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Book a Week in 2012 - Week 24


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Good Morning, my lovelies! Today is the start of week 24 in our quest to read 52 books in 52 weeks. Welcome back to all our readers, welcome to all those just joining in and to all who are following our progress. Mr. Linky is all set up on the 52 books blog to link to your reviews.

 

52 Books Blog-RIP Ray Bradbury: Highlighted Mr. Bradbury today since he passed away this week. Found a great you tube of Stephen Colbert reading Bradbury's scary story The Veldt. Read the story online while listening to him read the story - very well done. It's broken into 3 parts, each 9 minutes long: Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3. Also highlighted portions of Bradbury's essay in Chicken Soul for the Writer's soul.

 

What was the first Bradbury book you ever read and when?

 

 

 

June 13 is Dorothy Sayer's birthday so if you haven't read anything by her yet, now's the time. I'll be highlighting her next week.

 

 

What are you reading this week?

 

 

 

Link to Week 23

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What was the first Bradbury book you ever read and when?

Fahrenheit 451 -- which I reread this past week with the Misses. I don't remember when I first read it, though. I think it was my sophomore year in college.

 

What are you reading this week?

 

I Am the Cheese and Daughters of Eve, for "The Shelf Discovery Project." Of course, I have a number of other active bookmarks, too, but what else is new, right?

 

Number of books read this year: 56; list here.

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I'm in the middle of reading At Home:A Short History of Private Life by Bill Bryson and am thoroughly enjoying it. I took an hour or so and read Son of the Mob by Gordon Korman last week. Fun, YA/JF book - from Amazon:

 

Vince Luca, 17, has a problem. His wealthy family runs the, uh, vending machine business in New York, and Vince is determined not to be part of it. Especially after a hot date is ruined when he finds that his older brother Tommy has conducted some business with Jimmy the Rat and hidden the messy and temporarily unconscious body in the trunk of Vince's car. His dad, the King of the Mob, is reasonable, sensible, lots of fun, gives great presents to his kids--and his name strikes the hearts of other mobsters to stone.

 

Although Vince keeps a low profile at school, his family connection brings him unwanted advantages, like the birthday Porsche that gets him arrested on stolen vehicle charges, or the football game in which he makes touchdown after touchdown because word has gotten around and nobody is willing to tackle him. Even private conversations at home have to be carried on in the basement because the FBI has bugged the house and an agent is always listening. Vince's life is inextricably tangled up with the family business, no matter how hard he tries to stay out of it. How can he show them he's serious? Then he meets Kendra, and when she innocently reveals that her father's an FBI agent--that FBI agent--it's a match made in heaven. He thinks.

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I completed The Bishop by Steven James and the reviews were right. It was an unputdownable book. Have The Pawn on my nook which is the first one in the series so will be going back and reading it, then the rest of the series.

 

Finally read the thriller A Killing Tide by P.J. Adlerman. It's been on my nook forever - one of those free friday things. Great mystery with characters who loved to keep secrets which kept creating more crisis.

 

Finished Blameless by Gail Carriger, the 3rd book in her steampunk mystery series. Lady Maccoon is a hoot and the story is humorous as well as charming and entertaining. Now reading #4 in the series: Heartless.

 

Next up on the nightstand is Jane Emily: And Witches Children by Patricia Clapp. Discovered it through Shelf Discovery: The Teen Classics We Never Stopped Reading by Lizzie Skurnick.

 

And just received Love is Murder edited by Sandra Brown with original short stories from mystery authors: Lori Armstrong, Jeff Ayers, Beverly Barton, William Bernhardt, Allison Brennan, Robert Browne, Pamela Callow, Toni McGee Causey, Lee Child, JT Ellison, Bill Floyd, Cindy Gerard, Heather Graham, Laura Griffin, Vicki Hinze, Andrea Kane, Julie Kenner, Sherrilyn Kenyon, Dianna Love, Jon Land, D.P. Lyle, James Macomber, Carla Neggers, Brenda Novak, Patricia Rosemoor, William Simon, Alexandra Sokoloff, Roxanne St. Claire, Mariah Stewart, and Debra Webb. I've read the majority of these authors so know the stories will be good. Happy Happy Joy Joy!

 

 

 

My first Ray Bradbury book was The Martian Chronicles which I read way back when in high school. Hubby and I recently read Fahrenheit 451 and enjoyed talking about the story, big brother and how events relate to current politics. Lively discussion!!!

Edited by Mytwoblessings
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For me this week

 

#41 Fall on Your Kneesby Ann-Marie MacDonald

#42 The Psychopath Test: A Journey Through the Madness Industry by Jon Ronson. This was a (not comprehensive) look at psychopathy by a journalist who sort-of fell into researching the subject. It was sometimes amusing, sometimes horrifying. The author concludes (paraphrasing here) that normal is overrated and it is our differences that lead us to do some pretty interesting things. I found it interesting that psychopathy may be the "opposite" neurologically of anxiety. Also, much like the author, I found myself trying to figure out if anyone I know is a psychopath, including myself. Someone did state in the book that if you are worried about being a psychopath you are not one. So that was reassuring. I enjoyed the book.

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Fahrenheit 451 -- which I reread this past week with the Misses. I don't remember when I first read it, though. I think it was my sophomore year in college.

