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2nd grader, Weeks 12, 13 and 14

 

My younger son did not have much to do these last weeks. He had already done his analysis and made his graphs. All that was left was to label the photos, write the text, design the layout, cut everything out, glue everything on, design a 2-minute presentation, and practice it! :001_smile: It actually took him quite some time to do, but we were not nearly so pressed for time as with the older boy.

 

Writing: 5 hours

Poster prep: 4 hours

Presentation prep: 3 hours

Total over 3 weeks: 12 hours

 

Here is his write up. I typed it while he dictated. I will post photos of the posters soon.

Introduction

 

I have always wondered how far down tree roots go. As I pondered this questions while walking in the woods, and found that road cuts had many different layers of dirt each with a different color. As I looked more closely, I found that different road cuts in different places in the woods had different amounts of the different layers of soil. I wondered what caused these differences.

 

Questions

 

  • How does slope affect topsoil depth?
  • How do obstacles affect topsoil depth on slopes?

Methods

 

  • I chose sites with different slopes which had an obstacle or not.
  • I measured the slope (see Photos 1 and 2).
  • I measured the depth of the topsoil either on a road cut (see Photo 3) or by digging a hole (see Photo 4).

Results

 

Slope

 

  • As the slope increases, there is less topsoil (see Table 1 and Graph 1).
  • For example, in Photo 5 the slope of the hillside is 33 degrees, and its topsoil is only 1 cm deep (see Photo 6).

Obstacles

 

  • When there is an obstacle, the topsoil depth dramatically increases (see Table 2 & Graph 2).
  • For example, Photo 7 shows an obstacle. When I dug a hole, I found that there was 50cm of topsoil! (see Photo 8)

Discussion

 

Topsoil depth is affected by several different things: trees, fallen trees, roots, branches, rocks, and many other obstacles. All of these block the flow of topsoil down a hillside (see Photos 9 & 10, and diagram 1). They also collect leaf litter so more topsoil is made.

 

In fact, soil is much more complicated than I initially thought. This is only a fragment of the huge amount of things you can learn by studying topsoil depth.

Edited by lewelma
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Hi Ruth. What an awesome experience to be able to follow you along on this journey. Thanks so much for sharing with all of us. Yes, I would personally love to have you add closer views of the graphs. It would be helpful for me to see how they are constructed and read things a bit more closely.

 

I also loved the live presentations. They did a great job! I love hearing these American kids with their NZ accents! ;-) I grew up in Bermuda, so I remember sounding completely different at this age as well! ;-) They seemed so well prepared. Wonderful eye contact! Keep it up long enough so I can show my dc. They have oral presentations to give next month for their upcoming trip to the local fair with their chickens!

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I forgot to add the totals for the last week:

 

6th grader: Week 14

Write up : 5 hours

Poster prep: 5 hours

Presentation prep: 4 hours

Total: 14 hours in 1 week

 

 

 

So the grand totals are:

 

6th grader

Planning and Design 13 hours

Data collection: 23 hours (does not include clean-up!)

Write up, graphing, calculations: 46 hours

Discussion: 8 hours

Poster prep: 12 hours

Presentation prep: 4 hours

THE GRAND TOTAL: 106 HOURS over 14 weeks

 

2nd grader

Planning and Design: 5 hours

Data collection: 6 hours

Write up and graphs: 14 hours

Discussions: 4 hours

Poster prep: 4 hours

Presentation prep: 3 hours

THE GRAND TOTAL: 36 HOURS over 14 weeks

 

And we are finished!!! :party:

Edited by lewelma
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Here is the judge's review from the Home Educator's Science Fair. The italics are from the regional fair's evaluation report.

 

Scientific Thought & Understanding

The exhibit demonstrates clear scientific thought, the application of appropriate scientific methods, an appreciation of the need for accuracy in observation, measurement, data collection and reporting; and an understanding of the underlying or related scientific principles embraced within the project.

 

K... demonstrated a good understanding of his topic and did his best to test his hypothesis in as controlled a fashion as possible. He had some difficulties taking measurements when the wind was too high or in cloudy conditions, but his results were still clear. He took a large number of samples and was deliberate in his choice of sites. He considered the effect of the tides, and chose to only take samples in the incoming tide. He had a clear prediction or hypothesis.

