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Augsburg Drawing: free and AWESOME and complete 1-8


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This is a complete art curriculum grades 1-8. It teaches everything step by step.   Of special note, crayon drawing is taught in grades 1-3 as a form of painting with pages and pages of exercises us

The older edition of Augsburg didn't have the crayon painting and just began with watercolors. I had assumed the new grades 1-3 crayon paintings were the result of the new wax crayons on the market.

I recently e-mailed Mott Media to ask them to think about printing this series. It really needs to be professionally republished..

I wonder what Augsburg would think about the pdfs that were sent all over the world yesterday :-) I wonder how popular they were in their day. I'm thinking fairly popular if there was a NEW 8 volume edition after the original 2 volume edition.

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Rosie (and all other non-Americans), you can find it at archive.org. Now if I could just get my little macbook to read it.....

D

 

 

:grouphug:

 

An as an aside -I always wondered why everyone kept raving about Google books and when I used it it was nothing but book covers - another great site we are forbidden from using :glare:

 

 

EDIT - I'd love it if someone could send me a copy as well - these are great but I only managed to get the first 2 volumes - I would love Vol 3 please anybody :)

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I bought these Faber-Castell Bees wax crayons for the Augsburg crayon painting lessons. http://www.amazon.com/Faber-Castell-129012-Faber-Castell-Beeswax/dp/B004JA92GU

 

I bought the 12 pack for $5.87. The 24 pack is $9.90.

 

I assumed the 12 pack would have all 8 of the basic colors required for the lessons. It does NOT. Violet is missing, and instead, there is mustard, sky blue, lime, peach and white.

 

The crayons produce results almost identical to the samples in the curriculum. Colors do blend a bit. These are very nice crayons for the price.

 

If you want to do the yellow and violet lessons, you will need to get the 24 pack. Buying a 12 pack is not a waste, though. Many of the colors in the 12 pack will get hard use in the lessons, while some of other colors will only be used outside of the lessons.

 

I need to research which sharpener is recommended for these crayons. They are fatter than Crayola and other traditional sized crayons.

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  • 4 weeks later...
Rosie (and all other non-Americans), you can find it at archive.org. Now if I could just get my little macbook to read it.....

D

 

Thank you! I've never been able to figure out why I couldn't access google books. Thanks for recommending archive.org.

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I am getting ready to order the book, but thought I would see if people actually used theirs before I spend the money. Sometimes books look good, but are only used a few times.

 

Would anyone care to share experiences?

 

Thanks!

 

I'm currently still using the crayon paintings. I'm planning on doing some of the 2 handed drawing in the sand at the beach this summer. The figure drawing looks really good, but uses a 4 head tall figure and I'm concentrating on a 5 head figure from another curriculum, so it's not compatible right now. I forget what else is in grade 1. I have a lot going with figure drawing and map drawing right now.

 

The crayon paintings are a big deal to me. I'm an extreme minimalist, other than collecting massive amounts of books. I live in a high-rise, with a library downstairs, so when it comes time to move, I can just use one of the building carts and haul it in the elevator downstairs. Or call a homeschooler to come take it all :-)

 

But otherwise I am ridiculously minimal and that carries over into my art. I like crayons :-0 They don't smear or smudge, and don't require water. It's hard to find advanced crayon lessons. So many art lessons are based on messy and expensive media. I'm a crayon freak. What can I say?

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I'm currently still using the crayon paintings. I'm planning on doing some of the 2 handed drawing in the sand at the beach this summer. The figure drawing looks really good, but uses a 4 head tall figure and I'm concentrating on a 5 head figure from another curriculum, so it's not compatible right now. I forget what else is in grade 1. I have a lot going with figure drawing and map drawing right now.

 

The crayon paintings are a big deal to me. I'm an extreme minimalist, other than collecting massive amounts of books. I live in a high-rise, with a library downstairs, so when it comes time to move, I can just use one of the building carts and haul it in the elevator downstairs. Or call a homeschooler to come take it all :-)

 

But otherwise I am ridiculously minimal and that carries over into my art. I like crayons :-0 They don't smear or smudge, and don't require water. It's hard to find advanced crayon lessons. So many art lessons are based on messy and expensive media. I'm a crayon freak. What can I say?

 

Thanks!

 

What are you using for map drawing? Is that taught in these books or somewhere else?

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Thanks!

 

What are you using for map drawing? Is that taught in these books or somewhere else?

