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Not only TWTM, but tons of homeschool curriculum/programs seem to be built around the history studies. It's like the history is the foundation upon which many entire curriculuma are built. My daughter recently announced that she hates history. :001_huh:

 

She loves reading/literature and she loves science. But she says she hates history. I think more specifically, she hates the "spines", the textbook-ish books. She really enjoyed the "living books" that we used for history. And frankly, even though it might be considered sacrilege, I'm willing to ditch the spine and the chronological progressions and timelines and outlines, and just let her read living books that interest her in whatever order she wants.

 

So I'm curious if anyone else out there has a history-hating child, and if so, what does your curriculum look like? Are there any boxed or packaged type curricula that are more science and literature oriented, and a little less history focused?

 

Just curious....

 

Thanks!

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I don't like history centered curricula. I love history, just not as the CENTER.

 

I'm skills based not history based. I'm currently only covering interlinear skills for classical languages, with my tutoring students, but when I was homeschooling my boys, I was classical language and math centered. My boys were so toasted from all the skills classes, that when an opportunity to relax a bit, with a history book or DVD was presented to them, they were thrilled.

 

At other times I have been Bible centered and focused all studies around the daily Bible reading.

 

Geography, rather than history, has always been a biggie with me. I found it interesting to recently read that the Amish often teach geography, but not history, as they believe history to glorify war. My history lessons have always tended to be geographically organized, rather than timeline organized, except for when I've stuck for a long time with the Bible unit studies. Then, at least, the ancient history part followed a timeline.

 

You can CERTAINLY be classical and NOT follow a 4 year history timeline spine. I'm not a fan of the book, but I am a fan of the Latin Centered IDEA, that predates the book, by, ummmm, about how many centuries?

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You can CERTAINLY be classical and NOT follow a 4 year history timeline spine.

 

 

Thank you!!! We've recently started easing into the WTM style of homeschooling last year. My ds does not like history. He says he doesn't. He groans whenever the SOTW book comes out. He hasn't shown much interest at all in any of the extra books recommended. He won't pay attention to any videos I find.

 

The only bit of history he has shown an interest in is early US history. Colonial/Revolutionary times interest him. He'll read a Fritz book or If You Lived During...book on his own. He's also read some of the MTH Reasearch books. He loves anything Abe Lincoln. And like you Hunter I do a lot of geography because my ds wants to do geography.

 

The only glimmer of interest in the chronological lessons I've seen has been in prehistory. He watched all of the Walking With videos and both my ds's devoured anything Ice Age. But I think it was the science more than the history that was appealing to them. He tells me in no uncertain terms that he doesn't like anything that has to do with Egypt or Mesopotamia. Chronological is just not moving along very fast here.

 

So despite my best intentions, history has been all over the place and mostly incidental learning. I love history. And I'm trying to strike a balance between giving my children a desire to learn history with respect for their own desires as well. Push it do I risk crippling their future love of history? So I've backed off. I know that's sacrilegious in Classical circles, but I just can't force my child to do something when my goals are that they find joy in that thing.

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...when I was homeschooling my boys, I was classical language and math centered. My boys were so toasted from all the skills classes, that when an opportunity to relax a bit, with a history book or DVD was presented to them, they were thrilled.

 

Now, I like the sound of that approach! My husband has degrees in math and physics, and I know he would be very supportive of a heavily math-based curriculum. I'm not as mathematically inclined myself, though I can get by, but I do think it's very important "mental training". That's exactly what I told my daughter the other day when she was asking me "why do I need to know this?" I said that math is pure logic and it trains your brain to think logically. She actually found that argument pretty convincing and went back to her work more motivated! She has found my arguments for why she needs to know history far less compelling. :lol:

 

Now for classical languages . . . we did a bit of Latin together, but never having studied it myself, I felt very unqualified to teach her beyond the first year. I think we'd need to hire this subject out to a qualified tutor. And while I see the value in Classical languages, I'm not married to that idea either. I want her to become fluent in a second language. I'm not quite so particular about which language that is. I'd probably let her chose what she's most interested in.

 

At other times I have been Bible centered and focused all studies around the daily Bible reading.

