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Please help Asperger's Boy


Guest Exhausted_Aspie_Mom

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Guest Exhausted_Aspie_Mom

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Hello, I'm new to all of this. I'm a mom to an incredible 6y/o and 3 y/o Aspies. My 6 y/o (my son) started out at public school. We had been promised the world, but given nothing. To make a long story short, we finally (through a nasty legal battle) were able to free him from the Public School. The first month or so was a battle to break him free from his autistic shell that the school that left him with (his teacher was a sadistic freak who bullied him mercilessly). Once he started to become himself again, I started trying different curriculum.*

 

I know my son has unmedicated AD/HD, sensory issues, and little to no auditory abilities. So, since he is constantly on the go, I tried a whole hands-on learning curriculum from Learning Resources. When that failed, I tried Time4learning, apps on an IPad, multi-media unit studies on his "special interest," lap books, and the classical school method of text books and workbooks. Nothing works with my son.

 

(By the way, we did attempt to medicate his AD/HD. Unfortunately, he stopped eating altogether, and had a horrible attitude while on it. We did try several different ad/hd meds, but all of them had the same results.)

 

I love my boy. He is smart and very interesting (i.e. when I find the sunshine in his rants that go *on and on and on about his special interest for hours). He can't pay attention worth a darn. He is not just a reluctant learner, he is all out resistant. Unless I were to go "Clockwork Orange" style and strap him down with his eye pinned open, there is no way he will learn from me.

 

Please. This is not about me not following through or not setting up the proper routine, etc. My husband and I pretty much majored in Behavioral Psychology in undergrad., and worked together at a group home for severely disturbed/ assaultive kids. The bottom line is that there is no reward in the world that he cares about enough to work for. *There never has, and there may never be.*

 

I have been letting him do his own thing lately, since I've run out of ideas for him.

 

Can anyone, who has a child much like mine, make any constructive recommendations?

 

By the way, the school district insisted he start Kindergarten when he was still only 4 years old.*

 

Since being left alone by me to pursue his own interests, he has started to do things he was never capable of doing before. He now feeds himself most of the time (he needs OT for his hands, but the school district never provided it). He brushes his own teeth and is practicing (on his own) to put on his own clothes by himself. He actually started to pedal his tricycle! He even has been trying some new foods! Despite his sensory issues and ADD, he asked that we bake cookies together from scratch. And, he even tried them!

 

Most importantly, *for the first time ever, he actually wants a playmate. He has actually cut back on his monologues to me, and started to play real imaginative pretend play, with his 3 y/o sister. She is Aspie too and is easily frustrated by the world. He has been talking her through her freak outs and helping her problem solve. He does this better than most psychologists I know!

 

Besides these "adaptive living skills"' he has spent a lot of time building circuit boards out of his Snap Circuits. He won't read, but will "look at" reference encyclopedias of military airplanes and vehicles of WWI and WWII constantly and has inadvertently learned about the history surrounding the wars.

 

So, I guess what this long rant of mine is really about is, isn't this enough for now? Do I really have to push him to meet the insane expectations and standards that the public school was insisting upon? I mean, do all incoming Kindergarteners read full chapter books fluently and already can do double digit adding and subtracting? I understand that to the school district, he is very behind. But, in reality, is he really? Would it really hurt his future to just let him take the next 6 months off to just be a kid (like all his peers did years ago at the "appropriate" age?

 

My son is the type of kid who just gets easily overwhelmed, anxious, and shuts down. That's why I had to throw out our mass quantity of "routines" and "daily schedules" that all the *so-called professionals insisted we do. He hates structure and thrives on a flexible schedule only. It's probably because he needs lots of alone time to process what is going on around him mixed into his day. And, *he never knows how much down time he'll need in order to face the world again. *

 

The one thing that I have noticed about my kids and the few other Aspies I've had the pleasure to meet, is that they all talk about that they can't learn from others. They just can't open themselves up to it. They have to teach themselves. So, I have come to the conclusion that I just haven't figured out how to help him teach *himself.*

 

Do any of you (who have kids like mine) use a curriculum based approach? Do you unschool? Do you use IPad apps, BrainPop, Discovery Education videos streams, etc?*

 

So, *please, any constructive, supportive words of advice or guidance is welcome.*

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First of all :grouphug: You are going a FABULOUS job!

 

You have given your son a gift that you aren't realizing- the gift to come into his own, in his own time. The public school system does not allow for that. He has clearly shown you how he needs to learn and you've provided the tools for that.

