books (both by National Geographic for kids) as well as his favorite football team yearbook each year. For instance, if you give him any random date in US history, he can tell you who was president, when they took office and how long they served. He learned that completely on his own accord. The Ambleside readings are generally above the reading level of the child, which works fine for children who read well above grade level. When I try to get him to read them on his own (even on the Kindle with the print size he likes) he complains that it is much harder to narrate and understand the story (probably because he is focusing more on reading the words than understanding the story). We are working to develop fluency with reading, but he is not there yet. I do have him read a story from the McGuffey reader every day - we started below his reading level in order to develop fluency in oral reading, and we are currently in the midst of the third reader. Spelling was his strongest score on the ITBS, followed by science.

 

I think the day got long and he got tired of answering questions and sitting in one place. They started at 8 and got out at noon - that is a long time to sit still and answer questions when you are accustomed to a more active learning environment.

 

I also am pondering possibly red-shirting him for a year. My husband shot down the idea initially because he wished he had gotten his GED and started college early. I think for ds, an extra year would give him maturity and experience that would make a lot of things much less of a challenge. His birthday is five days before the current cutoff, and I am holding his brother back a year so they will be 4 years apart in school even though they are only three years apart in age. Perhaps my husband will be more open to that idea now that we have these test results.

 

Keep the comments coming as I am very interested in others experience with kids who bombed this test the first time they took it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If he has not been exposed to fractions, adding numerals with 4 digits, money, division, multiplication, etc (which cannot all be done orally) then I am not surprised he didn't do well on the math portion of the test. I guess I don't see why you would test him when you know he has not done much formal written work.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I administered the 3rd grade Stanford last year and very little of it is supposed to be completed orally. I also administered the 1st grade Stanford and most of that one is supposed to be completed orally with the administrator reading the question and answers and the child filling in the answer.

 

The norms (to my understanding) are based on standardized test administration to a preselected group. Those tests would all be administered the same way. If schools are giving the tests incorrectly then the scores are invalid.

 

 

:iagree: This is my understanding also, that the norms for the school/district would be invalid. The scenario described sounds like rampant, institutionalized cheating akin to the Atlanta scandal from a couple years ago. Nicht gut. I digress, sorry, back to the OP.:tongue_smilie:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I recommend testing him with something that you can do at home. That way you can do just one short test each day even if it takes you many days. You can discreetly watch him as he's taking the test so you can see if he is just randomly filling in bubbles or appears to actually be trying.

 

One thing that I tell the kids when I am administering ITBS to a group is to make sure at the end of each column that you are actually working the problem that matches the number. At least that way you'll know that if you're off by one, it happened on that column and not several columns ago.

 

I also recommend working through one of those Scoring High workbooks for whichever test you choose. It is not teaching to the test. It is teaching how to do that sort of test. It is a skill.

 

ETA:

I have administered the ITBS to groups of hsers several times. I always spread it over three days so we were there from 9-noon (a little longer for the 3rd graders because they had 2 extra test sections that nobody else had). I had the kids raise their hands as soon as they finished and I would look over the test section to make sure that they had actually finished it (and marked their answers in the correct section) and would generally have to have the 3rd and 4th graders fix a couple of their marks (where they bubbled way outside the circle or the marks weren't dark enough). Then I'd have them go outside to play until everybody was done. Once everybody was done, we'd have a 5-10 minute break. In the middle we'd take a longer break. The kids always seemed to have fun and looked forward to it every year.

Edited by AngieW in Texas
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We use mostly living books and try to avoid workbooks. But I do work on 'test prep' as a separate subject for DS. We spend about two hours once a month on a test prep workbook. Personally, I hate standardized tests, but they are a part of the world we live in and my child has to be comfortable with taking them because someday he is going to be competing with children who were drilled and drilled on how to take a test.

 

I think the day got long and he got tired of answering questions and sitting in one place. They started at 8 and got out at noon - that is a long time to sit still and answer questions when you are accustomed to a more active learning environment.
This part really stuck out in your last post.

I have given the ITBS at home twice now to a young boy.

Wow. Four hours is a long time! When I give the test, I break it up over a full week and we only do 1-2 test sections a day and never back-to-back w/o a break.

I organize our test taking so that we take a fun test subject first - like social studies or science, then we take a snack and reading break before doing a harder (one that needs more focus) subject like math.

 

I am also reminded of something my son did the first time he took the ITBS...

One of the vocab words was "battle." DS read the question, filled in the proper circle, then jumped up on his school table, fought an imaginary battle with his pencil, leaped off the table and was gone, off in his imaginary world of play.