 

Draw Write Now. One of my biggest mistakes this year was putting off purchasing Draw Write Now and trying to make do with other resources.

 

My figure drawing is a combination of mostly DWN, 123 Draw, and Ed Emberly Finger Print Book (2 pages of "feelings"). I scanned just the pages I needed from all the books and compiled them into a little booklet, held together with brass fasteners. I used card stock for the covers. I got the bookmaking idea from someone here, but don't know who.

 

The map drawing is almost all DWN with a few ideas from The Core added in. I scan, crop, enlarge and print the pictures from DWN, so they are the exact size and shape of the student's drawing paper. I'm in the process of creating a booklet for this too.

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Draw Write Now. One of my biggest mistakes this year was putting off purchasing Draw Write Now and trying to make do with other resources.

 

My figure drawing is a combination of mostly DWN, 123 Draw, and Ed Emberly Finger Print Book (2 pages of "feelings"). I scanned just the pages I needed from all the books and compiled them into a little booklet, held together with brass fasteners. I used card stock for the covers. I got the bookmaking idea from someone here, but don't know who.

 

The map drawing is almost all DWN with a few ideas from The Core added in. I scan, crop, enlarge and print the pictures from DWN, so they are the exact size and shape of the student's drawing paper. I'm in the process of creating a booklet for this too.

 

Thanks!

 

I saw your link for crayons. Did you ever find a sharpener that works with them?

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Thanks!

 

I saw your link for crayons. Did you ever find a sharpener that works with them?

 

No but it hasn't been a problem, at least right now. The crayon painting "washes" "sharpen" the crayons. And I haven't been attempting any fine work, so once I do, that may change.

 

I'm finding that I use these fat, blendable crayons differently than I did the Crayola Twistables. I'm adopting a more painterly technique, rather than a colored pencil technique if you know what I mean. Much of the time I'm taking ADVANTAGE of the side of the wide point, rather than trying to draw with the tip of a narrow point.

 

My OCD perfectionism is easing up. I think maybe that looking at a lot of Waldorf drawings, and some pen and ink sketches that included almost splashed on watercolors, has changed my art goals a bit. My style is becoming softer and less precise. I'm not as focused on line as I had been, when I'm using the crayons. And when I am adding crayon to pen and ink, I'm applying them like watercolor.

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To the OP - Thank you so much! I downloaded all the books you linked and can't wait to look through them! Both my kids have some talent for art, but I'd still love them to have a good foundation of art lessons, and what I have glanced at so far looks really, really good.

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  • 1 month later...

I'm carrying over a post.

 

Okay, stop it already . I am already in love with CtGE and Beeswax crayons and continent blobs. Sigh. I want to do it all...... The Augsburg crayons work? Where is this again? I think I recall a thread about this and I might have it in Google Books.

 

ETa: Are you doing map drawings from The Core? I love the idea but have no clue about how to get organized for implementation.

[/Quote]

 

Hmm...I thought one of you asked about the quality of beeswax crayons :-0 Oh well, I'll just comment.

 

Beeswax crayons work better when warm. They work well here because my highrise is a steambath. So I really don't know how well they will work in a cold home. My students were talking about this recently when I brought it up. the response was, "Yeh, those crazy white people buy those big houses they can't afford to heat. What's with that?" :lol: They told me I'm not white anymore :confused:

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This is the Stockmar set some of us have recently upgraded to. I'm not sure which Amazon seller we used.

 

We only need the 8 colors for the Augsburg "paintings". For the Draw Write Now maps we sometimes supplement with crayons from the Faber-Castell 24 pack.

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Just a quick word of warning from a long-time beeswax crayon user: don't leave them in the car, near the heater or in the pockets of clothes on a hot washing cycle. They will melt, they do stain and they are very hard to get out of the carpet or car seat covers (this is a common conversation for Waldorf mums). People of warm climates, BEWARE! :001_smile:

 

People of cold climates: Waldorf is obsessed with keeping little kids warm. As a Waldorf type, I am often amazed at how thinly dressed little kids are in the cold. Kids should have warm hands. Drawing happens after a story in most Waldorf classrooms: get the kids to hold the crayons while you tell the story: the crayons will be warm when they are ready to draw.

D

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While I was trying (unsucessfully) to find somewhere to download the Augsburg books for free in Canada, I found this site:

http://www.artiscreation.com/books.html

It seems to have links (some for Google Books :glare:) but others for other sites for the downloading and/or reading online of many, many vintage art books.