 

Your son sounds like a fabulous young man, who just happens to have the "label" of Aspie and is most likely right brained.

 

I encourage you to look here: http://www.therightsideofnormal.com/2012/04/16/the-natural-learning-development-for-right-brained-children/

 

Right brained children don't have the time frame that other children do for learning to read. Their world exists in 3D and reading is a 2D activity. My DS is ADHD, has binocular vision issues, AND is Right Brained. So, I do a lot with him at his pace and willingness-- also paying close attention to his interests and letting him explore them.

 

I don't know what state you are in so I am not sure what your homeschool requirements are. In NC, we are required to keep personal records and to test our children before they turn 8years old (and then yearly after that) but we are NOT required to submit it. If you are in NC or another more relaxed state, I'd say just continue with what you are allowing him to do. He's learning. Just not in the public school prescribed left brain way.

 

You may find How to get Your Child Off the Refrigerator and On to Learning helpful.

 

Time4Learning is an OK program but my son was frustrated and bored with it.

 

Discovery Channel offers A LOT you may be interested in purchasing for your son-that way he could explore what interests him.

 

I use REading Eggs here and it DOES work for us b/c of the game aspect and the activities change. My DS likes that part.

 

You really are doing a great job meeting his needs! Keep it up! :)

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I think taking some time off is an excellent idea....and how great he's making such incredible progress in life skills! That's was the hardest thing to teach, imo!!

 

I've heard many many times through my years of homeschooling that you should take off 1 month for every 3 months your child was in school...or something like that. Can't remember the exact numbers. Then start adding one subject at a time, taking things slow.

 

My oldest was similar to yours. People told me to "teach him outside the box" and "just let learning happen." But I didn't listen. I pushed. I drove myself to near insanity trying to insist this child learn. He was too smart, imo, to just let him coast. He wanted to watch documentaries all day if left to his own devices. He certainly didn't help a sibling (I wish!) Anyway, I wish I had listened to the advice. He is dysgraphic, so I do wish I had started some oral math and grammar lessons early on (so these weren't paper and pencil things to be feared.)

 

But it sounds like you are on the right path! Congratulations! Keep doing what you are doing!

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:grouphug: It sounds like you're doing a great job. I recently made the decision to unschool my youngest child (special needs.) Since I backed off & let her lead the way, I am already seeing her blossom! Also, she does have an iPad & she really enjoys it. I just sit down & turn it on & when she hears a favorite app, she comes running!:)

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Guest Exhausted_Aspie_Mom

My husband just came in and asked me why I am crying. I looked up at him, smiled, and said, “it’s tears of joy because I finally found supportive, kind people who get our family.†I’ve been searching for the last 3 years to find anyone (any blog, forum, etc.) who gets us. I was getting so depressed by everyone else just jumping down my throat telling me how terrible we are as parents and how we just need to “make†our children obey. It’s like the whole world went crazy and children were no longer people, but property like animals.

I seriously can’t thank you all enough for your hugs, positive support, and kind words. You have lifted my heart and made me smile for the first time in years. Thank you!!!

Thank you also for telling me that it is totally OK to just let him lead the course of study. I don’t know much about unschooling, but I guess if I just keep believing in him, encouraging his development, and chill out, he will continue making progress. You’re all right. He needs to deprogram from the horrors of public school. Thank you for letting me know that I won’t be doing him any harm by letting him just be him. I will try to just let him be through the summer.

In the meantime, you all brought up some incredible insight. I thought I knew almost everything about the different types of learners and types of homeschooling. Wow, was I ever wrong!

Thank you (RPDWifey2819 and Mom of C&A) for telling me about Right Side of Normal, and How to get Your Child Off the Refrigerator and On to Learning. This sounds fascinating! Thanks for telling me about Cindy Gaddis’ website and upcoming book. I had never heard of her or her work before. Thank you also for validating that Time4Learning gets boring quickly for our kind of kids. I needed that validation. Thank you for the ideas about the Reading eggs. I have not heard of them either. I will have to google it and look for it!

Thank you, RPDWifey2819 and BlueDarling, for making me feel like watching Discovery channel documentaries is OK and that there is nothing wrong with them. When left to his own device, he will “watch†hours of the Military Channel Greatest Tank Battles, or just about anything on the Science Channel, Discovery Channel, or History channels. While he is “watching†them he’ll also be building circuits, building with his gears, or wikki sticks. He has learned a whole lot this way and actually retains it!!! I just feel like this doesn’t “count†as education as it doesn’t fit the typical stereotype of learning at public school. Do you all feel the same way? Do you have other TV favorite channels or TV shows that work well for your child to learn?