 

 

 

I Am the Cheese and Daughters of Eve, for "The Shelf Discovery Project." Of course, I have a number of other active bookmarks, too, but what else is new, right?

 

Number of books read this year: 56; list here.

 

I have a few of Lois Duncan's books on my shelves. I am the Cheese looks quite intriguing.

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My brain has been fried lately & I haven't been much up to reading. :001_huh::tongue_smilie: So, I'm still working on Napoleon's Pyramids & I'm enjoying it. I love all the historical detail that the author includes.

 

Tonight, I meet w/ my book club to discuss Anthem (by Ayn Rand) & Wuthering Heights (by Emily Bronte). I can't wait to argue about how much I disliked Wuthering Heights! :lol: I'm still angry about wasting my time w/ those characters. I'm curious if others in my book club liked it or not.

 

Fahrenheit 451 was the first (and, I think, only) Ray Bradbury book I've read. I read it in high school & remember loving it. I'm getting ready to read it again, partly because my dd is reading it in prep for high school & I want to be able to discuss it w/ her. I have my copy of it sitting here ready to read.

 

And, I'm still looking for suggestions for reading that works when your brain is fried. :lurk5: I seriously need something like that!!!!

 

----------------------------

My Goodreads Page

Completed the Europa Challenge Cappuccino Level (at least 6 Europa books: #s 4, 9, 10, 11, 14, 19, & 21 on my list).

Completed Robin's Read a Russian Author in April Challenge (#24 & #26 on my list).

 

My rating system: 5 = Love; 4 = Pretty awesome; 3 = Decently good; 2 = Ok; 1 = Don't bother (I shouldn't have any 1s on my list as I would ditch them before finishing)...

 

2012 Books Read:

01. Mozart's Last Aria by Matt Rees (3 stars)

02. Oh No She Didn't by Clinton Kelly (2 stars, if you're in the right mood, lol)

03. The Sisters Brothers by Patrick deWitt (4 stars)

04. In a Strange Room by Damon Galgut (4 stars)

05. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by J.K. Rowling (5 stars)

06. The Infernals by John Connolly (3 stars)

07. Kitchen by Banana Yoshimoto (2 stars)

08. The Coral Thief by Rebecca Stott (3 stars)

09. Zeroville by Steve Erickson (4.5 stars)

10. Broken Glass Park by Alina Bronsky (4 stars)

 

11. Hygiene and the Assassin by Amélie Nothomb (2 stars)

12. The Geography of Bliss by Eric Weiner (3 stars)

13. The Raw Shark Texts by Steven Hall (4 stars)

14. The Nun by Simonetta Agnello Hornby (4 stars)

15. The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern (5 stars)

16. The Enchanted April by Elizabeth von Arnim (3 stars)

17. The Devotion of Suspect X by Keigo Higashino (3 stars)

18. The Scrapbook of Frankie Pratt by Caroline Preston (3 stars)

19. Cooking with Fernet Branca by James Hamilton-Paterson (4 stars)

20. Stone Junction by Jim Dodge (3 stars)

 

21. Clash of Civilizations Over an Elevator in Piazza Vittorio by Amara Lakhous (3 stars)

22. Colony by Hugo Wilcken (5 stars)

23. Swimming to Antarctica by Lynne Cox (3 stars)

24. The Master & Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov (4.5 stars)

25. Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs (3 stars)

26. The Dream Life of Sukhanov by Olga Grushin (4 stars)

27. Vanishing Point by David Markson (3 stars)

28. I Am Half-Sick of Shadows by Alan Bradley (4 stars)

29. The Curious Case of the Clockwork Man by Mark Hodder (4 stars)

30. Unclutter Your Life in One Week by Erin Rooney Doland (2 stars)

 

31. Hounded by Kevin Hearne (4 stars)

32. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald (5 stars)

33. The Bookman by Lavie Tidhar (2 stars)

34. Anthem by Ayn Rand (3 stars)

35. Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte (2 stars)

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52 Books Blog-RIP Ray Bradbury: Highlighted Mr. Bradbury today since he passed away this week. Found a great you tube of Stephen Colbert reading Bradbury's scary story The Veldt. Read the story online while listening to him read the story - very well done. It's broken into 3 parts, each 9 minutes long: Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3. Also highlighted portions of Bradbury's essay in Chicken Soul for the Writer's soul.

 

What was the first Bradbury book you ever read and when?

 

I finally read Fahrenheit 451 last year. That was my first and is still my only Ray Bradbury besides watching a couple movies. I will have to check out the Colbert videos.

 

I've been on a Veronica Mars binge and haven't finished reading anything. sad face.

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Stacia, what kind of "my brain is fried" book are you looking for? Mystery, funny, romance?

 

There's always P.G. Wodehouse. :001_smile:

 

Hmmm. Funny is good, mysteries are ok, romance is not really my thing. In my mind, books like Alan Bradley's Flavia de Luce books are good for that style of reading -- fun, engaging, intellectual enough w/out being brain taxing, kwim? Something like that....

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And, I'm still looking for suggestions for reading that works when your brain is fried. :lurk5: I seriously need something like that!!!!

 

 

I don't know if you reread books, but when my brain is fried I either pick up an old favorite that I love (which means I don't have to engage much brain power because I know the story) or I pick up a good, short, fluffy Regency romance. Georgette Heyer is my new favorite there. Cotillion was laugh out loud funny, yet still light and enjoyable. My old favorites are almost always my favorite David Eddings books.