 

Technical & Graphic Skill

 

The project has been assembled with skill and dexterity, equipment, models and the frame of the project have been well constructed; graphic materials have been carefully prepared and presented, living plants and animals have been well cared for, working parts are reliable; and the whole is well planned and neatly finished.

 

His photographs add to the projects. The whole project is well-presented and neat. His graphs are also easy to read and understand.

 

Originality

In the selection of a topic or statement of the problem, uniqueness of approach, resourcefulness in obtaining and interpreting data, ingenious use of illustrative objects, inventive apparatus, insight conclusions, or inspired applications of the principles, process or product.

 

This is one of the strengths of K....'s project, in my opinion. He has tested something which affects anyone living near a coast or who has swum in the sea, but which we often do not think about. It was an original project.

 

Thoroughness & Effort

The work which has gone into a Science Fair project is reflected in the scope of the topic, the scale of the investigation, the detail obtained, the extent of the results, the repetition of the experiments, the construction of the project and its illustrative items, written material and other displays.

 

K.... made a thorough investigation by taking a large number of samples, often in cold and windy conditions. The project could have been improved by testing in the outgoing tide as well as the incoming tide, but as K..... explained, this would have required a great number of extra trips to the beach and testing, and the project was already quite time-consuming.

 

Presentation

The exhibit is well designed and developed to be attractive, visually interesting, informative on all aspects of the investigation, well illus*trated with photographs, models, specimens or samples; and with wide public appeal.

 

The exhibit is well-presented, with colour photographs. I thought there could perhaps be more colour or larger lettering on the sign to make it more eye-catching. If there is space, there could be some photographs of beaches where long-shore transport has caused problems. K..... did a good job of explaining his project and presenting it in the microphone time. I noticed when he was talking to me that he talked very fast, so that is something to watch out for, though his pace was fine when doing the formal presentation.

 

Great job, and I wish you all the best for the NIWA Science Fair!

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  • 4 weeks later...
Guest kah374

Wow Ruth!

I love reading your science posts...so inspiring!

I would greatly appreciate your help...would it be possible for you to provide a list of specific resources? i.e. book titles, doco titles etc.? I noticed you were using Tarbucks Earth science. Would you say that was useful and if so what version?

We are heading towards Earth science but could really use your help with Biology too.

 

Thanks so much!

 

Kellie

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  • 2 weeks later...

Well, I thought I might as well put it all in one place. I am travelling right now so I don't have access to my Documentary list, so I will need to add it later. Also, I can't remember much about chemistry from 4 years ago, and we are just about to start it up again, so I can add more in a year!

 

In general, we learn about a subject for 3 terms and then do an investigation for the 4th term. During the learning phase we do some demonstrations and general observations of our world, but with no clear schedule or pressure to “get it done.”

 

DS#1 is about 2 years advanced in science, so the books I chose are more difficult than typical for each grade level.

 

1st. Biology

Topics: Zoology, Botany, Ecology, Human Body (not very formal)

Texts: just used library books

Docos: David Attenborough's numerous series

Hands on: observed birds, planted a garden, measured heart rate and lung capacity, made mushroom prints, etc

Investigations: ds#1 What is the most common mushroom in our woods?

Ds#2 Which fertilizer makes plants grow the tallest?

 

2nd. Earth Science

Topics: Astronomy, Geology, Oceanography, Metereology

Texts: Ocean http://www.amazon.com/Ocean-American...0729099&sr=8-1

Eyewitness Earth http://www.amazon.com/Earth-Eyewitne...0729126&sr=1-1

The Way the Universe Works http://www.amazon.com/Universe-Works...0729156&sr=1-1

plus library books

Docos: BBC's Planet Earth and others

Hands on: observed the night sky and moon cycles, studied weather maps, observed fronts, identified clouds, joined local geology club, collected and categorized rocks, and went on field trips to see road cuts

Investigations: ds#1 Can I predict the weather accurately using only cloud formations?

Ds#2 What affects the topsoil depth in my woods?

 

3rd. Chemistry

Topics: Periodic Table, chemical reactions, industry uses

Texts: Ellen Henry's The Elements, RS4K level 2 Chemistry, and numerous library books

Docos: Numerous Modern Marvels on Chemistry topics

Hands on: mostly from RS4K

Investigation: What mixture of ingredients makes the most pliable and bounceable silly putty?