Doesn’t building circuits or “machines†out of gears count as science, physics, and math? He loves all of his science experiment apps and physics based apps. He loves figuring out trajectories and such. Doesn’t all this count? It’s not your run of the mill “let’s sit down and practice adding and subtracting in your workbook†kind of learning, so I feel like it doesn’t count. What are your thoughts on this?

Again, he doesn’t read chapter books. But, he can look at the TV, read through the list of “Build it Bigger†episodes on the DVR, and tell me which one he wants to watch. He can read words like capacitor, resistor, etc., but gets enraged if tried to forced to read “age appropriate†books with sentences like “pig gets a wig.†This counts as reading proficiency in my book. Do you think so too?

FreeIndeed, thank you for validating that there is nothing wrong with learning from the Ipad. He can do a million electrical experiments, chemistry experiments, etc., and never get hurt or destroy the house. We also have lots of Book apps that read to him while highlighting each words that’ is being said. He refuses to do the math apps (I have yet to find one that is interesting, informative, and NOT competitive (the timed competitions infuriate him).

In case this benefits anyone, the best apps we’ve found for teaching Aspies in a way that doesn’t seem like you’re being taught, but just having fun is Bobo. It’s a great science app. My daughter also loves Mishka the rabbit (for preschoolers through Kindergarten or so). I think the problem with most educational apps is that they don’t allow for the child to show any creativity and they “punish†the child with no new levels or points. My kids like to choose the wrong answers because they think it’s hysterical to mess with the central character of an app. Or they disagree with what the app says is the correct answer. It’s hard to find apps that encourage the stifling of creativity and increasing conformity.

I can’t wait to hear all of your inspirational responses and advice. I’m so lucky to have such an incredible group of loving and caring people.

Thank you, thank you, and thank you again dear ladies. You are truly amazing and inspirational!!!

By the way, I’m out in California. I had to fight for the right to homeschool. Once won, I just had to become own private school.

We aren’t required to keep many records or logs. However, any templates or samples of attendance logs, lesson plan keeper/ place to keep log of what we’ve been doing for my own sanity, etc. is greatly appreciated.

Thanks all again, and if anyone wants to add, please do so. In the meantime, I’m going to print out your responses and tape them to the wall. I will look at it every day to remind me to chill, and let my son become the man he is meant to be.

Thank you and hugs to you all!

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I think you're exactly on the right track. :grouphug:

 

My 8yo DS has Asperger's (as well as unofficial diagnoses of ADHD and SPD). He was exactly like your son at age 6.

 

You've received some good advice above, so I don't have too much more to add. Just wanted to encourage you to continue letting your son "deschool" and destress, and follow his own interests for the time being. Tons of learning can happen without curriculum, workbooks, and the like. Based on our experience, I would say my son learns way more when he's researching something of his own choosing, rather than something I put in front of him. Aren't we all like that? ;)

 

One other note: addressing our son's food sensitivities (gluten, casein, and several other foods and additives) has almost eliminated his ADHD symptoms, and significantly reduced his sensory issues. If you haven't looked into the diet-behavior/gut-brain connection yet, that may be an area of interest to you. There are tons of posts on this topic on both this board and the General Board - just do a search for "GFCF" and similar terms.

 

Welcome to the boards! :)

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:grouphug::grouphug:

I agree with previous posters as well.

 

DS in 9th grade has strong Aspie traits and we followed a very relaxed bordering on unschooling approach for years (I withdrew him from ps in 1st grade). Reading, writing and math computation were all delayed for him. He kept on building, experimenting, living and learning though. Now he is taking accelerated classes at the ps and getting A+s in all his classes. He plans to go to college and graduate school and study physics or mathematics. I feel pretty sure that if he had stayed in ps he would have ended up hating math (he already hated math in 1st grade when I withdrew him).

 

Just wanted to share our history as DS is older and doing GREAT! He still has the definite aspie traits and reading nonverbal cues is hard for him, but he is aware of his situation and really tries to develop strategies that work for him.

 

Warmest wishes to you and your family.