That all happened within a few seconds and I just sat there, with my jaw hanging down. What just happened?

I laughed about it later. But I have also always said that I felt sorry for those boys that had to sit at their desks in a formal school setting and finish their tests. They were probably just as gone mentally as what my son was physically at that point and time.

It honestly sounds like that is what happened to your son - he just checked out mentally from taking the test.

Maybe he read a question that set his mind going into an imaginary world of adventure and he just couldn't pull it back together to finish the test?

 

And really - who can blame him? He is young, nothing is riding on the test, he has very little exposure to this type of test, four hours is a long time to hold a pencil if you are used to doing most of your work orally. (Heck, I can't even sit and hold a pencil for four hours!) I also think four hours is a long time for a young child to read w/o a break. (Again, I don't even sit and read for four hours at a time.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I administered the 3rd grade Stanford last year and very little of it is supposed to be completed orally. I also administered the 1st grade Stanford and most of that one is supposed to be completed orally with the administrator reading the question and answers and the child filling in the answer.

 

The norms (to my understanding) are based on standardized test administration to a preselected group. Those tests would all be administered the same way. If schools are giving the tests incorrectly then the scores are invalid.

 

Yep. Just because some schools give the test incorrectly, that doesn't mean it is okay. And the ITBS is timed, unlike the Stanford. They are completely different tests.

 

OP, I also randomly through my little guy into a testing situation. He had a few parts that went right over his head. I don't consider that to say anything meaningful about his education, because my biggest focus is on radically different things at this age than in the schools. Like others have said, I would do some test prep and give him another test. Or you could simply wait a few years. Giving a standardized test to an 8 yo boy is like trying to put a cat in a tuxedo. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are tons of 9 year old boys who take this test on a two day schedule. I would not blame his gender or age. When I used to administer the ITBS to a bunch of homeschoolers, there always seemed to be one kiddo every 3 or 4 years who did what your son did. He or she would just mark the last column of each question once the fun wore off.

 

I agree that you need to get some practice books for his age/grade range and see what the problem is. I wouldn't make him retake a formal test right now since he isn't going to figure it all out in just a few weeks.

 

It could be he is not being taught to his age, he was lazy, he didn't know any better, he has learning disabilities, he has not had enough experience writing, etc. The list is endless, and there may be multiple reasons. But, I do think this is a wake up call for you to figure out the problem and nip it in the bud if it is something you can fix.

 

The examples you gave of questions you made up seem very basic for a 9 year old. I may be mistaken, but the ITBS seemed to have long division by 3rd or 4th grade, as well as word problems, money, time, and measurement problems. It's been a long time since I looked at one for that age group, however.

 

Best wishes for finding out the answer to your questions.

 

:grouphug:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If he has not been exposed to fractions, adding numerals with 4 digits, money, division, multiplication, etc (which cannot all be done orally) then I am not surprised he didn't do well on the math portion of the test. I guess I don't see why you would test him when you know he has not done much formal written work.

 

Granted. However, money can be done with real money which does not involve pencil and paper. Ditto for weights & measures and telling time.

 

As for addition and subtraction, we learned the basic facts first until he knew them extremely well. Once we moved onto multiple-digit addition and subtraction, borrowing and carrying was very easy to master since he wasn't wasting energy trying to remember what 2+2 was - he got the concept of regrouping and so it didn't take three weeks of math to teach borrowing and carrying in mulit-digit problems.

 

If you tell him someone was born in 1532 and died in 1611, he can tell within ten seconds how long they lived without using pencil and paper to figure that out. I would consider that at least three-digit subtraction.

 

Once you get to long division, yes, you need to have pencil and paper. But prior to that, we simply look at the worksheet and he does the math in his head and gives me the answer orally, and 90%+ of the time he gives me the correct answer.

 

Fractions are introduced in third grade, but on simple enough level that they can be done in your head sans pencil and paper.

 

So I do think in the lower grades it is possible to do math largely without any formal written work.

 

And I don't always read everything aloud to him. Many times I just highlight the problem on the screen (we have the electronic version of Math Mammoth) and he gives me the answer. I just don't see the point of having him write out skip counting by 6's when he's done that orally many times. With Ray's, sometimes he reads the questions, and sometimes I read them aloud.

 

Bottom line - if a math question can be done mentally and answered orally, I would prefer to work that way. My job involves a lot of math, and everyone else at the table will be using pencil and paper or a calculator and I'll have the answer before any of them just doing it in my head (and my accuracy is as good as theirs). So I think being able to do math mentally is an advantage.