 

I could definitely envision a school day centered around Bible, saints, catechism, etc. but since my husband is not a Christian, I think he would be less impressed with that approach. I do try to incorporate those things into our days, but I don't think he'd be comfortable with an entire curriculum built around that. :(

 

Geography, rather than history, has always been a biggie with me.

 

Could you tell me more about how you've taught it? I must admit that I've been somewhat negligent in this regard. We've "dabbled" in geography as it relates to our history, but I think it's probably time for a more systematic and serious approach. She'll be in 7th next year. Are there any particular resources you would recommend? In theory, I really liked the method of teaching Geography that was in The Core by Leigh Bortins. In reality, it never got done. I think I need something that will give us more specific direction, more hand-holding. That was too DIY for me.

 

You can CERTAINLY be classical and NOT follow a 4 year history timeline spine.

 

Yes, I've always thought of Classical as meaning Latin, logic, and rhetoric, rather than a particular approach to history. It just seems like the vast majority of "packaged" curriculum are history based!

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The only bit of history he has shown an interest in is early US history. Colonial/Revolutionary times interest him. He'll read a Fritz book or If You Lived During...book on his own. He's also read some of the MTH Reasearch books. He loves anything Abe Lincoln.

 

<snip>

 

So despite my best intentions, history has been all over the place and mostly incidental learning. I love history. And I'm trying to strike a balance between giving my children a desire to learn history with respect for their own desires as well. Push it do I risk crippling their future love of history? So I've backed off. I know that's sacrilegious in Classical circles, but I just can't force my child to do something when my goals are that they find joy in that thing.

 

 

 

My daughter went through a phase where she was fascinated by the Titanic, and read tons of books about it. Then she was really into ancient Egypt. Right now, it's the World War II time period. I think that if I just let her pursue her own interests where history is concerned, we might come out ahead versus if I force a "curriculum" on her. Sure, we won't have the thoroughness of a "spine" or the nice outlines and timelines, but if she likes history without those, and detests it with them, then which way is really better?

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Have you heard of the Robinson Curriculum? I am NOT advocating adopting the curriculum as a WHOLE. The man has something to say though! Art Robinson is a scientist whose wife died, and left him behind with a bunch of homeschooled children, that he was now entirely responsible for educating, along with continuing to work.

 

Not knowing what else to do, he just handed them some Saxon math books and told them to go at it, for 2 hours a day. Then to write something, that he might not grade for weeks. Then go read something. He has a lot of unique things to say about math and science.

 

Our days started with Bible, using the KJV as much as possible. We covered music, current events, church history, history, geography, and I don't know what else in about 1 1/2 hours. Geography back then was a lot of Operation World and missionary magazines, and biographies.

 

Then the boys went for a walk.

 

Then the older one started his American School studies (a secular, concise, and inexpensive correspondance high school course) and the younger one started math (about 5 years accelerated).

 

Snack time was usually a history or science DVD, but sometimes art appreciation or something else.

 

The younger son then started listening to the KJV on tape or Pilgrim's Progress and I quickly drove the older son to work. (We were living in severe poverty and domestic abuse and my older son planned an illegal short cut route to financial independence that involved lots of work and only concise school work. At 19 he was graduated from junior college, debt free and living in Las Vegas.)

 

Then it was Greek and Latin till lunch and more Greek and Latin after lunch. We often squeezed in another documentary during lunch.

 

Then we did some writing or art, or whatever else I has having a guilt trip about. I soon dropped all formal science and history, because there just was no time and money. We had a several broken but overlapping sets of encyclopedias that my son read a lot.

 

Things were crazy back then. I can remember standing in the bathtub swishing clothes around with my bare feet, while wearing a winter coat, and trying to read ahead in a calculus book. We had hardly any heat and were sometimes without a washer and/or dryer, and food was mostly hot water and carbs. I knew nothing about Maslow's Pyramid back then and just ran on fumes.

 

Now for my own self education, I too reread The Core over and over. Right now I'm using Rod and Staff 4 as a read aloud, Draw Write Now (mostly 7 and 8) for map drawing and pictures of the ecosystems, and AIG Properties of Ecosystems as a read aloud. And I'm the one that is always starting the threads here about the vintage geography books, because we don't have anything like them now, and I don't know what I'm going to do next. Geography worksheets just don't work for me. To me, Geography is centered on oral work and map making, but...I don't have it figured out yet. I just muck around and spend lots of time and money :-0

 

This here is a 1 year unit study of missions and geography that is free, and worth looking at. I have toyed with stretching it out to a 4 year around the world cycle, but I'm too fickle and skills based, to stick with this type of thing. When it comes to centering on anything other than skills, I'm only able to stick with the Bible long term. Even geography doesn't seem to be able to hold me long.

