Jump to content

Menu

Is there an Arminian-based curriculum?


Virg
 Share

Recommended Posts

We are heavily Arminian with *ahem* pretty strong opinions. I was especially looking for Bible and History slanted our way. Everything I find is either neutral or Reformed. Obviously it isn't killing me but it would be nice to find to give our children a stronger foundation in our theology. :001_smile:

 

I have googled Wesleyan and Arminian, Methodist and Nazarene homeschool curriculum. I have looked through a bazillion pages of results. The closest I have gotten is Sunday School curricula and college textbooks. I will admit to being a horrible google searcher. I am not sure why I don't get the miraculous results everyone else does. :glare:

 

Anyway, anyone? :bigear:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is Rod and Staff and Christian Light both of which are Mennonite publishers. Any Anabaptist material--here is a lot both with those publishers and besides--will come from a strong Arminian perspective. I do a lot of picking through and creating my own stuff.

Edited by sbgrace
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We are in your camp. Evidently our " type" don't homeschool much.;). I usually just teach bible/ religion from our point of view and edit stuff on the fly. SWB materials have worked well. CLE for math and LA are pretty much OK. The HOD is so good but sometimes I have to do that editing thing. Sonlight wasn't too hard to edit either. But I did edit.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am a Calvanist so I can tell you what I usually do not look at ;)

 

I usually shy away from Abeka & Bob Jones - have you checked out those?

 

I totally understand the frustration of trying to find a curr that lines up with your biblical perspective :001_smile: I hope you find what you are looking for!

 

IHTH

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was pleasantly surprised to see this thread, because I was wondering the same thing a few months ago (and even searched on the same keywords as you).

 

Not sure why there isn't more written from the Wesleyan/Arminian standpoint. It would be nice if it were better represented among homeschooling curricular publications, but maybe I'm just being naive. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would look into Heart of Dakota. I don't know if it's specifically Arminian but I personally feel it's definitely NOT Calvanist.

 

As someone else also mentioned Abeka or BJU would probably not conflict with your views either. I'm Arminian myself and feel that HOD falls in line with my beliefs the most closely.

 

HTH!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm so glad to know that I'm not the only one in the hive that leans this way with theology!! We are definitely Arminian/Wesleyan when it comes to Bible interpretation and I've wondered about this very thing with curriculum. I mean really, our branch of Christianity certainly is a scholarly group, so I just don't get it. Then again, a lot of Armenian based churches are very socially minded and there seem to be a lot of families in the ps system. Not sure about this, but those are my thoughts at this moment.

What I have been doing is choosing curriculum that is strongly Christian, but I adapt the Biblical teaching as needed. So far this has not been that hard. In fact we have been very happy with TOG, which was written from a Reformed point of view. I honestly haven't had a lot of problems with it though. When we do hit a spot that differs in belief, I have used it as a discussion point. Dd is a very mature 12 yo, and we have had some really great talks about the different interpretations of scripture.

I think Christians in our camp just have to be willing to customize as needed until someone comes up with an Arminian/Wesleyan homeschool curriculum publishing company!

Blessings,
Lucinda

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am a Calvanist so I can tell you what I usually do not look at ;)

 

I usually shy away from Abeka & Bob Jones - have you checked out those?

 

I totally understand the frustration of trying to find a curr that lines up with your biblical perspective :001_smile: I hope you find what you are looking for!

 

IHTH

 

Abeka and Bob Jones are not Arminian. They are "once saved (by grace through faith, not by pre-election), always saved" (Christ has covered all of our sins, past, present and future through his death on the cross). Both teach that Christ's offer of Salvation is available to anyone who will accept His free gift and that once one is born again that their eternal security is kept by the same power that saved them in the first place. They teach we are predestined to be conformed into the image of Christ after we have been saved.

 

We are neither Calvinists nor Arminian.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Abeka and Bob Jones are not Arminian. They are "once saved (by grace through faith, not by pre-election), always saved" (Christ has covered all of our sins, past, present and future through his death on the cross). Both teach that Christ's offer of Salvation is available to anyone who will accept His free gift and that once one is born again that their eternal security is kept by the same power that saved them in the first place. They teach we are predestined to be conformed into the image of Christ after we have been saved.

 

We are neither Calvinists nor Arminian.

 

Actually, that's not how it's presented at BJU. Can't speak for Abeka/Pensacola. At BJU they have gone through stages where they were dominantly arminian in instruction (Dr. Bob Sr. was a Methodist remember), for a while were more inclusive allowing in presbyterian profs, etc., and are now swinging a bit more arminian again. They're just more traditional baptist in that they do it 2 parts, 3 parts, not straight one or the other. Their faculty and staff are a blend (some 5 point, most 2:3).

