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You can't be "behind" in science. :)

 

If I were going to use a textbook, it would be R&S's "God's Wonderful World" series.

 

But I probably wouldn't do that much formal with children so young. I like Charlotte Mason's nature study, which is the way I'd lean if we were hsing again. My dc also enjoyed doing some Usborne book science activities.

 

Also, 9yo might be old enough for Considering God's Creation.

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I am a big fan of BFSU (Building Foundations of Scientific Understanding). It is an excellent science program if you want to dive into it.

 

You could start with the first volume which is K-2. However, this book certainly can be used for older children since the concepts are actually quite advanced. If you choose this, you could proceed through it at a quick pace since your children are older.

 

Then you could start into BFSU Volume 2 which is designated as grades 3-5.

 

If you do this, I think your children will have a very solid understanding of basic science concepts.

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BFSU with CM nature studies. In fact, the two are quite compatible. I'm itching to start BFSU again (3-6). Even though I like MPH, ds gets bored with the workbooks. I miss the living books. I've reincorporated nature study and added in some living books. If BFSU 3-6 weren't advanced for ds, I would have continued.

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BFSU with CM nature studies. In fact, the two are quite compatible. I'm itching to start BFSU again (3-6). Even though I like MPH, ds gets bored with the workbooks. I miss the living books. I've reincorporated nature study and added in some living books. If BFSU 3-6 weren't advanced for ds, I would have continued.

 

 

I've read the MPH isn't "Americanized"---meaning there's animals and plants etc. that are not native to say an American child using it and so it could be confusing?? Your thoughts? This was one of the reasons I skipped it in my science considerations because although I like for my kids to know about other environments in other parts of the world---I feel like too many kids are not even aware of the plants and animals in their own backyard. So I wouldn't want something like that to be overwhelming in a curriculum choice.

 

For the OP---I've felt like my oldest ds has been "behind" in science because I've had the hardest time finding materials that I actually liked and wanted to use and fit with our worldview. I like RS4K and we've been working on the chem book. I've done an ETA Science Reinforcer book this year--that really helped me see where the holes were quickly. I think I might like GSA (Dinah Zike)---there's a whole lot of different activity guides/books that I like....TOPS and VanCleave. I like the ScienceWorks books and I've done a few with my oldest, and decided to do the entire K-1 level with my 4 year old.

 

I've always wanted to do The Handbook of Nature Study.

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You aren't behind in science. Your child may not have learned much about science, but take this time to explore the vast array of information available and don't stress about being behind. If you're really worried, make science readings 3x a week or everyday.

 

If you're looking for a plan for science, this is what I recommend: first, listen to SWB's science lecture. Next, ask your kids want they want to learn about in science. Then, check out books and videos and learn about the subject together.

 

For our school, we learn about science twice a week at minimum. Usually we read a passage about the subject and my son either does dictation or narration. The science video is reserved for the evening, unless the weather's crummy. In that case, we watch it when school's over. Nothing motivates my kids to complete chores, clean rooms, and finish schoolwork like Morgan Freeman narrating "Into the Wormhole." If it's a long video series, we'll watch an episode every day until we're finished.

 

Every few weeks, we do the discovery experiments generally available in Janice Van Cleave or online. They are not a priority though.

 

I can't speak for everyone, but this has really worked for my children. I rotated through many different science curricula before I settled on the plan outlined above. When we go to the library, they are required to pick at least one book on a new science subject. If they don't know, I offer guidance. "You were really interested in black holes when we watched the space video. How about black holes?" "You thought the time slowdown was cool when we read the book on black holes. How about time?"

 

I generally have a broad overview of the year for what I want the kids to learn, but I don't force them to stay on the pre-planned track. I purchased a science encyclopedia, and it helps find additional topics to explore. If we read about the Sun, we find more information on stars. Stars lead to constellations, constellations lead to Galileo and telescopes, which leads to the Hubble telescope and the international space station, ad infinitum until you're sick of space and snatch up a video on the ice age and shout, "How about these woolly mammoths?!?!?"

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Another vote for BFSU! BFSU has 3 volumes, one for K-2, one for 3-5, and one for 6-8. But that is just a general guideline, the whole program is structured so that each lesson, in each "thread" (subject area) builds on what came before. What I did with my 4th grader was get the $5 ebook of Vol. 1, and go over the few lessons that I thought she needed for fill-in, before starting on Vol. 2. It is a spine, we do lots of spin-offs from it, but it gives a structure that will ensure that we cover everything by the end of 8th grade.

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I've read the MPH isn't "Americanized"---meaning there's animals and plants etc. that are not native to say an American child using it and so it could be confusing?? Your thoughts? This was one of the reasons I skipped it in my science considerations because although I like for my kids to know about other environments in other parts of the world---I feel like too many kids are not even aware of the plants and animals in their own backyard. So I wouldn't want something like that to be overwhelming in a curriculum choice.

 

Well.. I feel that way quite often about the northeastern states curricula, or northern states in general. We live in the subtropical US, and I have found it to be quite similar (palm trees abound, for example), and ds understands about the warm climate year-round. We get hit on the head with talk of seasons all the time, and we don't quite it :tongue_smilie: :lol: So to us, Singapore seems to be more compatible.