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Thank you (RPDWifey2819 and Mom of C&A) for telling me about Right Side of Normal, and How to get Your Child Off the Refrigerator and On to Learning. This sounds fascinating! Thanks for telling me about Cindy Gaddis’ website and upcoming book. I had never heard of her or her work before. Thank you also for validating that Time4Learning gets boring quickly for our kind of kids. I needed that validation. Thank you for the ideas about the Reading eggs. I have not heard of them either. I will have to google it and look for it!

 

Also take a look at Homeschool Buys Co-op-- they have a lot of deals right now on literacy programs. Just play with them and see if there's one that may entice your son. Heck, have him play with them and see if there's one he would like to choose. Every minute he spends on those programs counts as education!!

 

Thank you, RPDWifey2819 and BlueDarling, for making me feel like watching Discovery channel documentaries is OK and that there is nothing wrong with them. When left to his own device, he will “watch†hours of the Military Channel Greatest Tank Battles, or just about anything on the Science Channel, Discovery Channel, or History channels. While he is “watching†them he’ll also be building circuits, building with his gears, or wikki sticks. He has learned a whole lot this way and actually retains it!!! I just feel like this doesn’t “count†as education as it doesn’t fit the typical stereotype of learning at public school. Do you all feel the same way? Do you have other TV favorite channels or TV shows that work well for your child to learn?

 

 

We don't have cable but we DO have Netflix!! Netflix has SOOOOO many documentaries and we have them all! SInce he likes building things, How Its Made is also on Netflix streaming. My DS loves that show!

 

We did most of our Egyptian learning by watching documentaries from Discovery Channel and the BBC -- all streaming on Netflix :D

 

And, yes, I count it as school! Its a modification that he would need for regular school- so it counts in our homeschool!

 

We also talk about it after he watches to check for comprehension-- and I allow him to draw or build models of something he enjoyed about the show-- all shows comprehension!

 

Doesn’t building circuits or “machines†out of gears count as science, physics, and math? He loves all of his science experiment apps and physics based apps. He loves figuring out trajectories and such. Doesn’t all this count? It’s not your run of the mill “let’s sit down and practice adding and subtracting in your workbook†kind of learning, so I feel like it doesn’t count. What are your thoughts on this?

 

Yes! It all counts! When you have a child with SN, you just count what you can! My DS logs hours of art a week ;) BUT, I apply it to Language Arts since he's coloring and drawing scenes from the book -- again, showing comprehension.

 

Also, take him to the library and let HIM choose a book he wants to read. Then, read to him while he builds, draws, tinkers.... you'd be surprised how much he retains. This is the ONLY way I can get DS to learn his Bible, listen to any literature I suggest and so on.

 

My DS is really into Captain Underpants right now. So, I make a deal with him- if we read something I choose, I reward him with Captain Underpants. So far, that's working.

 

Keep up the good work! You are doing a fabulous job supporting your DS and what he needs!

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I think it's great that he's made so much progress on life skills. That's terrific.

 

I wanted to add that even by ps standards, reading chapter books at age 6 would be an advanced reader. Both my sons started off school in one of the largest school districts in NC. My older DS, still in ps, was reading chapter books in second grade, and he's always been an advanced reader. Both of my sons love to read despite ps, not because of it.

 

PS kindergarten is far too academic, IMO. It's the wrong set of skills for that age, regardless of whether the kids are SN or not. As long as you're in compliance with the laws of your home state, do what you think is best.

 

It's great that you're starting out so early with him. You have the time to get acquainted with how he learns and research which things to try. That's also terrific.

 

:grouphug:

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Hi, I am in a somewhat similar situation with our younger son who is 6, but he never went to school so he is not recovering from that type of experience. Although I am not an unschooler and I am working on basic academic skills with him, I find that he benefits from me keeping things really relaxed and not having him spend much time on school work, and to have a lot of free time to play alone each day. And really he does not need a lot of time on school stuff, because he learns very quickly without much repetition. If I try to push him too much, he is like a spring that pushes back more the more it is compressed, so I try to do school without making him feel compressed. He is using Reading Eggs, doing math in the Horizons workbooks which are colorful and fun, and a bit of handwriting in the D'Nealian workbook. He is making good progress with a little bit each day, and not having to spend a lot of time on it or feel pushed, and tons of time for his own pursuits.

 

I try to remember that 6 is very young, and our son is not as mature as other 6 yo kids. He gets frustrated and agitated more easily, and his head is full of things he wants to go explore or work out on his own, and he needs his time to do that. I can not expect him to fit into a highly structured day. It would be terrible for him. I will not help his progress by pushing him to the point that he feels anxious and agitated and defensive or becomes uncooperative about school in general or starts having more meltdowns.