 

4th: Physics (We did middle school physics in 4th because it is ds#1's true love)

Topics: mechanics, electronics, astronomy, flight

Text: How Things Work (yes, the whole book!) + library books on electricity and flight

Scientific American's astronomy articles going back 10 years

Docos: The Way Things Work, Numerous Modern Marvels on Physics/Engineering topics

Hands on: Electronics kit. Mechanical Kit

Investigation: How does the angle of attack affect the flight time of a kite depending on the wind speed?

 

5th: Biology (topics of his choosing)

Topics: Biochemistry, Genetics, Evolution, Microbiology

Texts: The Way Life Works; The Cartoon Guide to genetics; The stuff of life; Biozone's Evolution

Docos: All of David Attenborough again (he is just great)

Hands on: Hemophilia in the royal family, lots of microscope work, gene pool and genetic drift games

Investigation: Which type of water supports the most diversity of micro-organisms, ocean, ditch, or river?

 

6th: Earth Science

Topics: Astronomy, Oceanography, Geology, Meteorology.

Texts: Tarbuck's Earth Science, and Applications and Investigations in Earth Science

(we only did about 2/3 of the text and ½ of the applications)

Docos: TTC one of the Earth Science series (did not get through even 1/2 of the series)

Hands on: Observed night sky and moon cycles, Applications and investigations book

Investigation: How does the wind direction and speed and the orientation of the bay affect longshore transport of sand?

 

We are using the university level text. I have compared it page for page to the HS text and there is a LOT of overlap. The graphs, diagrams, photos are the same. And at least half of the text is word for word. We use this one: http://www.amazon.com/Earth-Science-...9479388&sr=8-2

And the investigation book: http://www.amazon.com/Applications-I...9479427&sr=8-9

We got the answers for the text and investigation book from the publisher with proof of purchase and proof of homeschooling.

 

7th grade: Chemistry

Topics: Periodic table, reactions, quantitative chemistry, organic chemistry, industrial uses

Text: IGCSE Chemistry by Cambridge (he will be taking the exam in Nov 2013)

Docos: periodic table videos: http://www.periodicvideos.com/ , I have others planned but can't remember them

Hands on : he is signed up for a 3 day chemistry lab, and I have gotten about 6 easy labs we can do at home from my sister who is a chemistry teacher (but I don't remember what they are)

Investigation: TBA!!!!

 

Ok, I can pad this out in a week or so when I am back home,

 

Ruth in NZ who is currently in OH

Edited by lewelma
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I am so excited that I have a few of these resources which helps me understand what you do -- can I ask you, how do you us the books? Read them? For How Things Work, build along? Also I have read a lot of criticism for DK type books as having too many pretty pictures and too short, choppy text so if you have time, I would love to get your explanation of why these books are good ones. And also how do your kids watch the Attenborough documentaries? I remember you saying somewhere they watch them regularly, but do they just watch one episode? Do you discuss or just casually? Do they watch repeatedly? I love them but my kids need prompting to watch them and not wander off, saying they're boring. My son loved one episode of the bird one, where the raptors were hunting. Maybe I need more action packed episodes.

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how do you us the books? Read them? For How Things Work, build along? Also I have read a lot of criticism for DK type books as having too many pretty pictures and too short, choppy text so if you have time, I would love to get your explanation of why these books are good ones.

I find that DK books are terrible at telling stories, so IMHO the Eyewitness history books are not very good. Very bitsy. But science is not a story. The history of science is a story, but science facts are not.

 

The 2 DK books that I listed for 2nd grade earth science are quite good. And actually the astronomy book is excellent. I chose them by looking at about 20 books on each topic from the library, and I just picked the best one. I want my kids to know that you don't need a specialized curriculum to learn about science. There are BOOKS at the library that will do just fine. I never did find a good one on meteorology at the library, so we just made do with the best we found. This is why I did not list a meteorology book, because I did not find anything I would recommend. The Oceanography book is a bit difficult for the age, but we just picked the topics he was interested in and skipped the stuff that was too hard. So he wanted to read the spread about ice shelves and the spread about coral reefs. The sections on the geology of the oceans were over his head, so I paraphrased some of it and we skipped the rest (it is a very fat book with lots of photos!).