 

I've always wanted to do The Handbook of Nature Study.

 

I own this book. Have tried a few exercises, loved them, then didn't pick it up again. One of my things to do again. I like reading through it. Sometimes I get ideas on how to pose questions or start discussions about something. BFSU and Handbook of Nature Study together would be ideal. I really, really want to get to this level next year. With a nice little collection of living books, of course.

 

I hope 8FillstheHeart jumps in and explains how she never did any formal science with her children until high school. She gave them lots of interesting books to read (most likely what we would call living books), and kindled a fire in them. I know at least two are in the sciences now (college). All science starts from the beginning anyway in high school and college (Science 101). I'm starting to learn that cultivating an interest in the sciences is perhaps the most important.

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I don't believe in the concept of being "behind" in science. I don't think there is any such thing. I think the public school science scope and sequence is a joke.

 

Read the first couple chapters of Science Matters and what the average Harvard graduate understands about BASIC science. It's almost nothing, and they manage to survive quite well :-0

 

BFSU was written as a response to a junior college environmental science teacher's wish for what his students would arrive knowing. His 3 book "elementary" curriculum--and usually just the first 2 books--is all most students need to start junior college.

 

Bill Nye videos pretty much cover all of what the above 2 resources say a student needs. They are free here. EDIT: The videos seem to be down. Don't click on the ads!

Edited by Hunter
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Well.. I feel that way quite often about the northeastern states curricula, or northern states in general. We live in the subtropical US, and I have found it to be quite similar (palm trees abound, for example), and ds understands about the warm climate year-round. We get hit on the head with talk of seasons all the time, and we don't quite it :tongue_smilie: :lol: So to us, Singapore seems to be more compatible.

:iagree: Try explaining to your kid why autumn is called fall because of leaves falling, when here those that do fall do so in January!

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You are definitely not behind. We are experimenting with a more relaxed approach- my 5th, 3rd, and 1st graders are all doing interest led science. They choose what they want to read about, check books out of the library, find experiments if they choose, and occasionally write about their topic. That's it, and they are learning a ton and loving it.

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You can't be "behind" in science. :)

 

If I were going to use a textbook, it would be R&S's "God's Wonderful World" series.

 

But I probably wouldn't do that much formal with children so young. I like Charlotte Mason's nature study, which is the way I'd lean if we were hsing again. My dc also enjoyed doing some Usborne book science activities.

 

Also, 9yo might be old enough for Considering God's Creation.

 

:iagree:

We do science completely informally until 7 th grade. My kids have tons of science books, experiment kits, all sorts of videos etc. They have no problem starting in 7th, and find science easy.

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eh, I'd not worry about it. My son has had little to no formal science. we did a few experiments here and there, he did a few chapters of a biology program last year, and other than that we do trips to the science museum, he reads a few articles in a middle school science magazine, and every other week at least I tell him to watch a science documentary on netflix. We talk about science a fair bit, and he likes shows like mythbusters. He just scored in the 99 percentile on the ITBS science section. I'm no longer worried.

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I agree with PPs who said that you cannot be behind in science in 3rd or 4th grade. I do formal science with my kindergartener, but that is because it is his passion. Otherwise, I wouldn't. I highly recommend NOEO. I think Bio 2 would be perfect for you! It is a great combo of living books and experiments. We love it!

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I agree with PPs who said that you cannot be behind in science in 3rd or 4th grade. I do formal science with my kindergartener, but that is because it is his passion. Otherwise, I wouldn't. I highly recommend NOEO. I think Bio 2 would be perfect for you! It is a great combo of living books and experiments. We love it!

 

 

I agree that you can't be behind---although I do think there are some fundamental science topics that a child should have some working knowledge of by this age---living vs. non-living and the needs of living things (habitats and environments), five senses, basic body parts and function, parts of plants and their needs, some basic classification--reptile, mammal ,insect etc., life cycles of a butterfly and frog and mammals, how humans use animals and plants, types of matter (solid, liquid, gas), some basic Earth science---fresh vs, salt water, soil, air etc., weather and seasons--can make this relevant to your area, water cycle, energy and simple machines and magnets, some basic info about sun and moon and planets.

 

They may not have a mastery of these subjects or even a lot of fancy curriculum---lots of reading and talking and normal observations will do the trick---and then as they get older you can get more detailed. I consider it laying a foundation.

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I agree that you can't be behind---although I do think there are some fundamental science topics that a child should have some working knowledge of by this age---living vs. non-living and the needs of living things (habitats and environments), five senses, basic body parts and function, parts of plants and their needs, some basic classification--reptile, mammal ,insect etc., life cycles of a butterfly and frog and mammals, how humans use animals and plants, types of matter (solid, liquid, gas), some basic Earth science---fresh vs, salt water, soil, air etc., weather and seasons--can make this relevant to your area, water cycle, energy and simple machines and magnets, some basic info about sun and moon and planets.

 

They may not have a mastery of these subjects or even a lot of fancy curriculum---lots of reading and talking and normal observations will do the trick---and then as they get older you can get more detailed. I consider it laying a foundation.

 

:iagree:

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