 

He's done enough math with pencil and paper, though, that he should have been able to do better on the test.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So really I'm not concerned about his progress academically. His taking the ITBS was a total shot in the dark, but I wanted him to be familiar with that type of test because at some point he will encounter it when it does matter (we may move to a state where it is required or he may need to do well on college entrance exams). I try to avoid all things workbooky or textbooky and stick with living books and real-life math problems. I know in schools they tend to streamline things in a way that is easy to teach and show results - thus the emphasis on capitalization and punctuation on the ITBS among other things (easy to show you have taught the children something).

 

When family and friends hear a description of our typical school day, they are generally very impressed. DS is an out-of-the-box sort of child, and I've had more than one person say it is probably especially good that we homeschool him as he might not necessarily do well in a school environment. It think that was probably a factor in his taking of the test.

 

<snip>

 

I think the day got long and he got tired of answering questions and sitting in one place. They started at 8 and got out at noon - that is a long time to sit still and answer questions when you are accustomed to a more active learning environment.

 

I also am pondering possibly red-shirting him for a year.

 

I am :confused::confused::confused: at your conclusion here based upon the things I bolded in your earlier statement. It sounds like you did ZERO preparation before throwing him into the testing environment. Then, the testing facility (of which he's completely unfamiliar) administered the ITBS incorrectly for his age, I believe, because the company recommends no more than 2 sections per day! To me, it's like you threw him to the wolves with raw steak tied around his neck! Then, you want to punish him for not performing well by red-shirting him? (I don't mean that as harshly as it reads).

 

I'm not following your logic. If performing in tests well is paramount in your home, then work towards achieving that goal. If it is not, then don't use it as an arbitrary yardstick with which to prove success or failure.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Math and Reading, however would concern me. If he reads he should have done a lot better than the second percentile on the reading test. That's why I would want to see how he did on the test prep book.

 

It does concern me.

 

But get this: I went through his scores because they give total questions, total attempted, and % correct (of the total questions). I plugged those numbers into Excel and calculated the % correct of the questions attempted. So, for instance, say there were 12 questions, he attempted 6 and got 25% right. That means he answered 3 correctly. Answering 3 of 6 correctly is an actual score of 50% simply based on what was attempted. [He sat and read his book at the end of more than one test thinking he was finished when actually he was not.]

 

So his highest score using my method of scoring was spelling in which he got 90% - he answered 13 of the 15 questions he attempted correctly (there were 21 questions total).

Would a child who was really a poor reader score that high in spelling? To me it seems more likely that he flaked out on doing the test.

 

His second highest area was science, which is one of his favorite subjects. He would need to have a basic ability to read in order to score well in that subject area. We haven't done physical science yet as we are following the WTM 4-year cycle, so he didn't do well on those questions, but he scored almost perfectly on life science which he loves.

 

If he was really that bad at reading, I just don't see how he could have done that well on spelling and science. He had to read well enough to read the questions, understand what was being asked, and choose the correct answer.

 

As for History (which he also loves), with Ambleside we are currently in the midst of the Reformation so he hasn't been exposed to a lot of general history. We're going a lot more in depth rather than repeating the same overview every year or two.

 

Had he done as well in the remainder of the test as he did in Spelling and Science, we wouldn't be having this discussion. I think he just got bored with it, thought it was pointless, and didn't bother to try.

 

{And thank you to everyone for your responses. Just because I didn't quote you and respond doesn't mean I haven't appreciated what you said and taken it to heart.}

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The first time my dd took the ITBS, she scored really high on reading and vocab and then scored a 18% on math. I remember coming here to the forums and FREAKING out. After discussions with her, she "got bored" and made a design of flowers in the bubbles.:lol: it is surprising she got an 18%.

 

Now, before she is tested we go over test procedures and strategies a week ahead of time and I find testing sites that keep it fairly short days.

 

She has done very well since then and scored very high in all areas.:D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am :confused::confused::confused: at your conclusion here based upon the things I bolded in your earlier statement. It sounds like you did ZERO preparation before throwing him into the testing environment. Then, the testing facility (of which he's completely unfamiliar) administered the ITBS incorrectly for his age, I believe, because the company recommends no more than 2 sections per day! To me, it's like you threw him to the wolves with raw steak tied around his neck! Then, you want to punish him for not performing well by red-shirting him? (I don't mean that as harshly as it reads).

 

I'm not following your logic. If performing in tests well is paramount in your home, then work towards achieving that goal. If it is not, then don't use it as an arbitrary yardstick with which to prove success or failure.

