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Wondering if there are other Christians on here who don't celebrate Easter.


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I'm not trying to debate. I'm also not looking to convince anyone who does celebrate that they shouldn't.

 

I'm just feeling a bit alone I guess, and wondering who else on here is Christian but doesn't celebrate Easter.

 

We won't be doing anything different tomorrow than any other Sunday. We don't do baskets, eggs, special dinner. Nothing. It's just the personal choice we've made for our family that we don't celebrate in any way. My boys know that tomorrow is Easter, because we see/hear it wherever we go. But they don't expect tomorrow to be any different than any other day.

 

Anyone else? If you want to share why you don't, feel free.

 

I'm honestly not trying to bash on those who do. Just wondering who else doesn't.

 

:001_smile:

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I'm not Christian, but the rest of my family are. They will celebrate Easter by going to Church. Then we plan to go out for the day to a local country house that usually puts on a good fun fair and an Easter egg hunt. I don't consider the Easter egg hunt and fun fair as 'celebrating Easter', but rather enjoying a public holiday. Likewise, I don't consider making baskets and decorating eggs as celebrating Easter in a Christian way.

 

For me, really celebrating Easter would involve having family and friends around for a big meal, and reflecting on what the day means as a Christian (which I'm happy to participate in, even though not a Christian), and no, we're not doing that ...

 

Cassy

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I have a question if you don't mind my asking.

 

I get why one would not celebrate Easter if one looks at it as a usurped Pagan holy day. Or maybe some other reason that I've not heard of yet. So what I'm wondering is this: do you (as a family/group) celebrate the fact that Christ rose from the dead on another day or do your consider your family/group worship to be enough of a celebration?

 

Not looking for a fight/debate. Just wondering.

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We are Christians, but do not celebrate Easter as a religious holiday. Easter is not in the Bible. The Bible says that we are to remember Jesus' death, burial, and resurrection every first day of the week, not once a year.

 

We do enjoy the fun, non-religious parts of Easter, like Easter baskets, egg hunts, etc., but we do not associate any of that with Christianity.

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Do you mind sharing why you don't celebrate Easter in any way? (I respect if you don't want to go there for whatever reason. But since you brought it up . . . :)

 

Well, I'll see if I can comunicate it well.

 

Jesus' atonement on the cross, his shed blood for my sins, is my all and everything. It is the very core of Christianity. Christ crucified *is* why I live. I just don't think we should take one weekend a year and make a big deal about it, because it IS the deal. I don't feel the need to 'extra' focus on it one Sunday a year and call it Easter.

 

I don't know if that makes any sense to anyone else.

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Me! We don't celebrate Easter. We celebrate Christ's resurrection on every Lord's day. Bethany, your explanation makes perfect sense!

 

We will be traveling to visit my family for lunch, but it is mostly because my sister and her family will be in town. We will attend worship services, just like every week.

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I have a question if you don't mind my asking.

 

I get why one would not celebrate Easter if one looks at it as a usurped Pagan holy day. Or maybe some other reason that I've not heard of yet. So what I'm wondering is this: do you (as a family/group) celebrate the fact that Christ rose from the dead on another day or do your consider your family/group worship to be enough of a celebration?

 

Not looking for a fight/debate. Just wondering.

 

Chucki, I appreciate your question, and I "know" you well enough to know you're just looking to understand where I'm coming from. :)

 

I answered a similar question already. But really it boils down to the fact that Christ's crucifiction IS what it's all about, every day. His sacrifice for my sin is why I am able to be saved. It is everything to me, always. It is what we teach our children. We read scripture, and everything points to Christ. So we don't feel the need to have a special day to do it. We 'always' do it.

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Chucki, I appreciate your question, and I "know" you well enough to know you're just looking to understand where I'm coming from. :)

 

I answered a similar question already. But really it boils down to the fact that Christ's crucifiction IS what it's all about, every day. His sacrifice for my sin is why I am able to be saved. It is everything to me, always. It is what we teach our children. We read scripture, and everything points to Christ. So we don't feel the need to have a special day to do it. We 'always' do it.

Thanks. :grouphug:

 

Yes, I'm always looking to understand others' religious POVs.

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we don't celebrate Easter, either. We feel that we celebrate what Christ accomplished for us, every Sunday when we have communion.

 

It used to be a bit tricky when the kids were little and family were having egg hunts, but now it's no big deal.

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I think we try to strike a balance. I allow others to make a big deal about it if they want, i.e. grandma's send baskets, etc. At Christmas we do gifts. But our focus is on the bigger picture. For the actual holiday, I make sure the kids are aware that these are just dates set by man to give extra attention to the event rather than the historical date.