 

What I like about the 2 DK books that we used for astronomy and geology was that that were great surveys. Each spread describes a different topic and each book does a nice job surveying the field. When my kids are little, I want to give them a huge overview rather than go in depth -- that is what the investigation does. When we sit down on the sofa together, we review previous topics. I get my ds to describe what he knows about each image on a few previous pages that we read before. Then we read and discuss the current spread, and we add a few things to our memory sheet (1 page per term). Finally, we review previous things on the memory sheet. Sometimes my ds wanted to write about the topic for his IEW writing for the week, but otherwise we do not do any written narrations.

 

We never have time to finish a book completely, so I always ask them 1/2 way through the term what the want to focus on and what they want to skip. This seems to be a great technique, because both of them independently tell me "oh, no, we can't skip ANYTHING. I love it all." It is always better to stop while they are excited than when they are sick of the topic. It keeps them eager for more.

 

As for the How Things Work book, my older ds read 1 spread every morning before breakfast for about 7 months (about 20 minutes each day). We never discussed it, but it is clear that he really internalized it. However, physics is his love. I expect that my younger son might struggle with the book and require me to read and discuss some of the topics, or possibly require a different book for 4th grade. I will just play it by ear year after next.

 

And also how do your kids watch the Attenborough documentaries? I remember you saying somewhere they watch them regularly, but do they just watch one episode? Do you discuss or just casually? Do they watch repeatedly? I love them but my kids need prompting to watch them and not wander off, saying they're boring. My son loved one episode of the bird one, where the raptors were hunting. Maybe I need more action packed episodes.
I just ask them to watch about 3 per week (They pick which series they will be working through). They watch them over and over and over again year after year (go figure). I do not plan to discuss them, but they often want to tell me about them, so I listen while I am making dinner and ask leading questions. If there is a documentary that is particularly hard, then I sit with them and stop the doco to discuss difficult parts. Often this requires 2 days to get through an hour long show, because we stop it so much.

 

HTH

 

Ruth in NZ

Edited by lewelma
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This is a x-post that I thought might help explain what I do.

 

I thought I might expand a bit on how to get the kids on board and excited about "what is next." Science in my house is both interest driven and organized/systematic. Yes it can be done.:001_smile:

 

I start before summer, mentioning in passing about how "I can't wait until next year because we will be doing earth science." I drop little hints, "did you know that earth science has 4 major fields: astronomy, geology, meteorology, and oceanography." Every couple of week for months, I say something else quite purposefully, dropping seeds of interest. "I know so little about crystals, I can't wait until geology." Eventually, the kids start asking "what are we studying next year again?" or "Do we get to study sand next year?" And "oh, I can't wait until we get to astronomy!"

 

Then, once we are in the earth science year, I drop hints during the first unit on Astronomy, "did you know that geology is next?" A few weeks later, I might mention " wow, I had no idea that geology was such a huge field - rocks, crystals, soil, ground water, plate tectonics, earthquakes, and volcanoes. I just don't think we will be able to do it all. What should we skip?" Then, it goes something like, "ah, mom, we can't skip any of it. I love geology." etc. I think you get the idea. These are breadcrumbs, leading the way to path I want them to follow. It works shockingly well!!! Just today, as I was talking excitedly about finding some good chemistry books in the library for next year, ds(8) asked "what is chemistry?" "Well, it is all about atoms and reactions, like when you put vinegar and baking soda together." "oh, I love chemistry," he says. The first little breadcrumb in place...

 

As the kids get older, I start to ask for input. My ds when he was 10 was quite adamant that he wanted to study microbiology, and I wanted him to study genetics and evolution, so there you go 3 units for 3 terms. The 4th term being for the science fair project. The younger one (1st grade at the time) could obviously not do those topics, so I chose easier things: botany, zoology, and ecology. But it is nicer when both kids are studying the same big topic, which happened this year. Kind of depends on the field.

 

So how do I get the topics for the different sciences? Well, you do some research. Find out the big divisions within the subject for the year. Then, I check the library for good books. I check them out while I am planning for the following year and look over them and make sure there is enough of the good stuff at an appropriate level. If there is not, I have to buy some, but this has been pretty infrequent in 6 years. Then, I make a bit of a schedule. Each year has a subject (earth and space science), and each term has a topic (geology) and subtopics (crystals, volcanoes, ground water, erosion). The term topic is pretty well set in stone, but the subtopics can be very fluid. We often can't get to all of them, because we are following rabbit trails, which is just fine. Too much time spent on crystals and soil, leaves too little time on volcanoes and earthquakes. Oh well. There is always more to learn. But at the beginning of the next term, we start the new topic (switching from geology to oceanography which are all a part of the year's subject of earth science).