 

But geography and environmental science have always been the bulk of our science and social studies and the boys did fine with that. There are AP geography and environmental science exams that make good high school course descriptions :-) And the school board and the junior college didn't care what I did anyway. And my current students are all junior college bound and adults and no one cares what they do either.

Edited by Hunter
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Thank you, Hunter! I'm vaguely familiar with the Robinson Curriculum -- I actually got a hand-me-down copy of the CD-ROMs, but I didn't look at it very much because I didn't like the idea of having to do all that printing myself at home (so I passed it on to someone else). But I could definitely read some of the articles at the website for ideas and inspiration. I will check out the other links you provided as well.

 

It sounds like you handled a very difficult and challenging situation in your life with a lot of level-headedness and determination. :grouphug: I gather that your circumstances have improved, and I'm glad for that.

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Memoria Press has a good article on teaching with the KJV.

 

I am a Christian by culture not faith. It is a common symptom of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder to have no faith, and I don't have any. My oldest son was never a Christian, and my youngest son stopped being a Christian at about 15 I think. We all believe that an education drenched in the KJV is the best education though, and it has NOTHING to do with faith.

 

My youngest has always been a Great Books fan. As a younger child he read mostly nonfiction (usually encyclopedias and biographies) and the Bible. Pilgrim's Progress was the first novel he latched onto, and listened to the audio version about 13-15 times, I'd guess. Then he started reading the Loeb Classics partially in the Greek and Latin, Shakespeare, and John Dryden's translation of the Aenid. He says the KJV is an essential first step to reading the other Great Books.

 

My oldest says everything he uses in life now, he learned during family worship time.

 

Basing an education around the KJV doesn't always have anything to do with faith. There were a lot of Greeks that based an education around Homer that didn't believe in the Greek gods. Children do well to have a book, that includes THEIR mythology and stories of THEIR heroes, and is at least partially in verse.

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We are reading thru "Living History of our World" books by Angel Odell. We absolutely love them!!

 

http://www.angelaodell.com/a-living-history-of-our-world-history/

 

I do add some living books for free reading.

 

Have you looked into Beautiful Feet history guides? That might be something that your DD would enjoy.

 

Thank you, Flo, I will take a look at these!

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Memoria Press has a good article on teaching with the KJV.

 

I am a Christian by culture not faith. It is a common symptom of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder to have no faith, and I don't have any. My oldest son was never a Christian, and my youngest son stopped being a Christian at about 15 I think. We all believe that an education drenched in the KJV is the best education though, and it has NOTHING to do with faith.

 

My youngest has always been a Great Books fan. As a younger child he read mostly nonfiction (usually encyclopedias and biographies) and the Bible. Pilgrim's Progress was the first novel he latched onto, and listened to the audio version about 13-15 times, I'd guess. Then he started reading the Loeb Classics partially in the Greek and Latin, Shakespeare, and John Dryden's translation of the Aenid. He says the KJV is an essential first step to reading the other Great Books.

 

My oldest says everything he uses in life now, he learned during family worship time.

 

Basing an education around the KJV doesn't always have anything to do with faith. There were a lot of Greeks that based an education around Homer that didn't believe in the Greek gods. Children do well to have a book, that includes THEIR mythology and stories of THEIR heroes, and is at least partially in verse.

 

Wow, that's some interesting food for thought. I use the NKJV for our daily Bible reading, but my daughter has a copy of the "old" KJV that she likes to use for her own reading. She likes the "fancy, old-fashioned" language. Maybe she's on to something there, and I should switch us over to the old KJV completely. I'm off to check out the article you linked. Thanks!

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Wow, that's some interesting food for thought. I use the NKJV for our daily Bible reading, but my daughter has a copy of the "old" KJV that she likes to use for her own reading. She likes the "fancy, old-fashioned" language. Maybe she's on to something there, and I should switch us over to the old KJV completely. I'm off to check out the article you linked. Thanks!