 

I will be singing tomorrow at church and doing a lesson on the Resurrection. I did buy some Oreo cookies with the spring filling as a treat for the kids. But no big decorations or anything like that. :001_smile:

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Our family is in the middle of discussing this right now. In the past, we've been really laid-back about how we celebrate holidays.

 

I see it kind of like the "meat sacrificed to idols" issue in 1 Corinthians 10. I'm not bothered by the origins of holidays. But if someone else is, it would be wrong for that person to celebrate them.

 

It is important to me that our family has regular, repeated traditions that bring us together, though.

Edited by mudboots
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Thanks for explaining why you don't celebrate Easter, Bethany -- I had been wondering about it, too.

 

In our house, we go whole hog over anything remotely resembling a holiday, because we're always looking for an excuse to give gifts and eat a lot of candy and desserts :tongue_smilie:, but I would never take offense at anyone who doesn't celebrate -- for whatever reason.

 

But I have to admit, doing the "Bunny Thing" is a lot of fun -- even though ds is 12 now, and is long past actually believing in it. I wrap up a bunch of gifts, make up several baskets, and fill lots of plastic eggs with coins, and hide everything all over the house (I keep a list of where I hide the stuff so I don't forget,) and ds has a great time finding it all.

 

So for us, it's mostly about the fun of the commercial side of the holiday. Ds understands the Christian element of Easter, but we don't make it our only focus.

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When I was a girl my mom, sis and I always had a new dress to wear to church, and most often we wore bonnets, gloves, the whole nine yards. We had baskets and the Easter Bunny came to our house. We also dyed eggs the night before - which the EB conveniently put into our baskets. LOL! (Boy, were we gullible!) There were egg hunts and and chocolate candy, a traditional ham dinner, etc., etc.

 

As an adult, I learned to understand and appreciate Good Friday - a day that my childhood family never even mentioned. In my own family now we acknowledge that day as the day Christ died on the Cross as a day of reflection and prayer. Then on Sunday we celebrate the Resurrection of Christ. We always go to church for these observations and we celebrate Christ conquering death and fulfilling His promise to return. The whole Holy Week is extremely important to us. It isn't that we only think about Christ's death and resurrection at that time, we do have it all in our hearts year round. But there is still great significance in this tradition. It's always a very special time for soul searching and personal thanksgiving. I believe that these traditions were begun by the early church for a reason.

 

Other than this we very moderately celebrate Easter, but it isn't anything like when I was a girl. All of the EB stuff seems so meaningless, but we play along with those in the family that are into it. To me, Easter (aka Resurrection Sunday) is very meaningful, but only as it applies to the celebration of Christ rising from the dead. All of the rest is just fluff.

 

Blessings,

Lucinda

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We do celebrate Easter, but I've been giving a lot of thought to our traditions lately. I agree that we should be celebrating Christ's resurrection far more than one given Sunday a year, and we've been trying to figure out the best traditions and teachings to pass to our son. This thread is giving me food for thought. :)

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Well, I'll see if I can comunicate it well.

 

Jesus' atonement on the cross, his shed blood for my sins, is my all and everything. It is the very core of Christianity. Christ crucified *is* why I live. I just don't think we should take one weekend a year and make a big deal about it, because it IS the deal. I don't feel the need to 'extra' focus on it one Sunday a year and call it Easter.

 

I don't know if that makes any sense to anyone else.

 

:iagree:

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Well, I'll see if I can comunicate it well.

 

Jesus' atonement on the cross, his shed blood for my sins, is my all and everything. It is the very core of Christianity. Christ crucified *is* why I live. I just don't think we should take one weekend a year and make a big deal about it, because it IS the deal. I don't feel the need to 'extra' focus on it one Sunday a year and call it Easter.

 

I don't know if that makes any sense to anyone else.

 

Perhaps someone who is more theologically astute than I can address this but I was raised in a Christian tradition believing that the Resurrection was the very core of Christianity. Or is this splitting hairs?

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It's probably a pretty good bet that those who don't celebrate Christmas (http://www.welltrainedmind.com/forums/showthread.php?t=327451&highlight=don%27t+celebrate+christmas) also do not celebrate Easter.

 

;-)

 

Yep. I don't know why people would feel alone when they have different convictions.

 

We are Christians, who celebrate Easter and Christmas more as fun family holidays. We also celebrate the Resurrection. Everyone does things differently. :001_smile:

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It's probably a pretty good bet that those who don't celebrate Christmas (http://www.welltrainedmind.com/forums/showthread.php?t=327451&highlight=don%27t+celebrate+christmas) also do not celebrate Easter.