 

I have not read Bradbury. I meant to this year with my dd but ran out of time. Dd17 read Fahrenheit 451 last fall.

 

I am currently half way through Below Stairs. I hope I finish it but I don't anticipate it. Dd's grad party is this Saturday, family comes in on Thursday, and the Underwear Fairy hasn't visited or made Mount Laundry disappear!! :glare: Now next week...ah, that will be filled with reading bliss :D

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My first and only Ray Bradbury book was The Martian Chronicles in high school. Can't remember it.

 

This week I read Suspense and Sensibility on the treadmill. It would have been helpful to have read Sense and Sensibility sometime in recent memory--I was a little fuzzy on who was who. But now I may want to go back and read that again--I think it's on my shelf. Still working on Anna Karenina--I'm around 75% done now. Next up for treadmill reading--the first Jane Austen mystery book by Stephanie Barron (can't recall the name).

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I love Ray Bradbury. I first read The Martian Chronicles in junior high, and quickly followed with The Illustrated Man, Dandelion Wine, Fahrenheit 451 and Something Wicked This Way Comes (which I think created a vibe Stephen King has used multiple times /It, The Body/ in some of his better storylines).

 

As an adult I've read I Sing the Body Electric! and The Apples of the Sun. I'd like to read The October Country, Farewell Summer, and The Halloween Tree.

 

 

I'd say The Illustrated Man was my favorite. I used it to get my husband into science fiction.

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What was the first Bradbury book you ever read and when?

 

My first and only Bradbury book was Fahrenheit 451, which I read in May of 2011.

 

Hubby and I recently read Fahrenheit 451 and enjoyed talking about the story, big brother and how events relate to current politics. Lively discussion!!!

 

The bolded part - :iagree:

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This week I finished:

 

#27 - The Elusive Flame, by Kathleen E. Woodiwiss. This was a big departure from my usual reading. The cover said it was historical romance. It was much more romance than historical! It wasn't bad, though, and I enjoyed it. The verbal jousting, particularly in the beginning, was entertaining!

 

#28 - Awkward Christian Soldiers: Comic Relief from the Back Pew, by Ken Alley. Ehh...

 

Currently reading:

 

#29 - My Name is Asher Lev, by Chaim Potok. VERY good. Having a hard time putting this one down to do other things. About 2/3 of the way through and eager to finish it - hopefully today!

 

Next up will likely be the Dick Van Dyke autobiography, My Lucky Life In and Out of Show Business.

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I'm behind, but I have finished a few books in the last several weeks.

 

#20 The Man Who Was Thursday by G. K. Chesterton - I didn't entirely grasp the point of this rather bizarre story, but it was very entertaining. :D

 

#21 Going Postal by Terry Pratchett - I watched the movie and enjoyed it, so I thought I'd read the book, and I enjoyed it even more (there's a lot more to it!). I listened to the Audible audiobook with Stephen Briggs narrating, and he did a wonderful job, especially of Mr. Pump, who was my favorite character. I'm interested in reading more of the Discworld series - any recommendations ('cause I don't think I'm going to get to them all:lol:)?

 

#22 The Roots of American Order by Russell Kirk - took me awhile to get through, but well worth it.

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52 Books Blog-RIP Ray Bradbury: Highlighted Mr. Bradbury today since he passed away this week. Found a great you tube of Stephen Colbert reading Bradbury's scary story The Veldt. Read the story online while listening to him read the story - very well done. It's broken into 3 parts, each 9 minutes long: Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3.

 

 

I just finished reading this, thank you!

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My brain has been fried lately & I haven't been much up to reading. :001_huh::tongue_smilie:

 

And, I'm still looking for suggestions for reading that works when your brain is fried. :lurk5: I seriously need something like that!!!!

 

 

If you are into mysteries, there are a few cozy mysteries that you may like - Cleo Coyle's coffeehouse mysteries. I just downloaded Lillian Jackson Braun's first book in her The Cat who mysteries. Seems like they'd be easy reads.

More info on Cozy's here

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I'm in the middle of reading At Home:A Short History of Private Life by Bill Bryson and am thoroughly enjoying it.

 

I really enjoyed that book also. It wasn't a fun fast read but so interesting that I found I didn't want to stop reading it. I'd describe it as an incredibly interesting textbook. :001_smile:

 

Finished - The School Story by Andrew Clements. We did this as a read aloud and we all loved it. Even my niece who is the worlds harshest book critic. If she doesn't like the book in the first five pages then she'll complain until it's done.

 

Abandoned - The Great Brain by John D. Fitzgerald. I'm hesitant to post my opinion because I know lots of people on this forum loved this book but I thought it was awful. Yuck. We listened to this as an audiobook and when Abbi died DH and I both decided we couldn't stand listening to anymore of it. I'm pretty sure Tom is a sociopath. The girls seemed to enjoy it but they'll have to get it from the library when they're old enough to drive because DH and I both hated it. It made me feel dirty after listening to it.

 

I'm on a bit of a reading lull. The only reading I really got done on the trip we were on was a few read alouds to the girls and I want to read something for myself. Nothing I've gotten started has really caught me yet though. And Fellowship of the Rings is so far a bore. Does it get better? I liked The Hobbit but this seems to not be as much fun.

