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Which phonics book?


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Which phonics program+  

  1. 1. Which phonics program+

    • 100 Easy Lessons
      5
    • Phonics Pathways
      21
    • OPGTR
      20
    • Other (explain please)
      17


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We used the combination of Explode the Code (ETC), Bob Books, and the Leap Frog DVDs Talking Letter Factory and Talking words Factory I and II (aka The Cartoon Road to Reading :D).

 

The was enough goofy-humor in ETC to appeal to my child (the other options listed have very high "boring" factor).

 

The Bob Books (we read all the sets) gave a feeling of accomplishment and are nicely graded. And—while I really hate to say it—the Leapfrog cartoons are worth their weight in gold for going over the basics in a way young children absorb.

 

We did the ETC primers and ETC 1,2,3 without "writing." We were a little ahead on reading, but not on handwriting, and ETC adapted well to a "finger-tracing and/or oral approach.

 

Bill

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I used Reading Reflex with my two older boys (now in 5th and 7th grades) and am now starting it again with my youngest. I know it has a reputation as a remedial reading program, but I thought it was by far the most logical system out there for teaching reading to beginners too.

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We tried Phonics Pathways, but it wasn't open-and-go enough for us.

 

I used OPGTR with Sweetie, and while it was dull it did a great job getting her reading. She was 4 & 5yo when we used it. She did like the extra games, though there weren't many of them.

 

I have the primers for ETC with Lil'un, but she knows everything in them except how to write the letters. I looked at ETC1 and it looked like way too much writing for her. So we're using OPGTR when she demands "school", but we don't read every word on every page. She would get frustrated with the repetition and start making stories up. Thus far, my slimmed down OPGTR is working great.

 

Both my girls also have been on Starfall.com, and that was very helpful for my older girl. My younger enjoys it too, and also likes more.starfall.com. She's also using Reading Eggs, which has too much repetition but overall she enjoys.

 

:)

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.

 

I have the primers for ETC with Lil'un, but she knows everything in them except how to write the letters. I looked at ETC1 and it looked like way too much writing for her.

 

 

As I mentioned above, it is super easy to use ETC orally. My son at 4-5 could not have done all the writing in ETC, but had no problem absorbing the lessons orally, or using finder-tracing, pointing, etc.

 

I didn't want a subject that I suspected might cause some frustrations (handwriting) mixed up with a subject I hoped he would love (learning to read) in any case. ETC was very successful doing no writing until ETC 4 (when he was ready).

 

Something to consider.

 

Bill

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We originally started with 100EZ when dd was first interested in learning to read. It led to tears, tears, and more tears. We shelved it for awhile, picked up OPGTR and had great success. There were still a few teary moments ever so often, overall it worked well.

 

Now, I'm using OPGTR with ds, and we're taking it really slow. I'm going at his pace, trying not to overwhelm him, and just reviewing over and over. We do all the lessons on a white board, and he never looks at the book.

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Another vote for Webster's Speller! If you do the first part of the syllabary (open and closed syllables), your child will be able to read more of the Dolch "sight words" like he, she, the, I, a, me, etc. The child will know why they have a long vowel sound and not just have to memorize them.

 

I also LOVE I See Sam readers (first 52 free online). They are so much better than Bob books. I hated Bob books.

 

Those two resources (plus Leapfrog in the beginning - totally ditto the frog method of teaching) got DS able to sound out just about anything. I'm now using Dancing Bears to help him get to the next level, and that seems to be working. :)

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Which phonics book would you pick? Please explain why or why not. Also feel free to suggest other programs :D

 

We use Phonics Pathways. My 5th boy is going through it, and my older 4 boys can all read anything. It's so easy to use. Open it up and have the child read. It's easy to spend as little as 5 minutes or as long as you want.

 

Check your library, though, for the three books. It was really helpful to me when I was trying to decide which phonics book to buy to check the options out from the library and try them out.