 

;-)

 

Yes, I did start a thread at Christmas.

 

I don't understand why that matters. I was just looking to discuss. You know, like how there's a bazillion threads about baskets and dinner menus and such? Well this thead was about who *doesn't* do that.

 

I like to touch base with those here who feel the same as me at this time of year, just as you do, Patty Joanna.

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Perhaps someone who is more theologically astute than I can address this but I was raised in a Christian tradition believing that the Resurrection was the very core of Christianity. Or is this splitting hairs?

 

I don't know if it's splitting hairs - if Christ had died on the cross and had not risen again we would have nothing to be joyful about. But if he had not died on the cross and paid for our sins, then the Resurrection would be equally meaningless. I think they go hand in hand. We have a Savior who died for our sins and conquered sin's penalty, death, by rising from the dead. That, to me, is the core of Christianity.

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I don't know if it's splitting hairs - if Christ had died on the cross and had not risen again we would have nothing to be joyful about. But if he had not died on the cross and paid for our sins, then the Resurrection would be equally meaningless. I think they go hand in hand. We have a Savior who died for our sins and conquered sin's penalty, death, by rising from the dead. That, to me, is the core of Christianity.

 

Yes, I didn't mean to say that the resurrection wasn't just as important as the crucifixion.

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I don't know if it's splitting hairs - if Christ had died on the cross and had not risen again we would have nothing to be joyful about. But if he had not died on the cross and paid for our sins, then the Resurrection would be equally meaningless. I think they go hand in hand. We have a Savior who died for our sins and conquered sin's penalty, death, by rising from the dead. That, to me, is the core of Christianity.

 

Yes. If he died without rising, then the crucifixion would have been in vain. The most important feast day in the Catholic church is Easter.

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No Easter celebration here however we do celebrate the Resurrection. In other words, we don't do bunnies/eggs/baskets yet we do attend Good Friday services and Resurrection Sunday service. I won't even call it Easter as I refuse to link the practices associated with Easter to the crucifixion/resurrection.

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I grew up in a church where attendance was the same on Easter weekend as every other weekend. I am completely mystified by the people who only go to church on Christmas and Easter. In fact, now that I am Catholic, I must say I find it very frustrating that those of us who attend faithfully all. year. long. cannot find a seat when we go to church on Christmas or Easter. With small children, the last thing I want to do is arrive long before the service and have to keep my children quiet twice as long thanks to the people who attend only twice a year.

 

When I was a kid, our service the weekend of Easter celebrated Christ's death and resurrection. We might even have an Easter cantata or something. But there was no big meal that we had for Easter. No obligatory family gathering. My mom would hide eggs for my sister and I when we were preschoolers just because it was fun, but we never got gifts at Easter like we got at Christmas (as some people do). I just don't get the whole Easter thing.

 

We live near my husband's family, and we always get together with them for Easter. That is probably a good thing since we only see them three or four times a year (even though they live within an hour of us). My sister lives fifteen minutes from my parents, and they get together every week more than once. If there weren't big holidays like Easter, Christmas, Thanksgiving and the 4th of July, I don't think I'd ever see my husband's family. They're very good about getting together for those holidays, but those are the ONLY times we see them. Again, I just don't get it.

 

So count me in as one who is mystified by the big hoopla surrounding Easter.

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I grew up in a church where attendance was the same on Easter weekend as every other weekend. I am completely mystified by the people who only go to church on Christmas and Easter. In fact, now that I am Catholic, I must say I find it very frustrating that those of us who attend faithfully all. year. long. cannot find a seat when we go to church on Christmas or Easter. With small children, the last thing I want to do is arrive long before the service and have to keep my children quiet twice as long thanks to the people who attend only twice a year.

 

When I was a kid, our service the weekend of Easter celebrated Christ's death and resurrection. We might even have an Easter cantata or something. But there was no big meal that we had for Easter. No obligatory family gathering. My mom would hide eggs for my sister and I when we were preschoolers just because it was fun, but we never got gifts at Easter like we got at Christmas (as some people do). I just don't get the whole Easter thing.

 

We live near my husband's family, and we always get together with them for Easter. That is probably a good thing since we only see them three or four times a year (even though they live within an hour of us). My sister lives fifteen minutes from my parents, and they get together every week more than once. If there weren't big holidays like Easter, Christmas, Thanksgiving and the 4th of July, I don't think I'd ever see my husband's family. They're very good about getting together for those holidays, but those are the ONLY times we see them. Again, I just don't get it.

 

So count me in as one who is mystified by the big hoopla surrounding Easter.