 

I do agree with SWB that systematic study of any field is the hallmark of a classical education. I also like using a spine and then getting more books out, but the spines I use are MUCH more detailed than the ones she suggests. So I get a spine for geology, and a different spine for oceanography. Rather than a spine for earth science, which will be more vague and general because there is more to cover.

 

I disagree with SWB that kids need to summarize, list facts, draw pictures each week to review/document their studies. I have found that this KILLS the love of science learning in my kids. Who wants to read about astronomy if you know you are then going to have to sit at the table and write a summary? yuck:tongue_smilie:. My kids sometimes choose to write about science for their fortnightly reports during writing time. We use IEW, so they spend 1 or 2 weeks with crafting their words/sentences/paragraphs, and then editing and copying over. Much more satisfying than just the repetition of weekly note booking. But each to his own.

 

During each topic, we do some easy hands on stuff as a family. For example, for astronomy, we follow the moon, identify the constellations, and watch NASA launches; for geology, we grow a crystal, look at road cuts, watch the news for earthquakes (ug, think Christchurch); for oceanography we notice jetties, look at sea creatures, and watch the waves; and for meteorology we identify cloud types, study weather maps, and make measurement equipment. All of this is just observing the world-- making what we are learning come to life. It has no scientific method component, and there is no reason to write it up as a lab report. It is just fun and educational.

 

 

Then, after 3 terms of reading, we do 1 term on a large-scale investigation. This year's investigations are: ds(11)-- how does the wind speed and direction affect longshore transport of sand? And ds(8)-- How does land slope and vegetation affect the depth of the topsoil? This is where the kids will write up their project in a scientific report, including hypothesis, method, results, and discussion. They make a poster and then present at the science fair.

 

And one more X-post

 

We follow rabbit trails, but they are rabbit trails within the topic. I don't discourage the kids learning other topics within science when we are studying astronomy, for example, but the whole family is focused on astronomy. We are all noticing the moon cycle and finding stars in the sky. We are reading books and watching docos. And my dh comes home with news on NASA's new launch, and we watch it over breakfast on a streaming NASA TV. It is exciting. If they want to grow a crystal or read a Magic School Bus book on rain forests, fine, but the whole family is focused on astronomy.

 

This systematic focus helps the kids explore topics they never would have thought or on their own (oceanography for example) and helps to direct the rabbit trails within the topics. DS(11) was particularly interested in soil when we studied geology for 9 weeks and spent extra time on that subtopic. For geology, he studied rocks, crystals, plate tectonics, and soil/erosion (but ran out of time for ground water and volcanoes, when the term was up we moved on to oceanography). I don't think that either of us would have ever thought to study soil. How boring.... until you learn a lot about it. So IMHO, elementary school is about exposure in addition to the excitement that everyone always talks about.

Edited by lewelma
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  • 1 month later...

Regional science fair is tomorrow. Not sure why *I* have butterflies. :tongue_smilie:

 

ds(12) has gone through the program and counted all the projects that he thinks will be in the competition for the geosciences award. Only 11 out of 500, so he has a chance. Not too many kids apparently like the geosciences. :001_smile: There are 121 entrants for 6th grade and only 4 class prizes, so not likely that he will get one of those. I also put him forward for the math award, but I'm not sure how 'mathy' the project should be to be competitive. That award is self-selecting because the math judge cannot tell what is mathy from the titles.

 

His interview with the judges is at 9am but he needs to be available to discuss his work until noon. We have to walk 40 minutes across the city and up a huge hill because there will be NO parking, so homeschooler that I am, I am bringing ds(8) WITH his school work while we wait in the lobby. Luckily it is supposed to be sunny tomorrow.

 

Cross your fingers.

 

Ruth in NZ

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Just got back from the big day. DS told me that he was seen by 7 judges, the 2 6th grade judges, the math judge, 2 geosciences judges, and he thinks the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research judge (NIWA, who runs the fair), and possibly the scientific method judge. They talked to him for 10 to 30 minutes, and at one point he had 4 judges with him.