 

IF you are a Christian by faith, and maybe even if you are not, I recommend supplementing the KJV with more understandable versions. I often use the NIrV written at a 3rd grade level. Beware it contains words that I can't post here. It's a blunt version, where the KJV makes gibberish and flowers out of what the NIrV bluntly says. The Children's Golden Bible is another option that I am currently using as a reading book. MP sells 3 guides with comprehension questions and maps and more, that includes KJV memory work.

 

Invest in quality KJV audio in BOTH a multi-acted dramatized version with sound effects, and also another version that is read by just one person who knows what they are doing. The children need to HEAR the KJV to become, what I call bilingual. Even if you never become "bilingual" in 1600s English, it's easy for your children, if you provide audio. My youngest son is not even able to understand why an adult would struggle with Dryden's Aeneid or Shakespeare. "What is there to NOT understand?" He would ask me. "What is there TO understand", I would fire back.

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IF you are a Christian by faith, and maybe even if you are not, I recommend supplementing the KJV with more understandable versions. I often use the NIrV written at a 3rd grade level. Beware it contains words that I can't post here. It's a blunt version, where the KJV makes gibberish and flowers out of what the NIrV bluntly says. The Children's Golden Bible is another option that I am currently using as a reading book. MP sells 3 guides with comprehension questions and maps and more, that includes KJV memory work.

 

Invest in quality KJV audio in BOTH a multi-acted dramatized version with sound effects, and also another version that is read by just one person who knows what they are doing. The children need to HEAR the KJV to become, what I call bilingual. Even if you never become "bilingual" in 1600s English, it's easy for your children, if you provide audio. My youngest son is not even able to understand why an adult would struggle with Dryden's Aeneid or Shakespeare. "What is there to NOT understand?" He would ask me. "What is there TO understand", I would fire back.

 

 

We are Christians by faith, and I like using the NKJV at home because it is easily readable, but it still has some of the same language patterns and style of the KJV, which is what we sing in the liturgy. I do enjoy using both together.

 

Thank you for mentioning the audio versions -- I was going to ask for your recommendations on how to teach the KJV! The article you linked from Memoria Press was very inspiring! I'm now envisioning a homeschooling approach based on math and the KJV and I haven't been this excited about homeschooling in ages! I'm grateful for any and all advice that you'd want to send my way!

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Not only TWTM, but tons of homeschool curriculum/programs seem to be built around the history studies. It's like the history is the foundation upon which many entire curriculuma are built. My daughter recently announced that she hates history. :001_huh:

 

She loves reading/literature and she loves science. But she says she hates history. I think more specifically, she hates the "spines", the textbook-ish books. She really enjoyed the "living books" that we used for history. And frankly, even though it might be considered sacrilege, I'm willing to ditch the spine and the chronological progressions and timelines and outlines, and just let her read living books that interest her in whatever order she wants.

 

So I'm curious if anyone else out there has a history-hating child, and if so, what does your curriculum look like? Are there any boxed or packaged type curricula that are more science and literature oriented, and a little less history focused?

 

Just curious....

 

Thanks!

 

Why not ditch the spines then and just use the living books?

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Why not ditch the spines then and just use the living books?

 

Yeah, that's probably exactly what I'm going to end up doing. I have been looking into "boxed" type curricula for next year, for a number of reasons, but it seems like most of them are history-based, which wouldn't be a huge hit here. I seem to find *something* that I don't like about every packaged curriculum that I look at, so I think I'm going to end up doing my own thing yet again! Guess I'm too picky. :)

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Invest in quality KJV audio in BOTH a multi-acted dramatized version with sound effects, and also another version that is read by just one person who knows what they are doing. The children need to HEAR the KJV to become, what I call bilingual.

 

I'm finding a lot more versions out there than I would have guessed! :confused: If there are any particular ones that you would recommend, or not recommend, I'd love to have some help narrowing it down.

 

Also, I am curious how formally you approached your KJV studies. Did you simply read/listen and enjoy and discuss it? Memorize passages? Or use it as a basis for formal grammar and vocabulary studies? I'm envisioning reading, listening, and memorizing and letting the rest flow from there. But I'm :bigear: if you have other suggestions. My dd loves this idea! Now we just have to convince hubby. ;)

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Here are a few curriculums that are Bible centered.