 

He has a mini trampoline he can bounce on whenever he wants and that helps a lot. He also has a lot of small toys he can play with and set up in his pretend scenarios. He has weekly occupational therapy for fine motor skills and general strength and coordination, and we are able to get medical insurance coverage for this. The therapist works in some social skills training while she does the other work with him. He has a speech/language therapist come once per month since we pay for that ourselves and she gives me articulation homework to do with him for the month. He has also started a weekly social skills group with other boys like him through a psychology practice. These things combined with keeping it fun and relaxed during the school day are helping a lot. I also decided to reduce some of our weekly social contact as some experiences were really stressing him out, and that has helped too.

 

There is a lot of support here at WTM in the special needs area. There are also a couple of Yahoo groups for homeschooling Asperger's kids:

 

http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/asyoulikeit/

 

http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/HomeschoolingAspies/

 

Welcome. I hope you find lots of support and information for your journey. WTM has been a lifeline for me for a few years now. :grouphug:

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Thanks all again, and if anyone wants to add, please do so.

 

I'd be happy to chime in with some encouragement. I pulled my aspie son out of a Montessori school mid-way through 2nd grade because he was miserable and because it was clear he was learning far more through living life with his family than he was in school. He is currently a year away from finishing college, living on his own and thriving. I was convinced many, many times over the 10 years of homeschooling him that I had completely blown it with his education, convinced I was too unstructured or sometimes too structured. But we did did it, and he is effusive in his thanks that I homeschooled him.

 

Your ds does sound wonderful, especially his helping his little sister through her meltdowns. What a compassionate young man! That is a trait you can preserve by homeschooling him -- he won't get that side of him trampled and bullied.

 

He also sounds wonderfully similar to my own ds during our early homeschool years, and I want to reassure you, to chime in agreement with everyone else who has posted, that documentaries are a fabulous learning resource. We watched every NOVA episode ever aired, it seems, and countless hours of PBS documentaries and Discovery Channel programming. Documentaries were even an important part of high school, and as a young adult he STILL chooses to watch them.

 

My ds learned to read by reading the game guides for his favorite PlayStation game. He read anything he could find on the space program, too, and through my reading aloud he came to enjoy chapter books. Once he was obsessed with a series he would read them all -- Magic Tree House books were huge for him when he was 8, I believe, so I guess it did take that long for his reading ability and interest to match. He never did turn into a fiction reader, but will read the newspaper, following the business news of his favorite companies, the sports news and political news.

 

I didn't assign any writing other than handwriting worksheets until he was older. He didn't start doing narrations until 7th grade yet was writing nice essays by the time he was in 9th. His English professor in a recent class was impressed with his writing. I think one of the things that helped with his writing was our never ending discussions about what he was studying or doing. We debated ideas, well, let me rephrase that. He stubbornly held his ground on whatever fixated opinion he had, and I'd try to coax him into finding supporting arguments and tried to make him listen to opposing arguments. It took 20 years, but he no longer has to have the final re-statement of his opinion. Anyway, he did learn to develop ideas, which was helpful in writing an essay.

 

He loved manipulatives for math, but I did all the writing for a long time on a big white board. We even did algebra while sprawled on the living room floor with a white board. When he was little he bounced on a hop 55 ball while working on times tables or spelling. He also learned quite a bit through computer games for math facts and spelling.

 

His obsessive interests have served him well. He started learning about theatrical lighting design when he was 13 by working with a mentor in our church tech department. Within a few years, before graduating high school, he was being hired to light school theatrical productions. Show Production and Design is his major.

 

As he matured he was able to do more that resembled real school, and by mature, I mean 15 or 16. He understood the need for it, understood how to cope with it, but his overall academics remained fairly unorthodox. But it worked.

 

Keep doing what you are doing by following your heart and your child's lead. Watching documentaries, building with snap circuits or legos, reading non-fiction IS an education. It doesn't have to look like school for learning to happen. It is a crazy journey you are starting, and it will remain crazy for years to come. Just hang tight!