 

We had gone over a bunch of possible questions they might ask, but I never thought they would ask for a complete summary, which in the end he had to do 3 times. They were very interested to hear how he came up with the topic and how he figured out to use the different colored sand. Luckily, we had practiced answers for those questions as it was months ago when he started the projects, and honestly he had forgotten.

 

He said the 6th grade judges were completely emotionless, but that the others all told him he had done a great job and 2 even commented on the large size/scope of the project. He told me that one judge came back to talk to him. Apparently, ds glanced at the notebook and saw he got 2 ticks on the first visit, and then during the second visit proceeded to get another tick, 2 circles of his name, and finally a star. So that sounds positive. Here's to hoping that ds's "glancing" was not too obvious.:tongue_smilie:

 

He had no surprise questions and felt very prepared. He was very glad that he stayed the entire time (not all kids did) because it was clear that the judges were influenced a lot by interacting with ds. He told me that he overheard a number of other interviews and it was clear that some of the kids were just told to do a project and were not very passionate about it. Their interviews were much shorter than my ds's.

 

Now, we wait. Results are to be posted mid-day tomorrow. 1st prize is $1000 for the juniors (grades 6 to 9) and an i-pad for the 6th graders! (1st prize for the seniors is 1 year of free tuition to university!) But even all of the smaller prizes (geosciences, math, scientific method, NIWA) are for $250, and he can get more than one. He is very hopeful!

 

I did decide in the end to discuss the politics of judging. How although they want to give the prizes to the "best" projects, that "best" is not objective. And that they were likely keeping track of gender, race, and school of the prizewinners over the years just to make sure that there was the appearance of fairness. We also discussed the possibility that they would not want to give one of the top prizes to the only homeschooler attending. I hated to do it, but he needed to know that there might be some concern that he was overly helped by his mother. I don't think I overstepped, but he did get more one-on-one than a school kid was likely to get, and he clearly had more time for the project than a school kid would. Anyway, it was a good conversation, and he was not upset in the least and really did not care about winning something big.

 

I will let you know tomorrow what we hear.

 

Ruth in NZ

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Just got back from the big day. DS told me that he was seen by 7 judges, the 2 6th grade judges, the math judge, 2 geosciences judges, and he thinks the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research judge (NIWA, who runs the fair), and possibly the scientific method judge. They talked to him for 10 to 30 minutes, and at one point he had 4 judges with him.

 

We had gone over a bunch of possible questions they might ask, but I never thought they would ask for a complete summary, which in the end he had to do 3 times. They were very interested to hear how he came up with the topic and how he figured out to use the different colored sand. Luckily, we had practiced answers for those questions as it was months ago when he started the projects, and honestly he had forgotten.

 

He said the 6th grade judges were completely emotionless, but that the others all told him he had done a great job and 2 even commented on the large size/scope of the project. He told me that one judge came back to talk to him. Apparently, ds glanced at the notebook and saw he got 2 ticks on the first visit, and then during the second visit proceeded to get another tick, 2 circles of his name, and finally a star. So that sounds positive. Here's to hoping that ds's "glancing" was not too obvious.:tongue_smilie:

 

He had no surprise questions and felt very prepared. He was very glad that he stayed the entire time (not all kids did) because it was clear that the judges were influenced a lot by interacting with ds. He told me that he overheard a number of other interviews and it was clear that some of the kids were just told to do a project and were not very passionate about it. Their interviews were much shorter than my ds's.

 

Now, we wait. Results are to be posted mid-day tomorrow. 1st prize is $1000 for the juniors (grades 6 to 9) and an i-pad for the 6th graders! (1st prize for the seniors is 1 year of free tuition to university!) But even all of the smaller prizes (geosciences, math, scientific method, NIWA) are for $250, and he can get more than one. He is very hopeful!

 

I did decide in the end to discuss the politics of judging. How although they want to give the prizes to the "best" projects, that "best" is not objective. And that they were likely keeping track of gender, race, and school of the prizewinners over the years just to make sure that there was the appearance of fairness. We also discussed the possibility that they would not want to give one of the top prizes to the only homeschooler attending. I hated to do it, but he needed to know that there might be some concern that he was overly helped by his mother. I don't think I overstepped, but he did get more one-on-one than a school kid was likely to get, and he clearly had more time for the project than a school kid would. Anyway, it was a good conversation, and he was not upset in the least and really did not care about winning something big.