 

Personally, I can't remember an extreme issue ever coming up with that in their science or reading or history. Bible of course would be a blend, not 5 point in either direction, but I'm guessing they teach both sides for high school.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am glad people besides me are interested! I really thought I was the only one lol. I kept checking and no one had responded so I finally gave up. Then today I decided to look for my thread and was pleasantly surprised to find posts :001_smile:

 

There are a ton of Nazarene colleges, universities, etc and Free Methodist (which I actually am) also has a lot of Bible schools around the world. I know they have day schools in other countries, they must have a curriculum... right?

 

I am starting to think about attempting to find a college theology book to at least get ideas from. Bible has been the hardest subject for me. Everything is KJV (don't necessarily have a problem with that but kids with speech & reading disorders can barely read it much less understand it) or strongly Calvinist. We just started using CLE for LA and Math. However we don't cover our hair or wear only dresses. We just have a very holiness-purity based focus. I haven't seen a Bible light unit though to judge how much time is spent on Anabaptist theology vs what really makes up Wesleyan theology. As I understand it they are from different branches of the "denomination tree" LOL (I could be wrong and love to be educated though!)

 

ETA: Honestly I won't consider BJU because I just cannot support them. In 2000 when the ban was lifted my bi-racial children were being born. I don't judge others or anything, but me, personally, I just can't bring myself to use their curricula

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We are in your camp. Evidently our " type" don't homeschool much.;). I usually just teach bible/ religion from our point of view and edit stuff on the fly. SWB materials have worked well. CLE for math and LA are pretty much OK. The HOD is so good but sometimes I have to do that editing thing. Sonlight wasn't too hard to edit either. But I did edit.

 

:lol: about our "type"! Do you have a reference you use for yourself to help you teach it? I am now looking for an adult-aimed theology book to give myself a firmer foundation to teach from.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is Bedell Arminian? http://www.bedellcurriculum.com/

 

I'm using it, but don't know if it is. I've always been pretty neutral about this, so don't even notice.

 

If you e-mail him, I'm pretty sure he knows whether he is Arminian or not, though :-)

 

Thanks! I am going to email him today. It is so hard to tell from samples but it looks interesting anyway.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am glad people besides me are interested! I really thought I was the only one lol. I kept checking and no one had responded so I finally gave up. Then today I decided to look for my thread and was pleasantly surprised to find posts :001_smile:

 

There are a ton of Nazarene colleges, universities, etc and Free Methodist (which I actually am) also has a lot of Bible schools around the world. I know they have day schools in other countries, they must have a curriculum... right?

 

I am starting to think about attempting to find a college theology book to at least get ideas from. Bible has been the hardest subject for me. Everything is KJV (don't necessarily have a problem with that but kids with speech & reading disorders can barely read it much less understand it) or strongly Calvinist. We just started using CLE for LA and Math. However we don't cover our hair or wear only dresses. We just have a very holiness-purity based focus. I haven't seen a Bible light unit though to judge how much time is spent on Anabaptist theology vs what really makes up Wesleyan theology. As I understand it they are from different branches of the "denomination tree" LOL (I could be wrong and love to be educated though!)

 

ETA: Honestly I won't consider BJU because I just cannot support them. In 2000 when the ban was lifted my bi-racial children were being born. I don't judge others or anything, but me, personally, I just can't bring myself to use their curricula

 

You might look at the ESV (English Standard Version) for your kids. It's what I just got my dd.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't really have any help other than what has been mentioned. I am just glad to see this thread! I was beginning to believe I was nearly the only hs Christian that is NOT Reformed. Glad to see that I am not alone.

 

Many times I want to just use R&S for everything, because it is *safe*, but then I know that it would not work with our learning/teaching styles.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is Bedell's response:

 

Thank you for your questions, Virginia. Our curriculum is from a "Fundamental Baptist" perspective. We do not believe that God

arbitrarily chooses people to be saved or lost, but offers salvation freely to "whosoever will." We do believe in the security of the

believer, however. Our curriculum covers Bible (Bible Psychology, Bible Sociology, and Bible Apologetics) Science (Biology, Earth

Science, Chemistry, Physical Science) and History (World, U.S. Government/Economics) David Bedell

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was pleasantly surprised to see this thread, because I was wondering the same thing a few months ago (and even searched on the same keywords as you).