 

In progress:

 

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

The Fellowship of the Ring by JRR Tolkien

The Hounds of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (read aloud)

The Third Policeman by Flann O'Brien (for bookclub)

Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K. Jerome (audiobook)

 

2012 finished books:

 

68. The School Story by Andrew Clement - read aloud (****)

67. The Great Brain by John D. Fitzgerald (*)

66. Free-Range Kids by Lenore Skenazy (***)

65. Red Sails to Capri by Ann Weil -read aloud (***)

64. The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy by Douglass Adams (*****)

63. Death of a Cad by MC Beaton (**)

62. Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood (***)

61. The Year of Living Biblically by AJ Jacobs (***)

60. A Pocket Full of Rye by Agatha Christie (***)

59. The Secret Adversary (Tommy and Tuppence) by Agatha Christie (****)

58. Tales of Robin Hood by Tony Allan - read aloud (****)

57. Betsy-Tacy by Maud Hart Lovelace (*****)

56. The Beekeepers Apprentice by Laurie R. King (****)

55. Death of a Gossip by MC Beaton (***)

54. The Thin Man by Dashiell Hammett (**)

53. On Writing by Stephen King (*****)

52. Maus by Art Spiegelman (****)

51. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie (***)

50. The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins (****)

49. The Night Bookmobile by Audrey Niffinegger (*)

48. Notes from a Small Island by Bill Bryson (***)

47. Casino Royale - James Bond by Ian Fleming (**)

46. A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson - Audiobook (***)

45. The Lucky Shopping Manual by Kim Lenitt (*****)

44. And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie (****)

43. Half Moon Investigations by Eoin Colfer - Audiobook (****)

42. Half Magic by Edward Eager (***)

41. Dealing with Dragons by Patricia Wrede - Read Aloud (****)

 

Books 1 - 40

 

Amy's Rating System:

 

***** - Fantastic, couldn't put it down

**** - Very good

*** - Enjoyable but nothing special

** - Not recommended

* - Horrible

Edited by aggieamy
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Nothing I've gotten started has really caught me yet though. And Fellowship of the Rings is so far a bore. Does it get better? I liked The Hobbit but this seems to not be as much fun.

 

 

It gets better by Return of the King :lol:

 

Seriously, It does get better in Fellowship, but JRRT is not noted for his brevity; it can be a bit of a slog ...

 

But it's worth it, IMO.

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I finished The First 20 Minutes which I very much recommend.

 

 

Oooh, I am on the waiting list for The First 20 Minutes at the library! Can't wait until it's my turn. I heard two interviews with the author on NPR and found it all very interesting, particularly since I've really been getting into biomechanics lately.

 

I have not read any Bradbury. I need to--can't decide where to start. Dandelion Wine sounds good right now.

 

I abandoned a book this week, the first one this year: Salt: A World History by Mark Kurlansky. I kept hoping it would get better, but really never got past being a history of pickles and ham. This is how the Celts made ham. This is how the Chinese made pickles. Here's a Roman pickle recipe. Here's a Venetian pickle recipe. Yaaaaaaaaawwwwwwn.

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I've not read any Bradbury, ever. My husband is often surprised by how few modern "classics" I've read. But I haven't had good luck with them ... I hated all of the ones I did! So dark and disturbing ... I still shudder when I consider Brave New World.

 

Oh my! Susan Howatch's Sins of the Fathers (#27) was a compelling book! I think I will agree with Ladydusk that this sequel to The Rich are Different is better than the first book. Both are good. Both leave the reader spoiled rotten--few writers narrate a family saga so well.

 

The Julius Caesar parallel to The Rich are Different was immediately clear. But that is a play that I have reread in recent years and have seen performed. I have not read Antony and Cleopatra since college. Looks like I need to put that on my summer reading list, too!

 

What I particularly love about Sins of the Fathers is how Eliot's Four Quarters is woven into the story. This set of four poems has been a personal favorite for decades. (I actually wore out a copy of the poems--the book was rubberbanded together and eventually replaced with another copy.)

 

I loved how she wove the Eliot into the story ... and I've not read Eliot (or any serious poetry ever. It made me want to read it though.) I wondered as I was reading if it wove into the story as well as it seemed to.

 

I finished two other Howatch books on vacation last week: Penmarric (loved) and Cashelmara (which, well written, I found very disturbing. Sordid even. The first Howatch I wouldn't recommend)

 

Hey, Look! I've read 26! Half-way there :)

 

2012 Books Reviews

1. Lit! by Tony Reinke

2. Loving the Little Years by Rachel Jankovic

3. Words to Eat By by Ina Lipkowitz

4. How to Tutor Your Own Child by Marina Koestler Ruben

5. Evening in the Palace of Reason by James R Gaines (spectacular)

6. The Cat of Bubastes by GA Henty (Audio from Librivox)

7. The Last Battle by C S Lewis (Audiobook)

8. A Praying Life by Paul E Miller

9. Emotional Intensity in Gifted Students by Christine Fonesca

10. Little Britches: Father and I Were Ranchers by Ralph Moody (fantastic read aloud)

11. The Bronze Bow by Elizabeth George Speare

12. The Abolition of Man by C.S. Lewis

13. How to Write a Sentence by Stanley Fish

14. The Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion

15. The Rich Are Different by Susan Howatch

16. The Masqueraders by Georgette Heyer

17. Sylvester by Georgette Heyer

18. Understood Betsy by Dorothy Canfield Fisher (great read aloud)

19. Sins of the Fathers by Susan Howatch (wow!)

20. Half Broke Horses by Jeannette Walls (very good)

21. Mansfield Park by Jane Austen (favorite)

22. The Toll Gate by Georgette Heyer

23. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl (audio book)