 

I did prepare him in that I had him do a series of practice tests for math, spelling, and reading comprehension (possibly more, I don't remember). I made up the test myself based on what I remembered having taking the test every year when I was in grade school. I typed out the questions and gave 4 answer choices and had him fill in the bubble on a separate sheet.

 

For the reading comprehension questions, I simply took a lesson from Writing With Ease for his grade (I had that curriculum for my reference only) using the passage and the questions from the text. The answer I made up included the correct answer (obviously) as well as answers that were close but not quite right.

 

So he understood what the test would be like and how to do it.

 

How I didn't prepare him was that I didn't sit him down and give him full length practice tests. His reading comprehension test was one passage with questions - not a series of passages each with its own series of questions.

 

He took the test with a group of homeschool students. The administrators were homeschooling mothers themselves. They just used a church with classrooms that had tables at the right height for each group of students. He knew some of the kids he was taking the test with. I know they had snacks and I assume they took breaks.

 

I think my plan for next time is to do it myself and only give him one or two sections a day. I applied to administer the test myself through BJU.

 

I don't necessarily want to do "school at home" but I do want my children to be at least functional in that type of setting because it will come in handy at some point.

 

I was just shocked at his results because on most of the sections he could have just randomly filled in the blanks and scored better than he did.

 

And I'm not punishing him by red-shirting him, LOL! I have been pondering that since well before he took the test. He was a late talker, and his birthday is now 5 days before the cutoff. We seem to hit a lot of walls where he just doesn't get something but then we come back a couple months later and I don't hardly have to explain it to him and he understands it. That would be the story of homeschooling him. I think an added year of maturity would make a lot of things much easier for him, though he could also be one who just needs time for things to simmer. The cutoff date was three months later than it is now when we started schooling him or I probably would have delayed his entry.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It sounds like you did ZERO preparation before throwing him into the testing environment. Then, the testing facility (of which he's completely unfamiliar) administered the ITBS incorrectly for his age, I believe, because the company recommends no more than 2 sections per day! To me, it's like you threw him to the wolves with raw steak tied around his neck! Then, you want to punish him for not performing well by red-shirting him? (I don't mean that as harshly as it reads).

 

I'm not following your logic. If performing in tests well is paramount in your home, then work towards achieving that goal. If it is not, then don't use it as an arbitrary yardstick with which to prove success or failure.

:iagree:

Especially the highlighted parts.

My son has taken both the 1st and 4th grade ITBS, plus the 3rd and 5th grade TAKS. (TAKS - standardized test Texas takes.)

 

Any standardized tests, by their very nature, will have easy questions, questions on grade level, plus questions above grade level. We do a lot of prep work at our house for standardized tests and one of the most important things I tell my child is that there WILL be questions above his ability, he must not freak out when he comes across those. If he doesn't know it, move on. But it is natural for a child to freak out when they don't know something, they will get nervous and forget what to do. That is why one needs to do prep work and children need to be taught how to take a test.

(Or not give the test, if not required.)

 

Fractions are introduced in third grade, but on simple enough level that they can be done in your head sans pencil and paper.

Again, standardized tests have questions that are several grade levels above what the child is expected to be able to answer. There would be questions on the 3rd grade ITBS that need to be worked on paper. (If I remember correctly, 1st grade had three-step math problems. It has been a few years. But I do know the 4th grade tests includes three- and four-step math problems.)

 

If he was really that bad at reading, I just don't see how he could have done that well on spelling and science. He had to read well enough to read the questions, understand what was being asked, and choose the correct answer.

More than likely they administered the spelling and science portions first and your child was simply tired/done by the time he got around to the reading portion.

 

Then, the testing facility (of which he's completely unfamiliar) administered the ITBS incorrectly for his age, I believe, because the company recommends no more than 2 sections per day!
I guess I already quoted this, but I wanted to draw attention to it.

Yes, they did administer the test against guidelines.

Honestly, this is why I give the test at home and have not taken my child to a testing facility. I have yet - in four years of searching - found one that administers the tests according to guidelines! They all cram it into one or two days, when it is suppose to be given over a full week.

 

Had he done as well in the remainder of the test as he did in Spelling and Science, we wouldn't be having this discussion. I think he just got bored with it, thought it was pointless, and didn't bother to try.
That was me as a child. :lol:

We took the ITBS way back in the '70s. Giving my child the test now brings back fond memories of myself, just filling in the circles. Back then, there was nothing riding on the tests like in today's public school system. I remember, though, my teachers and parents fussing at me when I got my results back. I just shrugged them off.

I did manage to graduate from college with honors and be a productive citizen. :D

Thankfully, I wasn't red-shirted. You can't judge what a child will be capable of at 18 based on how they did on a test at age 8.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It does concern me.

