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We have been working on memorizing poetry lately. I bought a small notebook for DS and DD1 and explained to them that as they memorize different poems I will copy each one into their own notebook and they can have a collection of the poems they've memorized. They are SO excited about this that they are very eager to learn each poem quickly so I can write it down for them. But they are learning them really fast. Which is great in one way- it's very cool to see how amazing their minds are, but on the other hand I'm wondering about long term retention. Should I review the poems learned already? How often? What about when we have a whole ton that have been learned? (So far they each have about 3- and they're not short). My main reason for having them memorize is simply to develop good mental habits.

 

I appreciate any ideas. :)

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Repetition, duration and intensity are the keys to long term memorization. So yes, definitely review those poems! Just find a system that works for you, for example working on a new poem every day until it's learned, then review it every other day for a week. Then go to every three days. Then once every four days, so on and so forth. That way (or on a similar schedule) they'll be learning something new all the time and cementing the ones they've already learned. I bet if you searched for memorization schedule on this forum, you'd find lots of suggestions.

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I love your notebook system BTW...in FLL they do review poems often. We reviewed one today from early in the year. So yes, I would put a review system in place. It is amazing how fast they can memorize, I sure wish my memory was still as sharp!

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I second the Simply Charlotte Mason memory system. I use it for poetry, Scripture, and also any geography, science, or history facts I think pertinent for long term. I just use a different color notecard for each subject. Blessings:) Gina

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We have a poetry notebook, too. I write down the poems they are working on as well, so each day the notebook comes out and we review previous poems as well as practice our current poem.

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I created an adaptation of the CM book. I wanted to streamline the 30 days of assigment/review. We use a M-F system to put new work in our memory organizer, and I have an everyday section too. I add items to the 1st, 15th, and 30th for review. Once I feel that we have mastered the item well enough, I move it to completed. It never leaves the book. I will often assign the completed section for review on one of the days of the month that are not the three that have devoted sections.

 

We do not add just poetry either. I have the challenge cards from MOH, memory work from science, history dates, geography, pictures of landmarks, math facts, etc. It packs quite a punch when assembled, but the work is done each morning prior to any lesson. You would be surprised how much can be remembered through constant review.

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Should I review the poems learned already? How often? What about when we have a whole ton that have been learned? (So far they each have about 3- and they're not short). My main reason for having them memorize is simply to develop good mental habits.

 

I appreciate any ideas. :)

 

It's amazing how easily children can memorize but it is equally as amazing how quickly something is forgotten if it is not reviewed or used. It's mind boggling to realize that if a child moves to another country at around 5-6years of age, if they don't use the language they were speaking and hearing since birth -- their entire first language can be forgotten!

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Thanks for all the great ideas. Now I have a starting point as I go about finding how to organize this in the way that works best for us.

Miss Moe- I like your binder system. How many things do you typically have behind each tab? Would you do every single piece of memory work behind each Monday tab every Monday (I'm assuming there are 4-5 for each weekday, correct?) ? How do you keep it from getting to be too much? When do you retire a piece?

 

 

 

 

I second the Simply Charlotte Mason memory system. I use it for poetry, Scripture, and also any geography, science, or history facts I think pertinent for long term. I just use a different color notecard for each subject. Blessings:) Gina

 

I use the SCM system for scripture memory already. I'm curious how you combine with other subjects? Do you keep all the cards in the same box and have several behind each tab?

 

 

My goal was to try and memorize one poem a week or even every two weeks, but these guys are so eager that they're moving faster than that. I don't want things to get to cumbersome too fast because they are still so young and while I know they are capable of it, I wonder if it might turn into a burden if I push too much at this age.... I dont know. Thinking aloud....

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I created an adaptation of the CM book. I wanted to streamline the 30 days of assigment/review. We use a M-F system to put new work in our memory organizer, and I have an everyday section too. I add items to the 1st, 15th, and 30th for review. Once I feel that we have mastered the item well enough, I move it to completed. It never leaves the book. I will often assign the completed section for review on one of the days of the month that are not the three that have devoted sections.

 

We do not add just poetry either. I have the challenge cards from MOH, memory work from science, history dates, geography, pictures of landmarks, math facts, etc. It packs quite a punch when assembled, but the work is done each morning prior to any lesson. You would be surprised how much can be remembered through constant review.

 

 

Could you elaborate on this a bit more? I'm not able to picture just how it works. Thanks :)

 

 

Jumping in Puddles - you make an excellent point. My dad's first language was Spanish, but he moved to the US around age 5 and now, even though he can still speak, his Spanish is not as good as one would expect with it being his first language. Same thing with DH- his first language was Arabic and his story is almost the same as my dad.