24. The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick (audio book)

25. Penmarric by Susan Howatch

26. Cashelmara by Susan Howatch

Edited by ladydusk
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I will second trying a cozy mystery if you're in a reading slump. Robin suggested Cleo Coyle and I *really* like that series... the first book is On What Grounds. Other good authors are Sheila Connolly and Joanne Fluke.

 

I actually read a few books this week! I read Divergent and Insurgent by Veronica Roth... both very good and I can't wait until the third title comes out... although we don't know yet when that will be!! Then I just finished Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn... it's a psychological mystery and it was a great read.

 

That makes 34 books total for the year. :)

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Stacia, you crack me up!! :lol:

 

I am the middle of three, yes THREE, readalongs that are taking a while. I've never done any readalong before and now suddenly I have 3 at once. :001_huh:

 

But I managed to read/finish:

 

Framley Parsonage, by Anthony Trollope -- long, enjoyable domestic Victorian novel.

The Frogs--Aristophanes play, won tremendous honors despite (because of?) the part where he spends the whole time mocking Dionysus (the god the play honored) and eminent recently-dead playwrights.

Mystery of a Hansom Cab--classic best-selling Victorian mystery--set in Melbourne, Australia, not London! Outsold Sherlock Holmes even.

The Pharaoh's Secret, by Marissa Moss--nice modern kids solving ancient Egyptian mystery adventure, lots about Hatshepsut.

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Stacia, you crack me up!! :lol:

 

Why, thank you. :D

 

For the record, I went to book club tonight. (The dinner was delicious, btw. Always a highlight for me!) All 6 of us pretty much agreed that the characters in Wuthering Heights were reprehensible donkeys; in spite of that, half of the folks actually LIKED the book! :confused: (I seriously have to wonder about my dinner companions sometimes. :lol:) One person agreed wholeheartedly w/ me (as in 'hated it'). The more I think about that book, the more I think I'm going to have to go back & rate it one star instead of two. I think it's going on my list of 'books I love to hate'. :cursing:

 

Anthem by Ayn Rand got a more tepid overall response. The couple of people who had read it a long time ago remembered enjoying it more in their youth vs. now. One person said it was pretty much a concise summary of her more famous, (much) longer tomes (which I've never read). So, overall the votes were 'meh' for the most part (w/ one person intensely disliking Anthem).

 

I guess it was our reading month of ego-centric characters.

 

And, thanks, everyone, for all the brain-fry suggestions. I'm making notes!

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I am posting from the airport in Tokyo!!! That is how determined I am to keep going with this!!! :tongue_smilie:

 

 

This week...

 

Started Reading:

Among the Gods by Lynn Austin

 

Still reading:

Desiring God

 

Completed:

26. The Deadliest Monster

25. Faith of My Fathers

24. A Good American

23. They Say/I Say:The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing

22. Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking

21. Insurgent

20. Stand: A Call for the Endurance of the Saints

19. The Strength of His Hands

18. The Meaning of Marriage

17. Funny in Farsi

16. The Constantine Codex

15. What the Dog Saw

14. What is the Mission of the Church?: Making Sense of Social Justice, Shalom, and the Great Commission

13. Gods and Kings

12. A Skeleton in God's Closet

11. My Hands Came Away Red

10. The Omnivore's Dilemma

9. Dead Heat

8. Redeeming Love

7. Family Driven Faith: What it Takes to Raise Sons and Daughters Who Walk with God

6. Organized Simplicity

5. Year of Wonders

4. The Holiness of God

3. The Paris Wife

2. The Peach Keeper

1. Relic

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56. Sarabeth's Bakery by Sarabeth Levine~cookbook, baking, pastries. There was a nice variety here. A lot of more complex stuff (puff pastry, danish, and croissant), but not so complex you won't have the supplies to make them (unlike Pastries from the La Brea Bakery). If you have an interest in a pastry survey course this might be a good start.

 

55. Essential Pleasures edited by Robert Pinsky~poetry, compilation, audio CD included. I liked this compilation. All the poems were good, well chosen. The audio CD only includes 20 or so poems out of the books out of 100+ poems.

 

54. Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home by Jeni Britton Bauer~cookbook, ice cream~We've been enjoying this James Beard award winner for a few weeks. I've had 2 out of the 3 ice creams come out fabulous (the 3rd I changed so it may be my own fault). This book does use a single base for ice cream and a single base for frozen yogurt and teaches you how to build from there, including where to add your own flavor combinations. Instead of egg it uses cream cheese for richness. Some people will be pleased not to have to worry about overcooking the eggs and others might miss the texture of a well-cooked custard. The flavor combinations were bold, but not so bold that you wonder if you would eat any of them. Also included were recipes for cones, praline, fruit syrups, pop-ups, and other goodies.