 

Students of the Word has been around for a long time. Any Bible version can be used but the author recommends the NKJV. It is expensive and few people stick with it. It covers the entire Bible in 6 years, but is a bit choppy in the amount of chapters covered for each lesson and the science and social studies are usually not integrated with the Bible reading. People automatically start tweaking and tweak themselves right away.

 

The Ultimate Living Book Unit Study Adventure Curriculum is brand new, and I'm am quite impressed with the curriculum and the author. It is KJV based and uses mostly free internet resources. It's only $15.00!

 

Bedell is a 9 volume curriculum. Volumes 1-8 are available now. The author is writing a plan B curriculum at the same time as volume 9, so that is slowing things down. Plan A is a chronological plan. Plan B will be a subject organized plan. Plan A is a bit choppy, spending a LONG time in Genesis and almost no time in the the poetry books.

 

I used to just wing things with my boys. I used to be an expert at multitasking before the seizures started. Now the seizures cause memory loss and extreme difficulty in multitasking. My speech has also been affected and mimics a stroke. I have a house full of resources, now that I couldn't even have imagined owning in the past. More and more, I need to rely on open and go, multiyear curricula or I just get lost. I was a far better teacher with nothing, then I am now. Except for handwriting. I'm a MUCH better handwriting teacher now! :-)

 

I wouldn't suggest throwing it all on your hubby too fast. Start morning worship time and gradually let it lengthen as you learn more and more how to teach from the Bible. It's a life style more than a curriculum. You just gather your chicks and TEACH. For many moms it just comes naturally. I don't know how to explain it. ULBUSA has a yahoo group. The author would love to chat, if you are interested, I'm sure. The group is pretty dead. I don't post much as I fear my very strong personality and lack of faith issues could overshadow the curriculum, and I just don't want to be a strong presence there, at least yet, while it is new. SOW also has a yahoo group. I think Bedell has a group too, but is pretty dead. Go breathe some life into the groups! :-)

Edited by Hunter
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As for KJV audio, versions come and they go. There are decent free ones now. Often you can download some free from the library. There are Ipod apps. I'm not even sure what is available right now :-0

 

Audible.com has an awesome set for the NKJV that is free when you sign up for a free 30 day trial. I think it has orange covers. It's good to also have audio of easier versions, too.

 

All Bible audio is good. Excellent KJV are great. We used to have a KJV NT by a shakespearean company on cassette that were amazing, but I can't find any trace of it now. And we had a lousy full version with southern accents, that was almost comical, but...I guess it was good enough to prepare for Dryden, so... And we had an incomplete set of NIV, that...I don't remember anything about, that my son used for the prophets books, I think. I remember him lying on the floor coloring while he listened and other times reading along in his huge bulky parallel Bible.

 

He loved his Bible reading. He took about a year break when he lost his faith and then started reading again just for pleasure. He says reading the Bible made him lose his faith :-0 And laughs at people who say they want to increase their faith by reading and yells at them, "Don't do it!" He tells them to read the Bible to prepare for the Great Books, but NOT to increase faith :-0 That's HIS experience. I'm just repeating it.

 

My oldest son loves arguing the Bible with Christians. He thinks it's funny to use their holy book against them and show them how much they don't know about it. He can be cocky and arrogant at times. Sigh!

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My oldest doesn't care for history. I decided to just to do interest led in history. He does like American history, so we will hit that a lot between now and high school. Of course, he gets no choice in history during high school. :D

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Have you considered using a literature-based history program without any spines? I've heard Biblioplan mentioned around here but don't know anything about it, but it's something to look into.

 

What has worked for us is TruthQuest History. It's a stand-alone program, so you'd have to find other language arts, math, science, etc., but it sounds like that would work for you anyway.

 

We're finishing TQ American History for Younger Students I next week, and my son asks to do history first every morning by saying "Read to me, Mommy!" He thinks it's the best thing ever to listen to history books on the couch (or while he jumps on the trampoline). The fact that most of them have contained fascinating adventures has certainly helped, but still...if your kiddo likes living books, why not grab a TQ manual and use it to help you find terrific books on various topics?