 

Not sure why there isn't more written from the Wesleyan/Arminian standpoint. It would be nice if it were better represented among homeschooling curricular publications, but maybe I'm just being naive. ;)

 

:iagree:Me too! I have been trying and trying to find a children's doctrine course or at least a children's catechism that is not Reformed/predestination/eternal security. I haven't found one yet. I'm a terrible Googler, too.

Edited by Sahamamama
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is Bedell's response:

 

Thank you for your questions, Virginia. Our curriculum is from a "Fundamental Baptist" perspective. We do not believe that God

arbitrarily chooses people to be saved or lost, but offers salvation freely to "whosoever will." We do believe in the security of the

believer, however. Our curriculum covers Bible (Bible Psychology, Bible Sociology, and Bible Apologetics) Science (Biology, Earth

Science, Chemistry, Physical Science) and History (World, U.S. Government/Economics) David Bedell

 

This all makes my head hurt! I studied this years ago, but forget what I learned :-0

 

I knew Bedell would have a DEFINITE answer :-) I just don't know if I understand it. He isn't Arminian? Arminian believes you can lose your salvation?

 

I really like to use Bedell when I'm feeling all fried and crispy, and just want to do Bible and Bedell as read alouds. I'm tutoring a student right now who really responds well to Bedell. We are working through Spalding WRTR and she is working really hard in areas where she has experienced a lot of past failure and when the lesson is done, we are both literally sweating and sometimes crying. Then I take out the Bible and Bedell and it's just perfect.

 

Sometimes we read something, and just look at each other and laugh, and say, "um...okay, lets just move on." :-) I don't know whether he is "right" or "wrong" and sometimes I don't even know what he is talking about, but...I like this guy, a LOT! We are using vol 3 Patriarchs and studying Abraham and are learning SO much!

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I believe the big difference that Baptist believe that anyone can be saved by the blood of Christ if they chose to follow him. I "think" the Armenian faith believes that God chose at the beginning of creation who would be saved but I could be wrong on that. I am sure someone will chime in with the correct answer if this is wrong. :001_smile:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not all Baptists believe this. Baptists vary on both their eschatology and their views about predestination. Also, I am not totally sure what Arminian's believe point for point or issue by issue, but my understanding is they are pretty much the opposite of Calvinist's.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I believe the big difference that Baptist believe that anyone can be saved by the blood of Christ if they chose to follow him. I "think" the Armenian faith believes that God chose at the beginning of creation who would be saved but I could be wrong on that. I am sure someone will chime in with the correct answer if this is wrong. :001_smile:

 

It is the opposite :001_smile: Arminians believe that anyone can choose to follow Jesus. The Wesleyan branch of Arminianism focuses on purity and holiness. We even have different definitions of sin :tongue_smilie:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is the opposite :001_smile: Arminians believe that anyone can choose to follow Jesus. The Wesleyan branch of Arminianism focuses on purity and holiness. We even have different definitions of sin :tongue_smilie:

 

Got it, sorry for the mix up. I am intrigued now and will have to do some research on this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Isn't this fun? I love that we can all be "together" and discuss these differences in curriculum and help each other out.

 

One thing I know for sure - everyone in this discussion loves Jesus. Can I get an AMEN?! (which is huge for a reformed presbyterian like me - we don't do out-loud amens :lol:)

 

I love this group!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The only thing I know that would get close is Mennonite (CLE and R&S). They don't believe in eternal security.

 

I was raised strict Arminian, but our Christian schools had no problem using Abeka, BJU, and ACE. They just didn't use their Bible courses.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

There are a ton of Nazarene colleges, universities, etc and Free Methodist (which I actually am) also has a lot of Bible schools around the world. I know they have day schools in other countries, they must have a curriculum... right?

 

I am starting to think about attempting to find a college theology book to at least get ideas from. Bible has been the hardest subject for me. Everything is KJV (don't necessarily have a problem with that but kids with speech & reading disorders can barely read it much less understand it) or strongly Calvinist. We just started using CLE for LA and Math. However we don't cover our hair or wear only dresses. We just have a very holiness-purity based focus. I haven't seen a Bible light unit though to judge how much time is spent on Anabaptist theology vs what really makes up Wesleyan theology. As I understand it they are from different branches of the "denomination tree" LOL (I could be wrong and love to be educated though!)

 

Speak with your Pastor about Bible curriculum. If you are teaching the WTM way, Arminian primary and secondary sources are plentiful. Look at your Church history, belief statements, systematic theology, and any foundational documents.

 

The NIV (1984 Version) is easy enough to read. You may be able to find a Wesley Study Bible, and simply read through it with your kids. You should also look at your Church's Sunday school materials and peek at the publisher. BibleGateway.com has several versions of the Bible online. Print up some passages from the various Bible versions and compare them with your children.