 

It even has a section for books for the chemistry of pigments:

http://www.artiscreation.com/books.html#pigmentbooks

 

:D

 

(Chem teacher in me doin' a happy dance 'cause it's about the only part of art that makes sense to me... But I keep trying with the rest! ;))

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While I was trying (unsucessfully) to find somewhere to download the Augsburg books for free in Canada, I found this site:

http://www.artiscreation.com/books.html

It seems to have links (some for Google Books :glare:) but others for other sites for the downloading and/or reading online of many, many vintage art books.

 

It even has a section for books for the chemistry of pigments:

http://www.artiscreation.com/books.html#pigmentbooks

 

:D

 

(Chem teacher in me doin' a happy dance 'cause it's about the only part of art that makes sense to me... But I keep trying with the rest! ;))

 

Interesting books! :-) Thanks!

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Just a quick word of warning from a long-time beeswax crayon user: don't leave them in the car, near the heater or in the pockets of clothes on a hot washing cycle. They will melt, they do stain and they are very hard to get out of the carpet or car seat covers (this is a common conversation for Waldorf mums). People of warm climates, BEWARE! :001_smile:

 

People of cold climates: Waldorf is obsessed with keeping little kids warm. As a Waldorf type, I am often amazed at how thinly dressed little kids are in the cold. Kids should have warm hands. Drawing happens after a story in most Waldorf classrooms: get the kids to hold the crayons while you tell the story: the crayons will be warm when they are ready to draw.

D

 

Yes, the stockmar seem to stain when it gets really warm here. More than the Faber-Castell. But the stockmar block crayons make such nice "washes" and oceans and skys.

 

Some people may prefer the Faber-Castell. They are cleaner and they are good enough. They do blend, unlike petroleum based crayons, and better than the soy and plastic based ones.

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  • 3 months later...
I found the "new" book 4 on google books, in case anyone needs it. (I didn't see it linked previously - apologies if I missed it. Even though I have no problem bumping this thread ;).) Thanks Hunter, for finding these books.

 

:thumbup::thumbup1::thumbup:

 

:hurray::party::hurray:

 

Thank you!!!!

 

I love #4. Not only does it continue some already presented topics, but adds some new ones.

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Draw Write Now. One of my biggest mistakes this year was putting off purchasing Draw Write Now and trying to make do with other resources.

 

The map drawing is almost all DWN with a few ideas from The Core added in. I scan, crop, enlarge and print the pictures from DWN, so they are the exact size and shape of the student's drawing paper. I'm in the process of creating a booklet for this too.

 

You don't have any other places you have elaborated on this, by any chance, do you?? I would LOVE to hear more; I've caught little snippets here and there about DWN but didn't put two and two together about using that with MapWork (which we might do in a CC/Core-inspired way, but I need to go back and reread that part of the Core)....

 

TIA. 

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  • 10 months later...

I'm pretty sure that in this series (as in the Ella Frances Lynch books), the word "crayon" means a "chalk crayon," i.e., a piece of chalk.  Wax crayons weren't as widely used in those days and were usually called by their full name.    And then there's this, on p. 11 of the first book:

 

"the ease with which it is applied and removed from the blackboard"

 

Wax crayons are easy to apply to the blackboard (as my 3 year old can attest :laugh: ), but not so easy to remove!

 

So, has anyone tried doing the lessons with colored chalk?   I'm curious as to how that would work, and what difference (if any) it would make.

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I'm pretty sure that in this series (as in the Ella Frances Lynch books), the word "crayon" means a "chalk crayon," i.e., a piece of chalk.  Wax crayons weren't as widely used in those days and were usually called by their full name.    And then there's this, on p. 11 of the first book:

 

"the ease with which it is applied and removed from the blackboard"

 

Wax crayons are easy to apply to the blackboard (as my 3 year old can attest :laugh: ), but not so easy to remove!

 

So, has anyone tried doing the lessons with colored chalk?   I'm curious as to how that would work, and what difference (if any) it would make.

 

Such an important distinction!  I hope others chime in.

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Would someone be willing to email me the files? I can't get them here.

 

Anyone overseas that needs copies can PM me. I deleted a few PMs so should be able to handle a few requests. If you get a full PM box, try again on Monday, after I respond to the first requests and delete those requests from my PM box. I'm not feeling well, so am falling behind a bit in responding to things, but I can get some books out this weekend, I think.

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