 

We are actually less likely to go to church on Christmas and Easter. We do celebrate Christmas with gifts and all that, but my kids (at least my 6 year old) understand what the holiday means (my 4 year old really just grasped the concept of God and Jesus;)). But I dislike being crowded in church and fighting for a parking spot because people choose to go two days a year.

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DH & I are in the middle of discussing this right now. In the past, we've been really laid-back about things like this. This year, he has started talking about the origins of most of our holidays, and it bothers him.

 

I see it kind of like the "meat sacrificed to idols" issue in 1 Corinthians 10. I'm not bothered by the origins of the holidays. But if DH is, it would be wrong for him to celebrate them.

 

It's important to me that our family has regular, repeated traditions that bring us together. We're trying to decide what those traditions will be. I like the idea of celebrating seasons. We might have a rose-planting day, a fall bonfire, a "giving" day (e.g., taking a load of things to Goodwill). I don't know... we're still thinking about it. It should be meaningful to us.

 

I also don't want our traditions to cut us off from family members who just want to dye Easter eggs with the kids. I'd like them to enjoy that time together.

 

Just putting this out there, but if your dh is having problems with the idea of celebrating a "pagan" holiday, than celebrating things like seasons seems much more pagan than celebrating Christ's Resurrection.

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Okay. I know this is far from the topic that Bethany originally started (sorry Bethany!). But, I absolutely LOVE a full church. Maybe it's because our church can seat nearly 1000 people and we are lucky to see 300 on a sunday. So, even on Christmas and Easter, we will have a seat. But, I LOVE walking in to see our church "sold out!"

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Perhaps someone who is more theologically astute than I can address this but I was raised in a Christian tradition believing that the Resurrection was the very core of Christianity. Or is this splitting hairs?

 

It depends. Some Christians put much more emphasis on the idea of atonement than others, but they would still consider the Ressurection important to that. In other groups there may be no real atonement model as such and the Ressurection plays a stronger role theologically.

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Okay. I know this is far from the topic that Bethany originally started (sorry Bethany!). But, I absolutely LOVE a full church. Maybe it's because our church can seat nearly 1000 people and we are lucky to see 300 on a sunday. So, even on Christmas and Easter, we will have a seat. But, I LOVE walking in to see our church "sold out!"

 

:iagree: Although, our church is always packed and I love it. There are 3 services and we go to the packed one. We'll just leave 10 minutes early tomorrow. No big deal. I always hope that the Christmas/Easter visitors will like it so much that they'll keep coming. I'm sure it has to have happened.

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I grew up in a church where attendance was the same on Easter weekend as every other weekend. I am completely mystified by the people who only go to church on Christmas and Easter. In fact, now that I am Catholic, I must say I find it very frustrating that those of us who attend faithfully all. year. long. cannot find a seat when we go to church on Christmas or Easter. With small children, the last thing I want to do is arrive long before the service and have to keep my children quiet twice as long thanks to the people who attend only twice a year.

 

i'm not trying to be argumentative, but i disagree with your attitude about this. i grew up in a family that only went to church on christmas and easter. that's it. twice a year. and yes, we were total hypocrites and just taking up space. and although it didn't have an immediate effect on me, i can tell you that a seed was planted. years later when i was 25 i became a christian. my life was literally falling apart at the seams, and i remembered many years earlier being in church and hearing about jesus. at age 25, i remember kneeling and crying and asking god to help me. i knew that he could because i had heard it years before. i believe church is a lovely place for ungodly people. just something to remember when you're inconvenienced tomorrow. you don't know what god has in store. my own parents and my 3 sisters became christians after seeing my own life transformed.

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We don't celebrate Easter because o the pagan roots. The roots of easter are particularly appalling. We do celebrate his death and ressurection, but we do it during Passover. I know this offends some Jews. This isn't our intention. When you read the account of His death and ressurection, it was during Passover. There are a lot of parallels between the two. (slavery in Egypt, slavery to sin, Jesus was the "Lamb of God" sacrificed in our place, the lamb died in the place of the firstborn, ect)

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i'm not trying to be argumentative, but i disagree with your attitude about this. i grew up in a family that only went to church on christmas and easter. that's it. twice a year. and yes, we were total hypocrites and just taking up space. and although it didn't have an immediate effect on me, i can tell you that a seed was planted. years later when i was 25 i became a christian. my life was literally falling apart at the seams, and i remembered many years earlier being in church and hearing about jesus. at age 25, i remember kneeling and crying and asking god to help me. i knew that he could because i had heard it years before. i believe church is a lovely place for ungodly people. just something to remember when you're inconvenienced tomorrow. you don't know what god has in store. my own parents and my 3 sisters became christians after seeing my own life transformed.