 

But get this: I went through his scores because they give total questions, total attempted, and % correct (of the total questions). I plugged those numbers into Excel and calculated the % correct of the questions attempted. So, for instance, say there were 12 questions, he attempted 6 and got 25% right. That means he answered 3 correctly. Answering 3 of 6 correctly is an actual score of 50% simply based on what was attempted. [He sat and read his book at the end of more than one test thinking he was finished when actually he was not.]

 

So his highest score using my method of scoring was spelling in which he got 90% - he answered 13 of the 15 questions he attempted correctly (there were 21 questions total).

Would a child who was really a poor reader score that high in spelling? To me it seems more likely that he flaked out on doing the test.

 

His second highest area was science, which is one of his favorite subjects. He would need to have a basic ability to read in order to score well in that subject area. We haven't done physical science yet as we are following the WTM 4-year cycle, so he didn't do well on those questions, but he scored almost perfectly on life science which he loves.

 

If he was really that bad at reading, I just don't see how he could have done that well on spelling and science. He had to read well enough to read the questions, understand what was being asked, and choose the correct answer.

 

As for History (which he also loves), with Ambleside we are currently in the midst of the Reformation so he hasn't been exposed to a lot of general history. We're going a lot more in depth rather than repeating the same overview every year or two.

 

Had he done as well in the remainder of the test as he did in Spelling and Science, we wouldn't be having this discussion. I think he just got bored with it, thought it was pointless, and didn't bother to try.

 

{And thank you to everyone for your responses. Just because I didn't quote you and respond doesn't mean I haven't appreciated what you said and taken it to heart.}

Yes, that was what I was trying to say. If he reads (at least books like The Littles and the Boxcar Children) and can narrate, he should have done a lot better on the reading test. Something else was going on.

 

From what you say about his math, he should have done a lot better, too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think my plan for next time is to do it myself and only give him one or two sections a day. I applied to administer the test myself through BJU.

 

I don't necessarily want to do "school at home" but I do want my children to be at least functional in that type of setting because it will come in handy at some point.

 

I was just shocked at his results because on most of the sections he could have just randomly filled in the blanks and scored better than he did.

 

And I'm not punishing him by red-shirting him, LOL! I have been pondering that since well before he took the test. He was a late talker, and his birthday is now 5 days before the cutoff. We seem to hit a lot of walls where he just doesn't get something but then we come back a couple months later and I don't hardly have to explain it to him and he understands it. That would be the story of homeschooling him. I think an added year of maturity would make a lot of things much easier for him, though he could also be one who just needs time for things to simmer. The cutoff date was three months later than it is now when we started schooling him or I probably would have delayed his entry.

 

Thanks for laughing at my post, because in black and white it didn't convey the lightheartedness I meant. :) I don't know about red-shirting him though. Maybe just add in more of the test prep and let him mature? He sounds bright, and holding him back may just make things worse (bore him to death).

 

I also have my older take the standardized tests, and they are not required in our state. My dh and I both have advanced degrees and also had to test to keep abreast of our professions, so we seem to be coming at the concept of testing from a similar angle. I'll be mailing my dd's ITBS test back shortly. She bombed 1/2 the sections, and you know what? We don't care. I think that's the difference. We've been entertained by her answers and sometimes :001_huh:, but mostly entertained. So often, her answers were right for her world, but not to the standardized test world. It'll be interesting to see how she compares to the others. Just interesting.

 

All that said, I do find that the taking of the standardized tests yearly has helped me find gaps in my dd's knowledge. I simply use that information to move forward into planning the next year. Good luck in deciding what your path will be. :grouphug:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know they had snacks and I assume they took breaks.
If they gave the ITBS in four hours, they could not have taken more than five minute breaks between sections, with possibly one 15 minute snack break about midway through the testing session.

When you test your child at home, you will get a full instruction packet on how to administer the test. I think, when you read through the packet, you will realize how insane it was for the test to be given in one four hour session.

I do have friends that have their children take tests in the situation you described. Their children do fairly well on the tests, the moms are happy enough with the results.

But I don't agree with that testing situation. It seems inhumane to me. Even the public school setting doesn't cram that much testing into one morning.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You might want to look at the DORA and DOMA from We Go Learn. Homeschool Buyers Co-op has them for $15 each. They're done on the computer and are adaptive, so they start a little below a child's stated grade level, and then go up or down until a child hits their thresh hold level. There's some game-type aspects to them (for example, you'll be picking which soccer ball to kick, and when you pick your answer, the character kicks it into a goal), and because it's adaptive, unless your child is radically off where you expect them to be, usually doesn't take very long.