 

I will let you know tomorrow what we hear.

 

Ruth in NZ

 

 

Sending lots of Good Luck your way!

 

Your posts on the "how-to" of a scientific inquiry have inspired me to pursue something similar, but on a smaller scale, with my DD. Thank you.

 

P.S.- Addressing the dynamics or politics behind competitions is an excellent idea.

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He won!

 

1st in his class (6th grade)

1st in Mathematics and Statistics for the entire fair (grades 6 to 12)

Tied for 1st in Water and Atmospheric Research for the entire fair

Tied for 1st in Geosciences for the entire fair

 

:party:

Edited by lewelma
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He won!

 

1st in his class (6th grade)

1st in Mathematics and Statistics for the entire fair (grades 6 to 12)

Tied for 1st in Water and Atmospheric Research for the entire fair

Tied for 1st in Geosciences for the entire fair

 

:party:

 

Wow!!! That is wonderful!

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He won!

 

1st in his class (6th grade)

1st in Mathematics and Statistics for the entire fair (grades 6 to 12)

Tied for 1st in Water and Atmospheric Research for the entire fair

Tied for 1st in Geosciences for the entire fair

 

:party:

 

Congratulations and thank you for taking us along though the process with you both!

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He won!

 

1st in his class (6th grade)

1st in Mathematics and Statistics for the entire fair (grades 6 to 12)

Tied for 1st in Water and Atmospheric Research for the entire fair

Tied for 1st in Geosciences for the entire fair

 

:party:

 

:hurray:

 

:thumbup:

 

Congratulations!

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That is absolutely fabulous Lewelma! Thank you for sharing this past season's science fair project with all of us. I am thrilled to see that it culminated into academic awards for him. It certainly makes time spent in that frigid water well worth it!

 

How exciting. I am excited FOR you!

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You guys are so supportive! Thanks for all the congrats.

 

These kind of projects always looks so tidy at the end, and it feels really good to know that there are many people who know how hard my ds and I had to work, and who know that there were definitely difficulties along the way.

 

We are already in the planning stage for next year. Chemistry! (or possibly industrial design)

 

Thanks again for your support,

 

Ruth in NZ

Edited by lewelma
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He won!

 

1st in his class (6th grade)

1st in Mathematics and Statistics for the entire fair (grades 6 to 12)

Tied for 1st in Water and Atmospheric Research for the entire fair

Tied for 1st in Geosciences for the entire fair

 

:party:

 

Congratulations Ruth! I sort of knew he would ;)

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He won!

 

1st in his class (6th grade)

1st in Mathematics and Statistics for the entire fair (grades 6 to 12)

Tied for 1st in Water and Atmospheric Research for the entire fair

Tied for 1st in Geosciences for the entire fair

 

:party:

 

Congratulations! Thank you for sharing the process, I learned a lot!

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  • 7 months later...
  • 3 years later...

This was an amazing and inspiring read! As someone said above, it does read like a story. And frankly my son would love to read a series about kid scientists who go through all that your son's went through.

I was on the edge of my seat waiting to read the results.

Yes I know this was over 4 years ago. Bravo!

Edited by Korrale
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  • 3 years later...
12 minutes ago, lewelma said:

Just walking down memory lane, and thought I would bump this to the top. 🙂 

Oh Ruth! I remember this thread (and the wonderful hive members of that time) so fondly. 

Seems like just yesterday, yet so long ago.

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29 minutes ago, lisabees said:

Oh Ruth! I remember this thread (and the wonderful hive members of that time) so fondly. 

Seems like just yesterday, yet so long ago.

Older boy's little face in front of this poster still pops up when you google his name because the regional science fair posted pictures of all the winners. He looks sooooo young!

And younger boy *still* draws his fractal trees at age 17. 

Edited by lewelma
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31 minutes ago, lewelma said:

Older boy's little face in front of this poster still pops up when you google his name because the regional science fair posted pictures of all the winners. He looks sooooo young!

And younger boy *still* draws his fractal trees at age 17. 

They grow up so fast. You're almost done homeschooling, yes?

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