 

With the exception of Bible, we're using secular curriculum and inserting our beliefs as we teach. DH and I insert our beliefs and discuss theology all the time. I can't imagine any one curriculum fitting the bill. DH and I keep a running dialogue about how he wants me to approach history and science. I also speak with experienced, homeschooling friends that I respect.

 

ETA: Reflecting God looks good as a study Bible.

Edited by Heathermomster
I wasn't homeschooled..
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Abeka and Bob Jones are not Arminian. They are "once saved (by grace through faith, not by pre-election), always saved" (Christ has covered all of our sins, past, present and future through his death on the cross). Both teach that Christ's offer of Salvation is available to anyone who will accept His free gift and that once one is born again that their eternal security is kept by the same power that saved them in the first place. They teach we are predestined to be conformed into the image of Christ after we have been saved.

 

We are neither Calvinists nor Arminian.

 

This is a correct assement of Abeka's doctrine. I sat through Bible classes at PCC, and this is what was taught.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bumping, because I would love to hear if anyone comes up with a specific Bible course for children that would work. My youngest has specifically asked for more Bible for next year, but I haven't come up with anything preplanned that is deep enough for my older and that will work work for my younger too that go along with our beliefs. I can come up with things from Sunday school lessons and children's church lessons. But most are pretty superficial and not set up easily for hsing. (too much planning, not enough maps, too many crafty, game-like ideas etc.)

 

I am leaning towards Memoria Press Christian Studies. But I haven't seen them yet. Does anybody know anything that would be objectionable in them from the OPs viewpoint?

 

 

We will be saving original sources studies until they are older.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bumping, because I would love to hear if anyone comes up with a specific Bible course for children that would work.

 

R&S Bible or CLE may work for doctrine; even if some of their practices (head covering, non-resistence, etc.) are not what you are looking for.

 

I am leaning towards Memoria Press Christian Studies. But I haven't seen them yet. Does anybody know anything that would be objectionable in them from the OPs viewpoint?

 

Memoria does not go into specifics of soteriology or eschatology; they are vaguely Protestant by design.

 

 

 

My replies in red.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have no idea what Armenians believe, but I am Methodist and since you mentioned Wesley, I thought I would reply. Totally ignore me if I am misunderstanding what you are looking for. I use Bible Study for All Ages for Bible for our kids. They really try to focus on teaching the stories as opposed to getting into a certain theology, IMO. I haven't found anything that is contrary to our beliefs. I use a NRSV Wesley study Bible for my studies, but use NIV or CEV with the kids. The kids love the contemporary English version because they can really understand it without much explanation (it is a translation from the original Greek, not a modern interpretation).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

LOL at the spelling oopsies. I know some Armenians but none of them are Arminians. ;) The ones in our circle of friends are Catholic or Oriental Orthodox.

(They don't have their own curriculum, but one of them does use Memoria Press. Seems like an appropriate choice for a people who never forget their roots. <sorry... I can't resist a bad pun on Saturday morning...>)

Edited by ElizaG
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've only read page 1 of this thread, but I just want to say that I think part of the problem is that a lot of people who aren't "5-point Calvinists" have a wrong assumption (and/or have been taught incorrectly) about what Calvinists actually believe regarding salvation. For example, Calvinists would agree with every word that Donna T. said here, except for the bolded phrase. (Not to pick on you, Donna... just using your quote to make my point. ;) ):

 

"Abeka and Bob Jones are not Arminian. They are "once saved (by grace through faith, not by pre-election), always saved" (Christ has covered all of our sins, past, present and future through his death on the cross). Both teach that Christ's offer of Salvation is available to anyone who will accept His free gift and that once one is born again that their eternal security is kept by the same power that saved them in the first place. They teach we are predestined to be conformed into the image of Christ after we have been saved."

 

That being said, we ARE evangelistic and we can use *almost* any Christian curriculum out there, with some tweaking here and there. As an example, in MFW ECC where the single verse from John 3:16 is emphasized throughout the whole year, we would take the time to teach the verse in context of the entire chapter, not just focus on a single verse taken out of context.

 

In my experience, it's a lot easier to find NON-Calvinist specific curriculum than it is the other. In fact, I'm not aware of any homeschool curriculum that teaches you can lose your salvation, which is what a true Arminian believes. (Losing one's salvation was was part of the reason Calvin wrote his 5-point response to Jacob Arminius' five points of Remonstrance.)

 

Since I mentioned MFW, I can recommend adding them your list of non-Reformed, or even "Calvinistic" curriculums.