 

FWIW, your son's ITBS testing situation sounds exactly like how my DD took TerraNova this year, and there were enough breaks built in that the kids didn't seem to have much trouble-the younger, more wiggly kids had more, shorter test sections and therefore usually only were sitting 10-15 minutes before they had a chance to get up and walk around. I proctored 4th grade, and the longest section was 25 minutes. The group administration is almost identical to how the tests work in the schools I used to teach in, with the exception that homeschool moms tend to pack better snacks and that I've never had a 4th grade boy pull out needlepoint to do between test sections to keep him busy in PS!

 

We started testing with a homeschool group when DD was 6, and she actually generally enjoys the testing process because it's a chance to do "real school" for a few days-and she likes playing on the church playground, getting to pack a lunchbox for snacks, and getting to eat lunch with her friends after the test is over. I do no formal test prep-in large part because what I observed in PS was that the more test prep we did, the more kids second-guessed themselves and made themselves nervous over the test.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You've gotten a lot of good advice so far. I would add, though, that I would not test him again until you've done some more test prep.

 

~ I would use something like the Scoring High books, or sample tests, not something you make up. It will give him more experience with the actual kinds of questions he will face.

 

~ I would start by doing a small section at a time, untimed. Then check the answers and discuss them - all of them, not just the ones he got wrong. Find out how he's thinking. Give him tips on how to eliminate answers, making sure to read all answers before responding, sometimes it's better to work backwards, and so on.

 

~ Eventually, I'd start doing timed practice tests.

 

~ Only then would I give a "real" test.

 

Eight is still young for this kind of thing. My experience, though, is that however relaxed you want to be, a very tiny bit of writing ~ even if it's just a handwriting book ~ and a very tiny bit of written math, at least 3 days a week, really lays a good foundation. I would do 1 page of handwriting, 1 page of math, and I would add in Spelling Workout, a page a day or so, NOT at all for spelling, but because it has a really good combination of various skills beyond just the spelling aspect, in really tiny doses, and it's easy and non-intimidating. Start with the first level. No need for the teacher's guide.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just read through this entire thread and a few things jump out at me.

 

First, several of the things you are describing are screaming learning disabilities to me. Late talker, verbal skills lagging, copywork with missing punctuation, not finishing sections on the test, difficulty in baseball when actually dealing with the ball, etc. These things, in combination with the fact that you're thinking of holding him back, make be think that you might want to seek an evaluation. I'd see about getting him evaluated for dyslexia (with someone who gets gifted kids with issues such as dyslexia, called twice exceptional or 2E if you want to google) with an eye toward sensory processing issues as well (it sounds like there might be a vision thing going on and perhaps an auditory thing as well, both very common in dyslexics, BTW).

 

Your homeschooling style is pretty much perfect for a bright dyslexic, which is probably why you are feeling like he is generally doing well. He is! It's just that he's doing well with some pretty extensive accommodations. If he does indeed have dyslexia or another LD, you're going to need to have a plan to transition him away from the accommodations, and it will take time and effort on everyone's part, so you'll probably want to start now.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If they gave the ITBS in four hours, they could not have taken more than five minute breaks between sections, with possibly one 15 minute snack break about midway through the testing session.

When you test your child at home, you will get a full instruction packet on how to administer the test. I think, when you read through the packet, you will realize how insane it was for the test to be given in one four hour session.

I do have friends that have their children take tests in the situation you described. Their children do fairly well on the tests, the moms are happy enough with the results.

But I don't agree with that testing situation. It seems inhumane to me. Even the public school setting doesn't cram that much testing into one morning.

 

It was four hours a day for two days.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just read through this entire thread and a few things jump out at me.

 

First, several of the things you are describing are screaming learning disabilities to me. Late talker, verbal skills lagging, copywork with missing punctuation, not finishing sections on the test, difficulty in baseball when actually dealing with the ball, etc. These things, in combination with the fact that you're thinking of holding him back, make be think that you might want to seek an evaluation. I'd see about getting him evaluated for dyslexia (with someone who gets gifted kids with issues such as dyslexia, called twice exceptional or 2E if you want to google) with an eye toward sensory processing issues as well (it sounds like there might be a vision thing going on and perhaps an auditory thing as well, both very common in dyslexics, BTW).

 

Your homeschooling style is pretty much perfect for a bright dyslexic, which is probably why you are feeling like he is generally doing well. He is! It's just that he's doing well with some pretty extensive accommodations. If he does indeed have dyslexia or another LD, you're going to need to have a plan to transition him away from the accommodations, and it will take time and effort on everyone's part, so you'll probably want to start now.