Edited by JennW in SoCal
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Just wanted to thank the OP and everyone who responded for this thread. Ds2 (13) has Asperger's and ADHD, and I am exhausted from trying to teach him. We also had a very negative ps experience -- that was FOUR YEARS AGO and he still refers to it. I thought I was doing the right thing by tying his interests into his academics. For instance, he has an intense fascination with the Titanic and has for years. So we're doing a Titanic lapbook. Last week he informed me that he's not sure he likes the Titanic anymore because of this project. It broke my heart. I do not want academics to destroy his interests. It's his interests, not academics, that bring him joy.

 

I didn't mean to hijack this thread. Just wanted to let the OP know that I understand a lot of what she posted, and I'm also going to be reading the responses with interest. :001_smile:

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  • 4 weeks later...

My son is ADHD and struggles with fine motor skills, so we took his kindergarten year very slow. Lots of Legos for finger "exercises".

 

One friend reminded me that we are not public schooling at home but rather homeschooling. We are meeting our kids where they are and helping them reach their potential. It may not look at all like "school" and it may be different for each child.

 

You are doing a great job. Keep it up!

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Hi, I am in a somewhat similar situation with our younger son who is 6, but he never went to school so he is not recovering from that type of experience. Although I am not an unschooler and I am working on basic academic skills with him, I find that he benefits from me keeping things really relaxed and not having him spend much time on school work, and to have a lot of free time to play alone each day. And really he does not need a lot of time on school stuff, because he learns very quickly without much repetition. If I try to push him too much, he is like a spring that pushes back more the more it is compressed, so I try to do school without making him feel compressed. He is using Reading Eggs, doing math in the Horizons workbooks which are colorful and fun, and a bit of handwriting in the D'Nealian workbook. He is making good progress with a little bit each day, and not having to spend a lot of time on it or feel pushed, and tons of time for his own pursuits.

 

I try to remember that 6 is very young, and our son is not as mature as other 6 yo kids. He gets frustrated and agitated more easily, and his head is full of things he wants to go explore or work out on his own, and he needs his time to do that. I can not expect him to fit into a highly structured day. It would be terrible for him. I will not help his progress by pushing him to the point that he feels anxious and agitated and defensive or becomes uncooperative about school in general or starts having more meltdowns.

 

 

 

:iagree:

This has been, and remains our experience with ds10, who has NLD (nonverbal learning disorder- similar to AS), ADHD w/anxiety, ODD, SPD).The way these kids pursue their interests is a beautiful thing to behold, isn't it?

Edited by Geo
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Are you in N.Cal, anywhere close to UCDavis? They have a phenomenal program, called the MIND Institute, where my friend takes her two boys on the spectrum. I don't know much about it in terms of getting in or cost, except that she LOVES it.

 

Make sure you give him credit for learning and developing in his life skills- that's a lot to learn and maybe his system cannot add in reading and writing at the same time. It's like training for a triathalon. You don't train swimming and biking at the same time. You'd drown. Parenting and homeschooling can be the same way- if we try to tackle too much and expect too much of ourselves or our kids, we drown.

 

And in response to this:

MSo, I guess what this long rant of mine is really about is, isn't this enough for now? Do I really have to push him to meet the insane expectations and standards that the public school was insisting upon? I mean, do all incoming Kindergarteners read full chapter books fluently and already can do double digit adding and subtracting? I understand that to the school district, he is very behind. But, in reality, is he really? Would it really hurt his future to just let him take the next 6 months off to just be a kid (like all his peers did years ago at the "appropriate" age?

 

 

My son is 6.5, we just finished kindergarten, and he hasn't even finished the BOB book series. He's probably a year from chapter books (which his sister, who is 16 months younger than he is, has been doing for months.) My son is, I guess, neuro-typical. My sister is a first grade teacher in a fully-included school in Berkeley and she assures me that, while technically a little behind, my son's not in a place where we should worry. We are just continue to plug along. So if I'm not worried about it, (with my son who isn't learning all these new, huge things like yours is) then I don't think you should be either. :D

 

I don't have any advice other than to say enjoy these forums. The women here are amazing, and you will find so much support, it will blow your mind. Enjoy your kids- they are unique and special and should not EVER be limited to try to fit into anyone else's box.

 

:grouphug:

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At that age, I let my dd do what she needed/wanted. She's the whole enchilada of Gifted, ASD, ADD and her own unique brand of person. I believe our kids, at that age, show us what they need. It sounds like your son is thriving and making progress and IMO, that's what matters. My home is set up to be educational so we have lots of book, crayons for coloring and learning how to hold a pencil, we counted things like the steps to the playground or number of pushes on the swing, and stuff like that.

 

:grouphug:

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