 

53. The Sea Gull by Anton Chekhov~Russian, play.

52. A few hundred pages of Hyperion and Farewell to Hyperion by Dan Simmons~science fiction, future worlds, pilgrim tales.

51. North by Northanger by Carrie Bebis~Jane Austen, mystery

50. The Essential Garden Design Workbook by Rosemary Alexander~non-fiction, gardening, landscape design.

49. The Scrapbook of Frankie Pratt: a Novel in Pictures by Caroline Preston~fiction, '20s, NY, Paris, coming of age.

48. Q: a Novel by Evan Mandery~fiction, quirky, time travel.

47. The Monster of Florence by Douglas Preston and Mario Spezi~memoir, Italy, criminal case, serial killer.

46. Food Chaining by Fracker~non-fiction, food issues, picky eaters.

45. The Long Retreat by Andrew Krivak~memoir, Jesuit.

44. Exploring Garden Style by Tauton Press~non-fiction, gardening, design.

43. Homeschooling Children with ADD (and Other Special Needs) by Lenore Hayles~non-fiction, education, medical issues.

42. Reading Lolita in Tehran by Azar Nafrisi~non-fiction, memoir, Iran, literature.

41. Five Quarters of the Orange by Joanne Harris~fiction, France, WWII, food. *

40. Blue Like Jazz by Donald Miller~memoir, stories, Christianity.

39. Just Take a Bite! by Lori Ernsberger~non-fiction, food issues, special needs.

38. Suspense and Sensibility by Carrie Bebris~Jane Austen, Mystery.

37. Pride and Prescience by Carrie Bebris~Jane Austen, Darcys, Mystery, supernatural.

36. Superfudge by Judy Blume~fiction, classic children's book.

35. The Explosive Child by Ross Greene~non-fiction, behavior, children

34. Cyteen 2: The Rebirth by CJ Cherryh~science fiction, cloning.

33. The Peace War by Vernor Vinge~science fiction, future, technology.

32. Whiskey Breakfast by Richard Lindberg~memoir, Swedish Immigration, Chicago.

31. Corvus: a Life with Birds by Esther Woolfson~non-fiction, birds.

30. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen~classic literature.

29. Cyteen: The Betrayal by CJ Cherryh~science fiction, future, space, cloning.

28. Divergent by Veronica Roth~youth fiction, dystopian.

27. The Help by Kathryn Stockett~fiction, '60s, race relations.

26. Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs~youth, fiction.

25. Below Stairs: the Classic Kitchen Maid Memoir by Margaret Powell~non-fiction, memoir.

24. Ender in Exile by Orson Scott Card~fiction.

23. Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical Boyhood by Oliver Sacks~non-fiction, memoir.

22. The Garden Book of Wisconsin by Melinda Myers~non-fiction, gardening, flowers and landscaping.

21. Putting Down Roots: Gardening Insights from Wisconsin's Early Settlers by Marcia Carmichael~non-fiction, history, gardening.

20. Gudrun's Kitchen: Recipes from a Norwegian Family by Irene and Edward Sandvold~cookbook, biography.

19. Twelve Owls by Laura Erickson~non-fiction, birds.

18. A Thread of Grace by Mary Doria Russell~fiction, WWII **

17. A Fire Upon the Deep by Vernor Vinge~science fiction, space

16. Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card~classic science fiction, read aloud.

15. Flour by Joanne Chung~cookbook, baking

14. Home to Woefield by Susan Juby~light fiction, humorous

13. Making the Most of Shade by Larry Hodgson~non-fiction/gardening

12. Growing Perennials in Cold Climates by Mike Heger~non-fiction/gardening

11. Case Histories by Kate Atkinson~mystery

10. Letters from Yellowstone by Diane Smith~historical fiction

9. The Circus in Winter by Cathy Day~fiction

8. The Alphabet in the Park by Adelia Prado~poetry

7. The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down by Anne Fadiman~non-fiction/medical *

6. One Thousand White Women by Jim Fergus~speculative fiction

5. The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place: The Hidden Gallery by Maryrose Woods~juvenile

4. The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Jester~(read aloud) juvenile

3. The Alienist by Caleb Carr~Mystery

2. The Forgotten Garden by Kate Morton~Fiction

1. The Children's Book by A.S. Byatt~Fiction *

Working on:

Blood Meridian (McCarthy)

The Sacred Journey (Beuchner)

Temple of the Golden Pavilion (Mishima)

Cold Comfort Farm

Moby Dick (Melville)

 

 

*~top 5 books of the year (so far)

**~best book of the year (so far)

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To sum up, here's how I felt:

mzl-txuvggdd-320x480-75.jpg

Love this. :D

Stacia, how did you do it? Tell me, tell me, tell me! :smilielol5:

 

My rating system: 5 = Love; 4 = Pretty awesome; 3 = Decently good; 2 = Ok; 1 = Don't bother (I shouldn't have any 1s on my list as I would ditch them before finishing)...

Love your rating system. Somewhat similar to mine. May copy yours if you don't mind.

Yes, I also seldom have any 1s on my list, since I use the 10% Rule. If a book doesn't grab me in the first 10%, I give up on it and move on.

 

The First 20 Minutes at the library! Can't wait until it's my turn. I heard two interviews with the author on NPR and found it all very interesting,.

Yes, I've added it to my wish list, thanks to Kleine Hexe and the NPR interview.