 

THis is exactly what I was thinking as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had a similar teaching style/experience with my oldest. I got a test prep book and he was totally unable to answer even the basic math questions. In his math book 2+2 was always vertical, in the test prep book it was horizontal or had pictures. He seriously could not figure out the different format! We went through the whole book, 2 pages a day from both sections and it was by far the hardest part of his school day. The critical thinking it takes to figure out those worksheets is amazing. ;) He then scored in the 99% on the test, after 6 months of going through this book and other workbooks. I now find workbooks to be a necessary part of school. None of my other kids have had such problems and they don't do the test prep workbooks, just normal workbooks, like Spectrum.

 

I would start working through a test prep book and order a home test when he is done. You may be uncovering some deficits in your teaching style, materials or an LD that needs intervention.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I also am pondering possibly red-shirting him for a year. My husband shot down the idea initially because he wished he had gotten his GED and started college early. I think for ds, an extra year would give him maturity and experience that would make a lot of things much less of a challenge. His birthday is five days before the current cutoff, and I am holding his brother back a year so they will be 4 years apart in school even though they are only three years apart in age. Perhaps my husband will be more open to that idea now that we have these test results.

 

Please do not do this on the basis of one test that wasn't really testing what he's been taught. The time for redshirting is before the child starts school. Holding children back when they've already started can be VERY hard on them emotionally. If you're going to use a standardized test as the basis of this decision, give him a year (at least!) of teaching to the test first - after all, that's the type of teaching he's being normed against.

 

(Personally, I remember being coached very heavily in 1st grade on how to fill in the circles correctly - apparently in K I messed up my results by smearing the answer bubbles because I thought it was fun!)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My first thought is that he had no idea how to actually take such a test.

...

I'm not sure it's the best idea to do all his math orally, for example. You might not be able to go from your methodology to a first-time standardized test and expect success, IMO.

 

That's it. He has no idea how to test. You should consider doing practice test booklets with him next time.

 

Yes, they need SOME written work. They do need to be able to fit into the standard testing mode, even though you can be fairly loose when they are young.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It was four hours a day for two days.
That still doesn't follow the test guidelines - too much was tested in too short a time period.

 

We did the 4th grade test over six days, doing three test sections - max - a day.

There is a big jump between doing most of your work orally and sitting and reading/filling out bubbles for two days in a row. Especially for a boy.

 

I am glad to hear that you are going to administer the test yourself. I think that will give you a much better view of where your child is at academically.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yep. Just because some schools give the test incorrectly, that doesn't mean it is okay. And the ITBS is timed, unlike the Stanford. They are completely different tests....

 

Or you could simply wait a few years. Giving a standardized test to an 8 yo boy is like trying to put a cat in a tuxedo. :D

 

Yes, the ITBS is timed and the scores are invalid if you don't follow the protocol exactly.

 

My son just took the 7th grade test and the math part had so many questions that only 1 kid finished it. But when the timer goes off, that's it. There would be no time to sit and help a kid.

 

I think we did first test at 8 but it might have been 9. Yes, young boys would rather be doing a thousand other things!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree about getting him tested. He has a lot of symptoms of a learning disability.

 

If you get him tested, then you will know what is going on and be able to get help for him before he gets behind and struggles even more.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just read through this entire thread and a few things jump out at me.

 

First, several of the things you are describing are screaming learning disabilities to me. Late talker, verbal skills lagging, copywork with missing punctuation, not finishing sections on the test, difficulty in baseball when actually dealing with the ball, etc. These things, in combination with the fact that you're thinking of holding him back, make be think that you might want to seek an evaluation. I'd see about getting him evaluated for dyslexia (with someone who gets gifted kids with issues such as dyslexia, called twice exceptional or 2E if you want to google) with an eye toward sensory processing issues as well (it sounds like there might be a vision thing going on and perhaps an auditory thing as well, both very common in dyslexics, BTW).

 

Your homeschooling style is pretty much perfect for a bright dyslexic, which is probably why you are feeling like he is generally doing well. He is! It's just that he's doing well with some pretty extensive accommodations. If he does indeed have dyslexia or another LD, you're going to need to have a plan to transition him away from the accommodations, and it will take time and effort on everyone's part, so you'll probably want to start now.

 

:iagree:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My older dd bombed the standardized tests given by the State of Oregon, however, she deliberately slept through the test. I think it was a passive aggressive thing because she knew the test scores were submitted to the state and she didn't want to home school. However, even sleeping though the test she had improved over her score the previous year in public school and Oregon is not a hard place to home school, you need only a very low percentile to avoid trouble.