 

I have chills. Thank you for sharing. And, Happy Easter!!!!!

 

:iagree: Although, our church is always packed and I love it. There are 3 services and we go to the packed one. We'll just leave 10 minutes early tomorrow. No big deal. I always hope that the Christmas/Easter visitors will like it so much that they'll keep coming. I'm sure it has to have happened.

 

This is my prayer every year too.

 

(Sorry Bethany! I'll duck out now!)

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We don't. We celebrate the Passover, but as Christians. We also celebrate the Ressurection of our Lord & Savior....no cute bunnies or eggs....or baskets of junk food.

 

We do go to my sil's house, whose family does celebrate Easter for dinner....and family time as that whole side of the family does celebrate Easter....and my kids always get a nice treat from Grandma. But, it is not, like it is for my nieces and nephews, a time for big presents and lots of candy.

 

Faithe

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Do any Christians celebrate Passover instead of Easter? Just trying to think of alternatives...

 

We do. It is a beautiful tradition that the Bible TELLS us to do. It is my kids absolute favorite holiday. No presents, no bunnies, no eggs....just our family together....staying up late, talking about what the Lord has done for us. Each piece of our Seder, done in order, opens up discussion, thoughts, conversation of the deepest kind. We talk and EAT well into the night. It is not something we do only out of obligation, but out of JOY.

 

My kids were all here last night...and after our 4 cups of wine:D. We stayed up until dawn, discussing what God has done for us this year, what we hope to accomplish in the coming year...our hearts. The little guys (who drank juice):D. Each fell asleep in a lap listening to the thing God has done.

 

Our Seder is the highlight of our family's year! We usually include other families and friends...but this year dd 13 was so I'll, I couldn't have others join us...but, it was still so wonderful.....

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We do. It is a beautiful tradition that the Bible TELLS us to do. It is my kids absolute favorite holiday. No presents, no bunnies, no eggs....just our family together....staying up late, talking about what the Lord has done for us. Each piece of our Seder, done in order, opens up discussion, thoughts, conversation of the deepest kind. We talk and EAT well into the night. It is not something we do only out of obligation, but out of JOY.

 

My kids were all here last night...and after our 4 cups of wine:D. We stayed up until dawn, discussing what God has done for us this year, what we hope to accomplish in the coming year...our hearts. The little guys (who drank juice):D. Each fell asleep in a lap listening to the thing God has done.

 

Our Seder is the highlight of our family's year! We usually include other families and friends...but this year dd 13 was so I'll, I couldn't have others join us...but, it was still so wonderful.....

 

That sounds wonderful! I hope as our children get older we have similar experiences. It's always been just us. FIL came one year, and was supposed to come this year. But it being good friday we lost all our potential guests. That's alright, though. I was kinda glad they canceled. Being pregnant this year, the whole thing wore me out. We did get most of the deep cleaning done beforehand, but the day of the house was a disaster and I was grateful to just make the dining room pretty and not host.

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We are Christians, but do not celebrate Easter as a religious holiday. Easter is not in the Bible. The Bible says that we are to remember Jesus' death, burial, and resurrection every first day of the week, not once a year.

 

We do enjoy the fun, non-religious parts of Easter, like Easter baskets, egg hunts, etc., but we do not associate any of that with Christianity.

 

 

 

:iagree:

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we do a dinner and have a family lesson on the atonement and resurrection.

 

I stopped doing baskets (which I had always done on saturday to seperate them) years ago when we were having major financial difficulties and never had a desire to restart them. I'll have easter candy around in a dish (or just the bag) to satisfy sweet teeth. the olders never said anything, and 3ds doesn't know any different.

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I'm not trying to debate. I'm also not looking to convince anyone who does celebrate that they shouldn't.

 

I'm just feeling a bit alone I guess, and wondering who else on here is Christian but doesn't celebrate Easter.

 

We won't be doing anything different tomorrow than any other Sunday. We don't do baskets, eggs, special dinner. Nothing. It's just the personal choice we've made for our family that we don't celebrate in any way. My boys know that tomorrow is Easter, because we see/hear it wherever we go. But they don't expect tomorrow to be any different than any other day.

 

Anyone else? If you want to share why you don't, feel free.

 

I'm honestly not trying to bash on those who do. Just wondering who else doesn't.

 

:001_smile:

I'd also like to know why you don't? I don't think it is a Christian mandate or anything, but they seem to rejoice when the Lord has Risen, so we sort of focus on that in the service. Other than that, no real celebrating goes on.

 

ETA: Ok, I see what you mean, now that I read on. I guess we don't celebrate as if it is more important this day than any other, same as you.

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