 

I apologize if any of my comments are a repeat of pages 2, 3 or 4. :001_smile:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for bringing this up. I was using Training Hearts, Teaching Minds with my youngest son and finally decided to drop it as I had to interject so many comments about what the author presents from a strongly Calvinist perspective. I wasn't raised in any branch of the church so have had to "feel my way" for some years. Despite my having attended Reformed churches, my leanings are far more Arminian too. Part of my problem, though, is that I much prefer a more liturgical church style, but all the Arminian branches mentioned are more "low church" in style. : (

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for bringing this up. I was using Training Hearts, Teaching Minds with my youngest son and finally decided to drop it as I had to interject so many comments about what the author presents from a strongly Calvinist perspective. I wasn't raised in any branch of the church so have had to "feel my way" for some years. Despite my having attended Reformed churches, my leanings are far more Arminian too. Part of my problem, though, is that I much prefer a more liturgical church style, but all the Arminian branches mentioned are more "low church" in style. : (

 

Have you considered a Reformed Baptist church? Not Arminian, but definitely evangelistic. And I don't know that all of them are this way, but *ours* does follow somewhat of a liturgical church style. We do believer's baptism, not infant baptism.

 

PM me if you want more information on that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am positive that MP is not a Catholic study.

 

I know I have seen some of their materials telling who they are, and they were a mix of protestant denoms. But looking over the website, I can't find that. Maybe it was in a catalog somewhere? Wish I could find it now. They may employ Catholics, but the material is not specifically Catholic.

 

I was under the impression that it was as described above. I just wondered if anybody else knew anything else about it before I purchased it.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

LOL at the spelling oopsies. I know some Armenians but none of them are Arminians. ;) The ones in our circle of friends are Catholic or Oriental Orthodox.

 

(They don't have their own curriculum, but one of them does use Memoria Press. Seems like an appropriate choice for a people who never forget their roots. <sorry... I can't resist a bad pun on Saturday morning...>)

 

 

I will admit to having to look it up. When I first saw the thread, I wondered if there was a large enough Armenian population, and then I realized it was Arminian, and didn't even know what that was, went to look it up and discovered it was ME! Although I had never heard the word Arminian before. I love these boards.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Abeka and Bob Jones are not Arminian. They are "once saved (by grace through faith, not by pre-election), always saved" (Christ has covered all of our sins, past, present and future through his death on the cross). Both teach that Christ's offer of Salvation is available to anyone who will accept His free gift and that once one is born again that their eternal security is kept by the same power that saved them in the first place. They teach we are predestined to be conformed into the image of Christ after we have been saved.

 

We are neither Calvinists nor Arminian.

 

I consider myself an Arminian, have done a lot of research on Calvanist v/s Arminianist, and have never seen where Arminiasts believe that you can lose your salvation? Can you point me to an article discussing this?

 

Isn't this fun? I love that we can all be "together" and discuss these differences in curriculum and help each other out.

 

One thing I know for sure - everyone in this discussion loves Jesus. Can I get an AMEN?! (which is huge for a reformed presbyterian like me - we don't do out-loud amens :lol:)

 

I love this group!

 

AMEN! :iagree:

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh, and we have used Rod and Staff, A Beka, Bob Jones, and MFW and have always felt they line up with our Arminiast Beliefs. :001_smile: We are using Veritas Press right now, which is Reformed, but my oldest is in the logic stage, so it makes for great critical thinking.

HTH!

Blessings!

Dorinda

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am positive that MP is not a Catholic study.

 

I know I have seen some of their materials telling who they are, and they were a mix of protestant denoms. But looking over the website, I can't find that. Maybe it was in a catalog somewhere? Wish I could find it now. They may employ Catholics, but the material is not specifically Catholic.

 

I was under the impression that it was as described above. I just wondered if anybody else knew anything else about it before I purchased it.

 

I just called Memoria, and they are not specifically Catholic. She said the company is "Trinitarian Chirstian" ( Christians who believe in a Trinity), but they are not demonination specific. She also clarified that the Christian Studies is not designed to teach a certain denomination or doctrine, just to teach Bible. They made their materials to be usable to a wider audience.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I consider myself an Arminian, have done a lot of research on Calvanist v/s Arminianist, and have never seen where Arminiasts believe that you can lose your salvation? Can you point me to an article discussing this?

 

 

 

 

 

Here's a one-page comparison of Calvinism vs Arminianism. You can google many more articles about both. From various readings I've done, yes, the Arminian view is that salvation can be lost if faith is lost.

 

http://the-highway.com/compare.html

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...