 

I do remember the feeling in the pit of my stomach when I got her scores in the mail.:001_huh::001_huh:, so I wanted you to know I have great sympathy. I think he just didn't give any effort. Holding him back may make this problem worse. Very bright children need constant challenging or they become YOUR challenge, lol.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I did test administration two different years in a institutional setting but for homeschoolers. In one, it was a high school girl who was bombing the test. During breaks, she was reading Lord of the Rings, so it was simply unfamiliarity with the test that was the problem, at least with the reading portion. Unfortunately, we were in a mandatory testing state. I blamed the mom who got the girl to the test late and didn't review with her. The girl told me it was her first time testing and she must have been 14 or 15.

 

Then last year, I tested a room full of high schoolers. Most probably did okay. But at least two kids out of 20 probably had probably undiagnosed LDs that didn't have official diagnosis.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just read through this entire thread and a few things jump out at me.

 

First, several of the things you are describing are screaming learning disabilities to me. Late talker, verbal skills lagging, copywork with missing punctuation, not finishing sections on the test, difficulty in baseball when actually dealing with the ball, etc. These things, in combination with the fact that you're thinking of holding him back, make be think that you might want to seek an evaluation. I'd see about getting him evaluated for dyslexia (with someone who gets gifted kids with issues such as dyslexia, called twice exceptional or 2E if you want to google) with an eye toward sensory processing issues as well (it sounds like there might be a vision thing going on and perhaps an auditory thing as well, both very common in dyslexics, BTW).

 

Your homeschooling style is pretty much perfect for a bright dyslexic, which is probably why you are feeling like he is generally doing well. He is! It's just that he's doing well with some pretty extensive accommodations. If he does indeed have dyslexia or another LD, you're going to need to have a plan to transition him away from the accommodations, and it will take time and effort on everyone's part, so you'll probably want to start now.

 

I want to comment on this since so many people are seconding this.

 

He reads from the 3rd McGuffey Reader just fine. Sometimes he pauses, mostly at the end of a line, and sometimes he misses words. But he reads with expression. Occasionally he skips words, but usually they are small words like on or of immediately before an unfamiliar word - I think he misses them because he is focused on the unfamiliar words. But he can read a story from the 3rd McGuffey Reader aloud, sight-reading the first time through, and narrate it perfectly.

 

It's things like Pilgrim's Progress and Howard Pyle's Robin Hood that I read aloud to him because he says he it's harder to read them himself and then be able to narrate. Ambleside selections are on a higher grade level. They aren't children's versions of Charles Dickens or things like that. I hardly think that an 8-year-old third grader should be labeled dyslexic because he can't read this sort of selection on his own.

 

Other selections are easier and such that he could easily handle except that he gets overwhelmed by the length. Yes, that could be a sign of dyslexia, but it could also mean that he is reading these selections at a very young age and simply hasn't had the practice to have the confidence that he can read those selections fluently on his own. Just because you have a 2-year-old that can walk doesn't mean you take them on a 5-mile hike and expect them to walk the whole thing themselves.

 

That is also why I'm pondering holding him back - I think with an added year of maturity and experience, these same things would be much easier for him. His birthday is 5 days from the cut-off so he is at the young end of the range for his grade. If he were one of the oldest kids in his class rather than the youngest, things would be much easier for him simply because he's had time to develop rather than being pushed into things.

 

He started crawling at 7 months so we thought we'd have an early walker, but then he didn't walk until 18 months. When I started school with him and placed him in first grade, he loved books and had a great enthusiasm for learning. He did very well with phonics (which I think is why he is such a good speller), but now he seems to have stalled out like he did with crawling.

 

I've heard of many kids for whom reading doesn't "click" until they are 8 or 9. I was very good at phonics when I was in kindergarten, but I didn't really take an interest in reading until third grade (age 8) when it finally clicked for me and I learned to enjoy reading for the love of reading. I think it simply hasn't "clicked" for him yet and additional time would take the pressure off.

 

He is very good at spelling. He is also very good at phonics. In fact, now that we do Latin he goes around sounding out words with Latin pronunciation rules just for fun. The area where he is stalling out is building fluency and endurance for longer passages. We are working on that by doing selections from the McGuffey reader.

 

I think before I do any testing for dyslexia (from what I read, the testing is quite extensive), I need to have a teacher who has heard many a third grader read listen to ds read and tell me if he is behind for his age or if his reading skills would be perfectly acceptable for a child his age.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...