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We just recently (January) switched to OPGTR from k12 phonics program. K12's phonics program seemed very advanced for my son who went into the year only knowing a few of his letter sounds. (He has had a hard time pin pointing letters sounds in the past.) It moved way too fast and it came to the point where he couldn't handle it. I slightly stumbled ontp OPGTR. I went to our B&N that told me 100 easy lesson was in stock, but when I got there it wasn't. Since I drove to the B&N across town I wasn't going to leave empty handed. I looked through what they had and felt OPGTR went slow enough and was thorough enough for my son. I like how it starts with letter sounds and moved on to she short vowel words. I REALLY like how at certain places it tells you if you child hasn't mastered the last few lessons to go back and redo them. I know that may seem like common sense, but I didn't feel that with k12 phonics. I felt pushed to keep going and he would catch up with it.

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I've done ABEKA phonics with my older kids. So with my younger group I decided to try something new so I got the 10th edition Phonics Pathways. I really didn't like it so I bought ABEKA again and sold PP. I just do "A Handbook for Reading" along with the workbook. I will stick with this from now on. The grass is not always greener on the other side ;)

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We used the combination of Explode the Code (ETC), Bob Books, and the Leap Frog DVDs Talking Letter Factory and Talking words Factory I and II (aka The Cartoon Road to Reading :D).

 

HA! The Cartoon Road to Reading. I love it! :lol: I actually have been making my preschooler watch Letter Factory at least 3 times a week lately, cause he's struggling to remember letter sounds. It's helping!

 

I have looked at all three of these books. I don't think you could go wrong with any of them, unless your child hates it.

 

My personal favorite is what my K'er uses, in my siggy, combined with simple readers here and there. I switch him to Phonics Road next year, when he's mature enough to learn all the phonogram and rules.

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We've been using Phonics Pathways (slowly) for over a year. I love it: it's sequence makes perfect sense and the lesson pages are to-the-point and no frills, but there are suggestions and card games in the book to help you beef up the lesson. We haven't needed it so far with DD, but either of my DSes may be different and that will come in handy. The only thing I've done outside of its recommendations is teach he, she, the, me, and her as sight words. This was to allow me to make up sentences more easily for her, and it hasn't confused her. Again, the boys may be a different story; we'll see!

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We used the combination of Explode the Code (ETC), Bob Books, and the Leap Frog DVDs Talking Letter Factory and Talking words Factory I and II (aka The Cartoon Road to Reading :D).

 

The was enough goofy-humor in ETC to appeal to my child (the other options listed have very high "boring" factor).

 

The Bob Books (we read all the sets) gave a feeling of accomplishment and are nicely graded. And—while I really hate to say it—the Leapfrog cartoons are worth their weight in gold for going over the basics in a way young children absorb.

 

We did the ETC primers and ETC 1,2,3 without "writing." We were a little ahead on reading, but not on handwriting, and ETC adapted well to a "finger-tracing and/or oral approach.

 

Bill

 

:iagree::iagree::iagree: WE loved Leapfrog videos... they cemented the letter sounds in for all four of my kids. I stumbled across them for my older boys, they learned their sounds. Then the girls began to learn to read, and I had to repurchase them because I couldn't find the videos. All of my kids learned their letter sounds from these videos and were consistant!

 

I am using BOB books, ETC, and Phonics Pathways currently with the girls and it is a great combination!

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Thank you everyone for all the suggestions. I have been asking most of my questions about my oldest ds10 who is currently in 5th. I also have a dd8 in 2nd (I really need to make a signature lol) They are all going to Catholic school this year. We will start homeschooling in the fall. I thought my youngest ds4 was doing well, every time I saw his teacher she had nothing but good things to say. Today I received an email from her basically saying she was evaluating ds for the up coming report card and has discovered he doesn't know but a few of his letters and their sounds:confused: Ok Yes I should know this but in my own defense I had MAJOR surgery last month then had dh in the hospital for a week 3 Weeks after that. Poor kids have been shuffled from one set of grandparents to the other a lot this winter. Also with my oldest having major academic problems I guess it was easy to take my little guy for granted.All the work that came home looked good, teacher never said there was any problem. How is she just figuring this out now? School is over in 2 months. Not only is it her job, I'm paying a lot of $$ for her to do it. It's almost like with my oldest, the teacher let's it go till it's a major issue. So now ds4 has to learn all his letters, upper and lower plus their sounds or fail K4. I know that doesn't really matter but still. Also he is a young K4 with an August birthday. Not sure if that is a contributing factor or not. I know he is doing wonderfully socially and all the teachers say he has the best attention span in the class. I guess those letters just didn't make it through. The first thing I did after getting this email was order 3 leapfrog dvds. Any other suggestions? I know he is young, we have plenty of time to fix this. My oldest is really the one to be worried about, I guess I'm just embarrassed I didn't know and mad the school didn't either.