 

I have not read any Bradbury.

Me neither. Not sure if I'd like him or not. Not sure which one to read, if at all.

 

I abandoned a book this week, the first one this year: Salt: A World History by Mark Kurlansky. I kept hoping it would get better, but really never got past being a history of pickles and ham. This is how the Celts made ham. This is how the Chinese made pickles. Here's a Roman pickle recipe. Here's a Venetian pickle recipe. Yaaaaaaaaawwwwwwn.

:smilielol5:

 

For the record, I went to book club tonight. (The dinner was delicious, btw. Always a highlight for me!)

I'm so very, very envious. I wish I had something like that here. Happy for you, however. :D

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What was the first Bradbury book you ever read and when?

 

June 13 is Dorothy Sayer's birthday so if you haven't read anything by her yet, now's the time. I'll be highlighting her next week.

 

What are you reading this week?

 

Link to Week 23

 

First Bradbury was Martian Chronicles in 7th grade. Loaded ds up with Bradbury for Christmas a couple of years ago. He like him but thinks him odd. Ds 21 and dd 17 and I read F451 a couple of years ago- watched the movie, etc. Loved it. Read Amusing Ourselves to Death about the same time by Postman. Cue twilight zone music.

 

Dorothy Sayers has been my latest obssession but I am bogged down in Red Herrings. The brogue is difficult to read and to understand. But I love, love, love her writing, characters and am totally intrigued by her as a person. She's the intellect I wish I was.

 

Reading Howatch's High Flyer. Can't say I love it. It's like Peretti, but in London. Still slogging through Technopoly.

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54. Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home by Jeni Britton Bauer~cookbook, ice cream~We've been enjoying this James Beard award winner for a few weeks. I've had 2 out of the 3 ice creams come out fabulous (the 3rd I changed so it may be my own fault). This book does use a single base for ice cream and a single base for frozen yogurt and teaches you how to build from there, including where to add your own flavor combinations. Instead of egg it uses cream cheese for richness. Some people will be pleased not to have to worry about overcooking the eggs and others might miss the texture of a well-cooked custard. The flavor combinations were bold, but not so bold that you wonder if you would eat any of them. Also included were recipes for cones, praline, fruit syrups, pop-ups, and other goodies.

 

 

 

Yum! I'm going to check this book out. I have Ben and Jerry's ice cream book which I love. I can't wait to try cream cheese instead of egg.

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It gets better by Return of the King :lol:

 

Seriously, It does get better in Fellowship, but JRRT is not noted for his brevity; it can be a bit of a slog ...

 

But it's worth it, IMO.

 

:D But, don't forget their journey through Mordor in Return of the King! Talk about slog!! I thought that Fellowship got better after they leave Tom Bombadil, what a long part of the story and they totally axed it from the movie.

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I've not read any Bradbury, ever. My husband is often surprised by how few modern "classics" I've not read. But I haven't had good luck with them ... I hated all of the ones I did! So dark and disturbing ... I still shudder when I consider Brave New World.

 

 

:iagree: I read this in 12th grade. It (along with the bit of A Handmaid's Tale I actually made it through) made me realize I don't like dystopian. I therefore have no interest in The Hunger Games. Give me sparkling vampires any day over dark, disturbing, depressing literature. :ack2:

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:D But, don't forget their journey through Mordor in Return of the King! Talk about slog!! I thought that Fellowship got better after they leave Tom Bombadil, what a long part of the story and they totally axed it from the movie.

 

Oh, the song of Tom Bombadil--would it ever end?? :lol:

 

Right now, my local NPR station is broadcasting a show on summer reading with a few of the independent booksellers in the area. I am getting a lot of suggestions for books to read.

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Love this. :D

Stacia, how did you do it? Tell me, tell me, tell me! :smilielol5:

Stacia, my eldest saw what you did to the pic of the book and cracked up. He said he feels that way about some things.....like his history text.

Actually, I can't take credit for it. It's a pic I found on Google images. :001_smile: :lol:

 

And, for some fun reading, I just picked up & started Pink Boots and a Machete: My Journey from NFL Cheerleader to National Geographic Explorer by Mireya Mayor. (Already I like this gal MUCH more than any of the females in Wuthering Heights! :D)

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Right now, my local NPR station is broadcasting a show on summer reading with a few of the independent booksellers in the area. I am getting a lot of suggestions for books to read.

 

Oh, please be sure to share the list if you have time! :001_smile:

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:D But, don't forget their journey through Mordor in Return of the King! Talk about slog!! I thought that Fellowship got better after they leave Tom Bombadil, what a long part of the story and they totally axed it from the movie.

 

I have to admit that I dreaded Mordor. I dread that part of the movies too. Can't they just stay with the characters who are doing something?! :lol: Although, I suppose JRRT had a point with doing it the way he did.

 

I liked (but didn't understand) Tom Bombadil and Goldy and was sorry they cut that (and other things) from the movie, but I suppose they didn't want movies that lasted as long as it took me to read the books ...

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Oh, please be sure to share the list if you have time! :001_smile:

 

I was thinking the same thing.

 

We were just at the library and I was scanning everyone else's stacks of books to see if there were any interesting selections for me to keep in mind ...