 

TQ has no IG/grid/boxes to check, so there's no guilt if you camp out in one area or if you ignore another topic. I cannot say enough good things about the author's commentary throughout the guides. It's conversational in tone and always seems like just the right amount. Just a few sentences in many spots, yet a page or more for big topics like the Pilgrims or the American Revolution.

 

The author does offer some spines throughout the guides but we have never needed/used them, and from her posts on the TQ Yahoo group, I can tell she much prefers the use of living books.

 

Hopefully I don't sound like a gushing goober. I just can't say enough about how perfect TQ has been for us this year. And man, do ds and I know our early American History now!

 

Hope this helps!

Christina

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My ds is very similar. What I am considering, is putting more of a focus on science and just getting something like MOH to handle history with some readers/read alouds. So no big program just something simple that way he can focus more on his interest in science.

 

Sarah

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The Ultimate Living Book Unit Study Adventure Curriculum is brand new, and I'm am quite impressed with the curriculum and the author. It is KJV based and uses mostly free internet resources. It's only $15.00!

 

That looks amazing, especially for only $15!!! Wow! I'm buying it as soon as I post this. Thank you! :D

 

I used to just wing things with my boys. I used to be an expert at multitasking before the seizures started. Now the seizures cause memory loss and extreme difficulty in multitasking. My speech has also been affected and mimics a stroke. I have a house full of resources, now that I couldn't even have imagined owning in the past. More and more, I need to rely on open and go, multiyear curricula or I just get lost. I was a far better teacher with nothing, then I am now. Except for handwriting. I'm a MUCH better handwriting teacher now! :-)

 

I am so sorry that you are struggling with health issues. It sounds like you have rarely gotten a break in your life!

 

I wouldn't suggest throwing it all on your hubby too fast. Start morning worship time and gradually let it lengthen as you learn more and more how to teach from the Bible. It's a life style more than a curriculum. You just gather your chicks and TEACH. For many moms it just comes naturally. I don't know how to explain it.

 

Very good advice. We'll start slowly and build, and hopefully I'll get to that point you mention where it starts to come naturally.

 

ULBUSA has a yahoo group.

 

Thanks!

 

As for KJV audio, versions come and they go. There are decent free ones now. Often you can download some free from the library. There are Ipod apps. I'm not even sure what is available right now :-0

 

Audible.com has an awesome set for the NKJV that is free when you sign up for a free 30 day trial. I think it has orange covers. It's good to also have audio of easier versions, too.

 

Great, I'll just keep doing some browsing and see what strikes me.

 

My oldest doesn't care for history. I decided to just to do interest led in history. He does like American history, so we will hit that a lot between now and high school. Of course, he gets no choice in history during high school. :D

 

Right, since dd will also have no choice in high school, I guess that's why I'd like to give her some flexibility now while we still can. :)

 

Have you considered using a literature-based history program without any spines?

 

I didn't know there were any!

 

What has worked for us is TruthQuest History. It's a stand-alone program, so you'd have to find other language arts, math, science, etc., but it sounds like that would work for you anyway.

 

Yep, that would work. Thank you! I'll check it out.

 

My ds is very similar. What I am considering, is putting more of a focus on science and just getting something like MOH to handle history with some readers/read alouds. So no big program just something simple that way he can focus more on his interest in science.

 

I guess I haven't looked at MOH as closely as I should have, because I thought it was one of those big curriculums built on history. I'll check it out, too.

 

Thanks again to everyone!

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! Hi! My daughter hates history! We were using Story of the World, which I know most kids love, but it just wasn't working for us. I also had a hard time fitting it in. I was beginning to despair about where we would go from here. Then I discovered the Memoria Press complete curriculum packages, and I let out a huge sigh of relief that lasted for days! You should check it out :)

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! Hi! My daughter hates history!

 

It's a little like an AA meeting, isn't it? Hello, my name is Greta, and my child hates history.

:lol:

True confessions. :D

 

 

We were using Story of the World, which I know most kids love, but it just wasn't working for us. I also had a hard time fitting it in. I was beginning to despair about where we would go from here. Then I discovered the Memoria Press complete curriculum packages, and I let out a huge sigh of relief that lasted for days! You should check it out :)

 

I believe that my daughter is a grade level or two ahead of their release schedule, although someone did mention that their 7th grade might be available soon in a beta version. So we shall see. Thanks for mentioning it!

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