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:grouphug: I ordered All About Reading. I haven't used it yet, but we love All About Spelling and when we looked at the sample, dd wanted me to print it out so she could do it RIGHT NOW!!!! :lol: Their Pre-Level 1 should be right for learning letters, I think. Also I second the Leapfrog videos and starfall.com.

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:grouphug:

 

My kids have learned their letters and sounds with starfall.com (free interactive web site). Then we move on to the other readers.

 

I remember my oldest using that! How could I forget. We will have to try that tomorrow. He is great using the computer since he gets technology twice a week. They just fail to teach basic skills. You know between that twice a week, PE twice a week, then music, art, library and spanish once a week I'm surprised anything else is being accomplished. This is a 5 days a week 4hrs a day program.

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We used the combination of Explode the Code (ETC), Bob Books, and the Leap Frog DVDs Talking Letter Factory and Talking words Factory I and II (aka The Cartoon Road to Reading :D).

 

The was enough goofy-humor in ETC to appeal to my child (the other options listed have very high "boring" factor).

 

The Bob Books (we read all the sets) gave a feeling of accomplishment and are nicely graded. And—while I really hate to say it—the Leapfrog cartoons are worth their weight in gold for going over the basics in a way young children absorb.

 

We did the ETC primers and ETC 1,2,3 without "writing." We were a little ahead on reading, but not on handwriting, and ETC adapted well to a "finger-tracing and/or oral approach.

 

Bill

 

:iagree::iagree:

This is exactly what we are doing, but my daughters like to write, so they are writing in the ETC 1,2,3 books. We also do some of the OPGTR but not often and not the way it's written lol.

Starfall and Headsprout have also been used. For my 2nd grader I cannot say enough about the first 2 workbooks of R&S Phonics. By the last one we were all sick of the macrons and phonetic spellings, but by then she was reading well enough to sound out anything.

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I can see that 100 EZ has fallen out of favor. I did use it to teach all 4 of mine to read. My first didn't like it as much because I was pretty serious about following the script. With my other 3 I tried to make it much lighter and more fun. We would cover up the pictures so that they would read the little story and then the picture was a fun surprise. Then they would show Dad the new words and read him the story each night instead of me having them read it all to me a second time like the script suggests. Worked like a charm! So much so that my 4th learned to read just from watching her sister go through the lessons. When I tried it with her, she already knew it all!

 

We then went on to Explode the Code and Pathway Readers. I always feel so blessed to have been able to be part of that "reading breakthrough" with each of my children, that point when they just get it.

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I used an incredibly horrible phonics program with my two sons. I cannot and would not recommend it to anyone. No one knows it or has heard of it. It just is not worth mentioning.

 

I picked other. If I could do it over again, I would do Samuel Blumfeld's book, Alpha-phonics.

 

Blessings in your homeschooling journey.

 

Sincerely,

Karen

http://www.homeschoolblogger.com/testimony

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I used Reading Reflex with my two older boys (now in 5th and 7th grades) and am now starting it again with my youngest. I know it has a reputation as a remedial reading program, but I thought it was by far the most logical system out there for teaching reading to beginners too.

 

We are loving the simplicity of Reading Reflex. We are also using OPGTR and AAR Level 1, two more great phonics programs! I love utilizing more than one program for reading and math. Keeps the 3R's from becoming dreaded and boring :)

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I tried Phonics Pathways with my son but the book moved too fast for him. We would spend a week or more on a single page and he was very frustrated. I switched him over to Dancing Bears and it's been the prefect match for my son.

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