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:001_huh:

 

Okay, all these comments are making me rethink reading LoTR. DH already has me a little concerned because he read them ealier this year and kept complaining about the songs and how much time was spent describing the trees. I will continue though! I mean, it can't be as bad as Wuthering Heights, right? :lol:

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:001_huh:

 

Okay, all these comments are making me rethink reading LoTR. DH already has me a little concerned because he read them ealier this year and kept complaining about the songs and how much time was spent describing the trees. I will continue though! I mean, it can't be as bad as Wuthering Heights, right? :lol:

 

LOTR is totally worth having read.

 

I loved The Hobbit in 3rd grade. I was advised to wait to read LOTR after that.

 

I tried in high school and got half way through The Two Towers and gave up. It is a lot of description.

 

Twenty years later, I wanted to read the books before I saw the movies (I failed at this ...) but I did read it to say I'd read it. Then, I re-read the whole series in a row last year and really liked it.

 

Third time's a charm :001_huh::glare::tongue_smilie::lol:

 

Can't say I've ever made it far into Wuthering Heights nor that Stacia makes me want to try again ...

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:001_huh:

 

Okay, all these comments are making me rethink reading LoTR. DH already has me a little concerned because he read them ealier this year and kept complaining about the songs and how much time was spent describing the trees. I will continue though! I mean, it can't be as bad as Wuthering Heights, right? :lol:

 

LOTR is totally worth having read.

 

I loved The Hobbit in 3rd grade. I was advised to wait to read LOTR after that.

 

I tried in high school and got half way through The Two Towers and gave up. It is a lot of description.

 

Twenty years later, I wanted to read the books before I saw the movies (I failed at this ...) but I did read it to say I'd read it. Then, I re-read the whole series in a row last year and really liked it.

 

Third time's a charm :001_huh::glare::tongue_smilie::lol:

 

Can't say I've ever made it far into Wuthering Heights nor that Stacia makes me want to try again ...

 

I guess I'm worse than the proverbial squeaky wheel, huh? :tongue_smilie: (And, hey, don't let me deter you -- remember that HALF of my book club liked Wuthering Heights.)

 

Guess now would not be the ideal time to point out that I really didn't care for the LotR books either? Granted, last time I tried to read them I was in my 20s, but I found them so horribly depressing & dark that I just stopped halfway through. I enjoyed the movies, but still have no desire to go back & try reading the books.

 

Just call me the cranky reader, I guess. :D

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I totally forgot that I also read The Princess and the Goblin by George MacDonald last week. It wasn't even on my to-read list but I was stuck on vacation and didn't feel like reading something to heavy so I gave it a try and really enjoyed it. I'm planning on doing it as a read aloud for DD sometime next year now.

 

We're one chapter into The Hounds of the Baskervilles and I don't know how that's going to go as a read aloud for an eight year old. She loves the Enola Holmes books and the Jim Dale audio stories of Sherlock Holmes so I think she'll like the story but the language is pretty advanced in the book. I found myself stumbling over pronunciation of the words a lot. I asked her if she wanted to keep reading it and she did so we'll see how it goes.

 

In progress:

 

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

The Fellowship of the Ring by JRR Tolkien

The Hounds of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (read aloud)

The Third Policeman by Flann O'Brien (for bookclub)

Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K. Jerome (audiobook)

 

2012 finished books:

 

69. The Princess and the Goblin by George MacDonald (****)

68. The School Story by Andrew Clement - read aloud (****)

67. The Great Brain by John D. Fitzgerald (*)

66. Free-Range Kids by Lenore Skenazy (***)

65. Red Sails to Capri by Ann Weil -read aloud (***)

64. The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy by Douglass Adams (*****)

63. Death of a Cad by MC Beaton (**)

62. Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood (***)

61. The Year of Living Biblically by AJ Jacobs (***)

60. A Pocket Full of Rye by Agatha Christie (***)

59. The Secret Adversary (Tommy and Tuppence) by Agatha Christie (****)

58. Tales of Robin Hood by Tony Allan - read aloud (****)

57. Betsy-Tacy by Maud Hart Lovelace (*****)

56. The Beekeepers Apprentice by Laurie R. King (****)

55. Death of a Gossip by MC Beaton (***)

54. The Thin Man by Dashiell Hammett (**)

53. On Writing by Stephen King (*****)

52. Maus by Art Spiegelman (****)

51. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie (***)

50. The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins (****)

49. The Night Bookmobile by Audrey Niffinegger (*)

48. Notes from a Small Island by Bill Bryson (***)

47. Casino Royale - James Bond by Ian Fleming (**)

46. A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson - Audiobook (***)

45. The Lucky Shopping Manual by Kim Lenitt (*****)

44. And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie (****)

43. Half Moon Investigations by Eoin Colfer - Audiobook (****)

42. Half Magic by Edward Eager (***)

41. Dealing with Dragons by Patricia Wrede - Read Aloud (****)

 

Books 1 - 40

 

Amy's Rating System:

 

***** - Fantastic, couldn't put it down

**** - Very good

*** - Enjoyable but nothing special

** - Not recommended

* - Horrible

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#57 Neptune Noir: Unauthorized Investigations into Veronica Mars (Rob Thomas, editor) Non-fiction. Edited by the the series creator, this somewhat uneven collection of essays served as a lightweight diversion while we awaited Season 2 from the library.

 

Complete list of books can be found here.

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