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Could you elaborate on this a bit more? I'm not able to picture just how it works. Thanks :)

 

 

Jumping in Puddles - you make an excellent point. My dad's first language was Spanish, but he moved to the US around age 5 and now, even though he can still speak, his Spanish is not as good as one would expect with it being his first language. Same thing with DH- his first language was Arabic and his story is almost the same as my dad.

 

Elaborate ... shoot, I have pictures. I am; therefore, I blog! :lol: I was asked too many times for pictures and explanations over the last 15 years. I finally, and only in the last 8 months, began to blog it all, LOL.

 

Start here.

 

ETA: A quick search for memory will help you find all of my entries and pages that relate in some fashion to our memory work, including a list that I periodically add to our weekly review. I am a little detailed with the weekly review so that it may serve as my digital journal for the year. :) SC requires a portfolio of work, journal, and/or lesson plans.

Edited by ChrissySC
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Have you seen the Mnemosyne notebook system that Dragons in the Flower Bed put together? That is what we use.

 

 

I found this and the CM both to be driven by Biblical verse, and I wanted a more secular approach. I was not trying to focus on the quanity of memorization either. The point was to memorize things that are relevant to academics and life, which does include photographic memory work and something as simple as a poem from Mother Goose or even Longfellow! Mind you, I do inlcude scripture, but as it pertains to our study, and more often than not for the knowledge and witness to life versus the memorization.

 

These were what I viewed as drawbacks. I essentially omitted the references to the "verse" and shortened the month to specific review periods.

 

I think of the memory book as a memory organizer that allows focus on a variety of topics and academic skills.

 

To the OP, however, yes always review! LOL

Edited by ChrissySC
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Miss Moe- I like your binder system. How many things do you typically have behind each tab? Would you do every single piece of memory work behind each Monday tab every Monday (I'm assuming there are 4-5 for each weekday, correct?) ? How do you keep it from getting to be too much? When do you retire a piece?

 

 

Yes, we have quite a few behind each tab at this point and would spend hours reviewing if we reviewed it all every day. We play it by ear by choosing what needs to be reviewed. I do try to review everything at least a few times a year. At this point, we haven't retired anything by removing it from the binder.

 

So if I were you, I would review the ones you've blazed through every week for a few months. And then when they really are second nature and the kids can recite them anytime anywhere, push that review back to once a month, and then every few months.

 

I keep it from being too much to limiting how much time we work on it everyday! When we've hit the 45 minute limit, we move on!

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I found this and the CM both to be driven by Biblical verse, and I wanted a more secular approach. I was not trying to focus on the quanity of memorization either. The point was to memorize things that are relevant to academics and life, which does include photographic memory work and something as simple as a poem from Mother Goose or even Longfellow! Mind you, I do inlcude scripture, but as it pertains to our study, and more often than not for the knowledge and witness to life versus the memorization.

 

These were what I viewed as drawbacks. I essentially omitted the references to the "verse" and shortened the month to specific review periods.

 

I think of the memory book as a memory organizer that allows focus on a variety of topics and academic skills.

 

To the OP, however, yes always review! LOL

 

?? Have you actually read through the "works to memorize" section of Mnemosyne? I'm not sure she lists Bible verses at all--what I remember are poems and important speeches/documents. I guess what you are referring to is the reference to "verse" in the dividers, but based on the materials included I don't think it is intended just for scripture verses. I use the review system and put whatever I want behind it--right now we're heavy on history and math (like skip counting songs)--we also have scriptural verses, science (we put everything to music) and Spanish--but I'm really hoping to add more poetry etc.

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?? Have you actually read through the "works to memorize" section of Mnemosyne? I'm not sure she lists Bible verses at all--what I remember are poems and important speeches/documents. I guess what you are referring to is the reference to "verse" in the dividers, but based on the materials included I don't think it is intended just for scripture verses. I use the review system and put whatever I want behind it--right now we're heavy on history and math (like skip counting songs)--we also have scriptural verses, science (we put everything to music) and Spanish--but I'm really hoping to add more poetry etc.

 

 

I am glad that you pointed that out, because yes, that is exactly what I felt like I was viewing when looking at the dividers. I felt it was geared for scripture or poem only. Perspective - it makes a big difference when viewing some items. Thank you for elaborating.

 

I did not evaluate the materials. I stopped once I felt that this was geared to a more specific need and not so broad, as you mentioned.:001_smile:

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